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Last update: 2010-06-16

John Rogers - The passion of Friedemann bach

2010-06-16 :: John Rogers
Length: 1s

John Rogers
DMA candidate
Queensland Conservatorium
Video available at http://www29.griffith.edu.au/radioimersd/content/view/259/

The Passion of Friedemann Bach.

Because we are uncertain what is of value we are uncertain about what should be taught. Not long ago a musical education was a classical music (Blake, 2010) education. More recently a jazz education has been an alternative. Now as pop is the subject of serious study the entertainment business is collapsing under the strain of piracy, self-production and self-promotion, and the remix culture spoken of by Lessig (2001). Should the first thing taught now be how to produce a video and upload it to youtube? Followed by how to set up myspace and facebook pages? Before moving on to mastering garageband? What of scales, arpeggios, harmony and tonality? Aren't these the basics of music? Well no, they weren't found carved on stone tablets. They were the subjects of vigorous debate in the 18th century, another time when who paid, who played, on what, who listened, where, why and what it might mean were up for grabs. These questions about music are fundamental and provocative.

In spite of his father's peerless investment in him as a musician, Friedemann Bach, Sebastian's favourite, eldest, and most talented son ended up unable to make a living during this period. Why?

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Leah Barclay - Sonic Dialects: Explorations in Intercultural Electroacoustic Music.

2010-05-21 :: Leah Barclay
Length: 42s

Leah Barclay
DMA Candidate
Queensland Conservatorium
Video available at http://www29.griffith.edu.au/radioimersd/content/view/258/

Intercultural music, although divergent in nature, sits on a parallel platform of significance in today’s climate of globalisation. An intercultural stance in creating electroacoustic music can offer a unique opportunity to fuse tradition and technology and delve into a deeper understanding of the world. It can foster a stronger dialogue at a time where an awareness and understanding of international cultures is becoming imperative. Intercultural electroacoustic music has the capacity to provide a framework for collaboration that can contribute to preserving and exposing rich music traditions across the globe and promote the infinite possibilities of electroacoustic music to a global audience. It can be disseminated in an accessible manner and underpin the current desire for cultural exchange and understanding.

This seminar explores the creative process of Leah Barclay’s recent intercultural collaborations including Uruvam in India, Juxtapose in South Korea and Cypress Trilogy in Australia.

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Robert Davidson - Creating new music from old sounds

2010-05-08 :: Robert Davidson
Length: 42s

Robert Davidson
Video Available at http://www29.griffith.edu.au/radioimersd/content/view/227/

Robert Davidson is the founder, artistic director and bassist of Topology, a leading contemporary classical band. He studied composition with Terry Riley in the US and worked as a bassist in the Australian Opera, Sydney Symphony and Queensland Symphony before commencing an academic career at QUT and now UQ as a music lecturer. His work often focuses on the boundaries between language and music.

Recorded sound and images have remarkable power to effect a kind of time travel. Fascinated by this property, Davidson makes music that integrates archival images and sounds, particularly recorded speech. In "Australians", he creates "voice portraits" which provide musical frames for the inherent and individually distinctive melodies and rhythms found in the spoken intonation of eminent Australians from Kingsford-Smith to Fiona Stanley. These works draw on the oral history archives of the National Library of Australia and the National Film and Sound Archive. Davidson will explain and demonstrate his approaches in this talk.

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Peter Roennfeldt - Diabelli Variations (not by Beethoven)

2010-03-24 :: Peter Roennfeldt
Length: 49s

Professor Peter Roennfeldt
Professor in Music Literature
Queensland Conservatorium Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia
VIDEO AVAILABLE at http://www29.griffith.edu.au/radioimersd/content/view/225/

Diabelli's massive commissioning project of variations on his waltz from 50 composers came to fruition in 1823. The fascinating kaleidoscope of inventive techniques and textures offers intriguing insights into many composers who warrant further investigation. The innocuous theme also inspired Beethoven’s final monumental piano work. This presentation examines some questions that arise: the notion of collaborative composition, the question of performance practice in a work that rests virtually unacknowledged in the shadow of the ‘canon’, and the ways that artistic coherence can be imbued into such a diverse creative concept. An original piano of the period is featured.

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Kim Cunio - Where East and West collide.

