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Last update: 2015-10-07

County fair comparison // Git is the sh*t // Prep for a technical interview // Prototyping tools

2015-10-07 :: Ben Strahan, Abhi Aiyer

Yo what up #BenAndAbhi nation! Show num-beer 3 is here. We talk about Git & Git-Flow... What front-end prototyping tools to use under different circumstances and Abhi drops some solid wisdom on prepping for your first technical interview. …

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FIGHT! -- Native Apps vs. Cordova // Work Estimates vs. #NoEstimates // Are Dev Bootcamps Worth It? // p.s. Cali Weather Sucks!

2015-09-30 :: Ben Strahan, Abhi Aiyer

Cali weather is better than Chicago's :P .... Eric Crobak asks if Dev Bootcamps are worth it? Ashtyn Bell asks when does it make sense to switch from a Cordova app to Native apps. Dean Radcliffe asks about providing work estimates vs. providing no estimates. And you decided to go to twitter right now and ask us a question #BenAndAbhi …

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Chuck Norris' guide to open source contributing, stepping up to land a senior position & more

2015-09-21 :: Ben Strahan, Abhi Aiyer

Our first show! Ben and Abhi pick 4 questions to answer on contributing to open source, apply to senior positions, devops entry & demoing private code during an interview. …

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PW Radio Episode 133: Anil Ananthaswamy and Gabe Habash

2015-08-06
Length: 57s

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PW Radio 132: Naomi Jackson and Rose Fox

2015-07-30

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PW Radio 131: Tim Weiner and Fall Children%27s Announcements

2015-07-23

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PW Radio Episode 130: Tamara Winfrey%2DHarris and Jim Milliot

2015-07-16
Length: 52s

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PW Radio 129: Jill Ciment and Amy Hempel

2015-07-09

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PW Radio 127: Mark Ribowsky and San Diego Comic%2DCon

2015-06-25

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PW Radio 126: Eric Burns and ALA Preview

2015-06-18

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PW Radio 125: Robert Sietsema and Bay Area Spotlight

2015-06-11
Length: 52s

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PW Radio 124: Kate Bolick and BookCon

2015-06-04

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PW Radio 123: BEA 2015

2015-05-28

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PW Radio 122: Naomi Novik and Fan Fiction

2015-05-21

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PW Radio 121: Eugenia Cheng and Coloring Books

2015-05-14

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PW Radio 120: Michael J. Martinez and Summer Reads

2015-05-07

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PW Radio 119: Eric Jerome Dickey and BEA Preview

2015-04-30

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PW Radio 118: Sabaa Tahir and Children%E2%80%99s Institute

2015-04-23
Length: 47s

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PW Radio 117: Ken Liu and IBPA Recap

2015-04-16

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PW Radio 116: Mario Marazziti and AWP

2015-04-09
Length: 57s

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PW Radio 115: Jane Ashford and Bologna Book Fair

2015-04-02

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PW Radio 114: Sara Forte and London Book Fair

2015-03-26
Length: 51s

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PW Radio 113: Kabir Sehgal and April Nonfiction

2015-03-19
Length: 53s

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PW Radio 112: Cathy Erway and Cookbooks Month

2015-03-12
Length: 59s

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PW Radio 111: Carrie Patel and Fast%2DGrowing Small Presses

2015-03-05
Length: 54s

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PW Radio 110: Kevin Sessums and Spirituality Books Preview

2015-02-26
Length: 53s

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PW Radio 109: Richard Lange and Books After Jon Stewart

2015-02-19
Length: 1s

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PW Radio 108: Naomi Baron and Best Audio Books

2015-02-12
Length: 55s

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PW Radio 107: Joshua Davis and Children%27s Book Awards

2015-02-05
Length: 57s

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PW Radio 106: Greer Macallister and Winter Institute%27s Tenth Anniversary

2015-01-29
Length: 57s

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PW Radio 105: Brandon Sanderson and Spring Books Preview

2015-01-22
Length: 58s

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PW Radio 104: Ilyasah Shabazz and Supporting Free Speech

2015-01-15
Length: 56s

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PW Radio 103: Daniel Jose Older and Big Debuts of the Season

2015-01-08
Length: 56s

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PW Radio 102

2015-01-01
Length: 39s

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PW Radio 101

2014-12-25
Length: 56s

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PW Radio 100: Gay Talese

2014-12-18
Length: 59s

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PW Radio 99: Gilbert Hernandez

2014-12-11
Length: 58s

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PW Radio 98

2014-12-04
Length: 38s

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PW Radio 97

2014-11-25
Length: 39s

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PW Radio 96: Joanna Bourne

2014-11-20

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PW Radio 95: Cory Doctorow

2014-11-13
Length: 52s

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Series Break - 7th November 2014

2014-11-07 :: mail@northpod.co.uk (Northpod Productions)


Dear Listeners of Northpod Law and of UK Criminal Law Blog Podcast

From time to time, the fates conspire against us all and the absence of our last show of the series and the delay in the start of UKCLBP (as I am now calling it) is testament to this.

We don't generally take a series break as you know but we need one at the moment.

We have had people moving jobs, I have been beset with Whooping Cough (I know! How very 19th Century of me to get that as an adult)
and we think that one of our number might actually have been abducted by a Ministry of Justice hitsquad.

So, please accept our apologies and know that when UKCLBP (it'll catch on..) comes back next week, all will be well with the world of legal podcasting once more.

In the meantime, we are thinking of doing a mailbag episode of Northpod Law.  If you have a burning question for any of us, now is the time to send it in.  mail@northpod.co.uk will do nicely.

Thanks for listening.…

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PW Radio 94: Rose Levy Beranbaum

2014-11-06
Length: 59s

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PW Radio 93: Maira Kalman

2014-10-30
Length: 29s

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PW Radio 92: Scott Ian

2014-10-23
Length: 57s

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S14E04 - Running Late, Sounding Adequate

2014-10-19 :: mail@northpod.co.uk (Northpod Productions)

The episode that might never have happened is finally here.  You can listen right here.

What with Ben being incapacitated, Kirstin being snowed-under and Jonathan having been abducted by aliens (some of this may not be true), a big dent has been made on our otherwise reliable schedule.  We apologise unreservedly.

In this week's show, we have a look at R v Creathorne - an interesting case in which the question of how much credit ought to be given for a plea of guilty where the CPS hasn't handed-over the evidence at the time of the first hearing in the Crown Court.  This is crucial listening for lawyers and, just as much, for judges.

Whilst bemoaning the CPS's failures in the service of papers, we congratulate them on a bit of sensible legal commentary on the subject of the need for new laws.

Also, we look at judicial diversity and Kirstin takes a sideways look at a rather peculiar case from US Supreme Court about beards.

Please enjoy and we hope normal service will be resumed this week.

Links:
https://www.crimeline.info/uploads/cases/2014/2014ewcacrim500.pdf

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2014/10/07/supreme-court-religion-prisoner-beard/16856023/

http://www.theguardian.com/law/2014/oct/07/supreme-court-beard-hearing-justice-jokes-religious-rights

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/crime/11143699/Revenge-pornography-can-and-will-be-prosecuted-vow-CPS-lawyers.html


PLEASE RATE/REVIEW US: wherever you subscribe, please take two seconds as we start this series, to give us some stars and a few kind words.  We'd be e'er so obliged.  It helps us get up the search rankings, ya see.  If you use iTunes, please click here and it'll take just seconds!

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PW Radio 91: Michaela DePrince

2014-10-16
Length: 55s

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PW Radio 90: Louise DeSalvo

2014-10-09
Length: 57s

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S14E03 - Rights and Wrong'uns

2014-10-05 :: mail@northpod.co.uk (Northpod Productions)

You can listen to this week's show right here.

This week's show is about the Tory plan to abolish the Human Rights Act and to put England and Wales (though not Scotland or NI, of course) outside of the direct constraints of International Human Rights law.

It's a good job that Ben is still barely croaking otherwise this would no doubt have been an angry rant full of vitriol about our Home Secretary and Lord Chancellor.  Surely Kirstin will be far more calm about it...

Of course, you might want to balance the Tory slandering of the Act and the ECHR against a few examples of what the law has meant for us.

For a great collection of what to read about this to know more on both sides of the argument, please see the excellent compendium put together by David Allen Green.

Not only that but it has been a little while since we heard what's going on in the world of immigration law.  There has been a report about the Home Office and its ability to do its job.  Spoilers, government subcontractors are not exactly thrilling us with their efficiency.  Jonathan Holt explains all.  Visit Bail For Immigration Detainees and read all about it.

Next week should be a little more chatty assuming none of contract any other horrible illnesses.  


PLEASE RATE/REVIEW US: wherever you subscribe, please take two seconds as we start this series, to give us some stars and a few kind words.  We'd be e'er so obliged.  It helps us get up the search rankings, ya see.  If you use iTunes, please click here and it'll take just seconds!

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PW Radio 89: Jana Bommersbach

2014-10-02
Length: 57s

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S14E02 - Corruption

2014-09-27 :: mail@northpod.co.uk (Northpod Productions)

With Ben still suffering from the Dreaded Lurgy and Jonathan being AWOL, Kirstin is left to man the battlements of Northpod Towers this week.  Have a listen right here.

With all that is going in at the MoJ (for whom it has not been a good week!), we couldn't let that go by without a mention.

But before we get to that, the rather interesting case of Serious Fraud Office v Miltiades Papachristos and Dennis Kerrison.  This case concerns a legal question about amending indictments and contains some rather odd twists and turns.

All being well, we might even have a full team next week and we hope you'll join us then.


PLEASE RATE/REVIEW US: wherever you subscribe, please take two seconds as we start this series, to give us some stars and a few kind words.  We'd be e'er so obliged.  It helps us get up the search rankings, ya see.  If you use iTunes, please click here and it'll take just seconds!

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PW Radio 88: Joyce Carol Oates

2014-09-25
Length: 54s

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S14E01 - Power to the Victim

2014-09-19 :: mail@northpod.co.uk (Northpod Productions)

You can listen here!

This week we scrabble around in the mud to bring you a frankly minimal offering of law.  It may have been the silly season but the law has (at least in this country) remained aloof and above such matters.

Sadly this show was recorded before the Lord Chancellor was defeated in the High Court by criminal solicitors using judicial review - a system Grayling would like to seee abolished - and now we can see why.  He acted illegally.  That didn't stop his press office tweeting (like a petulant child) that it wasn't a complete victory for them but they did get to keep the 8.75% cut.  Not that that was the point of this particular action.  He's like this government's Comical Ali.
Nevertheless, the bulk of this week's show does deal with another announcement by Chris Grayling.  He has been electioneering announcing what he's doing for complainants victims.  

So what's new?  In our usual vein, this week Ben brings us a thoughtful report on the MoJ's recent publication.  Regular listeners may think they know where this is going...
If you would like to read the two papers, then they are below.
The 2013 Code of Practice
The 2014 pamphlet



PLEASE RATE/REVIEW US: wherever you subscribe, please take two seconds as we start this series, to give us some stars and a few kind words.  We'd be e'er so obliged.  It helps us get up the search rankings, ya see.  If you use iTunes, please click here and it'll take just seconds!


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PW Radio 87: Justin Martin

2014-09-18
Length: 56s

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PW Radio 86: Diane Ackerman

2014-09-11
Length: 56s

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S05E05 - Section 127 and revenge porn

2014-09-05 :: mail@northpod.co.uk (Northpod Productions)

Listen to the show here. 
This week Dan and Lyndon discuss (again) section 127 of the Communications Act 2003. Yes that's right, s.127 has reared its ugly head again this week as someone is convicted of the offence in relation to the Stella Creasy MP-led campaign to put Jane Austen on a bank note, and the vile abuse that was direct to her and others arising out of it. 
They also discuss revenge porn as, although the hacking and dissemination of intimate pictures of celebrities is not revenge porn, there are parallels. Do we need a new offence or is the behaviour amply covered by existing legislation? Dan and Lyndon consider what is a difficult issue. 
Links:
MoJ consultation on revenge porn (closes on Sunday 7 September)
Peter Nunn guilty of trolling Stella Creasy MP (UK Criminal Law Blog)
Peter Nunn guilty of trolling Stella Creasy MP (BBC News)
Online abuse, leaked nudes and revenge porn: this is nothing less than terrorism against women (New Statesman)

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PW Radio 85: Karen Abbott

2014-09-04
Length: 56s

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S05E04 - Judges comments and magistrates powers

2014-08-31 :: mail@northpod.co.uk (Northpod Productions)

Listen to the show here.
This week, Lyndon and Dan talk about those comments made by Judge Mowat about rape convictions and the news that Magistrates' Courts are to get increased sentencing powers. 
"Outrageous" and "dangerous" - that's how comments made by now retired Judge Mowat that rape convictions rates will increase when girls stop getting so drunk. Were they misrepresented? Has she got a point? Lyndon and Dan take a look and try to come to a conclusion. 
Also, they have a brief look at the news that Magistrates' Courts will be able to impose sentences of 12 months for a single offence - currently that limit is set at 6 months. Is it a good idea? What's behind it? 
Links
Judge Mowat's comments

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PW Radio 84: Kara Braden

2014-08-28
Length: 57s

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S05E03 - Silly season

2014-08-22 :: mail@northpod.co.uk (Northpod Productions)

Listen to the show here.
So, it's silly season. The newspapers are fully of silly stories but nothing much of substance happens...or does it?
Lyndon and Dan chat through the week's news including a man swallowing a goldfish (and being prosecuted for it), a man getting into the cargo hold of a plane, and claiming to be the captain (and being prosecuted for it) and a man who, after breaching his licence for manslaughter, committing a burglary, receiving a community order then breaching it, was "allowed to walk free from court" - or was he?
Dan also has a quick look at the Cliff Richard search warrant issue and briefly explains what a Newton hearing is.
Links:
Cliff Richard
Goldfish swallowing
Manslaughter/burglary/community order/breach
Ben's Newton hearing case…

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S05E02 - Football and nuts

2014-08-17 :: mail@northpod.co.uk (Northpod Productions)

Listen to the show here.

Lyndon's flying solo this week as Dan is otherwise engaged.

He discusses the *only* two interesting stories of the week - Ched Evans and the man who opened a bag a nuts on a plane, causing a young girl to go into anaphylactic shock.

First off, the Ched Evans case - he is to be released from his 5 year sentence in October and news broke this week that it is likely that he would return to play professional football for Sheffield Utd. Should he be able to? A 60,000 signature petition suggests some quarters feel very strongly that he should not. Should offenders who have served their sentences be entitled to go and live their lives? Most would say yes, but what about where the offender is a professional footballer, who still maintains his innocence? It's a sticky issue which is unlikely to go away anytime soon. 

Secondly, Lyndon discusses the case of the man who - contrary to instruction - opened a bag of nuts on a plane carrying a young girl with a severe nut allergy. The consequences were serious, causing her to lose consciousness. Stupid? Yes. Selfish? Undoubedly. Arrogant? Certainly. Criminal? Possibly...    Lyndon looks at the likely offences (if any) the man may have committed. 

Links:


Blog post on the 'nuts' case
Ched Evans - should he play football for Sheffield Utd?
Ched Evans appeal refused…

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PW Radio 82: Gabriel Weston

2014-08-14
Length: 56s

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S05E01 - Victim Impact Statements and "private" conversations

2014-08-08 :: mail@northpod.co.uk (Northpod Productions)

Listen to the show here.
Hurrah! We are back.
This week, Lyndon and Dan recap some of the news that happened in the past six weeks - including Rolf Harris and Ian Watkins appearances in the news (again). 
Lyndon introduces a story about comments made by a judge (who thought he was speaking in private) about how victim impact statements have no effect, and Dan explains why he doesn't really have a problem with the new Attorney-General not being a "top lawyer".
Finally, Lyndon and Dan take a look at suspended sentences in the context of sexual offences and explain how a suspended sentence is still a custodial sentence  -  and why that is important. 
Links
Ian Watkins
Rolf Harris - Conviction appeal and no AG's Ref
Parole Board / Victim Impact Statements
Suspended sentence for sex offender
Jeremy Wright misleads public over impact statements…

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PW Radio 81: Rudy Rasmus

2014-08-07
Length: 57s

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PW Radio 80: Maximillian Potter

2014-07-31
Length: 56s

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S13E06 - Tea and Cake

2014-07-31 :: mail@northpod.co.uk (Northpod Productions)

Hear this week's show right here.

This is a silly episode to end series 13.  We are doing cake, bourbon and tea. 

Yep, we are covering rulings of the tax tribunal and the Advertising Standards Agency.  You might think that this would be a bit dry but no.  

We go to town on Tunnocks and get passionate about pyramids.

Please don't expect the usual cutting analysis of heavy-weight appeal decisions.  Instead, expect munching and slurping.  And some chortling.  

Normal service will be resumed next series!

In the meantime, stay subscribed for UK Criminal Law Blog Podcast.  They'll be up next week.

PLEASE RATE/REVIEW US: wherever you subscribe, please take two seconds as we start this series, to give us some stars and a few kind words.  We'd be e'er so obliged.  It helps us get up the search rankings, ya see.  If you use iTunes, please click here and it'll take just seconds!

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PW Radio 79: Sharona Muir

2014-07-24
Length: 55s

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S13E05 - The VC Factor

2014-07-24 :: mail@northpod.co.uk (Northpod Productions)

Listen to this week's show right here.

In a CBA vice-chair election special, we are joined by the two candidates, Mark Fenhalls QC and Paul Keleher QC.

There was no bloodshed in this head-to-head but we think you'll want to hear what both candidates have to say on the wide-ranging topics up for discussion.

We cover everything from "The Deal" to the future use of direct action; from how to stop the slide back into the Bar being for the white, male, middle-class to what the future holds for the Bar in light of the reviews.

We put some of your questions to the two candidates and ask about the very structure of the CBA.

If you are a CBA member, you'll probably want to listen to this in order to help you decide on how to use your vote.

If you are not a CBA member, you might still find this little chat illuminating as to what is the sights of those who will serve initially under Tony Cross QC.

For more information on the candidates and the CBA, please visit their website right here.

PLEASE RATE/REVIEW US: wherever you subscribe, please take two seconds as we start this series, to give us some stars and a few kind words.  We'd be e'er so obliged.  It helps us get up the search rankings, ya see.  If you use iTunes, please click here and it'll take just seconds!

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S13E04 - Immigration and Impertinence

2014-07-23 :: mail@northpod.co.uk (Northpod Productions)


Listen to this week's show right here.

We have swapped Kirstin for Jonathan this week as we take on what must be the two biggest immigration cases of the year, MM and PLP vs Grayling - not their official titles!

These cases may be weighty immigration cases but they are important far more broadly as they involve the relationship between the State, Europe and private individuals.  They also demonstrate that politics may be getting in the way of good law-making, not for the first time.

Following on from that, we took a look at Re: Ian Stuart West - a case where a friend of our little show appealed a finding a contempt against him and landed-up winning before Sir Brian Leveson, the President of the Queen's Bench Division of the High Court.  Many have wondered why this Judge should hear this appeal and many lawyers are coming out on both sides of the battle lines on this one.  To hear extracts from the spat between Ian and Judge Kelson QC, you need look no further.  This is cathartic stuff for many criminal lawyers, faced with an increased feeling of being asked to be complicit in the manipulation of defendants, rather than the representation of them.  

In any event, lots to mull over in this week's show so enjoy and get in touch with your views.

PLEASE RATE/REVIEW US: wherever you subscribe, please take two seconds as we start this series, to give us some stars and a few kind words.  We'd be e'er so obliged.  It helps us get up the search rankings, ya see.  If you use iTunes, please click here and it'll take just seconds! Feeding BritCaster.com

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PW Radio 78: Joseph Luzzi

2014-07-17
Length: 34s

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S13E03 - Expert Evidence, Unreliable Evidence and Fresh Evidence

2014-07-14 :: mail@northpod.co.uk (Northpod Productions)

Listen to this week's show right here.

We have talked about expert witnesses many times over the past 12 series but we have seldom explored exactly what an "expert witness" is, what they do, to whom they are accountable, how they are regulated and how they come to be involved in cases.  


This week, we fix that by catching-up with Glen Siddall of Aequitas Forensics, Manchester.  Glen is an expert in digital forensics and he is instructed by "both sides" in criminal proceedings.  We ask him about his work and about recent changes in the world of the expert witness and about hacking Richard Bacon's iPhone.

We also talk to Glen about the recent BBC documentary, Panorama - Justice For Sale?  Did the programme accurately reflect his experience of being an expert and does he agree with the conclusions of the journalist and of Timothy Dutton QC, former Chair of the Bar about future regulation?

In the news this week, fresh evidence appeals.  We record on the day after a man walks free after being wrongly-convicted of raping his wife multiple times.  Fresh evidence emerged that the complainant (who still cannot be named) had lied about the rape, had talked about lying in advance of the trial and seemingly boasted about lying after the event.  This is the nightmare scenario that, whilst certainly rare, we would prefer to think never happens.  He had been sentenced to 9 years for each count but this was increased to 13 years by the Court of Appeal, following an Attorney-General's Reference.

With that and other matters in our minds, we look at what the Court of Appeal has recently said about fresh evidence and we'll consider whether its approach is consistent.

A little bit of Freedom of Information too, this week.  We heard that the CPS was using unpaid students to prepare cases in one of its offices.  We asked if this could possibly be true.  They answered our FOI request.  Is the answer surprising or not?


PLEASE RATE/REVIEW US: wherever you subscribe, please take two seconds as we start this series, to give us some stars and a few kind words.  We'd be e'er so obliged.  It helps us get up the search rankings, ya see.  If you use iTunes, please click here and it'll take just seconds!
Feeding BritCaster.com…

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PW Radio 77: June Melby

2014-07-10
Length: 28s

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S13E02 - Historic Sexual Offences

2014-07-05 :: mail@northpod.co.uk (Northpod Productions)

Have a listen to this week's show right here.

In the light of the recent verdicts and sentence in Rolph Harris' case, Kirstin goes through the Sexual Offences Act 1956, looking at what offences are contained in it and how amendments have affected the law.
Given that we are on the subject of how the law changes over the years and that retrospective legislation is dangerous territory, we thought it would be worthwhile to take a peek at the decision of the High Court in Reilly (No.2) as the Government gets a bloody nose for playing dirty with JSA claimants.

Both hefty legal matters this week so next week we will hopefully be being chatty on the subject of experts and looking at our postbag from the CPS, MoJ and Home Office.  Doesn't look like fan mail....

Also, PLEASE RATE/REVIEW US: wherever you subscribe, please take two seconds as we start this series, to give us some stars and a few kind words.  We'd be e'er so obliged.  It helps us get up the search rankings, ya see.…

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PW Radio 76: Paul Raeburn

2014-06-26
Length: 40s

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S13E01 - Let's Look At That Again

2014-06-26 :: mail@northpod.co.uk (Northpod Productions)

We are back for Series 13 (!) of the podcast and we are raring to go with some law this week.  Many thanks to the good folks at UK Criminal Law Blog Podcast and thanks again to Lyndon Harris for having both Kirstin and Ben on this series.  
As always, you can hear this week's show by clicking here.