2009-10-13 :: Kim Cunio

Kim Cunio
Lecturer in Music, Sound and the Moving Image, Queensland Conservatorium.
VIDEO AVAILABLE at http://www29.griffith.edu.au/radioimersd/content/view/190/

Where East and West collide - the music of Kim Cunio.
What happens when two opposing worlds collide in a composer, that of traditional devotional music that is learned and performed orally, and the world of writing music for a living that naturally leads to music being created for functional as well as aesthetic reasons. Cunio's music attempts to reconcile these two worlds; notation and oral tradition are equal partners alongside technology and the processes of recording and producing music. This lecture looks the compositions contained in the following projects: Music of the Dead Sea Scrolls (Art Gallery of NSW and Israeli Department of Antiquities 2000), Buddha Realms (ABC 2002), Ishq (Art Gallery of NSW (2007) and The Thread of Life (Foundation for Universal Sacred Music 2006).

This lecture also features Heather Lee - soprano, and Nicholas Ng - Erhu.

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Carolyn Ellis - Bringing Reflexive Writing and Personal Storytelling to the Creative Arts.

2009-09-13 :: Professor Carolyn Ellis
Length: 1s

Professor Carolyn Ellis
Professor of Communication and Sociology, University of South Florida

Bringing Reflexive Writing and Personal Storytelling to the Creative Arts.
Autoethnography is an autobiographical genre that connects the personal to the musical, cultural, social, and political. In this lecture, Professor Ellis explores how to bring this personal storytelling approach into music and the creative arts more broadly.

Professor Ellis is one of the world's leading experts on autoethnography. She has published four books—Fisher Folk: Two Communities on Chesapeake Bay; Final Negotiations: A Story of Love, Loss, and Chronic Illness; The Ethnographic I: A Methodological Novel about Autoethnography, and Revision: Autoethnographic Reflections on Life and Work—as well as four edited collections, and more than one hundred articles, chapters, essays, and autoethnographic stories. She has served as President of Society for the Study of Symbolic Interaction and chair of two divisions of national organizations, "The Ethnography Division" of National Communication Association and "The Emotions Section" of American Sociological Association. She has given approximately fifty invited workshops and keynote presentations all over the world, including the US, South Africa, Finland, Italy, Canada, China, and Denmark.

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John Drummond - North-West Asian Court Music

2009-08-12 :: Professor John Drummond
Length: 57s

North-West Asian Court Music: An ethnomusicological approach to Mozart and Brahms.
Once upon a time, in the first world, 'music' was Western Classical Music. In many educational settings, it still is. But the world of music has changed, and become a world of many musics. How do we position Classical Music in this new environment? In this presentation Professor John Drummond proposes that we should think of it, from an ethnomusicological perspective, as North-west Asian Court Music. He presents the case for adopting this perspective, and the benefits that can accrue from it.

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Natasha Vlassenko - 22nd April 2009

2009-04-28 :: Natasha Vlassenko

Streaming video is available at http://www29.griffith.edu.au/radioimersd/content/view/146

Vanessa Tomlinson interviews Natasha Vlassenko
Natasha Vlassenko was born in Moscow and graduated from Moscow Central Music School and Moscow Conservatory under Professor Jakob Flier and pursued postgraduate studies with her father, Professor Lev Vlassenko. As a student she was awarded the prestigious Tchaikovsky Scholarship.

Vlassenko has won major prizes in several international competitions, has given recitals around the world and has played under the baton of Rozhdestvensky, Osterriher, Pietnev, Martin, Chivjel, Hickox and others.

In an interview with Vanessa Tomlinson, Vlassenko discusses her musical upbringing and the "inner life" of the artist. Vlassenko then performs Chopin's "Raindrop" Prelude No. 15 in D-flat Major (op. 28).

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Gerardo Dirie - 11th March 2009

2009-03-20 :: Gerardo Dirie

Streaming video available at http://www29.griffith.edu.au/radioimersd/content/view/141

Unfolding “Moonless Etude”: descriptions from inside music making.
Born in Cordoba, Argentina, composer Gerardo Dirié is also an accomplished conductor, performer, and educator. As a composer, he has had many acclaims and performances in the United States, Latin America and Europe. Dirié is co-editor of Scores and Recordings at the Indiana University Latin American Music Center, one of the premiere resources available to performers and scholars of Latin American art music today. Dr Dirié is currently Head of Music Studies at the Queensland Conservatorium in Brisbane, Australia.

In this lecture, Dirié reflects on his own compositional process and its capacity for the development and transformation of the self. Dirié’s presentation spans issues from the abstract and philosophical to the technical matters of sound recording. At the center of the presentation are three pieces recently composed by Dirié, recordings of which feature both as examples and as arguments in themselves.