Also, PLEASE RATE/REVIEW US: wherever you subscribe, please take two seconds as we start this series, to give us some stars and a few kind words.  We'd be e'er so obliged.  It helps us get up the search rankings, ya see.

And now, on with the show notes:


When can the Attorney-General have the CA review a sentence?

We often talk of defence appeals but if the AG thinks that a sentence is passed he can refer it to the CA (with leave) but only in some cases.  

What are they? - The Criminal Justice Act 1988 (Reviews of Sentencing) Order 2006 amending Part IV of the CJA 1988.  

Recent addition? - CJA 1988 (Reviews of Sentencing)(Amendments) Order 2014 {IN FORCE 21st July but laid before Parliament today}

Thoughts on why we have that system? Is it only sentences or can the Crown have another pop at conviction when they fail the first time?

Why only certain offences?

Searching questionsSweeney -v- Westminster Magistrates’ Court and London Regional Asset Recovery Team and Environment Agency 2014 EWHC 2068

Experts and their dutiesThe BBC’s Panorama recently covered the behaviour of expert witnesses to criminal proceedings.

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S04E06 - Theft, Proceeds of Crime and Lex Mitior

2014-06-20 :: mail@northpod.co.uk (Northpod Productions)

Listen to the show here.
This week, Ben (of that there Northpod fame) guest hosts with Lyndon.
Ben considers the Supreme Court decision in the Ahmad and Fields confiscation case - don't be daunted, Ben's explanation is admirably clear and concise.  
Lyndon and Ben then discuss article 7 and the principle of lex mitior. The Court of Appeal considered some Strasbourg case law along with some domestic case law; the case is makes for a fascinating read so give it a go.
Finally, Ben and Lyndon discuss the soon-to-close Sentencing Council theft consultation. Is it fit for purpose? (Ben says no) Will it be problem free? (Ben and Lyndon say no) Is it sensible? (....Ben and Lyndon say no) Have your say...the link to the consultation document is in the blog post below. 
Links:
Ahmad and Fields
Lex mitior
Theft consultation…

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PW Radio 75: Ted Steinberg

2014-06-19
Length: 30s

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S04E05 - Expert evidence and making money

2014-06-13 :: mail@northpod.co.uk (Northpod Productions)

Listen to the show here.
This week, our plans went to ruin. We had intended on interviewing Karl Turner MP, former criminal barrister, about some topical legal issues. Unfortunately he was called back to his contituency ooop north and so that has had to be postponed. We had also intended on all getting together to record the show in one go...as has often happened, diaries conspired against us. 
Lyndon talks about the latest MoJ ploy to fool the electorate into thinking they are doing something worthwhile policy idea - raise the levels if fines in the Magistrates' Court. To be fair this had been in the offing for some time. But Lyndon has a closer look. Is it worth it? Will it make any money? Will it make a difference?
Dan then - responding to a request on Twitter - gives a very brief introduction to expert evidence. What is it? When can it be used? 
Links
Law Commission report on expert evidence
Magistrates' Court fines to increase
Fines - general principles…

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PW Radio 74: Jim Butcher

2014-06-12
Length: 36s

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S04E04 - The Queen's Speech...and slurry

2014-06-06 :: mail@northpod.co.uk (Northpod Productions)

Listen to the show here.
This week Lyndon and Kim discuss the contents of the Queen’s Speech and…slurry.
Lyndon runs (very quickly) through the proposed offence of assisting a criminal organisation - is it necessary? is it covered by other offences? who is it designed to catch?
And then he hands over to Kim who takes us through the proposed amendment to the Children and Young Persons Act 1933 in relation to emotional neglect of children. More criminal justice legislation; an improvement? or just the same old rubbish?
Finally, with the magic of podcasting…there’s a pre-recorded discussion of a peculiar case involving a man who likes to masturbate whilst covered in slurry. I know what you’re thinking, but it is in fact interesting for other reasons…
Links
CYPA 1933 
HC Briefing note
Queen’s Speech announcements (Law Soc Gazette)
Blog post on the slurry case

Post on a dodgy solicitor who helped a criminal gang

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PW Radio 73: Edward Lewis

2014-06-05
Length: 37s

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S04E03 - Calamitous conspiracies and minor motoring convictions (with Michael Bowes QC)

2014-05-30 :: mail@northpod.co.uk (Northpod Productions)



Listen to the show here.
This week, Kim and Lyndon take a look at two recent cases, the first of which involves a calamitous murder plot involving the conspirators getting lost and crashing their car whilst on a quest to find Joss Stone’s house (only she doesn’t live there anymore). The appellants have their sentences reduced rather substantially. Kim skims over the facts and the reasoning of the court. 
Lyndon has a brief look at judicial appointments and how minor motoring convictions can put the brakes (sorry!) on your judicial career. 
Finally, Kim interviews barrister Michael Bowes QC about the fascinating case of Danilo Restivo, which without giving too much away involves two murders, conspiracy theories, appeals and the Criminal Cases Review Commission.
Links
Joss Stone - Sentence appeal
Judicial appointments judicial review
Danilo Restivo - Wikipedia entry

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PW Radio 72: Sophie Jordan

2014-05-29
Length: 30s

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S04E02 –

2014-05-23 :: mail@northpod.co.uk (Northpod Productions)

Listen to the show here.Dan and Kim discuss a number of cases featuring in the news this week.

Stuart Hall’s conviction and acquittal provided much to talk about, but Dan and Kim examine the case in the context of the way in which juries work – the fact Hall’s bad character evidence (previous convictions) were put before the jury and the fact he didn’t give evidence yet was acquitted on all but one of the counts demonstrates that the jury system works, does it not?

Moving on, Danny Nightingale (remember him?) was back in the news this week, wasting more taxpayer’s money. He was refused permission to appeal against conviction for possession of a prohibited firearm. Dan takes a quick look at that and asks whether it is now, finally, the end of the line for the tabloid sweetheart Nightingale.

What would the podcast be without a little sex? Well not wanting to disappoint, Dan and Kim look at the recent case of Golding, concerning sexually transmitted diseases and criminal liability flowing from that. The case poses a number of interesting questions including ‘When is consent not consent?’

One of the bigger stories of the week was Operation Cotton. In the Court of Appeal for a consideration of the decision to stay the proceedings. Dan takes a look at the judgment and its consequences.

And finally, as it is election week, we thought we’d do something topical. After an interesting discussion on twitter, the question of whether taking a selfie in the polling booth would constitute a criminal offence was raised. Dan and Kim consider the issues.


Links:

Stuart Hall

Our summary of the case

Danny Nightingale

Our summary of the case

Herpes - when can you be criminally liable?

R v Golding 

When is consent not consent

R v McNally

Operation Cotton 

UK Criminal Law Blog report

Election selfie


The legislation

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PW Radio 71: Kseniya Melnik

2014-05-22
Length: 35s

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S04E01 - Costly defence cases

2014-05-16 :: mail@northpod.co.uk (Northpod Productions)



Listen to the show here. 
This week, Lyndon and Kim are in the ‘studio’ and roving reporter Dan is out and about.
Kim introduces the changes to the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 and discusses, amongst other things, why the offence was widened to include places which are not public places. Lyndon discusses a peculiar case from 2009 which is back in the news - a woman was sent prison for 6 months for protecting an abused dog. Confused? All becomes clear. 
Dan talks about Operation Cotton in the Court of Appeal and what the consequences might be for the criminal bar. Lyndon discusses the Max Clifford sentence and the problems around concurrent and consecutive sentences, touching on the potential problems created by the judge come the inevitable Court of Appeal hearing. 
Dan explains costs in criminal cases in light of the Huhne/Pryce costs judgment and explains that crime certainly doesn't pay - in any sense. 

Links:
Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014
Imprisoned for contempt
Max Clifford sentencing
Concurrent and consecutive sentences
Costs in criminal cases
Operation Cotton 



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PW Radio 70: Julia Dahl

2014-05-15
Length: 38s

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PW Radio 69: Bob Mankoff

2014-05-08
Length: 41s

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S12E06 - The Results Are In...

2014-05-08 :: mail@northpod.co.uk (Northpod Productions)


The cake and bourbon show is upon us again.  Our 72nd episode can be heard right here.

In this week's show, we take a look at Sir Bill Jeffrey's review of independent criminal advocacy in England and Wales.  It may be reopening an old front in the war between barristers and HCAs but the conclusions give considerable grounds for taking stock of the effects of all the reforms over the last 10 years.  They also present a potentially chilling view of the future for anyone who fears change.  Find the full report in the links below - along with the responses by the Bar Council and Law Society.

The Land Registry might be next in terms of selling the family silver - at the very least, there are problems with the reform plans for the Keepers of the Plans.

A pretty important costs case which confirms that the CPS and police cannot just blame each other to avoid costs orders and, more importantly, SNAFU is not a defence and neither is simple mistake.  You're going to want to bookmark this one.  The link is polite.

We also take a quick scoot the rest of this week's legal news and a couple of other cases.  Take a listen and find the links below.

PLEASE RATE/REVIEW US: wherever you subscribe, please take two seconds as we come to the end of this series, to give us some stars and a few kind words.  We'd be e'er so obliged.  It helps us get up the search rankings, ya see.


LINKS:

The review of independent criminal advocacy in England and Wales by Sir Bill Jeffrey has been published.
http://www.justice.gov.uk/downloads/about/jeffrey-review/jeffrey-review-criminal-advocacy.pdf
Bar Council response: http://www.barcouncil.org.uk/media-centre/news-and-press-releases/2014/may/bar-council-to-consider-jeffrey-report-into-criminal-advocacy
Law Society response: http://www.lawsociety.org.uk/news/press-releases/law-society-responds-to-jeffrey-report-on-criminal-advocacy/

Land Registry
http://www.lawgazette.co.uk/practice/legal-action-threat-over-land-registry-plan/5041123.article

R (ex. p. Singh v Ealing Mags and CPS)
http://www.bailii.org/ew/cases/EWHC/Admin/2014/1443.html

4 in 10 lawyers suggest you look elsewhere for a career… but who was asked?
http://www.lawgazette.co.uk/practice/dont-choose-law-as-career-say-4-in-10-lawyers/5041120.article 

Biometric data and crime report case:
http://www.bailii.org/ew/cases/EWCA/Civ/2014/585.html

Prison Governors’ Association say it’s getting to “tipping point” as Grayling carries on regardless.
http://www.politics.co.uk/news/2014/05/07/prison-governors-grayling-s-regime-is-driving-us-to-tipping

Apple v Samsung - the results are in.  Kinda:
http://www.claimsjournal.com/news/national/2014/05/05/248430.htm
http://bgr.com/2014/04/23/2014-apple-vs-samsung-lawsuit-google/


Johnny Foreigner to be denied legal aid by Lord Chancellor - but is he relying on nonsense figures?  Never!  (But even the press can’t decide if it’s £3m or £10m):
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/politics/10812723/No-more-legal-aid-for-foreigners-to-sue-MoD-says-Chris-Grayling.html
Or a more balanced piece from the Daily Mail (!?!?)
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2621672/War-crimes-lawyers-specialise-suing-serving-soliders-received-10MILLION-legal-aid-three-years.html

AND FINALLY…
A bit of fun: Personal Injury and the ambulance-chasers of yesteryear.  Aviva’s archives of claims reveal that we were a compo-culture country long before the Yanks got involved!
http://injuryclaimsnationwide.co.uk/article/history-of-injury-claim?src=tab

That’s a wrap for series 12

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PW Radio Show 68: Mike Magner

2014-05-01
Length: 36s

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S12E05 - The Schadenfreude of Rampant State Failure

2014-05-01 :: mail@northpod.co.uk (Northpod Productions)

It's NorthPod Law 4 - MoJ and the Home Office 0 as (oh dear) Kirstin Beswick and Jonathan Holt have a lot of fun at the expense of those two ministries - you can Listen Here.
First up is the total collapse of a five-handed serious fraud involving the exploitation of members of the public, including rather vulnerable people. And why? Well, because as the MoJ has discovered that if you pay peanuts, sometimes you can't even get monkeys.

It doesn't help does it, Mr Grayling, when it's the Prime Minister's brother who's making the application...and doing it for free.http://www.judiciary.gov.uk/Resources/JCO/Documents/Judgments/r-v-crawley-others.pdf
Next, Jonathan reports a bit more Lord Chancellor-bashing courtesy of the Joint Committee on Human Rights.  It's not just left-wingers saying you're wrong, Mr G. Who'd have thought?JCHR Report on JR Changes 1JCHR Report on JR Changes 2
Then, more fun for Jonathan as he looks at a case where the Home Office sought to bolster its position and thus handed the applicant the weapons with which to successfully fight.http://www.bailii.org/ew/cases/EWHC/Admin/2014/1310.html
And finally the Secretary of State learns what the term "no cogent reason" actually means. Listeners may think the clue is in the words.http://www.bailii.org/ew/cases/EWCA/Civ/2014/477.html

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S12E04 - All Change! No Change!

2014-04-25 :: mail@northpod.co.uk (Northpod Productions)

On this week's show, which you can listen to by clicking these very words, Ben and Kirstin talk their way through the so-called "revolution" in the family courts.

It is something of an oddity that reforms that actually do very little in terms of changing the status quo and, instead, assume that lawyers have been doing it wrong for all of this time, should be heralded as a "revolution" by a political judge.  Check out the government hype in the links below.

Not content with having a pop at the President of the Family Division's self-congratulation, Ben finds the High Court utterly objectionable as it gives a litigant in person a raw deal and seems to object to justice being done.

Knife crime guidelines get the sharp tongue of Kirstin as we celebrate another Court of Appeal decision that is a little lacking in purpose.

In addition, we have a little look at the cost of getting judicial review wrong - or rather, not turning to the silver bullet that is ADR.

Yes, you may be able to tell that we are feeling more than a little snarky this week.  It might pass.  It might not.

Links:

Law students in divorce courts and putting the children first.
Sir James Munby’s Oscar Speech: http://flba.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/2014view11-2.doc.docx
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2610014/Law-students-drafted-help-resolve-divorce-cases-shake-family-justice-system.html
http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2014/04/23/law-studentstrusted-counselling-divorcing-couples_n_5197804.html
http://www.adjacentgovernment.co.uk/local-government-news/family-justice-reforms-put-childrens-need-first/
http://www.tayloremmet.co.uk/blogs/new-family-court/
THINK OF THE CHILDREN (or “How to use children to push a government austerity agenda" video): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XA99gui758I
https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/217343/family-justice-review-final-report.pdf

Knife crime guidance.
http://www.bailii.org/ew/cases/EWCA/Crim/2014/747.html

The cost of getting it wrong: http://www.bailii.org/ew/cases/EWHC/Admin/2014/11l97.html

Medical excuses and litigants in person getting steamrollered.
http://www.bailii.org/ew/cases/EWHC/Admin/2012/332.html…

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PW Radio 67: Dinaw Mengestu

2014-04-24
Length: 32s

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PW Radio 66: Colman Andrews

2014-04-17
Length: 40s

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S12E03 - A Rare Thing Indeed!

2014-04-17 :: mail@northpod.co.uk (Northpod Productions)

On this week's show, which you can hear by clicking here, we are joined by lap-dancer-turned-law-student, Vanessa Knowles to talk about how a law student making good money from being very visible online might encounter problems in a future career.  It turns out things are not as bleak as you might think.

We talk about how not to deal with the Court of Appeal when it comes to having a pop at a client's previous lawyers and how the Court uses its rarely-wielded power to dismiss a case without a hearing of any sort.

We look at a rarely-used power to have a witness deposed - US-style!  Is it about to be used more often after being on the statute books for many years?

We also take a look at the Legal Aid position in relation to awkward forensic experts holding on to evidence until a fee is paid by defence lawyers.  No spoilers, but it turns out that things are not quite as they seem.

All of that and we have a quick glance at the sad plight of Nigel Evans MP, the PDS and Nick "Mr Loophole" Freeman.

Check out the links below for the sources used and for additional material we thought you might like to read.

Have a good Easter break.

The links:


No charge allowed for prosecution expert labs to show all to the defence - Keith Borer Consultants make a FOI request to the Forensic Regulator. http://www.keithborer.co.uk/uploads/assets/files/KBC%20April%202014%20Newsletter%20E&W.pdfhttps://www.whatdotheyknow.com/request/171649/response/425409/attach/html/3/84617%20Final%20response.pdf.html


You have an appointment to be deposed! http://northpod.openshadow.com/asset_docs/Power%20of%20justice%20to%20take%20depositions.pdf

R v Achogbuo http://www.bailii.org/ew/cases/EWCA/Crim/2014/567.html http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1968/19/pdfs/ukpga_19680019_en.pdf
£3,000 for a splinter in the bum. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2606125/Parents-sue-school-3-000-seven-year-old-son-got-splinter-sat-wooden-bench.htmlCroydon Guardian tells it slightly differently again: http://www.croydonguardian.co.uk/news/11148736.Boy_with_sore_bottom_wins_payout_after_school_bench_gives_him_painful_splinter/
Law student stripper
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2605809/Lap-dancing-webcam-work-teach-transferable-legal-skills-Law-student-set-scoop-funds-degree-stripping-online-earns-50k-year-it.htmlhttp://www.independent.co.uk/student/news/as-many-as-a-third-of-women-strippers-are-students-trying-to-pay-for-their-education-9158808.html

and for lawyers already working at the CPS:http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/howaboutthat/2463005/CPS-lawyer-works-as-nude-model-while-on-sick-leave.htmland those BPP boys are in demand (or they were before the agency went belly-up):http://www.rollonfriday.com/Blogs/ReadBlog/tabid/144/id/25891/Default.aspxIn case you’re wondering what that test is for solicitors, here it is: http://www.sra.org.uk/solicitors/handbook/suitabilitytest/content.page

“More rigorous tests to be applied by CPS and police says Scotland Yard Chief” http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2606080/Historic-sex-abuse-allegations-subject-stricter-tests-prosecutions-says-Scotland-Yard-chief.htmlTwitter coverage https://storify.com/anyapalmer/a-tax-on-innocence

The PDShttp://www.lawgazette.co.uk/practice/public-defender-service-hires-11-advocates/5040880.article

Nick Freeman and the ASA. http://www.lawgazette.co.uk/5040872.article?utm_source=dispatch&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=GAZ160414

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PW Radio 65: Adam Begley

2014-04-10
Length: 39s

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S12E02 - The New Way(a)

2014-04-10 :: mail@northpod.co.uk (Northpod Productions)


The Way(a) to listen is to click here!
Enough with the awful title and dreadful pun - is it a pun?  This week we transport you to the sunny shores of Cape Town via a fascinating interview with barrister David Pojur, telling us all about the legal system that's currently trying Oscar Pistorius.
We come closer to home although no further from scandalous trials to look at the Nigel Evans trial in Preston.  Ben's promised link to the Code for Crown Prosecutors is here.
Kirstin discusses Re G a family case with wider importance to absent fathers and Ben tells you why the glimmer of hope we had in POCA cases turns out to be fools gold due to R v King whilst Jonathan saves the day with some good news and a quote from Simon Spence QC.

We urge you to reply to the BSB consultation - Possibly the most important thing you will do this year.

If you would like to know more about Legal Hack Minnesota you can find out here. We do hope they're going to come and tell us more in person.




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S12E01 - Proposals

2014-04-08 :: mail@northpod.co.uk (Northpod Productions)


Listen Here

Welcome back.  It's the glorious Twelfth!

In week one, we talk to Family Barrister Joe Lynch about the proposed changes to the child cruelty laws to add in emotional abuse.  Should it be done?  Can it be done?  How's it done in the rest of the world?  The Action for Children report can be found here


We exclusively reveal how much the Lord Chancellor's car costs - STOP PRESS!!

And we confuse you completely with the proposed theft sentencing guidelines - don't forget to engage with the consultation to try at least to make it less complicated.  You can read about it, confuse yourself and contribute here.

Your extra reading material can be found here (POCA Case) and here (Solicitor)

Nice to have you back.…

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PW Radio 64: Mireille Guiliano

2014-04-03
Length: 33s

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PW Radio 63: Sarah Pinborough

2014-03-27
Length: 35s

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Women and bullies S03E06

2014-03-26 :: mail@northpod.co.uk (Northpod Productions)



Listen to the show here.
Joining Lyndon this evening is Kim and Kirstin (from our sister show, the Northpod Law podcasts).
Kim talks about the societal impact of the legal aid cuts (as distinct from the financial impact upon the legal profession) in the context of judicial review. 
Lyndon, Kim and Kirstin then discuss whether women get more lenient sentences than men, with reference to a recent case. Loren Morris was imprisoned for sexual activity with an 8 year old child. Why wasn’t it charged as rape? Well the law doesn’t permit a female to be charged with rape - why? Is it outdated? Does that go some way to explaining why in some cases, the sentences women get seem more lenient than for men? 
Finally, the three look at cyber bullies and tougher sentences. In an amendment to the Criminal Justice and Courts Bill, the government have backed calls for greater sentencing powers for internet bullies. Is it necessary? Or is it just considered a vote winner? If we are changing the law in relation to cyber bullies, should we re-write it completely?
Links
Blog story (Loren Morris)
An MP claiming men are discriminated against
Guardian article
Evening Standard article


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PW Radio 62: Phil Klay

2014-03-20
Length: 27s

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S03E05 - Twitter and new legislation

2014-03-20 :: mail@northpod.co.uk (Northpod Productions)

Listen to the show here.
Lyndon talks about the new Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014 which when in force will repeal ASBOs, SOPOs and various other orders, and replace them with things that look mighty similar. There are a few things to watch out for such as the different tests to apply under the new orders but one is left with the feeling that it may have been better to amend the existing legislation rather than tear it up and enact very similar provisions. But such is Parliament’s wont.


He also discusses two cases in the news this week – another Twitter prosecution, this time for breaching the anonymity afforded to complainants in sexual offence cases in relation to the Michael Le Vell trial last year, and the mysterious case of a murder, committed during a burglary, which seemingly did not attract the 30 year starting point usually appropriate for a murder ‘done for gain’.


On top of that, there is a quick discussion about the victim surcharge and the question as to whether the cut in fees means lawyers can’t prepare their cases properly.


Links:


Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014


Michael Le Vell

Murder done for gain




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S03E04 - Police station reps and suspended sentences

2014-03-17 :: mail@northpod.co.uk (Northpod Productions)

Listen to the show here.
This week, Lyndon looks at the case of Laura Cunliffe - imprisoned for 14 weeks for causing unnecessary suffering to a kitten. The case seemed to divide opinion on the blog and on Twitter between the animal lovers who thought 14 weeks was far too lenient, and those who thought the sentence was too high. The reason for the division in opinion? Ms Cunliffe's mental health difficulties. Does that reduce her culpability? Would a suspended sentence be better for all? But would a suspended sentence fail to mark the seriousness of the offence?
Then, Kim discusses what it is like to be interviewed by the police. Kim used to be a detective in the Met police and latterly a police station rep, representing clients in the police station. She sets out the structure and highlights some issues which she has encountered throughout her time in the police station (on the other side of the desk!)
Links:
A police officer's approach to interviewing
Laura Cunliffe - microwaving a kitten case…

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PW Radio Show 61: Helen Oyeyemi

2014-03-13
Length: 35s

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S03E03 - Strikes and dangerous offenders

2014-03-08 :: mail@northpod.co.uk (Northpod Productions)




Listen to the show here.
In a slightly shorter show this week, Lyndon discusses a case of rape where the offender was given a non-custodial sentence. Is it right? Why might he have received such a low sentence? I can hear the Daily Mail mob and their pitchforks now...
Also, Lyndon discusses a case which came out of the Court of Appeal on 4th March 2014 about dangerous offenders. In a long judgment the Court gave guidance on the sentencing in such cases, but Lyndon takes a brief look at a comment the Court made about Automatic life sentences. 
Finally, as many of you will have heard, the lawyers are going on strike this week. Why? What are the issues? Why should I be concerned? Dan answers all these questions. 
Links:
Independent article on the rape case
Automatic life - blog 

R v Burinskas

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PW Radio Show 60: Paul Rosolie

2014-03-06
Length: 47s

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PW Radio Show 59: Terry Frei

2014-02-27
Length: 34s

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S03E02 - Murder, manslaughter and more whole life

2014-02-27 :: mail@northpod.co.uk (Northpod Productions)

Listen to the show here.
This week, Lyndon and Kim discuss the sentences imposed on Michael Adebolajo and Michael Adebowale for the murder of Lee Rigby. After the sentencing was deferred to allow the Court of Appeal to determine whether whole life tariffs are lawful, The pair were give a whole life tariff and life with a minimum of 45 years. Lyndon and Kim look at the judge’s reasons for those sentences and question whether there might be an appeal. 
Dan has a look at another homicide case in the news this week - the ‘one punch manslaughter’ of a man who challenged someone who was riding their bike on the pavement. The defendant received 4 years’ imprisonment. Members of the public have called for the Attorney General to refer the case to the Court of Appeal as ‘unduly lenient’ and Dan takes a look at manslaughter, the sentencing for ‘one punch manslaughter’ and whether the Court of Appeal are likely to increase the sentence.
Finally, Kim has a quick look at Silk - the BBC One legal drama. She gives a few examples of how lawyers on Twitter grumble about the legal ‘inaccuracies’ and tells of how she had dinner with Neil Stuke, the actor who plays Billy in Silk. 
Whole life
Sentencing remarks 
Sentencing in murder cases - Fact sheet 
One punch manslaughter - AG’s Ref?
Fact sheet on AG’s References
Daily Mail article
Silk

Dan’s review of episode 1

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PW Radio Show 58: Alan Paul

2014-02-20
Length: 45s

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S03 E01 – Whole life, the loss of life, and automatic life

2014-02-20 :: mail@northpod.co.uk (Northpod Productions)

Listen to the show here. 
Hurrah we are back!


This week Dan and Lyndon discuss the Court of Appeal’s judgment on the issue of whole life tariffs; widely debated, anticipated and…misunderstood by the public and press. (One Independent article couldn’t even get the distinction between the EU and the European Court right!)


Also, they discuss Neknominations and the issue of manslaughter prosecution if your nominee dies as a result of downing a pint of gin etc. and Lyndon tells of what might be the first automatic life sentence – a robber who in the past 15 or so years has spent more time inside than out, but has managed to rack up a string of armed robbery convictions and looks likely to be heading for a(nother) lengthy life sentence.


The usual thanks to Ben, Kisten and Jonathan.


Whole life


Our review of the judgment


Transcript of the judgment


Vinter v UK


Explanation of murder sentencing


Halsbury’s Law Exchange article on why the judgment isn’t a victory for UK


Neknominate


Independent article


Robber up for third lot of life sentences


UKCLB write up of the story

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PW Radio Show 57: Jeannie Lin

2014-02-13
Length: 27s

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S11E06 - Between The Rock and a Hard Place

2014-02-13 :: mail@northpod.co.uk (Northpod Productions)

Listen to this week's show here.

On this week's show, John Cooper QC joins our roving reporter, Keith Jones in Gibraltar to talk about the law and the Bar in one of Britain's far-flung outposts.

A little closer to home, we look at what happens when you cough to something whilst in custody and when that sort of confession will not be allowed in to evidence.

We take a glance over fracking near Northpod Towers and celebs on trial near our local cobbles.

Also, a look at sentencing for assisting a suicide by buying the petrol used.  The rather grim case of R v Howe [2014] gets a once-over.

The links are below.  Enjoy UKCLB Podcast for the next six weeks and we'll see you on the other side of that.

You can listen to show by clicking right here but, of course, we'd prefer that you subscribed on iTunes or via Google Play Store or via any good podcatcher app on your phone/tablet.  Ben from Northpod Law particularly recommends this one for Android and iOS.You can also find us on Stitcher and soon on TuneIn.


Beeres v CPS West Midlands [2014] EWHC 283 Admin
R v Howe [2014] EWCA Crim 114
R (Purdy) v DPP [2010] 1 Cr App R 1

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PW Radio Show 56: Joshua Max Feldman

2014-02-06
Length: 23s

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S11E05 - Words, Words, Words

2014-02-06 :: mail@northpod.co.uk (Northpod Productions)

This week we carry on the tradition of the series in that we're a member of the usual team short. It's Ben on this occasion. He'll be back next week, I'm sure.  Listen Here  
Matters under consideration are – what knowingly means when it comes to the environment; when a crime under the Dangerous Dogs Act is not a crime at all (and it's not the same as the last one); when parking is not parking and when a solicitor can hang on to papers and when he has to pass them on. 
It's all very cutting edge as Jonathan gets excited about...


Walker and son v Environment Agency [2014] EWCA Crim 100
Criminal Injuries not a crime of violence
Parking v Ancillary Parking [2014] EWHC 211 (Admin)
Liens and solicitors - see paragraph 42 - 50

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PW Radio Show 55: Jennifer Senior

2014-01-30
Length: 28s

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S11E04 - Of Interest to the Public

2014-01-30 :: mail@northpod.co.uk (Northpod Productions)

Ben and Jonathan get to grips with some matters of public importance this week's show. 


First up is a look at the guidance (in force from February 2014) on the publication of decisions of the family courts and the Court of Protection.  There are some interesting questions raised about how this is going to work and who is paying for it.  

Either way, you'll have to know about this if you work in either of these areas of law and the public may well find the reality of these cases far more challenging than the abstract way in which they are reported at present.

We move on to the case of the "Iceland Three".  This story was all over social media this week.  This was the case of three men who faced prosecution for taking food from a skip at a London branch of London.  There was outrage and a change in CPS approach but, once you factor-in other information that appeared in later reports, did the CPS make the right call or were they duped by the publicity?


Then onto our favourite [redacted for legal purposes], Theresa May.  She has been calling for some powers that, if they were to be used against convicted terrorists, you might think were pretty obvious, but that's not quite what she wants.  We look at the terrible misreporting of this case by almost all UK media.  There is some very scary devil in the detail and Ben issues a personal thanks to his MP, Hazel Blears, for being one of the 297 MPs who played politics with something the UN think is fundamental to a person's very being.


As always, there is stuff that we didn't get to this week.  Please see the show notes below for the links to those stories and for all of the articles for the above.


We'll be back next week when hopefully Kirstin will be back with us and Mr Kipling will have sent us some cake.  Or Iceland might have sent us a prawn ring.  Let's hope it's the former.

You can listen to show by clicking right here but, of course, we'd prefer that you subscribed on iTunes or via Google Play Store or via any good podcatcher app on your phone/tablet.  Ben from Northpod Law particularly recommends this one for Android and iOS.
You can also find us on Stitcher and soon on TuneIn.

Links:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-17150054

- The public will get to peer at the decisions of the Family courts and the Court of Protection under the new transparency guidance.http://www.judiciary.gov.uk/Resources/JCO/Documents/Guidance/transparency-in-the-family-courts-jan2014.pdfhttp://www.dailymail.co.uk/debate/article-2540976/At-victory-secrecy-courts.html- Skipping case - in the public interest until the public gets interested. First story: http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2014/jan/28/three-charged-vagrancy-act-food-skip-icelandIceland 1st response: http://about.iceland.co.uk/_assets/files/Prosecution-for-waste-food-theft-29-1-14.pdfCPS decision (as reported in Indie) PLUS the shades of grey appear:http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/iceland-food-bin-theft-case-dropped-by-cps-9094415.htmlIceland 2nd statement:http://about.iceland.co.uk/_assets/files/Update-on-Kentish-Town-waste-food-theft-29-1-14.pdf- Theresa May and the race to the bottom on Immigration toughness leads to 11th-hour amendment to bill to include right to strip naturalised Brits of their nationality.What does ILPA say? They say not within scope.http://www.ilpa.org.uk/data/resources/25742/14-01-29-Deprivation-ILPA-briefing.pdfBlog:http://www.freemovement.org.uk/2014/01/30/amendment-to-immigration-bill-allows-home-secretary-to-make-people-stateless/#more-12265Guardian: http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2014/jan/29/theresa-may-terror-suspects-citizenship-clegg-approvalNot just “terrorism suspects” or “terrorists” at all.  Read the section (at page 1651):http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/bills/cbill/2013-2014/0128/amend/pbc1283001m.1649-1655.htmlActual reasons for Home Sec simply to be satisfied of are:Home Sec satisfied that it is conducive to the public good because that person has conducted himself in such a manner that is seriously prejudicial to the vital interests of the UK.  AND if it’s a decision takenthen there will be no public information as to why the decision has been made and there will be no right of appeal.http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1981/61/section/40ANot just May, of course.  100 MPs support this, including Hazel Blears.Further reading/”No time for” stories- 17 y.o. death at YOI Wetherbyhttp://www.inquest.org.uk/media/pr/serious-failures-identified-by-jury-inquest-17-year-old-ryan-clark-wetherbyhttp://www.ibtimes.co.uk/failings-wetherby-prison-blamed-17-year-old-ryan-clarks-death-1434271- Even those terps who scabbed and went to work for Capita are now calling for a boycott.  This is because Capita has finally scrapped Tier 2/3 terps and so the power is now in the hands of the Tier 1s.http://www.linguistlounge.org/all-articles/analysis-and-comment/999-time-to-take-action-boycott#comments Premier League IP case:http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-south-west-wales-25968200But, in Feb 2012

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PW Radio Show 54: Lisa Unger

2014-01-23
Length: 32s

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S11E03 - Dangerously Out Of Control

2014-01-23 :: mail@northpod.co.uk (Northpod Productions)

You can listen to show by clicking right here but, of course, we'd prefer that you subscribed on iTunes or via Google Play Store or via any good podcatcher app on your phone/tablet.  Ben from Northpod Law particularly recommends this one for Android and iOS.
The Court of Appeal recently took the opportunity to set straight a peculiarity in the law that has existed since 1991.  Most criminal lawyers will have dealt with the scenario with which the court was concerned and the Court of Appeal have used their powers of statutory interpretation to fix what most would see as a terribly unfair and poorly-drafted bit of legislation: the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991.
It had appeared, until recently, that s.3(1) of the 1991 Act had created an offence whereby you could go to prison for up to two years even if you did nothing wrong.  It is unlikely that this case will be overturned any time soon as it needed fixing but see what you think about it.
The case and some other reading material are below.
Then we move on to our second case of the week; in fact, it's one of Mr Knight's.
The appeal against sentence of Connor Martin was described as an exceptional case by the Court of Appeal because it dealt with the unusual scenario of a Crown Court Judge giving an express indication of what sentence would be imposed after a Newton hearing and then imposing a higher sentence.  The case was regarding legitimate expectation and gives the strongest indication that judges should never give such indications prior to the decision being taken to hold a Newton hearing.  
We do have a quick look at the QASA judicial review decision of the High Court but it contained few surprises.  We promised in the show that we would give you a link to a good set of reactions to the decision.  It is in the links below.


LinksA very important precedent has been set in Dangerous Dogs cases.  The strict liability offence of having a dog dangerously out of control in a public place has just had a much-needed caveat added to it by the Court of Appeal.http://www.bailii.org/ew/cases/EWCA/Crim/2013/2396.html(http://www.solicitorsjournal.com/case-reports/animals-regina-v-robinson-pierre)(http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2264113/Symieon-Robinson-Pierre-Dog-owner-sentenced-22-months-failing-stop-dog-mauling-police-officers.html)
R v Martin [2013] http://www.bailii.org/ew/cases/EWCA/Crim/2013/2565.html
Reactions to QASA: http://www.halsburyslawexchange.co.uk/qasa-criminal-barristers-react-to-rejected-challenge/

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S11E02 - Filth, Filthy Behaviour and Filthy Lucre

2014-01-19 :: mail@northpod.co.uk (Northpod Productions)

You can listen to show by clicking right here but, of course, we'd prefer that you subscribed on iTunes or via Google Play Store or via any good podcatcher app on your phone/tablet.  Ben from Northpod Law particularly recommends this one for Android and iOS.On this week's show, we take you through the details of the Sexual Offences Guidelines on sentencing.  We consider not only the mechanics of the guidelines for rape and assault by penetration but also the reasoning behind some of the changes.  The link to the guidelines is below.Jonathan takes a look at the case that made the CPS cringe this week.  Did cost considerations really lead to the CPS binning at trial?  The full text is below.The CBA meet with Grayling and it does not look good.Andrew Neil meets with Grayling and makes him look a fool.  Turns out ministerial responsibility is a principle no longer appreciated by the Lord Chancellor.  Thanks to the BBC for the clip.And a whole pile of other news stories that caught our eye but for which we had no time left.  Lots to get through in the links below.
LinksSexual Offences Guidelines: http://sentencingcouncil.judiciary.gov.uk/docs/web_SexualOffencesAct_2003.pdfCPS bin a trial when things get costly: http://www.crimeline.info/case/r-v-renate-andrews-and-others  and http://www.thebureauinvestigates.com/2014/01/14/cps-criticised-for-wilful-calculated-and-prolonged-disobedience-in-trial/

In it to win it (and we are) says Nigel Lithman QC: http://us7.campaign-archive1.com/?u=9e935b7a6c6c561621aaf46ab&id=a4a2f8c45e&e=cded007a3d

AND STOP PRESS: 16th January at 1730 hours: http://us7.campaign-archive1.com/?u=9e935b7a6c6c561621aaf46ab&id=f3ecdaebd2&e=366745fc1e

Lies, Damned Lies and Statistics:1. Grayling admits that the barristers’ earnings figures published out of nowhere last week were not an accurate reflection of the actual earnings but says that, even though his department published the stats, he could not be responsible for it.  This was during interview on Sunday Politics with Andrew Neil.

2. Law Society says that the drop in crime, year on year, will save £80m in legal aid by 2019 so no cuts are needed.http://www.theguardian.com/law/2014/jan/13/declining-crime-save-80m-a-year-in-legal-aidBut it’s a bit undermined by its own preamble: Top of page 6 'The MoJ and LAA have been extremely helpful in supporting this work. However the LAA’s forecasting model draws on a number of datasets and assumptions that are not publically available. Without first-hand access to the LAA model or the confidential datasets, it has not been possible fully to recreate the LAA’s forecast for future years. The criminal Legal Aid expenditure forecast generated  by our model cannot therefore be directly compared to the LAA’s figures in any given year.'and the MoJ told the Gazette: ‘This forecast is far less accurate than our own. Last year our forecast was correct to within 1%, whereas if we had used Oxford Economics analysis, we would have repeatedly overspent our legal aid litigation budget in the past few years.’ - interesting based upon Grayling’s view of the Ministry’s ability with figures...

3. A few days later, tory-rag the Daily Mail trumpets that that MoJ’s crime figures are wrong and that crime is not falling at all - therefore the Law Society’s argument must be wrong too.  Will May and the police get thrown on to the sacrificial bonfire by Grayling to continue his hate campaign against legal aid lawyers?  http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2540003/Its-official-Crime-numbers-NOT-trusted-statistics-watchdog-strips-police-data-seal-approval.html

4. 140 fewer courts but still the same costs for security?  Law Soc Gaz gets all FOI on the MoJ and reveals some odd answers:http://www.lawgazette.co.uk/law/security-spending-unchanged-as-courts-close/5039347.article

5. What cost injustice?  This is devastating to the CPS.https://www.whatdotheyknow.com/request/wasted_costs_orders?unfold=1#incoming-470067JD: A summary of the highly pertinent info (yes, that’s 1.2 million):

Crown Prosecution Service
  Mar03418,961   Mar04160,606   Mar05146,998   Mar06153,878   Mar07403,358   Mar08751,538   Mar09652,766   Mar10907,061   Mar111,547,874   Mar12384,682   Mar131,202,515


Some interesting stats on interpreters at court.  https://www.facebook.com/download/435950943174804/Ineffective%20trials%20statistics%20INTERPRETERS.pdfvs. http://www.crimeline.info/uploads/docs/capita2014.pdfIn response to our request for comment from Geoffrey BuckinghamChairman, APCI, he said “you may like to see the APCI FB page (link below) which has a comment;"MoJ COURT INTERPRETING STATISTICS

The MoJ has published statistics for the performance of the Framework Agreement. They have done their best to dress it up, but you know that old saying about lipstick and bulldogs? Well they've gone a step further and put a dress and hat on it."There is rather more considered comment and analysis to come on their website: http://www.apciinterpreters.org.uk/

Family courts cloggedhttp://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/courts-becoming-clogged-as-legal-aid-cuts-affect-separating-couples-seeking-mediation-9057133.html

But Law Society thinks that it has spotted a problem.  Fee-charging McKenzie friends trying to make money by plugging the gap left by legal aid cuts (especially in family law): http://www.lawsociety.org.uk/news/stories/case-studies-on-fee-charging-mckenzie-friends/

Cops want to stop locking kids up in Greater Manchesterhttp://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2014/jan/13/detention-children-overnight-police-cells-breach-law

On the subject of locking up kids, this is often the subject of coroners’ Prevention of Future Deaths reports (or “Rule 43 reports” as they used to be known).  These have just started to be made available online.  Good news for transparency and for research.
http://www.judiciary.gov.uk/about-the-judiciary/office-chief-coroner/pfd-reports/index

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PW Radio Show 53: Alison Levine%2C Digital Book World Recap

2014-01-16
Length: 38s

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PW Radio Show 52: Sara Eckel; the Big Library Stories of 2013

2014-01-09
Length: 34s

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S11E01 - The Truth vs A Good Story

2014-01-09 :: mail@northpod.co.uk (Northpod Productions)


Welcome to Series 11 of Northpod Law.

You can listen to show by clicking right here but, of course, we'd prefer that you subscribed on iTunes or via Google Play Store or via any good podcatcher app on your phone/tablet.  Ben from Northpod Law particularly recommends this one for Android and iOS.

This week, we talk about the statistics on sentencing and how most of what you hear about them is nonsense.  We say "told ya so" about IPNAs after the House of Lords gives the Government a bloody nose.

We look at the actual findings of the Mark Duggan inquest jury (as opposed to the claptrap spouted by many a public figure this week).

We take a look through the hits and misses of the strike action (oops we used the S word) on 6th January and call out the scabs.  We can find many positives in this though.

Last but not least, Jonathan takes us on a tour of the recent decision on Gulshan in which the wheels get a bit wobbly when free-wheeling around article 8.

Links are below, folks.

Whilst we were off air:
- thanks to UKCLBP - and see their very good piece on the sentencing statistics that have been misreported everywhere.
http://ukcriminallawblog.com/2014/01/08/criminal-justice-statistics-and-politicians-talking-rubbish/ 

- IPNAs a no-no
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-25648019

- Mark Duggan inquest - jury’s actual conclusions
http://dugganinquest.independent.gov.uk/docs/Jurys_Determination_and_Conclusion.pdf

- Vote of no confidence in Law Soc management - http://www.lawsociety.org.uk/news/stories/special-general-meeting-vote-results/

- 6th Jan 2014 - a partial success - sols hang heads in shame - says Bill Waddington (CLSA)
http://www.clsa.co.uk/index.php?q=And-so-the-bells-have-rung-the-old-year-out-and-the-New-Year-in.

Immigration case
Full Case: Gulshan (Article 8 – new Rules – correct approach) [2013] UKUT 640 (IAC)
 http://www.bailii.org/uk/cases/UKUT/IAC/2013/%5B2013%5D_UKUT_640_iac.html
Commentary: http://www.freemovement.org.uk/2014/01/08/gulshan-article-8-new-rules-correct-approach-2013-ukut-640-iac/#more-12059

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S02E06 - UK v Europe: A storm in a very expensive teacup

2014-01-03 :: mail@northpod.co.uk (Northpod Productions)

Listen to the show here.
This week, Lyndon and Dan discuss Europe and the ECHR.
First off, after the announcement by the Government that murderers could receive “hundreds of years in prison”, Lyndon and Dan revisit the whole life tariff debate and look at how the proposals might work (spoiler - they wont). They recap the decisions concerning whole life tariffs such as Ian McGloughlin (not whole life) and the Lee Rigby killers (sentencing adjourned pending the Court of Appeal decision on whole life) made by Mr Justice Sweeney. 
Secondly, Dan and Lyndon look at the prisoners’ right to vote and the recommendation by an Parliamentary committee that short term prisoners should be given the right to vote in European, local and national elections. 
Links
Whole life and 100 year sentences
BBC News report
The Telegraph
Law Society Gazette
UK Criminal Law Blog - Vinter v UK 
Prisoners’ right to vote

Law Society Gazette

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PW Radio Show 51

2014-01-02
Length: 44s

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S02E05 - (The) Sweeney

2013-12-23 :: mail@northpod.co.uk (Northpod Productions)

Listen to the show here.
Lyndon - on his own again - discusses Two of Mr Justice Sweeney’s recent cases: Denis MacShane and the Lee Rigby murder.
Denis MacShane was sentenced to 6 months imprisonment on 23 December 2013; Lyndon looks at his case, the way in which the defence attempted to distinguish his from previous cases of MPs/Peers fraudulent expenses claims and whether or not it would have been ‘right’ to suspend the sentence. 
Lyndon takes a brief look at the Lee Rigby case, what the defence was, why there was a trial and what the sentence might be. It will provide for an interesting sentencing exercise because Sweeney J has previously ruled that a whole life order  - the sentence that the two defendants are in line for - is unlawful due to a decision by the ECtHR (European Court).
Finally, Lyndon takes a (very) brief look at Nigella’s complaints that she had not opportunity to rebut the allegations made against her in the recent trial of her two former assistants. Should the law provide for a method of redress where a witness’ character/reputation has been impeached, or, is it simply a case of ‘it ain’t all about you honey’? 
Links:
Denis Macshane 
BBC News report
Sentencing remarks
Lee Rigby
UK Criminal Law Blog report
Jury nullification
Nigella

Matthew Scott’s blog post 

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S02E04 - R v Ian Watkins

2013-12-20 :: mail@northpod.co.uk (Northpod Productions)

Listen to the show here.