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Learning to be creative in the 21st Century

2008-10-12 :: David Price

Streaming Video is available at http://www29.griffith.edu.au/radioimersd/content/view/137

David Price is a highly experienced public speaker, project manager, strategic adviser and education consultant. After a 15 year stint in the music industry, he began to work in education, lecturing in adult, further, and higher education. In 1994 he helped establish Sir Paul McCartney’s Liverpool Institute for Performing Arts, where he was Director of Learning for 7 years. Since then, he has led national projects in arts and education in the UK, and advised companies, third-sector organisations and government departments internationally. He was instrumental in developing the Musical Futures project in the UK, an exciting innovation which has produced a substantial increase in the uptake of music by students in participating schools. This project is one of the subjects David referred to in his presentation to Bachelor of Popular Music students, Education students and a range of Griffith staff members when he delivered a Twilight Series lecture on the Gold Coast Campus on October 7, 2008.

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Pt 1 - Music, Sound and Interdisciplinary Collaboration in the Digital Arts

2008-08-26 :: Frank Millward
Length: 10s

Frank Millward’s work explores cross-disciplinary relationships between technology, science and art where focus is given to the innovative use of sound and moving image in order to produce new interactive forms in live performance. He currently lectures in Audio Art, Digital Media, Popular Music and Performance at Kingston University, London.
His research track record includes several successful ARC-ABC documentary and film score collaborations, an ARC APAI, and a range of successful film projects and site specific works in the UK with the Arts Council London, the Queen's Trust and the British Arts Council. His musical style combines audio art, sound design, jazz, experimental, orchestral and electro-acoustic forms.

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Pt 2 - Music, Sound and Interdisciplinary Collaboration in the Digital Arts

2008-08-26 :: Frank Millward
Length: 10s

Frank Millward’s work explores cross-disciplinary relationships between technology, science and art where focus is given to the innovative use of sound and moving image in order to produce new interactive forms in live performance. He currently lectures in Audio Art, Digital Media, Popular Music and Performance at Kingston University, London.
His research track record includes several successful ARC-ABC documentary and film score collaborations, an ARC APAI, and a range of successful film projects and site specific works in the UK with the Arts Council London, the Queen's Trust and the British Arts Council. His musical style combines audio art, sound design, jazz, experimental, orchestral and electro-acoustic forms.

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Pt 3 - Music, Sound and Interdisciplinary Collaboration in the Digital Arts

2008-08-26 :: Frank Millward
Length: 4s

Frank Millward’s work explores cross-disciplinary relationships between technology, science and art where focus is given to the innovative use of sound and moving image in order to produce new interactive forms in live performance. He currently lectures in Audio Art, Digital Media, Popular Music and Performance at Kingston University, London.
His research track record includes several successful ARC-ABC documentary and film score collaborations, an ARC APAI, and a range of successful film projects and site specific works in the UK with the Arts Council London, the Queen's Trust and the British Arts Council. His musical style combines audio art, sound design, jazz, experimental, orchestral and electro-acoustic forms.

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Pt 4 - Music, Sound and Interdisciplinary Collaboration in the Digital Arts

2008-08-26 :: Frank Millward
Length: 12s

Frank Millward’s work explores cross-disciplinary relationships between technology, science and art where focus is given to the innovative use of sound and moving image in order to produce new interactive forms in live performance. He currently lectures in Audio Art, Digital Media, Popular Music and Performance at Kingston University, London.
His research track record includes several successful ARC-ABC documentary and film score collaborations, an ARC APAI, and a range of successful film projects and site specific works in the UK with the Arts Council London, the Queen's Trust and the British Arts Council. His musical style combines audio art, sound design, jazz, experimental, orchestral and electro-acoustic forms.

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Pt 5 - Music, Sound and Interdisciplinary Collaboration in the Digital Arts

2008-08-26 :: Frank Millward
Length: 10s

Frank Millward’s work explores cross-disciplinary relationships between technology, science and art where focus is given to the innovative use of sound and moving image in order to produce new interactive forms in live performance. He currently lectures in Audio Art, Digital Media, Popular Music and Performance at Kingston University, London.
His research track record includes several successful ARC-ABC documentary and film score collaborations, an ARC APAI, and a range of successful film projects and site specific works in the UK with the Arts Council London, the Queen's Trust and the British Arts Council. His musical style combines audio art, sound design, jazz, experimental, orchestral and electro-acoustic forms.

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Pt 6 - Music, Sound and Interdisciplinary Collaboration in the Digital Arts

2008-08-26 :: Frank Millward
Length: 5s

Frank Millward’s work explores cross-disciplinary relationships between technology, science and art where focus is given to the innovative use of sound and moving image in order to produce new interactive forms in live performance. He currently lectures in Audio Art, Digital Media, Popular Music and Performance at Kingston University, London.
His research track record includes several successful ARC-ABC documentary and film score collaborations, an ARC APAI, and a range of successful film projects and site specific works in the UK with the Arts Council London, the Queen's Trust and the British Arts Council. His musical style combines audio art, sound design, jazz, experimental, orchestral and electro-acoustic forms.