This week, Lyndon focuses on the Ian Watkins case.


He looks at the offences to which the defendants pleaded, some of the facts (not too graphic) and the sentences imposed. Further, he explains what an extended sentence is, as there seemed to be some confusion in the press as to what it meant, and also briefly looks at the issue of protection post-release.


Links:


UK Criminal Law Blog post on the Watkins sentence


Judge’s sentencing remarks


Explanation of what an extended sentence is


Paedophiles and pass codes – By Felicity Gerry


New Sex Offences Guideline


Old Sex Offences Guideline



Guideline on concurrent or consecutive sentences

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PW Radio Show 50

2013-12-19
Length: 37s

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PW Radio Show 49

2013-12-12
Length: 37s

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S02E03 - Guidelines and recommendations

2013-12-12 :: mail@northpod.co.uk (Northpod Productions)


Listen to the show here.
This week, Lyndon and Dan discuss the Law Commission's recommendations in relation to contempt of court and they take a look at the new Sentencing Council guideline for sentencing sexual offences. 
The Law Commission made numerous recommendations in relation to contempt of court in what is a wide project taking a fresh look at contempt of court as a whole. These recommendations relate only to juror contempt and internet publications. Dan explains the process and looks at whether the recommendations might make it onto the statute book. 
Lyndon briefly explains the 'headlines' from the new sexual offences guideline. Hardly ever out of the news of late, sexual offences is a topic which gets everyone talking. Lyndon runs through the rape guideline and he and Dan pick holes in some of the self styled 'big changes' to the sentencing of sexual offences.
Links

Sexual Offences Guideline

Blog post on the consultation, prior to publishing the sexual offences guideline

Law Commission recommendations…

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S02E02 - The Court Martial and Marine A aka Sgt Blackman

2013-12-07 :: mail@northpod.co.uk (Northpod Productions)


Listen to the show here.
On this week’s show, Dan interviews Bob Scott, a solicitor advocate who represented Marine C. They discuss the Court Martial, give some background as to how it works and why it exists, and briefly talk about Marine A’s sentencing (prior to the hearing). 
Lyndon and Kim discuss the decision of the Divisional Court to dismiss the application for judicial review against the decision of the Judge Advocate General to lift the anonymity order (basically, to name Marine A as Sgt Blackman) and the reasons given for imposing a life sentence with a minimum term of 10 years.
Many thanks to Bob. 
Links:
Bob Scott, Solicitor advocate
Bob Scott’s profile 
Anonymity
Named as Sgt Alexander Blackman, 39Summary of legal arguments re anonymityJudiciary press release re anonymity
Sentence
Joshua Rosenberg's predictionHarsh or lenient sentence? Neither is appropriateShould we scrap the mandatory life sentence for murder?Sentencing remarks

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PW Radio Show 48

2013-12-05
Length: 32s

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S02E01 – Ian Watkins, Contempt and Victims

2013-11-29 :: mail@northpod.co.uk (Northpod Productions)



Listen to the show here. 
In the first show of series 2, Lyndon is all on his lonesome due to thanksgiving and technical issues.


First up he looks at one of the bigger stories of the week; Ian Watkins, former Lostprophets singer, pleaded guilty to some very serious child sexual offences. The case has thrown up a number of issues including the question of which guideline applies, the new sex guideline or the existing guideline, (again) the problem of users of social media naming victims or ‘publishing’ information likely to lead to the discovery of their identities, and the concern regarding the investigation leading to Watkins’ arrest.


Lyndon also looks at the contempt case surrounding the publication of photographs purporting to be Venables and Thompson – the James Bulger killers – which was in the High Court this week.

Finally, Lyndon takes a very brief look at the new Victims’ Code which takes effect in December. Specifically the criticism that the code gives victims false hope.


Next week: Hopefully with Dan and Kim back with Lyndon, the show will be less of a ramble and more of an informative and informed discussion! They’ll be looking at the Marine A case and discussing the sentence imposed upon him, which is due to take place on 6 December.


Links:


Victims’ Code


Ian Watkins, Lostprophets singer, pleads guilty to child sex offences

 Ian Watkins case – breach of the anonymity afforded to victims?


Sexual Offences Sentencing Guidelines


James Baines gets suspended sentence for ‘Bulger’ tweet



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PW Radio Show 47

2013-11-21
Length: 26s

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S10E06 - Rallying The Troops

2013-11-21 :: mail@northpod.co.uk (Northpod Productions)

Listen to the show here.

This week we have ventured down South with the rest of the Bar to attend the Criminal Bar Association's conference to fight for the Criminal Justice System and for the very future of the Independent Criminal Bar.

We have plucked out some highlights of what was a lively event featuring some of the best advocates of the cause.  This episode is slightly longer than usual but we thought you might appreciate hearing what you missed if you were not able to be there.

You may have gathered that the resolutions proposed at this event were all passed unanimously which, given that there were delegates of 100% of the chambers undertaking criminal legal aid work is really saying something.

The speakers and resolutions of the day included Hannah Kinch of the Young Barristers' Association in support of the resolution that the conference resolves to support the young Bar.

The conference heard from (as will you) Jaime Hamilton and Peter Joyce in relation to the cuts in scope of legal aid and the speaking to the resolution that the conference deplores the contemptuous way in which the publically-funded Bar is treated.

Paul Harris, a solicitor representing the CLSA and LCLSA, demonstrated that the Law Society may be contemptuous of its own members' views on legal aid but the CLSA and LCLSA most definitely not.  He also talks of unity and the Criminal Lawyers United pledge which all chambers and firms should sign.

The conference heard from Michael Turner QC, Max Hill QC and Nigel Lithman QC on the politics of the battle to save legal aid and to maintain a justice system not just fit for purpose but fit for Britain.  Max Hill QC dealt with the misleading approach adopted by the Ministry of Justice over the figures and Nigel Lithman QC spoke to the resolution that VHCC work will not be accepted by the Bar or solicitors under the new proposed fee scheme.

Mark George QC (who received the only standing ovation of the day) and Russell Fraser dealt with calls for days of action when no criminal lawyers would undertake work in magistrates' courts or Crown courts.

The tanks are rolling, it seems.  Whilst we are off air, Des Hudson will find out if he will survive an historic vote of no confidence in him at the Law Society and no doubt there will be another salvo from Grayling and Co.

We will also see if the new fee scheme comes into effect on 2nd December and if anyone actually works under it.

Enjoy the next six weeks with our friends at UKCLB ad we'll be back in January.

Also, keep watching our Twitter feed for news of a possible live show in the not too distant future.

Thanks for listening!
Ben, Kirstin and Jonathan.…

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PW Radio Show 46

2013-11-14
Length: 33s

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S10E05 - Getting Away With It

2013-11-14 :: mail@northpod.co.uk (Northpod Productions)


Have a listen here.

We've got everything from worship by cannabis to esoteric legal points here.

First - yes we're serious we have cannabis sacrifice -  a couple found not guilty on the basis that their cultivation crop was not for supply but for burning to honour Shiva.
2 takes on the same story:  Russian Times and Daily Mail

Then Ben explains for any Home Office flunkies listening, how the law works and relates to everybody, foreign or not.


Kirstin finds two cases for legal complexities junkies - read them yourselves they might be easier to follow!

An interesting defence that worked:
http://rt.com/news/cannabis-shiva-sacrifice-burn-540/
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2499598/Cannabis-growers-cleared-dealing-saying-Hindu-god-Shiva.html

Foreign sex-offender gets damages for being held too long:
The story causing people to go nuts: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-24917755
The actual decision of the court:
http://www.bailii.org/cgi-bin/markup.cgi?doc=/ew/cases/EWCA/Civ/2013/1378.html&query=saleh&method=boolean


The importance of time on “qualifying tag”:
Two things to remember:
1. The provisions under CJA 2003 in relation to time spent on remand are mandatory - even if you have a clever argument.
2.  Time spent on tag is not automatically taken into consideration and the timetable to sort it out will be adhered to from now on.  Counsel beware.
http://www.bailii.org/ew/cases/EWCA/Crim/2013/1994.html

R v Stocker
http://www.bailii.org/ew/cases/EWCA/Crim/2013/1993.html


Report by NAO into MoJ reliance upon G4S and similar (or “Bears defecate in wooded areas”):
http://www.lawgazette.co.uk/practice/ministry-of-justice-relationship-with-outsourcers-under-scrutiny/5038715.article
Original report and executive summary here: http://www.nao.org.uk/report/memorandum-role-major-contractors-delivery-public-services/

So it begins. .. fraud vhcc likely to be derailed
http://www.theguardian.com/law/2013/nov/14/fraud-trial-threatened-barristers-reduced-rate 


The Judicial Office is seeking views on the following areas:
- How the CJC/FJC functions should be delivered  Civil justice council and family JC
- Whether the bodies should be abolished
- If the functions could be moved to the Ministry of Justice
- Whether they should be delivered by the voluntary or private sector or by a new executive agency
- Should they remain arm’s length bodies
The deadline for responses is 5pm on 25 November. The email addresses are: cjcreview@judiciary.gsi.gov.uk and: fjcreview@judiciary.gsi.gov.uk.

Grayling purposes an end to multiple cautions but the clue is in the word "simple" perhaps:
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/crime/10447936/Ban-on-police-cautions-for-repeat-offenders.html

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PW Radio Show 45

2013-11-07
Length: 35s

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PW Radio Show 44

2013-10-31
Length: 39s

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PW Radio Show 43

2013-10-24
Length: 43s

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PW Radio Show 42

2013-10-17
Length: 36s

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PW Radio Show 41

2013-10-10
Length: 41s

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S01E06 - Baby P and Party Conferences

2013-10-10 :: mail@northpod.co.uk (Northpod Productions)



Listen to the show here.
For the final show in the series, Lyndon and Dan discuss the Baby P case and review the criminal justice announcements from the recent party conferences.
The Baby P case - in the news this week because of the announcement that the mother, Tracey Connelly, has been recommended for release by the parole board. She was sentenced to 5 years’ IPP for allowing the death of 17 month old baby Peter in the most horrific of circumstances. When he died, he had 50 separate injuries including a broken spine. 
Lyndon and Dan explain the sentence, why they think it wasn’t too short, and why the parole board have had to consider her case now. They also briefly touch on the parole board test and discuss rehabilitation and release of prisoners more generally. 
Dan gives a good overview of the conference speeches of Tory Justice Minister and Lord Chancellor, the esteemed Chris Grayling, and of Shadow Justice Secretary Sadiq Khan. Lyndon and Dan discuss their policy announcements, the rhetoric and whether or not their speeches really showed any sort of promise in a practical sense. 
If you’d like to get in touch, as ever, get us on @uk_criminal_law or ukcrimeblog@gmail.com
In the meantime, listen to Northpod law, which is back next week with Kirsten and Ben, and see how the seasoned professionals do it. 
Links
Baby P blog post
R v Tracey Connelly sentencing remarks
Chris Grayling conference speech
Sadiq Khan conference speech

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S01E05 - Cautions, manslaughter and the early release of child rapists

2013-10-07 :: mail@northpod.co.uk (Northpod Productions)


Listen to the show here.


This week Kim and Lyndon return to talk about two recent MoJ announcements and Dan discusses the Amanda Hutton manslaughter conviction and sentence. 


So first off, Kim and Lyndon look at the recent announcement that the MoJ intend to scrap simple cautions for the most serious offences. Is it pure political posturing, or is there some substance - and justification - behind the proposal? Kim, as an ex-police officer, offers an interesting insight. 


Lyndon introduces the second proposal, that the MoJ will scrap early release from prison for those convicted of child rape or terrorist offences. Everyone knows that when sentenced to 4 years in prison, an offender usually only serves 2 years. Kim asks why this change will apply only to those offences listed and Lyndon looks at the possible effect of the policy. 


Finally, Dan looks at the sentence of 15 years imposed on Amanda Hutton for the manslaughter of her son and other associated offences. 


If you’d like us to discuss a particular topic or issue in next week’s show, then get in touch: @uk_criminal_law or ukcrimeblog@gmail.com


Links


Cautions


MoJ Press Release on 'banning' cautions for serious offences


R (T) v Chief Constable of Greater Manchester & Others  2013 EWCA Civ 25


Early release


MoJ Press Release on scrapping early release for certain prisoners


Halsbury’s Law Exchange Blog on the possible effects of the announcement


Manslaughter



R v Hutton and Khan sentencing remarks




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PW Radio Show 40

2013-10-03
Length: 38s

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PW Radio Show 39

2013-09-26
Length: 45s

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PW Radio Show 38

2013-09-19
Length: 34s

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PW Radio Show 37

2013-09-12
Length: 43s

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PW Radio Show 36

2013-09-05
Length: 32s

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PW Radio Show 35

2013-08-29
Length: 33s

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PW Radio Show 34

2013-08-22
Length: 33s

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PW Radio Show 33

2013-08-15
Length: 51s

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PW Radio Show 32

2013-08-08
Length: 40s

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PW Radio Show 31

2013-07-31
Length: 44s

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PW Radio Show 30

2013-07-25
Length: 43s

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PW Radio Show 29

2013-07-17
Length: 48s

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PW Radio Special Edition: The Apple Price%2DFixing Verdict

2013-07-11
Length: 36s

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PW Radio Show 28

2013-07-10
Length: 43s

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PW Radio Show 27

2013-06-27
Length: 52s

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PW Radio Show 26

2013-06-20
Length: 51s

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PW Radio Show 25

2013-06-13
Length: 51s

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Vodcast June 7: Audio

2013-06-07

Strip Club Mitchell Brothers O'Farrell theatre doorman Duey Comedian Gary Anderson Burlesque Dancer Kittie Von Tittie Drag performer "Faux Kid" (aka Skip) …

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Vodcast June 7: Strip Club Doorman from O'Farrell Theatre (Part 1 of 4) mobile

2013-06-07

Strip Club Mitchell Brothers O'Farrell theatre doorman Duey Comedian Gary Anderson Burlesque Dancer Kittie Von Tittie Drag performer "Faux Kid" (aka Skip)…

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Vodcast June 7: Comedian Gary Anderson (Part 2 of 4) mobile

2013-06-07

Strip Club Mitchell Brothers O'Farrell theatre doorman Duey Comedian Gary Anderson Burlesque Dancer Kittie Von Tittie Drag performer "Faux Kid" (aka Skip)…

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Vodcast June 7: Burlesque Dancer Kittie Von Tittie (Part 3 of 4) mobile

2013-06-07

Strip Club Mitchell Brothers O'Farrell theatre doorman Duey Comedian Gary Anderson Burlesque Dancer Kittie Von Tittie Drag performer "Faux Kid" (aka Skip)…

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Vodcast June 7: Drag performer "Faux Kid" (Part 4 of 4) mobile

2013-06-07

Strip Club Mitchell Brothers O'Farrell theatre doorman Duey Comedian Gary Anderson Burlesque Dancer Kittie Von Tittie Drag performer "Faux Kid" (aka Skip)…

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PW Radio Show 24

2013-06-06
Length: 52s

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Podcast May 31

2013-05-31

Under the Golden Gate's second video podcast from the new Polk Street Studio location with guests Social Networking guru Megan Murray and Comedian Matt Lieb joining Andrew Roberts, Maria Konner, DJ Dank and crew.…

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Video Podcast May 31: Introduction (Part 1 of 3) mobile

2013-05-31

Our second video podcast from our new Polk Street location with Social Networking guru Megan Murray and Comedian Matt Lieb.…

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Video Podcast May 31: Comedian Matt Lieb (Part 3 of 3) mobile

2013-05-31

Our second video podcast from our new Polk Street location with Social Networking guru Megan Murray and Comedian Matt Lieb.…

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Video Podcast May 31: Megan Murray Social Networking Guru (Part 2 of 3) mobile

2013-05-31

Our second video podcast from our new Polk Street location with Social Networking guru Megan Murray and Comedian Matt Lieb.…

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PW Radio Show 23

2013-05-29
Length: 52s

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May 24 (with video)

2013-05-25

Andrew and DJ Mark do their first show from the new Polk Street location, and it was broadcasted live! They talk about the happenings on Polk Street, one of the more colorful, San Francisco streets. DJ Dank was at Bloke night at Track, and Philiipe was working tech.…

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May 24

2013-05-24

Andrew and DJ Mark do their first show from the new Polk Street location, and it was broadcasted live! They talk about the happenings on Polk Street, one of the more colorful, San Francisco streets. DJ Dank was at Bloke night at Track, and Philiipe was working tech. See the video on our website.…

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PW Radio Show 22

2013-05-22
Length: 51s

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May 17

2013-05-17

Withdrag queens Pristine Condition and Duplicity Dilemma, the band Darling Gunsel, and comedian Juan Medina…

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PW Radio Show 21

2013-05-15
Length: 52s

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FRANKVAR - Enter Your Pin (Frankvar)

2013-05-10 :: info@bigslam.net

Title: Enter Your Pin
Artist: FRANKVAR
Label: Frankvar
Format: 192 mp3, 320 mp3, wav

Track listing:
Reaction
Back To Home
Sadness
Universe

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May 10

2013-05-10

DJ Jimmy Swear from the Lone Star, DJ La Perve from The Dark Room & drag queen Phatima Rude, comedian Jacob Rubin, singer and drag queen Effervescence Jackson…

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PW Radio Show 20

2013-05-08
Length: 52s

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May 3

2013-05-03

Guest DJ comedian David Hawkins joins Mark/Maria to welcome guests DJ Derek Pavone from Seattle, Comedian Ivan Hernandez, and Paulina to talk about the fundraiser for Boston Marathon victims.…

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PW Radio Show 19

2013-05-01
Length: 52s

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April 26

2013-04-26

Bay Area comedians Clare O'kane and Tasmanian Tim Logan.…

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PW Radio Show 18

2013-04-24
Length: 52s

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April 19

2013-04-19

Comedian Andrew Holmgren, burlesque queen Candy Pie, Comedian David Hawkins …

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PW Radio Show 17

2013-04-17
Length: 52s

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April 12

2013-04-12

Jon Macy (from the weird cartoon show Bookish Beasts from the Center of Sex and Culture), Faux Queen Taudrey Hepburn and Comedian/guitarist/singer Tommy Arnold.…

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PW Radio Show 16

2013-04-10
Length: 51s

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April 5

2013-04-05

Drag Queen Joshua Grannel (aka Peaches Christ), Sam Sharkey from (SF Underground film festival)…

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PW Radio Show 15

2013-04-03
Length: 52s

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March 29

2013-03-29

Singer/songwriter Candice Roberts, Mega Singer from San Francisco and X-Factor Jason Brock, drag producer/performer and activist Anna Conda, comedian Chris Duncan…

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PW Radio Show 14

2013-03-27
Length: 52s

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FRANKVAR - Scratch It On The Air (Frankvar)

2013-03-24 :: info@bigslam.net

Title: Scratch It On The Air
Artist: FRANKVAR
Label: Frankvar
Format: 192 mp3, 320 mp3, wav

Track listing:
Scratch It (On The Air)
Scratch It (On The Air Fired Singer)

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March 22

2013-03-22

Simone Equity Campbell DJ, interview with Ash Beckham who unexpectedly created a viral video which encourages people to not use the term "gay " in a negative way - a funny video. Comedian Chris S.…

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PW Radio Show 13

2013-03-20

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March 15

2013-03-15

Back for more fun - Zach Benfield activist and polyamorist, Pristine Condition Drag Queen and leatherist, comedian Alex White…

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March 8

2013-03-08

Zach Benfield activist, polyamorist and Fey Boy & Neon (founder of Zombie Jesus Haunted House), Dj Sergie Fedasz, comedian Juan Medina…

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March 1st (Part 2)

2013-03-01

Dj Simone Campbell…

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March 1st (Part 1)

2013-03-01

Dj Simone Campbell…

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PW Radio Show 12

2013-02-27
Length: 51s

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Feb 22

2013-02-22

Performance artist Jayden Perry, Singer Dennis Sanchez, performance artist Skip David Charles, comedian Bryce Benson…

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PW Radio Show 11

2013-02-20
Length: 51s

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Feb 15

2013-02-15

Drummer David Jayne, Drag Queen Duplicity Dilemma, Sings Shakey Gibson & De Coco Johnson, comedian David Hawkins, comedian Alex from Chicago…

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PW Radio Show 10

2013-02-13
Length: 33s

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Feb 8

2013-02-08

With Faux Drag Queen Ferocia Titties, Comedian Mean Dave, and producer Dave Johnson, …

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PW Radio Show 9

2013-01-30
Length: 50s

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PW Radio Show 8

2013-01-23
Length: 51s

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PW Radio Show 7

2013-01-16
Length: 49s

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PW Radio Show 6

2013-01-09
Length: 52s

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PW Radio Show 5

2013-01-02
Length: 49s

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PW Radio Show 4

2012-12-26
Length: 50s

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PW Radio Show 3

2012-12-19
Length: 50s

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PW Radio Show 2

2012-12-12
Length: 49s

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PW Radio Show 1

2012-12-05
Length: 52s

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FRANKVAR - Welcome To Minetrance (Dance All Day Germany)

2012-11-14 :: info@bigslam.net

Title: Welcome To Minetrance
Artist: FRANKVAR
Label: Dance All Day Germany
Format: 192 mp3, 320 mp3, wav

Track listing:
Fly With Me (radio edit)
Danger In My Trance
The Ghost
Electronic Sound

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FRANKVAR - Abstract Light (Dance All Day Germany)

2012-07-22 :: info@bigslam.net

Title: Abstract Light
Artist: FRANKVAR
Label: Dance All Day Germany
Format: 192 mp3, 320 mp3, wav

Track listing:
Catch Me
Tongue Twisters
Jump On Mars
The Sound Of My Life

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The Uncanny Valley - 12 March 2012

2012-03-12
Length: 51s

Do you ever wonder why the almost-human characters that appear in video games can seem downright creepy? That disturbing sensation is called "the uncanny valley." Speaking of creepy, do you know someone with a morbid fear of clowns? There's a term for that, too. Why do politicians suspend a campaign instead of just ending it? How is it that the sentence Buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo actually makes sense? Plus, onomatopoeia for the digital age, a magic word quiz, and the kippie bags and vaporwakes you'll find in the airport security line.