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Pt 1 - Music 2.0: a framework to examine next-generation digital arts environments

2007-12-07 :: Paul Draper
Length: 7s

Music 2.0: a framework to examine next-generation digital arts environments

This presentation features a recent case study in the Fullbright-funded iOrpheus (iPod Opera) project, held on the Brisbane Australia, South Bank Parklands in August 2007. This involved the work of US Internet music pioneers Bill Duckworth and Nora Farrell, as well as students and staff from the Queensland Conservatorium and the Griffith Film School. The session opens with an address by Paul Draper followed by the screening of the ‘iOrpheus – the Movie’ documentary, and live cross to New York to videoconference with Bill and Nora to further examine the project.

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Pt 2 - Music 2.0: a framework to examine next-generation digital arts environments

2007-12-07 :: Paul Draper
Length: 5s

Music 2.0: a framework to examine next-generation digital arts environments

This presentation features a recent case study in the Fullbright-funded iOrpheus (iPod Opera) project, held on the Brisbane Australia, South Bank Parklands in August 2007. This involved the work of US Internet music pioneers Bill Duckworth and Nora Farrell, as well as students and staff from the Queensland Conservatorium and the Griffith Film School. The session opens with an address by Paul Draper followed by the screening of the ‘iOrpheus – the Movie’ documentary, and live cross to New York to videoconference with Bill and Nora to further examine the project.

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Pt 3 - Music 2.0: a framework to examine next-generation digital arts environments

2007-12-07 :: Paul Draper
Length: 4s

Music 2.0: a framework to examine next-generation digital arts environments

This presentation features a recent case study in the Fullbright-funded iOrpheus (iPod Opera) project, held on the Brisbane Australia, South Bank Parklands in August 2007. This involved the work of US Internet music pioneers Bill Duckworth and Nora Farrell, as well as students and staff from the Queensland Conservatorium and the Griffith Film School. The session opens with an address by Paul Draper followed by the screening of the ‘iOrpheus – the Movie’ documentary, and live cross to New York to videoconference with Bill and Nora to further examine the project.

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Pt 4 - Music 2.0: a framework to examine next-generation digital arts environments

2007-12-07 :: Paul Draper
Length: 5s

Music 2.0: a framework to examine next-generation digital arts environments

This presentation features a recent case study in the Fullbright-funded iOrpheus (iPod Opera) project, held on the Brisbane Australia, South Bank Parklands in August 2007. This involved the work of US Internet music pioneers Bill Duckworth and Nora Farrell, as well as students and staff from the Queensland Conservatorium and the Griffith Film School. The session opens with an address by Paul Draper followed by the screening of the ‘iOrpheus – the Movie’ documentary, and live cross to New York to videoconference with Bill and Nora to further examine the project.

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Pt 5 - Music 2.0: a framework to examine next-generation digital arts environments

2007-12-07 :: Paul Draper
Length: 4s

Music 2.0: a framework to examine next-generation digital arts environments

This presentation features a recent case study in the Fullbright-funded iOrpheus (iPod Opera) project, held on the Brisbane Australia, South Bank Parklands in August 2007. This involved the work of US Internet music pioneers Bill Duckworth and Nora Farrell, as well as students and staff from the Queensland Conservatorium and the Griffith Film School. The session opens with an address by Paul Draper followed by the screening of the ‘iOrpheus – the Movie’ documentary, and live cross to New York to videoconference with Bill and Nora to further examine the project.

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Jonathon Welch Public Lecture

2007-10-30 :: Jonathon Welch
Length: 53s

Jonathon Welch - Creator and Director "Choir of Hard Knocks" - Interview with Peter Roennfeldt

Considered one of the finest tenors of his generation, Jonathon's credits include some 70 roles with most State Opera Companies and Opera Australia. He has performed with some of the world's most highly regarded singers, directors and conductors including Dame Joan Sutherland, k.d.lang, Baz Luhrman, Graeme Murphy, Richard Bonynge, Anne Murray and Jimmy Somerville.

Jonathon completed a Post Graduate Degree in Music at Queensland Conservatorium of Music studying with Donald Smith. The following years led him to win some of Australia's most coveted performing scholarships, including the Young Artists Program with Opera of Queensland. With a deep commitment to the community and youth music education, Jonathon has directed some of Australia's finest community choirs, also creating the Australian Pop Choir, Pop Kidz and the Sydney Street Choir prior to his return to his "hometown" of Melbourne where he has created the Choir of Hard Knocks.