FULL DETAILS

What is it about lifelike robots and the humanoid characters in movies like The Polar Express that feels so disturbing? Robotics scientist Masahiro Mori dubbed this phenomenon the uncanny valley. It's evident with movies like The Polar Express. There are lots of interesting articles explaining this creepy sensation in Slate http://www.slate.com/articles/technology/gaming/2004/06/the_undead_zone.html, Wired, http://www.wired.co.uk/news/archive/2011-07/19/uncanny-valley-tested, and on the NPR blog. http://www.npr.org/blogs/13.7/2012/01/20/145504032/story-telling-and-the-uncanny-valley

When selling a house, the last thing you want is to take a bath--or, for that matter, a haircut. The first of these refers to getting cleaned out of money. The second is an allusion to the idea of being left with just two bits, or 25 cents.

Be careful with that lazy man's load! http://www.fromoldbooks.org/Grose-VulgarTongue/l/lazy-mans-load.html That's the oversize armful you carry when you're transporting things and take too much to avoid making another trip.

Why do politicians say they're going to suspend a campaign? Aren't they really just ending it? Under Federal Election Commission funding regulations, politicians can continue to collect money for paying off campaign fees well after an election, so long as their campaign is just suspended. William Safire's Political Dictionary http://books.google.com/books/about/Safire_s_political_dictionary.html?id=c4UoX6-Sv1AC remains the best reference for such political terminology.

Would you prefer a low, six-figure salary or a low six-figure salary? With the comma, there are two independent modifiers for the salary; it's six figures and by the speaker's standards, it's low. Without the comma, it's simply less than $500,000.

Quiz Guy John Chaneski has a magical puzzle, the answers to which contain the word magic. For example, a motel sign in the '70s might have included the enticement Magic Fingers, and Gabriel Garcia Marquez was a proponent of the literary genre Magic Realism.

How do you spell the exclamation that rhymes with the word "woe"? Is it woah or whoa? http://separatedbyacommonlanguage.blogspot.com/2009/04/whoa-and-woah.html The correct spelling in the United States is whoa, but when words are primarily translated orally, spelling often varies.

If you're as happy as if someone were throwing pork at you, you're pretty darn happy. And if something is higher than a cat's back, it's pretty darn high.

Post-9/11, we've heard a lot of new jargon pertaining to travel and security. An example is vaporwake, that term for the airborne trail we leave consisting of our natural scent, perfumes, and the odor of any drugs or weapons we may be carrying. Another example of Transportation Safety Administration terminology: puffer machine, the device that's used to read your vaporwake by blowing a puff of air on you.

Why don't nouns have gender in English they way they do in Spanish, French, or German? http://www.quora.com/Why-dont-nouns-in-English-have-gender Before the Middle English period, nouns in English were either masculine, feminine, or neuter. Over time, however, we've moved away from the semantically arbitrary practice of assigning genders to objects that have none. In other words, the linguistic notion of grammatical gender is completely different from biological and social notion of natural gender.
 
Kippie bags, named after the former TSA head Kip Hawley, are those quart-sized bags we put toiletries in when going through airport security.

Grant has collected some modern onomatopoeia for the technological age. Try untz, for the beat in dance music, or wub, for the common dubstep sound. Pew pew! works for lasers, and beep, for a computer's beep, is a modern classic.

Can you describe a price as cheap or expensive, or are those words properly applied to the item for sale, rather than the price? Across all registers of language, both variants are appropriate.

Absenteeism is a problem in the workplace, but so is presenteeism. That's when people who should stay home to nurse a cold or flu insist on coming in to work, risking a turn for the worse or infecting everyone around them.

When it comes to words like reckon, is it true that Southerners preserve the Queen's English? For the most part, reckon has its own meanings between the continents, and the more common English spoken in the South is actually of the Scotch or Irish varieties.

What do you call a fear of clowns? Coulrophobia, from the ancient Greek term for "one who walks on stilts." Perhaps coulrophobia is a creepy cousin of the uncanny valley. This article from Scientific American offers further explanation. http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/anthropology-in-practice/2011/10/31/cant-sleepclown-will-eat-me-why-are-we-afraid-of-clowns/

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W2nK_qmvJ7A

How many buffaloes can you fit in a sentence? Eight? How about 40? The sentence Buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo is a staple of introductory linguistics classes, because it's a great illustration of polysemy, in which one word can have several different meanings. In this case, example, buffalo can be a noun, a verb, an adjective, and a proper noun. It makes more sense to think of it this way: "Buffalo-origin bison that other Buffalo bison intimidate, themselves bully Buffalo bison."

....

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The Bees Knees (Rebroadcast) - 5 March 2012

2012-03-05
Length: 51s

Let's put the moose on the table: You have questions, and Grant and Martha have answers. For example, why would someone have an albatross around his neck? And what's so cool about bees' knees, anyway? Plus, jockey boxes, bailiwicks, and cute names for loved ones, from snookums to bubula. If a bartender ever serves you a mat shot, don't try to beast it. You'll regret it in the morning.

FULL DETAILS   

What pet names do you have for your loved ones? In The Joys of Yiddish, Leo Rosten shares the name his Mother used to call him--Bubala, a term of endearment grandmothers might use in addressing children. We have all kinds of substitutes for the names of those we care about: sweetie, honey buns, snookums, etc. Martha opts for the Portuguese fofinha, meaning "fat, cuddly baby."

http://wywd.us/yiddishjoy

What's so cool about bees' knees, anyway? The bee's knees, a phrase meaning "cool" or "great," dates back to the flapper era of the 1920s. It relates to an old definition of the word "cute," referring to something "small and nicely formed." The knees of a bee are just that, after all.

http://wywd.us/bees-knees

A bartender wonders about the origin of the term jockey box. In his world, a jockey box is a "metal container for ice." However, in some parts of the western U.S., jockey box means "the glove compartment of a car," and much earlier, the term referred to boxes attached to the side of chuck wagon for holding feed or water.

The caller also shares another bit of bartending slang, the so-called mat shot or Matt Dillon. It's a glass of whatever liquor collects on the rubber mat behind the bar, which some enterprising patrons order as a prank or a test of a strong stomach.

The hosts discuss an email from a listener in Romania. His problem is that he learned English in the Southern U.S., but after going back home to where a British English is taught, people are having a hard time understanding his accent. Where we learn a language plays a big role in how we speak it.

Quiz Guy Greg Pliska has a game called Centricity, emphasis on the "city." For example, "Mickey ate all the fruit, leaving Minneapolis." And as George H.W. Bush said to George W. Bush, "You can be president Tucson."

Has your boss ever used the expression Let's put the moose on the table? This management buzzphrase, meaning "let's address the problem everyone's been avoiding," is relatively new, showing up in print around the early 1990s. The phrase pops up in books by former Eli Lilly CEO Randall Tobias and management guru Jim Clemmer. In Clemmer's book Moose on the Table, he tells a possible origin tale about a baby moose that crawled under a buffet table, only to be avoided by the patrons as it stank up the banquet hall.

http://wywd.us/moosetable

What does it mean to have an albatross around your neck? A political pundit, referring to a current candidate, mentioned "an alcatraz around his neck." The proper version, with an albatross, originates from Samuel Taylor Coleridge's The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, wherein a sailor shoots an albatross, bringing down a curse on the boat, and his shipmates force him to wear an albatross around his neck as a symbol of shame. Grant notes that the name albatross likely derives from the Portuguese or Spanish alcatraz, meaning "pelican" or "sea bird." So perhaps an alcatraz around the neck isn't so far off after all.

http://wywd.us/albatrossneck

http://wywd.us/ancientrime

If something's "the bee's knees," you can bet that it's also beast. A sixth grade teacher wonders about the term beast being thrown around by her students. This synonym for "cool" or "good" is also used as a verb, as in I beasted that exam, or "I did extremely well." The slang term "beast" is common slang in sports, as in, "That player is a beast on the field." Former Cal running back Marshawn Lynch is notably famous for his signature playing style, beast mode.

http://wywd.us/beasted

A few weeks ago, a listener was looking for a term to describe the copy of The Emperor's New Clothes that he'd read many times as a child. In this picture book, the naughty bits were always cleverly covered up. Thinking he wanted a synonym for "fig leaf," Martha had offered the word antipudic, from the Latin pudor meaning "shame." Many listeners responded, suggesting that the word he really wanted was bowdlerize, meaning "to remove improper or offensive material." This eponym comes from Thomas Bowdler, whose sister ghost-edited The Family Shakespeare in 1818 containing censored versions of Shakespeare's plays.

http://wywd.us/antipudic

http://wywd.us/bowdlerandsis

If you go to a department store, you'll see the Men's department, the Women's department, and the Children's department. So why do so many stores have a department that's called simply Baby? Grant attributes the non-possessive nomenclature of stores like Baby Gap to tradition in the retail industry.

A listener from San Diego, California, named Lois has been called Louise, Lori, Lauren, Louisa, and Rosa, to name a few. And of course, the Scott/Todd mix-up phenomenon continues. Do people ever mess up your name?

http://wywd.us/scotttodd
 
What does it mean to vet a political candidate? The word vet comes from veterinarian, specifically the ones who would examine a horse before a race to make sure it was healthy and eligible. Similarly, one might vet a candidate to make sure they're up to snuff. The novelist John le Carre popularized the term in his political stories.

http://wywd.us/lecarre

A listener from Wisconsin adds to the discussion on wind pudding and air sauce, explaining that where he's from, wind pudding is old loggerspeak for baked beans.

http://wywd.us/windpudding

How do you pronounce biopic? The proper way to mention the genre of biographical motion picture has always been "BUY-oh-pick," as opposed to the mirror of myopic. It's not unusual to mispronounce a word if the spelling does not clearly indicate how to say it. For example, Grant notes a common error people make in pronouncing misled to rhyme with "chiseled."

If something's not in your bailiwick, it's not in your jurisdiction or area of control. But what exactly is a "bailiwick"? Martha explains that the two words which make up the term--bailiff and wick-- have specific meanings in Middle English. A bailiff, in the time of kings, was "a public minister of a district," and a wick was simply a "town" or "village." For example, Gatwick literally referred to a "goat village." And Greenwich literally meant "green village" or "village on the green."

Is that funny hehe, or funny haha? The way we laugh indicates whether we're laughing at someone or if we're simply enjoying the humor they've brought.

--

A Way with Words is funded by its listeners: http://waywordradio.org/donate

Get your language question answered on the air! Call or write with your questions at any time:

Email: words@waywordradio.org

Phone:
United States and Canada toll-free (877) WAY-WORD/(877) 929-9673
London +44 20 7193 2113
Mexico City +52 55 8421 9771

Donate: http://waywordradio.org/donate
Site: http://waywordradio.org/
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Copyright 2012, Wayword LLC.

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Share: The Bees Knees (Rebroadcast) - 5 March 2012


Put That in Your Pipe and Smoke It (Rebroadcast) - 27 February 2012

2012-02-26
Length: 51s

Which came first, orange the color or orange the fruit? And what's a busman's holiday? Martha and Grant talk about bumbershoots, brollies, nursery rhymes, and alternatives to the word "unicycle." Plus, an app-inspired quiz, favorite oxymorons, and the origin of "put that in your pipe and smoke it"! If the Google Books Corpus doesn't sound like fun, think again. And by the way, shouldn't more than one company be allowed to sell Monopoly?

FULL DETAILS
 
You know those words whose meanings never seem to stick in your mind, no matter how many times you flip back to the dictionary? Martha wrestles with the term atavistic, meaning "the tendency to revert to ancestral characteristics." She now remembers it by the Latin root it shares with the Spanish word for "grandfather," abuelo. Grant, in turn, shares his revelation that upwards of actually means "more than," not "up to."

A unicycle enthusiast wonders if his unicycle can be properly called a bike. To avoid the four-syllable mouthful, the unicycle community (yes, there is one) sometimes calls it a uni, but for the general public, the term "bike" works. Martha reveals that she once spent a summer teaching herself to ride a unicycle, and doesn't mind calling it a bike. Grant notes the general rule that once a word has left its etymological root, it can be used for whatever we need it for.

http://www.unicyclist.com/forums/showthread.php?t=88860

Rihanna's hit "Umbrella" may not have had the same ring if she'd referred to being "under my bumbershoot." Nonetheless, bumbershoot, bumberell, brolly and bumbersol, among others, are all playful alternatives to umbrella that even Mary Poppins would appreciate. Grant explains that bumbershoot, itself an American slang term, derives from the Latin umbra, meaning "shadow," and chute, as in "parachute."

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IjXKk3AbgH8&feature=related

http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-bum2.htm

Twitter's 140-character format has made way for a whole new brand of comedy writing. See Judah Friedlander: "More than one company should be allowed to sell Monopoly," or Stephen Colbert: "It doesn't always pay to get up early. If you're a worm, you just get eaten by that early bird. So sleep in, worms."

http://twitter.com/#!/JUDAHWORLDCHAMP

http://twitter.com/#!/stephenathome

In the mood for a word puzzle? Our Quiz Guy Greg Pliska has an app for that. This week's quiz features solutions starting with the letters app. Someone afraid to take care of the bug problem in their apartment doesn't want to "app-roach" them!

Is it worth using proper pronunciation if it makes you sound ignorant or misinformed? Contrary to the common understanding, the word forte is actually pronounced "fort." Grant describes forte as a skunked word; it's a losing situation no matter how you use it. For the sake of clarity and conversational flow, it's best instead to say that something is a "strength," a "strong suit," or is "in one's wheelhouse."

Do you ever spend your off-time doing something work related? This is known as a busman's holiday or a postman's holiday, as in the British understanding of holiday as a vacation or time off work. Research for a dictionary entry on postman's holiday led Grant to an old French ragtime song called "Le Facteur en Balade," or "The Postman on a Walk". In the proper sense, a postman's holiday might consist of a leisurely walk along the same route whereon he delivers the mail. Let's just hope it doesn't involve getting chased by dogs.

http://bit.ly/jruSKk

Some listeners are madly in love with oxymorons, and they continue to share their favorites. One listener has a great T-shirt that reads "An oxymoron a day keeps reality away." Another says his favorite oxymoron is "Dodge Ram."

A listener from Richmond, Virginia, remembers an old game called buckeye that consists of metaphorically pulling someone's leg, then calling Buckeye! and tugging one's own lower eyelid. Martha suggests that it may be related to a 19th-century use of buckeye that refers to "something or someone inferior," like a country bumpkin or a rube. Thus, calling "Buckeye!" may be  equivalent to calling someone a sucker for getting tricked, or punk'd. Still, any explanation for the eyelid exposure is still pending.

Grant is pleased as punch about BYU Professor Mark Davies' new Google Books Corpus, which contains entries for every word ever in the entire Google Books database. In addition to parts of speech and definitions, the site provides contextual examples for each word. For example, the database has revealed that the word suitcase is often preceded by the adjective battered. Writers, teachers, English learners and language enthusiasts will love prospecting in this lexical goldmine.

http://googlebooks.byu.edu/
 
Home again, home again, jiggity-jig! A listener wonders about the origin of this phrase her Mother often used. Grant and Martha trace it back to another mother: Mother Goose. The full line goes, "To market, to market, to buy a fat pig, home again, home again, jiggity-jig." It does not, contrary to a highly visited Google result, originate from the movie Blade Runner (though it's a cute scene nonetheless).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qpK6GcViC88

Listeners have been sharing some of their personal Scrabble rules, including new uses for the blank tile. For example, one variation allows for the tile to be removed and reused, so if Grant were to play the blank tile as an "E" and Martha has an "E" in her tray, she can swap the tiles and then use the blank for her own play. Just be sure to use it, because nobody likes someone who bogarts the blank tile!

Downton Abbey, a program featured on Masterpiece Theater, provided a handful of colorful expressions that date surprisingly far back. Like it or lump it, meaning "deal with it," is found at least as early as 1830 and takes from the old verb lump meaning "to look sulky or disagreeable." Put that in your pipe and smoke it, a contemporary favorite meaning "Take that!" actually shows up around 1820. As for the phrase you're sailing perilously close to the wind, meaning "be careful not to overstep"--well, we haven't caught wind of the origin of that one.

Databases like the Google Books Corpus can also be used to follow text over time. For example, as the women's suffrage movement grew around 1910, words relating to women's rights grew in popularity and frequency of usage.

What came first, the color orange or the fruit? The original term is Sanskrit and refers to the fruit. As the fruit traveled west, the word came with it. Grant notes that, like the terms for parts of the body, the names of colors travel very well in language because we're constantly speaking and writing about them. The term "orange" became what it is in English after the fruit made it to the French town Orange.

Martha shares a quip that's all too true: "I don't find it hard to meet expenses. They're everywhere!"

--

A Way with Words is funded by its listeners: http://waywordradio.org/donate

Get your language question answered on the air! Call or write with your questions at any time:

Email: words@waywordradio.org

Phone:
United States and Canada toll-free (877) WAY-WORD/(877) 929-9673
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Donate: http://waywordradio.org/donate
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Share: Put That in Your Pipe and Smoke It (Rebroadcast) - 27 February 2012


Kissing Games - 20 February 2012

2012-02-20
Length: 51s

What's the best way to help your child learn to speak a foreign language? One option is an immersion school, where teachers avoid speaking English. Also, did you ever play padiddle while riding in a car? It's a game that's supposed to help courting couples get closer. Plus, what your signature says about you, what to call that last hors d'oeuvre on a plate, sitting on your tuchus, alphabet riddles, old camp songs, soup to nuts, and the weather-related phrase Who let the hawk out?

FULL DETAILS

What does your signature say about you? http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2012/01/signing-off-the-slow-death-of-the-signature-in-a-pin-code-world/251934/ In today's world of PIN-codes and electronic communication, maybe not so much.

What's a tasteful way to refer to one's rear end? Tushie and tush come from the Yiddish word tuchus. The Yiddish word tuchus, also spelled tochis and tochas, is venerated by some, but regarded by others, including The New York Times http://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2010/06/words-that-the-new-york-times-will-not-print/57884/, as "insufficiently elegant."

Grant has a handful of alphabet riddles for the young ones. What did the alphabet's love note say? U R A Q T!

Ever play padiddle in the car? You know, that game where you slap the ceiling when someone's rear light is out? Padiddle, also known as perdiddle and padoodle, go back to the 1940s, and were traditionally kissing games. There's even more about such games, including slug bug, in an earlier episode. http://www.waywordradio.org/road-trip/

Next time you're in Texas, be on the lookout for instances to drop this colloquialism: He didn't have enough hair on his chest to make a wig for a grape!

Our Quiz Guy John Chaneski has a game called Word Scouts. In order to earn your badge, you'll have to know the architectural term Bauhaus, and the flower that's also a past tense verb.

The phrases Who let the hawk out? and The hawk is flying tonight, both mean "there's a chilly wind blowing." This saying is almost exclusive to the African-American community, and is associated with that Windy City, Chicago.

What's the difference between a lawyer and an attorney? None, really. In the past, though, the word attorney could also refer more generally to a person you "turned to" to represent you, regardless of whether that person had legal training.

How would you fare in a quiz of idiom meanings? If you're looking to bone up on these colloquial expressions, the American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms http://www.amazon.com/American-Heritage-Dictionary-Idioms/dp/039572774X is a good place to start.

What do you call the last appetizer on a plate--the one everyone's too embarrassed to reach for? That last piece has been variously known as the manners bit or manners piece, a reference to the fact that it's considered polite to not empty a plate, assuring the hosts that they provided sufficient fare. In Spanish, the last remaining morsel that everyone's too bashful to take is called la verguenza, or "the embarrassment."

What was your favorite camp song? If it sounds like nonsensical scat singing, it may date back to a radio character named Buddy Bear who sang in scat on the Buddy Bear show in 1946.

How does the alphabet get to work? Why, the L, of course!

Among some African-Americans, the term "Hannah" means "the sun." This sense is memorialized in the lyrics of "Go Down Old Hannah," a work song from the 1930s. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sv3Qt_ZCsu4 One writer said of this haunting melody: "About 3 o'clock on a long summer day, the sun forgets to move and stops, so then the men sing this song." The great folklorist Alan Lomax http://www.loc.gov/folklife/lomax/ also made recordings of prison workers singing this song.

Twitter is a great way to discover new words. Just search with #newword, and you'll find gems like holus-bolus http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/holus-bolus, meaning the whole thing (e.g. he ate the whole turkey, or he ate the turkey holus-bolus).

If something is described as soup to nuts, it's "the whole thing" or it "runs the gamut." The phrase refers to an old-fashioned way of dining, beginning with soup and ending with nuts for dessert. The ancient Romans used an analogous expression in Latin: ab ovo usque ad malum, literally, "from the egg to the apple."

Martha reads a poem by former U.S. Poet Laureate Kay Ryan called "The Long Up." http://archives.newyorker.com/default.aspx?iid=46998&startpage=page0000031

--

A Way with Words is funded by its listeners: http://waywordradio.org/donate

Get your language question answered on the air! Call or write with your questions at any time:

Email: words@waywordradio.org

Phone:
United States and Canada toll-free (877) WAY-WORD/(877) 929-9673
London +44 20 7193 2113
Mexico City +52 55 8421 9771

Donate: http://waywordradio.org/donate
Site: http://waywordradio.org/
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Share: Kissing Games - 20 February 2012


The Rubber Match - 13 February 2012

2012-02-12
Length: 51s

Survey time! Do you call that kind of cap a beanie, a toboggan, or a stocking hat, or something else? What about rubber-soled athletic shoes? Do you call them sneakers or tennis shoes? Also, great Scrabble words, feeling owly, Jumpin' Jehoshaphat!, finjans and zarfs, catching plagiarism with mountweazels, and the art of long sentences. It's a larrupin' good episode!

FULL DETAILS

What do you call a knitted cap? A beanie? A toboggan? A stocking hat? Grant's Great Knitted Hat Survey (http://waywordradio.org/great-knitted-hat-survey.html) traces the different terms for this cold weather accessory used across the country.

How do you refer to athletic shoes? Are they sneakers or tennis shoes? When canvas shoes with soft rubber soles came into use, they were so quiet compared to wood-soled shoes that one could literally sneak about. Outside the Northeast, however, tennis shoe is the much more common term.

The biblical king Jehoshaphat is the inspiration for the exclamation Jumpin' Jehosaphat. This alliterative idiom probably arose in the 19th century, but was popularized by the cartoon character Yosemite Sam.

Looking for some good Scrabble words? Try zarf, a type of cup holder of Arabic origin, or finjan, the small cup that's held by the zarf.

Our Quiz Guy John Chaneski shows off his acting skills with a word puzzle based on sounds.

Tight games often end up at a rubber match, or tiebreaker. Used for a variety of sports and card games, rubber match has been in use since the late 16th century, and seem to have originated in the game of lawn bowling. The term may allude to the idea of erasing one's opponent.