This webcast takes the form of an interview between Jonathon and the Director of the Queensland Conservatorium Griffith University, Professor Peter Roennfeldt. This was recorded in front of a live audience in Ian hanger Recital Hall on Friday the 26th October 2007.

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Part 1 - Music Two-point-zero: How Participatory Culture is Reclaiming Knowledge, Power and Value Systems from the inside Out

2007-10-15 :: Paul Draper
Length: 11s

VIDEO Podcast Part 1

In the last decade, the Internet has served to enable the explosion of
social networking. From MySpace, to YouTube and Wikipedia, participatory
culture has transformed value systems, undermined notions of authority and
power, while simultaneously creating new pathways for autonomous creativity
and innovation. In this lecture, Paul Draper discusses these phenomena and
suggests a higher learning imperative for what might be considered ‘music
2.0’, that is, for independent musical craft set in authentic contexts
which continue to redefine 21st century artistry.

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Part 2 - Music Two-point-zero: How Participatory Culture is Reclaiming Knowledge, Power and Value Systems from the inside Out

2007-10-15 :: Paul Draper
Length: 10s

VIDEO Podcast Part 2

In the last decade, the Internet has served to enable the explosion of
social networking. From MySpace, to YouTube and Wikipedia, participatory
culture has transformed value systems, undermined notions of authority and
power, while simultaneously creating new pathways for autonomous creativity
and innovation. In this lecture, Paul Draper discusses these phenomena and
suggests a higher learning imperative for what might be considered ‘music
2.0’, that is, for independent musical craft set in authentic contexts
which continue to redefine 21st century artistry.

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Part 3 - Music Two-point-zero: How Participatory Culture is Reclaiming Knowledge, Power and Value Systems from the inside Out

2007-10-15 :: Paul Draper
Length: 12s

VIDEO Podcast Part 3

In the last decade, the Internet has served to enable the explosion of
social networking. From MySpace, to YouTube and Wikipedia, participatory
culture has transformed value systems, undermined notions of authority and
power, while simultaneously creating new pathways for autonomous creativity
and innovation. In this lecture, Paul Draper discusses these phenomena and
suggests a higher learning imperative for what might be considered ‘music
2.0’, that is, for independent musical craft set in authentic contexts
which continue to redefine 21st century artistry.

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Part 4 - Music Two-point-zero: How Participatory Culture is Reclaiming Knowledge, Power and Value Systems from the inside Out

2007-10-15 :: Paul Draper
Length: 10s

VIDEO Podcast Part 4

In the last decade, the Internet has served to enable the explosion of
social networking. From MySpace, to YouTube and Wikipedia, participatory
culture has transformed value systems, undermined notions of authority and
power, while simultaneously creating new pathways for autonomous creativity
and innovation. In this lecture, Paul Draper discusses these phenomena and
suggests a higher learning imperative for what might be considered ‘music
2.0’, that is, for independent musical craft set in authentic contexts
which continue to redefine 21st century artistry.

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Part 5 - Music Two-point-zero: How Participatory Culture is Reclaiming Knowledge, Power and Value Systems from the inside Out

2007-10-15 :: Paul Draper
Length: 9s

VIDEO Podcast Part 5

In the last decade, the Internet has served to enable the explosion of
social networking. From MySpace, to YouTube and Wikipedia, participatory
culture has transformed value systems, undermined notions of authority and
power, while simultaneously creating new pathways for autonomous creativity
and innovation. In this lecture, Paul Draper discusses these phenomena and
suggests a higher learning imperative for what might be considered ‘music
2.0’, that is, for independent musical craft set in authentic contexts
which continue to redefine 21st century artistry.

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William Duckworth - Visions for Virtual Music

2007-08-27 :: William Duckworth
Length: 1s

Visions for Virtual Music: How the Web Got Wired for Sound

Visiting Senior Fulbright Specialist William Duckworth presents his views on the future of web-based music making. He is well positioned to do so: a decade ago, on June 10th, 1997, he and media artist Nora Farrell created Cathedral, the first on-going interactive work of music and art online. Featuring the PitchWeb -a custom-designed multi-user virtual instrument that allows global site visitors to perform with each other online and live in concert with the Cathedral Band- their work blurs the boundaries between composer, performer, and audience.

Today, Duckworth and Farrell are developing iOrpheus. a public opera for the promenades of the South Bank Parklands on 31 August 2007. With tableaus of the central moments of the Orpheus legend appearing and reappearing in various unexpected locales, iOrpheus is an undertaking that explores the artistic transformation of scale, as it progresses from in the ear, to in concert, to in the streets.

In his Twilight Lecture, Duckworth will discuss his work online, touching on the concepts of distributed composition, and collective creative processes of present and future. The lecture will also include a display of the sights and sounds of Cathedral, a behind the scenes look at the iOrpheus development, and a brief journey through early sounds online when, for music, the Web was the new frontier.

William Duckworth’s residency at the Queensland Conservatorium is supported by
The Fulbright Foundation
South Bank Corporation
Queensland Conservatorium Research Centre and
Griffith University

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Striving for a musical Utopia

2007-08-23 :: Peter Roennfeldt
Length: 51s

ENHANCED PODCAST - iTunes recommended
Striving for a Musical Utopia - but why in Queensland?

The first of the Twilight Lecture series for 2007 will be presented by the Director Peter Roennfeldt, who has been closely involved with the archival work surrounding the Conservatorium's 50th anniversary celebrations. It will highlight the ways in which the planning for, establishment and subsequent development of the Queensland Conservatorium were imbued with vision and the search for an ideal.

The human element behind institutional life comes clearly through in the reportage and memoirs of staff, students and supporters over many years - it was their Utopian vision which made many artistic projects come to fruition, often against the odds. Surviving the 'double cultural cringe' from the northern hemisphere and the southern states has nevertheless been a significant subtheme attached to this journey, with mixed and at times interesting and unexpected results. This talk will be much more than a trip down memory lane, but inevitably some of the more interesting and under acknowledged aspects of the Conservatorium's story will be brought to light.

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Globalisation of the Digital Arts

2007-04-01 :: Dagfinn Bach
Length: 59s

Dagfinn Bach's experience in the development of the on-line music and digital arts business provides an opportunity for academics, students and industry practitioners to learn first hand some of the solutions adopted internationally to meet the challenges for creative artists presented by the rapidly changing digital environment. As well as musicians, his presentation will resonate with all artists for whom the digital environment is a major part of their work and dissemination, and will be of interest to technologists engaged in creating on-line mechanisms designed to bring artistic content to the public.

Dagfinn’s presentation will focus on the challenges and opportunities arising from the dramatic changes in the digital arts value chain particularly the relationship between multinational companies, small and medium enterprises and individual artists. How do rights holders – both artists and producers – avoid being exploited by these changes and what can we expect in the next decade in this exciting and rapidly evolving industry? During the presentation, Dagfinn will also present an introduction to the next generation online media technology standard: MPEG-7.

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AT Pro QCGU Launch

2007-03-18 :: Prof Paul Draper
Length: 29s

The opening speeches from the Acoustic Technologies and Queensland Conservatorium Research Centre partnership Launch of the new ATPro Blackbird line Array system.…

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Pt 1 - Lessons From the World

2006-10-14 :: Huib Schippers
Length: 15s

Part 1 - Associate Professor Huib Schippers,
Director Queensland Conservatorium Research Centre, Griffith University

Lessons from the World
In western music education, we tend to take for granted that learning and teaching follow certain time-tested paths. We teach well-defined step by step, from simple to complex, from known to unknown, with writing and notation as essential tools. But is that really how people learn music? On the basis of extensive research across cultures, Huib Schippers paints pictures of refined musical traditions that sometimes follow the principles outlined above, but at other times work holistically, reject notation, and emphasise intangible aspects of music making. An invitation to rethink our beliefs.…

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Pt 2 - Lessons From the World

2006-10-14 :: Huib Schippers
Length: 17s

Part 2 - Associate Professor Huib Schippers,
Director Queensland Conservatorium Research Centre, Griffith University

Lessons from the World
In western music education, we tend to take for granted that learning and teaching follow certain time-tested paths. We teach well-defined step by step, from simple to complex, from known to unknown, with writing and notation as essential tools. But is that really how people learn music? On the basis of extensive research across cultures, Huib Schippers paints pictures of refined musical traditions that sometimes follow the principles outlined above, but at other times work holistically, reject notation, and emphasise intangible aspects of music making. An invitation to rethink our beliefs.…

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Pt 3 - Lessons From the World

2006-10-14 :: Huib Schippers
Length: 15s

Part 3 - Associate Professor Huib Schippers,
Director Queensland Conservatorium Research Centre, Griffith University