Do dictionaries deal with copyright infringement or plagiarism when definitions match up between volumes? Since many modern dictionaries derive from the same few tomes, it's common to see definitions that match. But lexicographers have been known to plant mountweazels, (http://www.newyorker.com/archive/2005/08/29/050829ta_talk_alford) or fake words, to catch serial plagiarizers. One famous mountweazel is the word jungftak (http://www.waywordradio.org/picklebacks-and-mountweazels/) the spurious definition of which is "A Persian bird, the male of which had only one wing, on the right side, and the female only one wing, on the left side; instead of the missing wings, the male had a hook of bone, and the female an eyelet of bone, and it was by uniting hook and eye that they were enable[d] to fly,—each, when alone, had to remain on the ground."

If someone directs you to drive three C's, they're advising you "drive as far as you can see, then do it two more times."

If something's larrupin' good, it's spankin' good or thumpin' good, and comes from the word larrup, a verb meaning "to beat or thrash."

Martha shares a couple of choice idioms: dry as a contribution box, and plump as a partridge.

Pico Iyer's piece in the Los Angeles Times (http://articles.latimes.com/2012/jan/08/entertainment/la-ca-pico-iyer-20120108) is a testament to the value of long sentences in our age of tweets and abbrevs.

Oh no you di-int! The linguistic term for what happens when someone pronounces didn't as di-int, or Martin as Mar-in without the "t" sound, (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kF4H5vZ-Km4&feature=related) is called glottalization. Instead of making a "t" sound with the tongue behind the teeth, a different sound is made farther back in the mouth. John Rickford (http://www.johnrickford.com/Home/tabid/1101/Default.aspx), professor of linguistics at Stanford University, does a thorough job tracing this phenomenon in his book African-American English: Structure, History, and Use. (http://www.johnrickford.com/Writings/Books/tabid/1128/Default.aspx)

When putting together a jigsaw puzzle, do you call it making a puzzle or doing a puzzle? Listeners shared lots of different opinions on the A Way with Words Facebook page. https://www.facebook.com/waywordradio

The Dictionary of American Regional English traces you'uns, a plural form of you, to the Midlands and the Ohio River Valley. But the phrase goes back a while; even Chaucer used it.

If someone's feeling owly, they're in a grumpy mood and ought to pull up their socks and cut it out. The phrase is chiefly used in the Midwest and Canada, and can be found in some dictionaries from Novia Scotia and Prince Edward Island. Some people think owls look grumpy or creepy (http://bit.ly/y31Ja5), although others think they're adorable (http://www.kpbs.org/news/2010/mar/25/san-marcos-famous-barn-owl/). Then there are those who prefer moist owlets (http://bit.ly/x7XVcD)

Martha reads a favorite love poem by e.e. cummings. (http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poem/179622)

--

A Way with Words is funded by its listeners: http://waywordradio.org/donate

Get your language question answered on the air! Call or write with your questions at any time:

Email: words@waywordradio.org

Phone:
United States and Canada toll-free (877) WAY-WORD/(877) 929-9673
London +44 20 7193 2113
Mexico City +52 55 8421 9771

Donate: http://waywordradio.org/donate
Site: http://waywordradio.org/
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Forums: http://waywordradio.org/discussion/
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Twitter: http://twitter.com/wayword/
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Copyright 2012, Wayword LLC.

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Share: The Rubber Match - 13 February 2012


Strange Spelling Bee Words - 6 February 2012

2012-02-06
Length: 51s

Why do spelling bees include such bizarre, obsolete words like cymotrichous? And why is New York called the Big Apple? Also, the stinky folk medicine tradition called an asifidity bag. Worn around the neck like an amulet, these smelly bags supposedly keep away cold and flu. Also, the surprising number of common English phrases that come directly from the King James Bible. Plus, three sheets to the wind, the term white elephant, in like Flynn, Australian slang, and what to call foam sleeve for an ice-cold can of beer or soda.

FULL DETAILS

What's the common thread that connects the phrases pour out your heart, from time to time, fell flat on his face, the skin of my teeth, and the root of the matter? They all come from, or were popularized by, the King James Bible, published in 1611. The Manifold Greatness (http://www.manifoldgreatness.org/) exhibit is now traveling to libraries and schools nationwide, demonstrating, among other things, this translation's profound impact on the English language.

A wedding photographer says she happens to run into lots of people who are three sheets to the wind, and wonders why that term came to mean "falling-down drunk." It's from nautical terminology. On a seagoing vessel, the term sheets refers to "the lines or ropes that hold the sails in place." If one, two, or even three sheets get loose and start flapping in the wind, the boat will swerve and wobble as much as someone who's overimbibed.

In Australia, if someone's socky, they're "lacking in spirit or self confidence." If someone's toey, they're "nervous," "aroused," or "frisky."

The words respiration and inspiration have the same Latin root, spirare, which means "to breathe." The word "conspire" has the same Latin etymological root. But what does conspiring have to do with breathing? The source of this term is notion that people who conspire are thinking in harmony, so close that they even breathe together.

The so-called Wicked Bible is a 1631 version of the King James, printed by Robert Barker and Matin Lucas. This particular Bible is so called because the printers somehow managed to leave out the word not in the commandment against adultery. They were, indeed, punished. Behold the offending page here. (http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/30/arts/design/manifold-greatness-and-king-james-bible-at-folger-review.html?pagewanted=all)

Our Quiz Guy John Chaneski has a game of Curtailments, in which the last letter of one word is removed to make another. For example: When the family gathers around the ________, it's clear that home is where the _______ is.

What do you call a gift that turns into more of a hassle, like a gift card for a store not in your area, or one with a pressing expiration date? A New York caller suggests the term gaft. Another possibility is white elephant, a term derived from the story of a king in ancient Siam, who punished unruly subjects with the gift of a rare white elephant. The recipient couldn't possibly refuse the present, but the elephant's upkeep became extremely costly.

What's an asafidity bag? Variously spelled asfidity, asfedity, asafetida, asphidity, and assafedity, it's a folk medicine tradition involves putting the stinky resin of the asafetida or asafoetida plant in a small bag worn around the neck to ward off disease. Then again, if this practice really does help you avoid colds and flu, it's probably because nobody, contagious or otherwise, wants come near you.

You can hear Granny Clampett mentions asafidity bags twice in the first two minutes of this episode of The Beverly Hillbillies(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7S2RJqBbRpkof). There's also a lengthy online discussion about this old folk tradition here.

http://en.allexperts.com/q/General-History-674/f/old-medicinal-practices-southern.htm

In an earlier episode (http://www.waywordradio.org/your-sweet-bippy/), Martha and Grant discussed what to call a person who doesn't eat fish. A listener calls with another suggestion: pescatrarian, from the Latin word that means "fish."

Why do spelling bees in the United States use so many bizarre, obsolete, ginormous, and Brobdinagian words? Webster's New International Dictionary, 3rd Edition, published in 1961, is still the standard for spelling bees, and thus contains some dated language. However, most unabridged dictionaries won't get rid of words even as they slip out of use.

Recent winners of the Scripps National Spelling Bee included cymotrichous, stromuhr, Laodicean, guerdon, serrefine, and Uhrsprache. How many do you know? The whole list is here. (http://www.spellingbee.com/champions-and-their-winning-words)

Do you pronounce the words cot and caught differently? How about the words don and dawn, or pin and pen? The fact that some people pronounce at least some of these pairs identically is attributable to what's called a vowel merger. 

Why is New York City called the Big Apple? In the 1920s, a writer named John Fitzgerald used it in a column about the horse racing scene, because racetrack workers in New Orleans would say that if a horse was successful down South, they'd send it to race in the Big Apple, namely at New York's Belmont Park. For just about everything you'd ever want to know about this term, visit the site of etymological researcher Barry Popik. (http://www.barrypopik.com/)

A caller says her relative always used an interjection that sounds like "sigh" for the equivalent of "Are you paying attention?" The hosts suspect it's related to "s'I," a contraction of "says I." This expression open appears in Mark Twain's work, among other places.

Many teachers aren't crazy about cornergami. That's what you've committed if you've ever been without a stapler and folded over the corners of a paper to keep them attached.

The phrase in like Flynn describes someone who's thoroughly successful, often with the ladies. Many suspect it's a reference to the dashing actor Errol Flynn and his sensational trial on sex-related charges. That highly publicized trial may have popularized the expression, but it was already in use before that. It could perhaps be a case of simple rhyming, along the lines of such phrases as What do you know, Joe? and Out like Stout.

The foam sleeve you put around a can of ice-cold beer or soda sometimes goes by a name that sounds like the word "cozy." But how do you spell it? As with words that are primarily spoken, not written, it's hard to find a single definitive spelling. In fact, the word for this sleeve is spelled at least a dozen different ways.

--

A Way with Words is funded by its listeners: http://waywordradio.org/donate

Get your language question answered on the air! Call or write with your questions at any time:

Email: words@waywordradio.org

Phone:
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Gibberish Language - 30 January 2012

2012-01-30
Length: 51s

SUMMARY

What do pigs have to do with piggyback rides? Martha and Grant have the answer. They also get a lesson from a listener in the fine art of speaking gibberish. And what's the correct way to pronounce the name of the nut spelled p-e-c-a-n? Pee-KAHN or PEE-can?  The French have the Academie Francaise, but what authority do we have for the English language? Also, what you should do when someone yells, "Hold 'er Newt! She's headed for the barn!"

FULL DETAILS

Martha and Grant share some favorite unusual words. Omphaloskepsis is a fancy term for "navel-gazing," from the Greek omphalos, meaning "navel." The other is mumbleteenth, a handy substitute when a number is too embarrassing to mention, as in, "Socrates the omphaloskeptic questioned himself for the mumbleteenth time."   

Double-talk, or doublespeak, is a form of gibberish that involves adding "ib" or other syllables to existing words. This sort of wordplay may have originated among criminals using double-talk to communicate on the sly. 

You say pee-KAHN, I say PEE-can. Just how do you pronounce the name of the nut called a pecan? Actually, there are several correct pronunciations.

Window-shopping became popular pastime along New York's 5th Avenue back in the days when stores closed at 5 p.m. Passersby would stroll past, gazing at the window displays without intending to purchase anything. The French term for "window shopping," lecher les vitrines, literally translates as "window-licking."

The word plangent, which means "loud" and sometimes has a melancholy ring to it, is an apt descriptor for movie soundtracks.

Our Quiz Guy John Chaneski revives a classic game of word reversals called Get Back. What palindromic advice would you give to someone who ought to stay away from baked goods? How about shun buns? If, on the other hand, you've highlighted the pastries, then you've stressed desserts.

The word silly didn't always have its modern meaning. In the 1400s, silly meant happy or blessed. Eventually, silly came to mean weak or in need of protection. Other seemingly simple words have shifted meanings as the English language developed: the term girl used to denote either a boy or a girl, and the word nice once meant ignorant.

Is there an English language authority like the Royal Academy in Spain or the Academie Francaise? Dictionaries often have usage panels made up of expert linguists, but English is widely agreed to be a constantly shifting language. Even in France and Spain, the common vernacular often doesn't follow that of the authorities.

How do double rainbows form? Scientists at UCSD have explained that extra-large droplets, known as burgeroids because of their burger-like shape, have the effect of creating a double rainbow. Burgeroids, all the way!

http://news.sciencemag.org/sciencenow/2011/12/science-shot-burgeroids-cause-do.html

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OQSNhk5ICTI

The word bummer originates from the German bummler, meaning "loafer," as in a lazy person. In English, the word bum had a similar meaning, and by the late 1960s, phrases like bum deal or bum wrap lent themselves to the elongated bummer, referring to something that's disheartening or disappointing.

Many in the South know a pallet to be a stack of blankets or a makeshift bed. The classic blues song "Make Me a Pallet on Your Floor" gives a perfect illustration.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=39RBm4tH9cA

The I vs. me grammatical rule isn't hard to remember. Just leave the other person out of the sentence. You wouldn't say me am going to a movie or Dad took I to a movie.

What's the difference between empathic and empathetic? Empathic is actually an older word, meaning that one has empathy for another, but the two are near-perfect synonyms, and thus interchangeable.

http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2011/12/rat-empathy/

Do you suffer from FOMO? That's an acronym fueled by Facebook and Twitter and other social networking sites. It stands for "fear of missing out."

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2011/apr/17/hephzibah-anderson-fomo-new-acronym

http://wordspy.com/words/FOMO.asp

What does a piggyback ride have to do with pigs? Not much. In the 16th century, the word was pickaback, meaning to pitch or throw on one's back. It's changed spellings dozens of times over the past few centuries, but perhaps the word piggy has contributed to its popularity among children.

You know how it is when you encounter a word and then suddenly you start noticing it everywhere? One that's seemed to pop up is cray, or cray-cray, a slang variant of crazy.

http://www.doubletongued.org/index.php/dictionary/cray_cray/

Hold 'er Newt! This primarily Southern idiom means either "Hold on tight!" or "Giddy-up!" It apparently derives from the idea of a high-spirited horse. Variants of this expression include Hold 'er Newt! She's headed for the rhubarb and Hold 'er Newt! She's headed for the barn! Eric Partridge's 1922 Dictionary of Catch Phrases indicates that the name Newt was once jocularly used to mean an idiot.

Some classic advice for writers from Anton Chekhov: "Don't tell me the moon is shining, show me the glint of light on broken glass."

http://writershandbook.wordpress.com/2008/03/27/a-glint-of-light-on-broken-glass/

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A Way with Words is funded by its listeners: http://waywordradio.org/donate

Get your language question answered on the air! Call or write with your questions at any time:

Email: words@waywordradio.org

Phone:
United States and Canada toll-free (877) WAY-WORD/(877) 929-9673
London +44 20 7193 2113
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Donate: http://waywordradio.org/donate
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Share: Gibberish Language - 30 January 2012


AllSaints Basement Session Podcast

2012-01-27 :: AllSaints Spitalfields
Length: 1s

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By Jingo - 23 January 2012

2012-01-22
Length: 51s

SHOW SUMMARY

If your friend says she's coming to town "Sunday week," exactly when should you expect to see her? And what do you call those typographical symbols that cartoonists use in place of profanity? Martha and Grant have the answer. Plus grass widows, the linguistic phenomenon called creaky voice, the difference between insure and ensure, the roots of the term jingoism and what it means if someone warns You don't believe fat meat is greasy. Also, is it okay to make a noun out of a verb?

FULL DETAILS

Researchers have found that stress is a leading cause of plewds--you know, those drops of sweat popping off the foreheads of nervous cartoon characters. That's one of several cartooning terms coined by Mort Walker, creator of the Beetle Bailey comic strip. Martha and Grant discuss this and other coinages from The Lexicon of Comicana.

http://www.mortwalker.com/books7.html

If someone's coming to town Sunday week, when exactly should you expect them? This Scots-Irish term means "a week after the coming day mentioned."

What are those symbols cartoonists use in place of profanity? They're called grawlixes--good to know for the next time you play "Comic Strip Trope or Pokemon?"

Is it okay to make a verb out of a noun? Yes! It's estimated that twenty percent of English verbs started as nouns. Just think of the head-to-toe mnemonic: you can head off a problem, face a situation, nose around, shoulder responsibility, elbow your way into something, stomach a problem, foot the bill, or toe the line.

http://madshakespeare.com/2010/08/sunday-funnies-verbing-weirds-language/

http://moreintelligentlife.com/content/ideas/anthony-gardner/youve-been-verbed

Squeans are the little starbursts or circles surrounding a cartoon character's head to signify intoxication or dizziness.

Quiz Guy John Chaneski has a puzzle called Categories. The challenge is to find the common thread that unites seemingly unrelated things. For example, Mary-Kate and Ashley, Jack Sparrow's crew, and Cherubim all fall into which category? The answer: Twins, Pirates, and Angels are all baseball teams!

What's a grass widow? In the 1500s,this term applied to a woman with loose sexual morals. Over time, it came to mean a woman who's been separated from her husband, or a divorcee.

If someone's jingoistic, they're extremely patriotic, often belligerently so. The term comes from a British song written in 1870 that uses the phrase By jingo! to conjure up enthusiasm for a British naval action.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EnCNJD3-e7g

The curved lines that follow the moving limbs of cartoon characters? Those are called blurgits or swalloops.

The admonition You don't believe fat meat is greasy means "Just go ahead and try me" or "Don't push your luck." This idiom is found almost exclusively among African-Americans. The idea is apparently that if you don't believe fat meat is greasy, you're someone who misses the obvious.
 
What's the difference between the words insure and ensure? To ensure means to make certain. Insure means to protect someone or something from risk, and should be used exclusively in a financial sense.

For some time now, linguists have been studying a style of speaking known as creaky voice. In the United States, it's heard particularly heard among young, white  women in urban areas. New research about this phenomenon, also known as vocal fry, has been making the rounds on the internet.

http://www.waywordradio.org/chicken-scratches-and-creaky-voice/

http://healthland.time.com/2011/12/15/get-your-creak-on-is-vocal-fry-a-female-fad/

Voila (not spelled wallah or vwala) is a good example of a borrowed word. Though French for "there it is," Americans often use it as a simple utterance, akin to presto or ta-da.

http://itre.cis.upenn.edu/~myl/languagelog/archives/005052.html

Lock the bad guys up in the hoosegow! This slang term for a jail comes from the Spanish juzgado, meaning "tribunal." It's an etymological relative of the English words judge and judicial.

Did you know roly-polies, or pill bugs, aren't even bugs? They're isopods, meaning they have equal feet, and they're technically crustaceans.
 
Autocorrect mistakes abound, but have you ever made the errors yourself, such as typing the word buy when you meant by? Studies in Computer Mediated Communications have linked this phenomenon to the way we process words phonetically before typing them out.

Solrads are those lines radiating from the sun or a lightbulb in a comic strip, while dites are the diagonal lines on a smooth mirror.

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A Way with Words is funded by its listeners: http://waywordradio.org/donate

Get your language question answered on the air! Call or write with your questions at any time:

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Phone:
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Share: By Jingo - 23 January 2012


Like a Boss - 16 January 2012

2012-01-16
Length: 51s

SHOW SUMMARY

It's a bird! It's a plane! It's . . . "witches' knickers"? Well, what do YOU call those stray plastic bags littering the landscape? Also, what it means to do something "like a boss," how to hyphenate correctly, and why we say we have a "crush" on someone. What do you call when you meet someone for the first time, and they ask if you know so-and-so, just because you share an area code? Also, similes from the 1800s, a rule on hyphens, and the truth about what happens when you turn a bull loose in a china shop.

FULL DETAILS

What do you call those plastic shopping bags that litter the street? Some know them as witches' britches or witches' knickers. Others prefer urban tumbleweeds. In American Beauty, Ricky Fitts famously called one the most beautiful thing he'd ever seen. Either way, despite the effort to introduce reusable bags, the plastic variety continues to build up. Lori Robinson of Santa Barbara has even gone so far as to collect them from Tanzanian villages and distribute the more sustainable variety.

http://animprobablelife.com/2011/11/26/lori-robinson-bag-project-africa/

http://africainside.org/favorite-charities/one-wordplastics/

A clumsy person may be known as a bull in a china shop or a bull in a china closet. The former came into use first, in the early 1800s, but a bull in china closet is all the more evocative.  Plus, according to the MythBusters, a bull in a china shop is surprisingly nimble.

http://dsc.discovery.com/fansites/mythbusters/db/animals/bull-china-shop-cause-dish-carnage.html

When did the expression to have a crush on someone come into use? The television series Downton Abbey has dropped this and other fun bits of language, but no need to worry about its historical accuracy- crush has been around since the early 1880s. To mash on someone or crash on someone are idioms in the same vein, and may derive from the idea of an emotional collision between two prospective flames.

As they say in Wasika, Minnesota, "If I don't see you in the future, I'll see you in the pasture."

Our Quiz Guy John Chaneski has a new game entitled The Secrets of Nym. In AA, d.e.n.i.a.l. is said to stand for don't even notice I am lying, which is a backronym. An acoustic guitar could be considered a retronym. And an editor named Daily is an example of an aptronym.

When someone finds out where you're from, do they ask if you know so-and-so? The cynics out there may refer to this as the six degrees of stupid, but even urban dwellers can admit that the answer is yes more often than the odds would suggest. How do you respond in those cases, and is there a term for those questions?

The Spanish equivalent of our bull in a china shop analogy translates to "like an elephant in a pottery store."

Where does the meme like a boss come from? The original boss may be the rapper Slim Thug, whose 2005 track "Like A Boss", from the album Already Platinum (which never went platinum), lists the myriad tasks he performs like a boss (e.g. "When I floss/ like a boss"). In 2009, Andy Samberg of SNL and The Lonely Island made a video entitled "Like A Boss" featuring Seth Rogen, which describes further boss-like activities (e.g. "promote synergy/ like a boss").

A book of similes from the 1800s contains such gems as it's easy as peeling a hardboiled egg and it's as hard to shave as an egg.

Does evidence-based have a hyphen? Why, yes it does, because evidence-based often functions as an adjective. While style guides indicate that we're continuing to drop hyphens, evidence-based is an important one to keep intact, even when used after the verb (e.g. the research is evidence-based).
 
Here's another great simile: large as life and twice as natural. As in, did you really see Elvis? Yep, he was large as life and twice as natural.

It's been a puzzler tracking the origin of the saying good night, sleep tight, see you on the big drum. Perhaps it's an innocent mixup that takes from the Robert Burns poem "Tam o' Shanter", which reads, good night, sleep tight, I'll see you on the Brigadoon.

http://www.waywordradio.org/kit-caboodle/

http://www.robertburns.org.uk/Assets/Poems_Songs/tamoshanter.htm
 
You'd better behave, or I'll knock you from an amazing grace to a floating opportunity! This African-American saying, used as a motherly warning, first popped up in the 1930 play Mule Bone by Langston Hughes.

Infra dig, short for the Latin phrase infra dignitatum, means beneath one's dignity, or uncouth. Abbreviated Latin phrases like infra dig have become standard after old English schoolboys used to shorten them while studying classical texts.

Here are some easy similes: easy as winking, or easy as breathing. If you prefer a tough one, try as difficult to grasp as a shadow.

We all know the idiom slow as molasses, but slow as Moses does just as well. After all, he spent 40 years trekking to the Promised Land, and even described himself as slow of speech and of tongue.

The 19th Century French writer Adolphe de Lamartine said that written language is like a mirror, which it is necessary to have in order that man know himself and be sure that he exists.

In their song "The Old Apartment," The Barenaked Ladies sang, "crooked landing/ crooked landlord/ narrow laneway filled with crooks. This is an example of a polyseme, or one word that has multiple meanings. Similar to this is the syllepsis, wherein one word is applied to other words in different senses (e.g. Alanis Morissette: "you held your breath and the door for me").

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8ggJS0p-QQc

http://rhetoric.byu.edu/figures/S/syllepsis.htm
 
Here's one that's sure to lull a restless child into sleep: night night chicken butt ham head yoo hoo!

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Get your language question answered on the air! Call or write with your questions at any time:

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Share: Like a Boss - 16 January 2012


AllSaints Basement Session Podcast

2012-01-13 :: AllSaints Spitalfields
Length: 1s

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How Holiday Bargain Hunters are Revolutionizing the Mobile Retail Landscape

2012-01-11 :: Neil Hickey

In this High Performance Business Podcast, learn how holiday bargain hunters are revolutionizing the mobile retail landscape and creating new opportunities in cyberspace.…

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Pickles and Ice Cream (rebroadcast) - 9 January 2012

2012-01-09
Length: 51s

SUMMARY

How about some wind pudding with a dollop of air sauce? What's in a tavern sandwich? Do pregnant women really crave pickles and ice cream? Grant and Martha dig in to colorful language from the world of food. Plus, ever think of publishing a novel? Be warned: The snarky literary agent from SlushPile Hell shows no mercy when it comes to rejections. Also, piggy banks, children vs. kids, hand vs. foot dexterity, and a bi-coastal quiz. Plus, those flipped sentences known as antimetabole, such as "It's not the men in your life that counts, it's the life in your men."

FULL DETAILS

Ever thought about getting that novel published? Apparently, others have too, and some of their queries are less than persuasive for the admittedly grumpy literary agent who writes the blog SlushPile Hell. He posts some of the more colorful queries from his inbox, along with his own pithy responses. Take this one: "Have you ever wondered what it's like to be pulled up a waterfall or to be flushed down a toilet?" To which the agent responds, "Hey! Have you been reading my mind?" Ouch.

http://bit.ly/9z3rBp

Is it wrong to refer to children as kids? One discerning mother, when asked about her kids, always replied, "I don't raise goats, but my children are fine." Grant explains that as early as the 1600s, the word kids had popped up to refer to bratty or unruly children. But by the 1800s, it was normal even among upper-class households to call their young ones kids without any negative connotations.

A vegetarian from Vermillion, South Dakota, wonders about the origin of a popular loose meat sandwich called a tavern. It's like a sloppy joe, and also goes by the monikers Maid-Rite and Tastee. Martha notes a diner in Sioux City, Iowa, called Ye Olde Tavern, that claims to have created the sandwich. Still, with food origins, plenty of people lay claim to the inventions of everything, from hamburgers to breakfast cereal.

http://bit.ly/fik8P2

http://bit.ly/jtCwOA

Quiz Guy Greg Pliska has a bi-coastal quiz about two-word phrases connecting the letters NY and CA. For example, the man in black is JohnNY CAsh. Keep your eyes wide open for the clues!

A Canadian listener's boyfriend has a special talent. He can remove his socks, roll them up, and throw them across the room into the laundry basket--all with his toes. She says he has toe dexterity, but wonders if the word dexterous can apply to feet as well as hands? Martha notes that great soccer players like Argentina's Lionel Messi are simply called dexterous, although nimble and agile are also appropriate adjectives.

Noctivagant people are those who wander the night, and vespertilian folks have bat-like qualities. Add these to "shirtless" as poignant ways to describe a vampire.

When the going gets tough, the tough get going. This and other phrases of wisdom are known as antimetabole, from the Greek for "turning about in the opposite direction." Certain forms of these statements also go by the name chiasmus, from the Greek letter chi, meaning "X." They're often effective for making a point in a speech, like John F. Kennedy's famous "Ask not what your country can do for you--ask what you can do for your country." No matter the context, these flipped-sentence proverbs are great for making a point clear. Mardy Grothe has a whole book about chiasmus called Never Let a Fool Kiss You or a Kiss Fool You.

http://bit.ly/lJz5qp

The grumpy agent who writes the blog SlushPile Hell received a submission stating, "I have attached a copy of a letter I recently sent to Oprah about my book. She ends her show in September 2011, which leaves little time to select an agent." The agent responds, "Finally! An author who understands the importance of Oprah and has a no-fail plan for getting on her show." As if.

What's for dinner? How about wind pudding, air sauce, and a side of balloon trimmings? This colorful euphemism for "nothing" dates as far back as the American Civil War, when troops would come into the mess tent, see a wild squirrel boiling in a pot, and opt for wind pudding and air sauce instead.

The calls and e-mails keep coming in about Scotts being called Todds and Todds being called Scotts. One listener left a voicemail about a christening where the priest called the baby by its oddly common misnomer. Another listener by the name of Stefanie complains that she keeps getting called Jennifer. Perhaps it has to do with rhythm, and the patterns we develop out of sounds and syllables.

There's been a lot of talk about the place of handwriting in the digital age. Grant has some great books to recommend on the subject: Reading Early American Handwriting by Kip Sperry, and Handwriting in America: A Cultural History by Tamara Thornton. A long time ago, part of the reason for teaching longhand cursive was to have students practice transcribing documents with indoctrinating political messages. The character of handwriting, from the flourishes to the way a letter sits on the line, brought with it an array of cultural implications.

http://bit.ly/mwKGPn

http://bit.ly/lDrvCS

Why do we have piggy banks instead of any other kind of farm animal banks? In Scotland and Northern England, a kind of earthen material called pigg was used in the Middle Ages for making pots. The name stuck, and today we fill our piggs, or piggy banks, with coins.

Why do pregnant women enjoy pickles and ice cream? Or do they? Linguists from the American Dialect Society have been discussing this recently. They found that the expression pickles and ice cream once referred simply to the conjoining of two unrelated things, sort of the opposite of peas and carrots. Not until the middle of the 20th century did it pertain to cravings, simply because pregnant women go through different nutritional patterns than they would when eating for one.

Can the word training be pluralized, as in "How many trainings did you have last week"? Martha and Grant disagree about whether training can be a count noun.

A Minnesotan who relocated to Wisconsin gets called a Mud Duck, and wants to know why. Much in the way Wisconsinites get referred to as Cheese Heads, it's really a harmless bit of nomenclature from a cross-state rivalry. In hunting, the term duck has also been known to mean a mixed kind of species. Unfortunately, Mud Duck has popped up in odd corners with negative racial connotations. Still, the vast majority of people using Mud Duck mean it simply as a friendly jest.

Martha shares another barb from the SlushPile Hell agent.

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A Way with Words is funded by its listeners: http://waywordradio.org/donate

Get your language question answered on the air! Call or write with your questions at any time:

Email: words@waywordradio.org

Phone:
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Share: Pickles and Ice Cream (rebroadcast) - 9 January 2012


Who You Calling a Jabroney? (rebroadcast) - 2 January 2012

2012-01-02
Length: 51s

SHOW SUMMARY

Yo! Who you callin' a jabronie? And what exactly is a jabronie, anyway? Also, what do vintage school buses and hack writers have in common? Grant and Martha trace the origins of famous quotes, and a listener offers a clever new way to say "not my problem." All that, plus winklehawks, motherwit, oxymorons, word mash-ups, and a quiz about palindromes.

FULL DETAILS

Is that a winklehawk in your pants? A listener shares this word for those L-shaped rips in your trousers, from an old Dutch term for "a carpenter's L-shaped tool." And Grant has a new favorite term, motherwit, meaning "the natural ability to cope with everyday life." You could say a mark of wisdom is showing some motherwit in the face of life's winklehawks.

Ever heard a school bus called a school hack? Grant and Martha explain the etymology of hack, beginning with hackney horses in England, then referring to the drivers of the horse-drawn carriages, then the carriages themselves, and finally the automobiles that replaced them. A museum in Richmond, Indiana, has a vintage yellow school hack, once used in the 19th and early 20th centuries to bring rural children to their schoolhouse. Incidentally, the contemporary term hack, meaning a tired old journalist, comes directly from the original term for the tired old horse.

http://bit.ly/mfS08T

O heavy lightness! Serious vanity! Misshapen chaos of well-seeming forms! A listener senses something awfully good about oxymorons, from the Greek for "pointedly foolish". Grant shares this favorite example from Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, while Martha picks a modern classic: airline food. What are your favorites?

In the U.K., they don't count their seconds as one-Mississippi, two-Mississippi, because, well, they have no Mississippi. Instead, they say one-elephant, two-elephant. Lynne Murphy, author of the blog Separated by a Common Language, points out this difference between English speakers on opposite sides of the pond.

http://bit.ly/pZxYG

Our Quiz Guy Greg Pliska has a game called Welded Palindromes, with two-word phrases spelled the same forwards and backwards. What do you call your first appearance on TV? A tube debut. What kind of beer does a king drink? Why, a regal lager, of course.

A listener wonders about the origin of the phrase your father's mustache, akin to the phrase go jump in a lake, or your mamma wears combat boots. Grant explains that it may sound more familiar as your fadda's mustache, circa 1930s, Brooklyn. The borough's own jazz musician Woody Herman had a hit song in 1945 called Your Father's Mustache, but those in the know pronounced it "FAH-dah."

http://bit.ly/lCbNwL

A listener named Meagan from Wisconsin uses the term flustrated, combining flustered and frustrated--one of many mashed together words she deems Meaganisms. Though Grant applauds her innovation and creativity, Martha points out that flustrate actually does pop up in English texts as far back as the 18th Century. Though dictionaries with entries for flustrate note that it's usually a jocular term, a conversation could always use more Meaganisms.

Grant gives Martha a little Greek test with the word leucomelanous. Leuco, meaning "white," and melano, meaning "black," together refer to someone with a fair complexion and dark hair, like Snow White or Veronica from the Archie comics.

How do you say "not my problem"? A listener shares his go-to: Not my pig, not my farm. It means the same thing as I don't have a horse in that race, or I don't have a dog in that fight. Douglas Adams, in The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, created the SEP Field, or the Somebody Else's Problem field. Though examples are boundless, there doesn't seem to be a standard or definite origin.

http://douglasadams.com/

A cowboy loves a ranch that's pecorous, meaning abundant with cattle. Just something worth knowing.

There's an old joke running around that goes as follows, "Lost: Bald, one-eyed ginger Tom, crippled in both back legs, recently castrated, answers to the name of 'Lucky.'" Nigel Rees of The Quote Unquote Newsletter has been tracking down this oft-quoted joke, and so far he's found it as far back as 1969. On another front, Fred Shapiro of the Yale Book of Quotations has made progress in tracing the origins of famous quotes, often to people other than those who made them famous. And the folks at quoteinvestigator.com are doing their share in researching the history of those quips and aphorisms that do so much to frame our essays and speeches.

http://bit.ly/dgveSD

http://bit.ly/lz1qRp

http://bit.ly/8nWlvi

A violin maker wonders about the origin of a practice in his trade known as purfling, where a black and white line is inlaid into a tiny channel along the edge of the instrument. Martha traces the word back to the Latin filum, meaning "line" or "thread." Purfling is also a practice in guitar-making, furniture-making, and embroidery, and it shares an etymological root with profile. A fun fact: purfling is also just "profiling" said with a mouth full of marshmallows.

When someone admiringly called a woman "outspoken," Dorothy Parker is said to have cynically replied, "Outspoken by whom?" Well, according to quoteinvestigator.com, the line pre-dates Parker's quip.

Why do we call our biceps guns? The slang lexicographer Jonathon Green suggests that the metaphor first pops up in baseball around the 1920s, when players referred to their throwing arms as guns. Believe it or not, the early baseball pitchers actually threw the ball intending for the batter to hit it. It wasn't until later that a strong arm, or gun, was needed to throw a pitch too fast to hit.

A listener shares a Russian saying that translates I am going there where the Tsar goes on foot, meaning "I am going to the bathroom." It's the equivalent of we all put our pants on one leg at a time, or we're all just human.

Who you calling a jabronie? And what exactly is a jabronie? Grant traces this playful insult, meaning a "rube" or "loser," to the 1920s, when Italian immigrants brought over a similar-sounding Milanese term for "ham." Jabronie is also commonly used in professional wrestling, referring to those guys set up to lose to the superstars.

A decade is ten years. A century is a hundred. But what do you call a period of five years? It's a lustrum, borrowed whole from Latin. So you might say a decade is two lustra.

--

A Way with Words is funded by its listeners: http://waywordradio.org/donate

Get your language question answered on the air! Call or write with your questions at any time:

Email: words@waywordradio.org

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Share: Who You Calling a Jabroney? (rebroadcast) - 2 January 2012


You Bet Your Sweet Bippy (Rebroadcast) - 26 December 2011

2011-12-24
Length: 51s

SUMMARY

Why do some puns strike us as clever, while others are plain old groaners? Martha and Grant puzzle over this question. Also, the difference between baggage and luggage, a royal word quiz, the "egg" in egg on, what to call someone who doesn't eat fish or seafood, Hawaiian riddles, and why we say "You bet your sweet bippy!"

FULL DETAILS

When President Barack Obama had the Oval Office redecorated in soft browns and beige, The New York Times headline read: “The Audacity of Taupe.” The hosts discuss how puns work, and what makes them clever. Martha recommends John Pollack's new book, The Pun Also Rises: How the Humble Pun Revolutionized Language, Changed History, and Made Wordplay More than Some Antics.

http://www.thepunalsorises.com/

What do you call someone who doesn’t eat fish? A caller wants to know, but not because of dietary requirements. He's a string bass player who plays in an ensemble that’s tired of being asked to perform Schubert’s famous composition, the Trout Quintet.

http://www.classicalnotes.net/classics/trout.html

Martha and Grant tells him he has several options. Among them: non-pescatarian, anti-marinovore, anichthyophagist--and, of course, non-seafood eater.

What’s the difference between baggage and luggage? After all, it’s not as if anyone confesses to having emotional luggage. The hosts conclude that usually the word “luggage” specifies the container, while “baggage” is more likely to refer to that which is lugged inside the container.

Martha shares a quotation from Joseph Addison, no fan of puns: “If we must lash one another, let it be with the manly strokes of wit and satire: for I am of the old philosopher’s opinion, that, if I must suffer from one or the other, I would rather it should be from the paw of a lion than from the hoof of an ass.”

Quiz Guy Greg Pliska has a royal quiz in honor of the wedding of Kate Middleton and Prince William. He celebrates the wedding of the King and Queen with clues to answers that contain the letters "K" and "Q" next to each other. The answer to "The band that recorded 'Take Five,'" for example, is the "Dave BrubecK Quartet."

Where'd we get a word like skyscraper? Martha explains the image literally refers to scraping the sky, but first applied to the topmost sail on a ship, and later to tall horses, and high fly balls in baseball. There are similar ideas in other languages, as in the Spanish word "rascacielos" and French "gratte-ciel." In German, the word is picturesque as well. It's “Wolkenkratzer,” which literally means "cloud-scratcher."

Grant shares some fill-in-the-blank puzzles from a listener. For example, "There's one w______ on a u________" and "There are 5 d________ in a z_________ c__________."

A listener remembers her mother used to say, "Your Monday is longer than your Tuesday." This phrase offered a subtle way to notify someone that her slip was showing. Other expressions convey that warning as well, including "Monday comes before Sunday" and "Saturday is longer than Sunday." Also, if someone whispers "Mrs. White is out of jail," it's time to check to see if your slip is showing. Ditto if you're told you have "a Ph.D.," but you've never earned that degree. In this case "Ph.D" stands for "Petticoat Hanging Down."

Martha's been reading the Dictionary of Smoky Mountain English again, and stumbled across a synonym for "fried chicken." It's preacher meat.

http://www.cas.sc.edu/engl/dictionary/

"The Die is Cast" is the title of an episode of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. A listener and his wife disagree about what kind of "die" is meant here. It's not a reference to metallurgy -- it's a quotation attributed to Julius Caesar. When he crossed the Rubicon to lead a campaign against his enemies, he supposedly declared, "Alea jacta est." The word "alea," which refers to one piece of a set of dice, is an ancestor of the modern English word "aleatory," which means "by chance."

What happens when a clock gets hungry? It goes back four seconds. Martha talks about how puns weren't always considered "bad." Cicero praised them as the wittiest kind of saying, and Shakespeare made plenty of them, for both serious and comic effect. In the early 18th century, though, things changed. Pamphlets with titles like "God's Revenge Against Punning" began appearing, and the great lexicographer Samuel Johnson denounced them as "the last refuge of the witless."

Martha and Grant discuss why some puns work and others don't. Martha recommends John Pollack's observation in The Pun Also Rises describing how "for a split second, puns manage to hold open the elevator doors of language and meaning as the brain toggles furiously between competing semantic destinations, before finally deciding which is the best answer, or deciding to live with both."

Where'd we get the expression You bet your sweet bippy!? It's from Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In, a zany television show from the late 1960s. The word "bippy," by the way, means "butt." The phrase "You bet your sweet bippy" is a linguistic descendant of earlier versions that go back to at least the 1880s, when phrases like "You bet your sweet life" were commonly used.

http://www.museum.tv/eotvsection.php?entrycode=rowanandmar

The show also popularized such phrases as "Sock it to me!" and "Look that up in your Funk & Wagnalls."

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8iGvzmOoh3Y

Why is Cairo, Ill., pronounced "KAY-roh"? Why do Midwesterners pronounce Versailles as "Ver-SALES" and the New Madrid Fault as "New MAD-rid"? Grant explains that these names are far removed from their earlier incarnations and function as a sort of shibboleth among the locals.

Martha springs another pun on Grant: Knock-knock. Who's there? Tarzan. Tarzan who? “Tarzan Stripes Forever.”

Why do we speak of trying to egg on a person, meaning to urge them to do something? Martha explains that the "egg" in this case has nothing to do with chickens. This kind of "egg" is derives from an old root that means to "urge on with a sharp object." It's a linguistic relative of the word "edge."

Grant wraps up with some Hawaiian riddles from the book Riddling Tales From Around the World, by Marjorie Dundas, including this one:

My twin was with me from the day I crawled
With me till the day I die
i cannot escape him
yet when storms come, he deserts me

http://books.google.com/books?id=qnWz6zrE8RUC&pg=PA66&lpg=PA66&dq=%22My+twin+with+me+from+the+day+I+crawled%22&source=bl&ots=dTLR_OAxIm&sig=vvHKYEeCGLgl2SqLqqqpcOn8d_A&hl=en&ei=drrZTcbZEoeusAP9wtWFDA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CBYQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=%22My%20twin%20with%20me%20from%20the%20day%20I%20crawled%22&f=false

--

A Way with Words is funded by its listeners: http://waywordradio.org/donate

Get your language question answered on the air! Call or write with your questions at any time:

Email: words@waywordradio.org

Phone:
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Donate: http://waywordradio.org/donate
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Share: You Bet Your Sweet Bippy (Rebroadcast) - 26 December 2011


Bah Humblebrag - 19 December 2011

2011-12-19
Length: 52s

SHOW SUMMARY

What's YOUR choice for the Word of the Year for 2011? What word or phrase best sums up the ideas, events, and themes that speakers of English have been talking about? Grant shares some of his picks. And speaking of picks, why do football commentators seem to love the term pick-six? Also, great quotations from writers, the meaning of such Britishisms as cheeky and naff, the intentionally misspelled and mispronounced word defulgaty and a discussion of whether the term ladies is offensive. And does the insect called an earwig really crawl into people's ears at night?

FULL DETAILS

Writers always seem to come up with brilliant quotes about writing, and why shouldn't they? Douglas Adams has noted, "I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by." And Gloria Steinem once quipped: "I do not like to write. I like to have written."
 
What's the difference between hand grenades and pomegranates? Not much when you think about their shape and the fact that they're both packed tightly with small things, which is why both share a linguistic root with the word granular.

http://www.altalang.com/beyond-words/2009/07/13/pomegranates-and-hand-grenades/

Grant offers examples from his latest Words of the Year list, including Crankshaft (the code name for the Osama Bin Laden), and basketbrawl, referring to the fight that broke out between the Georgetown Hoyas and the Chinese National Team.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ClAM3zXx-I
 
Football, like most sports, brings its own set of idioms and jargon that ride the line between cleverness and cliche. The adjective multiple describes a player, an offense or defense, or even a whole team that has multiple threats or talents. And a pick six, one of the more exciting plays in football, is when a player makes an interception and scores a touchdown. For a more erudite take on the language of sports, David Foster Wallace's "Roger Federer as Religious Experience" never fails.

http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/books/2011/10/writing-the-beautiful-game.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/08/20/sports/playmagazine/20federer.html?pagewanted=all

Writers will appreciate this quotation from Burton Roscoe: "What no wife of a writer can understand is that a writer is working when he's staring out of a window."

Our Quiz Guy John Chaneski offers a quiz called Take-Offs. For each clue, remove the first letter of a word to get the second (or third) word in the puzzle. For example, in the first chapter of Moby Dick, Ishmael had to screw up his courage and join the crew. Or, I've been in the barber chair for an hour, my hair looks great, but it's time to come up for air. Be sure to check out John's new NPR show, Ask Me Another.

http://twitter.com/#!/NPRAskMeAnother
http://www.facebook.com/pages/NPRs-Ask-Me-Another/263283727044159

What is an earwig? Those skinny brown insects with pinchers coming out their backsides have a reputation in folklore for crawling through people's ears and laying eggs in their skull. But really, earwigs are just simple insects that take their name from the Old English term wicga, meaning "insect." The males do have one interesting anatomical feature, though.

http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg17223183.200-lucky-earwigs-are-doubly-endowed.html

A professional auctioneer shares some techniques for creating his mesmerizing, melodious patter. He explains that auctioneers are known as colonels, because colonels in the civil war were assigned with auctioning off captured property. And he warns to beware of so-called chandelier bidding. His final tip: Remember, at an auction, it's cheaper to kiss somebody than to wave at them!
 
The 2011 Words of the Year list wouldn't be complete without occupy, as in the Occupy protests that sprang up in Manhattan's Zuccotti Park and elsewhere. And Zuccotti Lung? It's an illness that made its rounds among the camped-out protesters.

Have you ever been faced with a defugalty? This ironic misspelling and mispronunciation of difficulty popped up in a Dashiell Hammett novel, The Glass Key, in 1931. It's often said with a tongue in the cheek, but, as in the case of the Hammett novel, it refers to the mispronunciations of the uncouth or uneducated.

http://www.languagehat.com/archives/000630.php

Is the term ladies an offensive way to refer to a group of women? As a recent discussion on Ask Metafilter revealed, many interpret it as outdated, condescending, or patronizing. The hosts conclude it all depends on context.

http://ask.metafilter.com/200453/Why-are-some-women-offended-by-the-term-ladies

What does cheeky mean? How about the words twee and naff? A British ex-pat says she finds it hard to convey the nuances of these adjectives to her American friends.

What's Lady Macbeth talking about when she urges Macbeth to "screw your courage to the sticking point"? This image of mustering up bravery most likely has to do with tightening the strings of a crossbow.

If your iPhone's Siri thinks that two meetings in one day is not bad, does that make her an optimist? And by the way, since when did cellphones start making value judgments?