Lessons from the World
In western music education, we tend to take for granted that learning and teaching follow certain time-tested paths. We teach well-defined step by step, from simple to complex, from known to unknown, with writing and notation as essential tools. But is that really how people learn music? On the basis of extensive research across cultures, Huib Schippers paints pictures of refined musical traditions that sometimes follow the principles outlined above, but at other times work holistically, reject notation, and emphasise intangible aspects of music making. An invitation to rethink our beliefs.…

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Pt 4 - Lessons From the World

2006-10-14 :: Huib Schippers
Length: 7s

Part 4 - Associate Professor Huib Schippers,
Director Queensland Conservatorium Research Centre, Griffith University

Lessons from the World
In western music education, we tend to take for granted that learning and teaching follow certain time-tested paths. We teach well-defined step by step, from simple to complex, from known to unknown, with writing and notation as essential tools. But is that really how people learn music? On the basis of extensive research across cultures, Huib Schippers paints pictures of refined musical traditions that sometimes follow the principles outlined above, but at other times work holistically, reject notation, and emphasise intangible aspects of music making. An invitation to rethink our beliefs.…

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Pt 4 - Rethinking music teaching and learning

2006-09-25 :: Peter Dunbar-Hall
Length: 6s

Associate Professor Peter Dunbar-Hall
Associate Dean Sydney Conservatorium of Music

Rethinking music teaching and learning
How does learning music outside one’s comfort zone influence one’s beliefs about music education and one’s work as a practitioner? In this lecture, Peter Dunbar-Hall discusses how his experiences of learning to play Balinese music from teachers in Bali changed his views on music education.

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Pt 2 - Rethinking music teaching and learning

2006-09-25 :: Peter Dunbar-Hall
Length: 19s

Associate Professor Peter Dunbar-Hall
Associate Dean Sydney Conservatorium of Music

Rethinking music teaching and learning
How does learning music outside one’s comfort zone influence one’s beliefs about music education and one’s work as a practitioner? In this lecture, Peter Dunbar-Hall discusses how his experiences of learning to play Balinese music from teachers in Bali changed his views on music education.

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Share: Pt 2 - Rethinking music teaching and learning


Pt 1 - Rethinking music teaching and learning

2006-09-25 :: Peter Dunbar-Hall
Length: 20s

Associate Professor Peter Dunbar-Hall
Associate Dean Sydney Conservatorium of Music

Rethinking music teaching and learning
How does learning music outside one’s comfort zone influence one’s beliefs about music education and one’s work as a practitioner? In this lecture, Peter Dunbar-Hall discusses how his experiences of learning to play Balinese music from teachers in Bali changed his views on music education.

x

Share: Pt 1 - Rethinking music teaching and learning


Pt 3 - Rethinking music teaching and learning

2006-09-25 :: Peter Dunbar-Hall
Length: 20s

Associate Professor Peter Dunbar-Hall
Associate Dean Sydney Conservatorium of Music

Rethinking music teaching and learning
How does learning music outside one’s comfort zone influence one’s beliefs about music education and one’s work as a practitioner? In this lecture, Peter Dunbar-Hall discusses how his experiences of learning to play Balinese music from teachers in Bali changed his views on music education.

x

Share: Pt 3 - Rethinking music teaching and learning


Free Improvisation Part 1

2006-05-09 :: Jonty Stockdale
Length: 15s

Part 1 - Twilight Lecture Series - Professor Jonty Stockdale. (10/05/2006)

Free Improvisation - thought by many to be a rarefied and abstract art form - is simply misunderstood. Drawing on perspectives from within and beyond the boundaries of music, this presentation will examine a musical practice often perceived as self-indulgent, impulsive, wayward and chaotic. By the very nature of it, can an approach be developed for improvising in a free manner? Is free improvisation the same as jazz improvisation? Is the act of improvising really about 'making things up on the spur of the moment'?

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Free Improvisation Part 2

2006-05-09 :: Jonty Stockdale
Length: 15s

Part 2 - Twilight Lecture Series - Professor Jonty Stockdale. (10/05/2006)

Free Improvisation - thought by many to be a rarefied and abstract art form - is simply misunderstood. Drawing on perspectives from within and beyond the boundaries of music, this presentation will examine a musical practice often perceived as self-indulgent, impulsive, wayward and chaotic. By the very nature of it, can an approach be developed for improvising in a free manner? Is free improvisation the same as jazz improvisation? Is the act of improvising really about 'making things up on the spur of the moment'?

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Free Improvisation Part 3

2006-05-09 :: Jonty Stockdale
Length: 15s

Part 3 - Twilight Lecture Series - Professor Jonty Stockdale. (10/05/2006)

Free Improvisation - thought by many to be a rarefied and abstract art form - is simply misunderstood. Drawing on perspectives from within and beyond the boundaries of music, this presentation will examine a musical practice often perceived as self-indulgent, impulsive, wayward and chaotic. By the very nature of it, can an approach be developed for improvising in a free manner? Is free improvisation the same as jazz improvisation? Is the act of improvising really about 'making things up on the spur of the moment'?

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Free Improvisation Part 4

2006-05-09 :: Jonty Stockdale
Length: 15s

Part 4 - Twilight Lecture Series - Professor Jonty Stockdale. (10/05/2006)

Free Improvisation - thought by many to be a rarefied and abstract art form - is simply misunderstood. Drawing on perspectives from within and beyond the boundaries of music, this presentation will examine a musical practice often perceived as self-indulgent, impulsive, wayward and chaotic. By the very nature of it, can an approach be developed for improvising in a free manner? Is free improvisation the same as jazz improvisation? Is the act of improvising really about 'making things up on the spur of the moment'?

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Free Improvisation Part 5

2006-05-09 :: Jonty Stockdale
Length: 11s

Part 5 - Twilight Lecture Series - Professor Jonty Stockdale. (10/05/2006)

Free Improvisation - thought by many to be a rarefied and abstract art form - is simply misunderstood. Drawing on perspectives from within and beyond the boundaries of music, this presentation will examine a musical practice often perceived as self-indulgent, impulsive, wayward and chaotic. By the very nature of it, can an approach be developed for improvising in a free manner? Is free improvisation the same as jazz improvisation? Is the act of improvising really about 'making things up on the spur of the moment'?

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Unlearning Performance Part 1

2006-04-11 :: Erica McWilliam
Length: 15s

Professor Erica McWilliam. (11/04/2006) Recent educational scholarship draws attention to problems that arise for young people when performance goals are pursued to the exclusion of learning goals. This flies in the face of the idea that learning and performing are a neat complementary set. Erica McWilliam's presentation will explore the links between learning, 'unlearning' and performance, using ideas about pedagogy that are in many respects counterintuitive. This includes challenging the idea that good teachers provide clear explanations, minimise errors and pay close personal attention to their students.…

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Unlearning Performance Part 2

2006-04-10 :: Erica McWilliam
Length: 15s

Part 2 - Twilight Lecture Series - Professor Erica McWilliam. (11/04/2006) Recent educational scholarship draws attention to problems that arise for young people when performance goals are pursued to the exclusion of learning goals. This flies in the face of the idea that learning and performing are a neat complementary set. Erica McWilliam's presentation will explore the links between learning, 'unlearning' and performance, using ideas about pedagogy that are in many respects counterintuitive. This includes challenging the idea that good teachers provide clear explanations, minimise errors and pay close personal attention to their students.…

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Unlearning Performance Part 3

2006-04-10 :: Erica McWilliam
Length: 15s

Part 3 - Twilight Lecture Series - Professor Erica McWilliam. (11/04/2006) Recent educational scholarship draws attention to problems that arise for young people when performance goals are pursued to the exclusion of learning goals. This flies in the face of the idea that learning and performing are a neat complementary set. Erica McWilliam's presentation will explore the links between learning, 'unlearning' and performance, using ideas about pedagogy that are in many respects counterintuitive. This includes challenging the idea that good teachers provide clear explanations, minimise errors and pay close personal attention to their students.…

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Unlearning Performance Part 4

2006-04-10 :: Erica McWilliam
Length: 14s

Part 4 - Twilight Lecture Series - Professor Erica McWilliam. (11/04/2006) Recent educational scholarship draws attention to problems that arise for young people when performance goals are pursued to the exclusion of learning goals. This flies in the face of the idea that learning and performing are a neat complementary set. Erica McWilliam's presentation will explore the links between learning, 'unlearning' and performance, using ideas about pedagogy that are in many respects counterintuitive. This includes challenging the idea that good teachers provide clear explanations, minimise errors and pay close personal attention to their students.…

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John Rogers - The passion of Freidemann bach

0000-00-00 :: John Rogers
Length: 1s

John Rogers
DMA candidate
Queensland Conservatorium
Video available at http://www29.griffith.edu.au/radioimersd/content/view/259/

The Passion of Friedemann Bach.

Because we are uncertain what is of value we are uncerta…

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Behind The Music

'Behind the Music' presents intimate insights from leading musicians into what happens ‘behind the scenes’ as they prepare their art. In music performance, technology, composition, education and research, creative activities are often a response to musical questions arising directly from their artistic practice. These presentations offer a valuable opportunity to reveal a range of creative processes as artists share their personal approaches to such issues.

Behind The Music


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