Nobody likes a humblebrag. That's when someone complains about, say, having to choose among their dozen college acceptance letters. Harris Wittles, a writer on television's Parks and Recreation, runs the Twitter handle @Humblebrag, where he retweets those ironic complaints akin to Arianna Huffington's tweet: "About to take off from Milan to Istanbul and none of my three blackberries are working."

https://twitter.com/#!/Humblebrag

--

A Way with Words is funded by its listeners: http://waywordradio.org/donate

Get your language question answered on the air! Call or write with your questions at any time:

Email: words@waywordradio.org

Phone:
United States and Canada toll-free (877) WAY-WORD/(877) 929-9673
London +44 20 7193 2113
Mexico City +52 55 8421 9771

Donate: http://waywordradio.org/donate
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Copyright 2011, Wayword LLC.

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Share: Bah Humblebrag - 19 December 2011


Special Request! -- Help Support A Way with Words

2011-12-14
Length: 1s


Give Now for the $25,000 Fundraising Challenge



Dear friends and listeners,

As we near the end of our biggest year yet, we must raise $25,000 to cover the remainder of this season. We need your help to reach that amount before December 30th.

Reaching that goal will mean covering fixed costs: Broadcast studio rental. A sound engineer and board operator. Website hosting. Podcast hosting. The toll-free phone line. Episode distribution through the Public Radio Satellite System — an expense that will increase 50% in 2012.

What you may not know is that when you donate to your local station — as you should — none of that money goes to A Way with Words. We’re independent of any radio station and independent of NPR. We receive no funds from them at all.

This means, in part, that A Way with Words can carry out its educational mission without excessive bureaucracy and overhead costs. It also means we can make it available to everyone, completely free of charge.

But it also means that to do well, we require support from our listeners. We need your donations, whether you listen online or on the air.

Show us that we can count on you. Make a tax-deductible donation of $100 or more today. If that’s too much, please donate what you can.


If you’ve given to A Way with Words before, thank you! But can we ask you to double your donation this time? Will you go the extra mile to support quality radio that respects your intelligence?

You can also send your donations by postal mail to this address:

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Best wishes, and happy holidays,

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PS: A Way with Words is now heard on the air in more than 173 cities across North America and we’re happy to report that the program will also be heard on Vermont Public Radio starting in January!



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Share: Special Request! -- Help Support A Way with Words


A Murmuration of Starlings - 12 December 2011

2011-12-12
Length: 51s

SHOW SUMMARY

If you've ever eaten Flavor-Crisp Chicken, it was probably served with JoJo potatoes. And speaking of fried chicken, ever wonder why colonel isn't pronounced "KOH-loh-nell"? Grant and Martha have the answers to those nagging little questions, like the difference between a turnpike and a highway, and the rules on me versus I. Who's behind those eponyms in anatomy, and why are doctors phasing them out? Plus, a newsy limerick challenge, dog breed mashups, pallets, a little Spanglish, and a list of -ologies to fill a whole course catalog!

FULL DETAILS

What's your favorite -ology? Perhaps alethiology, the study of truth, from the Greek alethia? Theologians might concern themselves with naology, the study of holy buildings.

http://phrontistery.info/sciences.html

What are JoJo potatoes? Starting in the 1960s, fried potato wedges came to be known as JoJos, especially in the Northern states. JoJos were often served in restaurants that also made Flavor-Crisp Chicken, which requires a special type of deep fat fryer. JoJos are simply unpeeled potato wedges thrown in the fryer, but the name may derive from the idea of "junk," because the potato scraps were considered worthless until restaurateurs realized they could be marketed and sold.

http://www.barrypopik.com/index.php/new_york_city/entry/jo_jo_potatoes_jojo_potatoes/

http://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/showthread.php?t=563558

We'll keep this short: Perissology is the superfluity of words.

Why is colonel pronounced like "kernel"? The original form comes from Italy, where a colonello was in charge of a column of soldiers. As it moved from Italian to French, it took on an r sound, but the English translators reverted to the more etymologically correct Italian spelling. That's why it looks one way but sounds another.

What do you get when you mix a Shelty and a Cocker? A Shocker! Or how about a Dachshund and a Border Collie? That'd make it a Dashboard. We don't want to know what you'd call a cross between a Pit Bull and Shih Tzu.

Hope you've been checking the headlines, because our Quiz Guy John Chaneski has a new set of current event limericks. What's been "occupied?" How long did the Kardashian marriage last? And who made ambiguous the definition of the word "winning"?

A thick blanket or stack of blankets is also called a pallet. The Dictionary of American Regional English says this term is most common in the South Midlands--such states as Tennessee, Kentucky, and Missouri. In the New American Standard Translation of the Bible (John 5:8) Jesus says to a man who's been incapacitated for nearly 40 years, "pick up your pallet and walk." The term actually comes from French, where a pallet was a thick, woven mat of hay to lie on.

The usage of the word me vs. I will always be a point of debate. Grant and Martha contend that language works in the service of culture, and thus, there will always be informal settings where the words me and I are slung around interchangeably. Then again, there will also be classrooms, job interviews and the like, where my colleague and I completed the project is the better choice than me and my colleague completed the project.

Aesthetes might go for kalology, or "the study of beauty."

What's the difference between a turnpike and a highway? In the 1700s, privately funded roads were constructed in the Northeast to connect commercial centers, but tolls were charged in order to pay for the wood planks that covered the road; this was well before gravel or pavement came about. A turnpike itself is the bar on a turnstile, much like you'd see in a subway station or an amusement park; one pays the toll, then moves through the turnpike. On the other hand, freeways were the dirt roads that didn't require a toll.

Anatomy is full of eponyms--that is, names inspired by the name of a person. In this case, there are the fallopian tubes, the Achilles heel, and the eustachian tubes. But there's a movement in anatomy to replace eponyms with more scientific, descriptive names. Thus, fallopian tubes are now uterine tubes, and eustachian tubes are auditory tubes.

The Spanglish term frajo, meaning "cigarette," evolved over a couple of generations of Mexican-American language. Primarily thanks to Pachucos, sometimes known as Zoot Suiters, the term developed from the verb fajar, meaning "to wrap up or roll."

A flock of starlings is called a murmuration, and a beautiful video of a murmuration of starlings flying about has been described by Martha as "nature's ornithological lava lamp."

http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2011/11/starling-flock/

If you're looking for a clever way to straddle the glass-half-empty line, try using litotes, or understated slights turned positive. For example, the guy you met for a blind date was really not unattractive.

http://www.poetryfoundation.org/learning/glossary-term/Litotes

If you're into fungus among us, you might enjoy uredinology, the study of rust molds.

Why do we refer to people of questionable sanity as nuts, nutty, or nut-cases? In the early 1600s, a nut was considered something "pleasing" or "delightful." Its meaning then transferred to someone who liked something pleasing, and then someone obsessed with that thing to the point of eccentricity or weirdness.
 
Zymology? That's the study of joining or fastening.

Support for "A Way with Words" comes from the Fifth Edition of The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language. 10 Years in the Making with 10,000 New Words and Senses.

http://ahdictionary.com.

Support for "A Way with Words" also comes from National University, which invites you to change your future today.

http://www.nu.edu/

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A Way with Words is funded by its listeners: http://waywordradio.org/donate

Get your language question answered on the air! Call or write with your questions at any time:

Email: words@waywordradio.org

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Share: A Murmuration of Starlings - 12 December 2011


Not the Thongs You're Thinking Of - 5 December 2011

2011-12-05
Length: 51s

SHOW SUMMARY

Is it cool for parents to use their children's slang? What's wrong with the term "illegal alien"? Grant and Martha discuss possible alternatives. The catchphrase Who's Yehudi refers to the mysterious character who holds up strapless dresses, turns the light on in the fridge, and does lots of other things we can't see. But why Yehudi? Also, terms from the dictionary of anatomy, an idiom puzzle, putzing around, out of pocket, long in the tooth, and the ancient roots of the folksy expression even a blind pig can find an acorn. And what do you call the slobber marks a dog leaves on the windshield?

FULL DETAILS

Does your vocabulary mark you as old or outdated? Certain words really indicate generational gaps, like chronological shibboleths. For example, are thongs "sandals" or "panties"? And what do women carry around--a pocketbook, a purse, or a bag? Your answer likely depends on when you were born.

At what point is it inappropriate for parents to use the slang of their offspring? Can you call your son dude, or give your kids a beatdown in Scrabble? Living with children makes for a slang-filled home, so it becomes part of your regular speech. So long as your children aren't mortified, the hosts say, go for it.

Who is Yehudi, and what exactly does he do? In the 1930s on Bob Hope's radio show, there was a musical guest named Yehudi Menuhin. His name proved so catchy, along with sidekick Jerry Colonna's joking phrase, "Who's Yehudi?" that it entered the common vernacular, coming to refer to anyone, or anything, mysterious. Yehudi is, for example, the little man that turns on the light inside the refrigerator. He holds up strapless dresses. The Navy even had a secret project named Project Yehudi.

Charles Hodgson's Carnal Knowledge: A Naval Gazer's Dictionary of Anatomy is chock-full of great terms. It's best to keep the lipstick within the vermillion border, or that line where the lips meet the skin. And be careful when applying around the wick, or the corner of the mouth.

http://www.amazon.com/Carnal-Knowledge-Dictionary-Anatomy-Etymology/dp/B004E3XEJ8

Our Quizmaster John Chaneski has a puzzle based on clues with everything but the but. For example, when likening someone to a house, we say the lights are on, but nobody's home. Or regarding a noisy political contest, it's all over but the shouting.

If someone's being a bit lazy, or just moseying aimlessly, we say they're putzing around. But the word put derives from the Yiddish for "penis." Plenty of Yiddish words have made their way into the common vernacular, especially in the Northeast. But before you open your mouth, it's important to be mindful of context and whom you're speaking to.

A physician wants to know: Is it politically correct to use the phrase illegal alien? The Society of Professional Journalists have decided, collectively, to use illegal immigrant. But even words like illegal or undocumented can often be inaccurate. If, for example, doctors are talking about a patient, they want to recognize the patient as an individual person, not a statistic.

http://www.mediabistro.com/fishbowlla/society-of-professional-journalists-votes-to-end-use-of-term-illegal-alien_b40464

Speaking of those generational divides, did you know that Post-It notes haven't always been around? Martha shares a listener's funny email about that.
 
If you're having a tough time finding something, remember that even a blind pig can find an acorn once in a while. This encouraging idiom actually comes from Ancient Rome, where the concept of a blind animal turning something up lent itself to the Latin saying that a blind dove sometimes finds a pea. An 18th-century Friedrich Schiller play employed the blind-pig-and-acorn version, and the play's translation into English and French brought it into modern speech.

What event in life introduced you to a whole new vocabulary? Going away to college, having a child, renovating a home, or even getting diagnosed with a medical condition  often exposes us to huge bundles of new words. If you're renovating a house for example, suddenly a whole slew of new words muscles its way into your vocabulary, such as backsplash, shoe moulding, quarter-sawn oak, sconce, grout, and bullnose.

What does out of pocket mean? The answer actually splits down racial lines. Among many African-Americans, if someone's out of pocket, they're out of line or unruly. For most Caucasian speakers, out of pocket is primarily used in business settings, meaning that someone is either unavailable or out of the office, or they're paying for something with personal money, rather than charging it to a company.

What do you call those slobber marks that dogs leave on the inside of car windows? Some of our favorites are woofmarks, dog schmear, and snot kisses.

Is your name a conversation piece? A listener by the name of H. Christian Blood shares his story growing up with a colorful name. And for those of you with a comment to make, Christian Blood would remind you that he's heard plenty of it over the years, so unless it's really something sharp and original, it's best not to waste your breath. And yes, his name is for real.

http://www.scu.edu/cas/classics/faculty/blood.cfm?p=4834

What crawled over your liver? This Pennsylvania Dutch idiom means "What's the matter with you?"

If someone's getting long in the tooth, it means they're getting old, or too old for their behavior. The metaphor of long teeth comes from horses. If you look at a horse's teeth and the extent to which their gums have receded, you can tell pretty accurately how old they are. It's the same source as that old advice Don't look a gift horse in the mouth, which means "if someone gives you a gift, don't inspect it too closely."

--

A Way with Words is funded by its listeners: http://waywordradio.org/donate

Get your language question answered on the air! Call or write with your questions at any time:

Email: words@waywordradio.org

Phone:
United States and Canada toll-free (877) WAY-WORD/(877) 929-9673
London +44 20 7193 2113
Mexico City +52 55 8421 9771

Donate: http://waywordradio.org/donate
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Cathead Biscuits (Rebroadcast) - 28 November 2011

2011-11-28
Length: 51s

SUMMARY

Ever eaten golden catheads for breakfast? Yum! A listener shares this Southern term for big, fluffy biscuits. Also, how did people greet each other before "hello" became a standard greeting of choice? What does it mean if someone's fair to middling? How do you pronounce the word bury? Is the phrase whether or not redundant? Should we use try to or try and? And if Sam and them are coming, who exactly is "them"? Plus, Grant and Martha share some classic riddles, and Quiz Guy Greg Pliska has a game of animal name mash-ups.

FULL DETAILS

What happens when you throw a yellow rock into a purple stream? It splashes. (Ba-dump-bum.) Grant and Martha share this and other favorite riddles, some with deceptively obvious answers.

Why do we pronounce bury like berry and not jury? The word originates in the Old English term byrgan, and the pronunciation apparently evolved differently in different parts of England. Grant explains why many terms go mispronounced if we read things without hearing them out loud.

What do you say when you answer the telephone? On the NPR science blog, "Krulwich Wonders," Robert Krulwich notes that hello did not become a standard greeting until the mid-19th Century, when the Edison Company recommended the word as a proper phone greeting. Before that, English speakers used a variety of phrases depending on the circumstance, from hail to how are you? One thing's certain: If we'd followed Alexander Graham Bell's recommendation, we'd all be greeting each other with "Ahoy!"

http://n.pr/gscLCA

A riddle, a riddle, I suppose, a thousand eyes and never a nose. Nothing shakes up the dinner table conversation like a good potato riddle!

Greg Pliska, musical director for the Broadway show War Horse and our very own Quiz Guy, has a puzzle about Animal Hybrid Phrases combining two common expressions involving animals. For example, what do you get when stuffed animal stocks go down? A Teddy Bear Market.

Here's a link to Greg's musical bio on the Lincoln Center website:

http://bit.ly/gt9h84

Ever had golden catheads for breakfast? A native of Tennessee wonders about the origin of this term meaning "biscuit"--specifically, ones that are light, fluffy, and about the size of, well, a cat's head. Martha explains how the names of many foods derive from their resemblance to other things--a head of cabbage, for example.

A listener has spent the last 30 years looking for the origin of the playful phrase "you're the berries." This affectionate expression first appears in literature in the 1908 book Sorrows of a Showgirl, then made its way into popular slang by the 1920s. However, it seems to disappear during the next decade, and it remains only as a relic heard in the vernacular of those who lived during the era.

http://bit.ly/gyF9TV

Should we use try and or try to? Merriam-Webster's Dictionary of English Usage says it's grammatically permissible to try and go to the store, or to ask someone to try and speak up. However, a fan of formality ought to stick with try to. Still, Grant warns against trying to force logic on the English language by creating rules that don't exist.

http://bit.ly/cQrxPx

http://bit.ly/eydxnN

Whoever makes it tells it not. Whoever takes it knows it not. Whoever knows it wants it not. What is it? Martha shares this old riddle.

The question of how children acquire language has long intrigued parents and scholars.  MIT cognitive scientist Deb Roy recently found a novel way to study what he calls "word birth."  He wired his home with cameras and microphones, and recorded his infant son's every utterance as he grew into toddlerhood. He then combined the 90,000 hours of video and 140,000 hours of audio into some astonishing montages. Dr. Roy shared his findings at a TED conference.

http://bit.ly/eaKVBS

More visuals and audio from the study in this article from Fast Company:

http://bit.ly/hOOf3Z

If you're fair to middling, you're doing just fine. A native of the Tennessee mountains wonders about the origin of this phrase her good-humored grandfather used. As it turns out, fair to middling was one of the many gradations a farmer would hear in the 19th Century when they'd bring in their crop--usually cotton-- to be priced and purchased.

Is the phrase whether or not redundant? Well, take this sentence: "Whether or not you like it, Martha is dressing as a ballerina." Would that sound right without the or not? Now, the or not is technically redundant, but depending on the case, it's best to pick the wording that won’t distract the reader or listener.

http://bit.ly/91hA3J

Only the grass dies when elephants fight. This Liberian proverb is a reminder that it's the powerless who suffer when governments or factions fight.

If Sam and them are going to be here after while, can the "and them" mean just one additional person? In some parts of the country, it could be Sam's wife, or Sam's entire softball team. A listener from Texas shares this charming colloquialism.

What goes 99, clump? If you woke up at night and scratched your head, what time would it be? Grant has the answers to those riddles.

--

A Way with Words is funded by its listeners: http://waywordradio.org/donate

Get your language question answered on the air! Call or write with your questions at any time:

Email: words@waywordradio.org

Phone:
United States and Canada toll-free (877) WAY-WORD/(877) 929-9673
London +44 20 7193 2113
Mexico City +52 55 8421 9771

Donate: http://waywordradio.org/donate
Site: http://waywordradio.org/
Podcast: http://waywordradio.org/podcast/
Forums: http://waywordradio.org/discussion/
Newsletter: http://waywordradio.org/newsletter/
Twitter: http://twitter.com/wayword/
Skype: skype://waywordradio

Copyright 2011, Wayword LLC.

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Share: Cathead Biscuits (Rebroadcast) - 28 November 2011


Heads Up! It's a Meteor! (rebroadcast) - 21 November 2011

2011-11-14
Length: 51s

SUMMARY

"Well, butter my buns and call me a biscuit!" Martha and Grant talk about great catch phrases from old-time radio comedies. Also, why do we speak of a meteoric rise? Don't meteors plummet? What do you keep in a Fibber McGee drawer? Plus, myriad vs. myriad of, enamored of vs. enamored with, autocorrected text messages. And Martha shares a trick for eliminating those annoying verbal fillers like "um" and you know" from one's speech.

FULL DETAILS

They say it's easier for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle than for an autocorrected text message to be, well, correct. Listeners like Arnold share their funny Autocorrected text messages. And by Arnold, we of course mean Brooke.

http://n.pr/fz6qI4

Well, shut my mouth and call me Shirley! Butter my buns and call me a biscuit! A listener shares several of these humorous imperatives. Grant explains that the roots of these phrases probably go back to the 1940s. Phil Harris, the bandleader on Jack Benny's radio comedy, was known for using such colorful catchphrases. An early version was Cut off my legs and call me Shorty!

http://bit.ly/exqCLY

Martha shares a childhood misunderstanding sent in by a listener. Seems her three-year-old daughter confused the phrase "exposed to the elements" with "exposed to the elephants."
 
What do you call an expert speller? A "Words With Friends" enthusiast wants to know. Martha tells her that a great speller is called an orthographer or orthographist, from the Latin roots ortho- meaning "straight" or "correct", and -graph meaning "to write". A bad speller, on the other hand, is a cacographer, or as it's known among them, a kakagrifar.

What is the term for that big inflatable play area you see at the park, or in your neighbor's yard? Is it a bouncy house? A jump? Grant asks listeners what they call this modern pumped-up playpen.

Our multi-talented Quiz Guy Greg Pliska, served as musical composer for the television documentary Flying Monsters 3-D.

http://www.flyingmonsters3dmovie.com/

That experience inspired him to create a puzzle using phrases that have the same letter appearing three times in a row. For example, where will you find trumpets and trombones? In the braSS Section.

What do you keep in your Fibber McGee drawer? That's what some people call a catchall container for household items. Grant traces the term for the drawer back to the old Fibber McGee and Molly radio comedy. Whenever Fibber had to fetch something from the closet, that meant a green light for the sound effects guy to let anything and everything come tumbling out. Classic Fibber!

http://bit.ly/igh3Hs

Why do we say someone whose career on the ascent is enjoying a meteoric rise? Don't meteors plummet? For that matter, a caller asks, why do we call "Heads up!" when a ball is coming towards us? Shouldn't it be "Heads down"? The hosts explain that "meteoric" in "meteoric rise" refers to the speedy, brightly streaking nature of a meteor. As for "Heads up," well, no language is perfect.

Grant shares a word he's been encountering at conferences: discussant. A discussant is someone who, after a series of papers are presented, takes the microphone to summarize the information given and offer opinions on the matter.

Should you use enamored of or enamored with? Grant explains that while North Americans use both, enamored of is the more common of the two. In Great Britain, it's enamored of, a construction similar to those in several Romance languages. Enamored by, on the other hand, should never be used. But then, love is always worth expressing, no matter the preposition.

A listener reports that when her cat starts whining, she tells it to shut its kibble-hole. If only cats understood wordplay--or English.

Ben Schott's language blog Schott's Vocab on the New York Times website held a contest for modern age greeting cards called Get Web Soon. Among the favorites: "Heartfelt condolences on the loss of your data" and "Congratulations on your relationship update".

http://nyti.ms/e0YbYe

A listener from Tennessee has a saying that doesn't quite land with his friends: "Is it any count?" Martha confirms that the phrase is most definitely Southern. It originates in the word "account," and the question of whether something "adds up."

What does hoot mean? You might describe someone as a real hoot. But is the hoot in the phrase not give a hoot a different kind of hoot? Grant explains that in the positive case, hoot is a shortening of hootenanny, a informal party with folksy music. In the negative sense, however, to hoot at somebody means to disapprove of something.

Is it really possible to change your style of speaking so that you stop using the verbal fillers "um" and "you know"? Yes, you can. Martha relates her experience with dialect-coach-to-the-stars Sam Chwat. He was adamant that by catching ourselves every time we use that conversational crutch, we can consciously train ourselves to avoid it.

http://n.pr/eoFauX

Should you use myriad or myriad of? Actually, either is fine. Here's what David Foster Wallace had to say about the question in his commentary for the Oxford American Writer's Thesaurus: "[A]ny reader who's bugged by a myriad of is both persnickety and wrong--and you can usually rebut sniffy teachers, copyeditors, et. al. by directing them to Coleridge's 'Myriad myriads of lives teemed forth.'"

http://bit.ly/bSX35G

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A Way with Words is funded by its listeners: http://waywordradio.org/donate

Get your language question answered on the air! Call or write with your questions at any time:

Email: words@waywordradio.org

Phone:
United States and Canada toll-free (877) WAY-WORD/(877) 929-9673
London +44 20 7193 2113
Mexico City +52 55 8421 9771

Donate: http://waywordradio.org/donate
Site: http://waywordradio.org/
Podcast: http://waywordradio.org/podcast/
Forums: http://waywordradio.org/discussion/
Newsletter: http://waywordradio.org/newsletter/
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Copyright 2011, Wayword LLC.

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Share: Heads Up! It's a Meteor! (rebroadcast) - 21 November 2011


The Whole Kit and Caboodle - 14 November 2011

2011-11-14
Length: 51s

SUMMARY

Nothing brightens up an email like an emoticon. But is it appropriate to include a smiley face in an email to your boss? Also, what do time management experts mean when they say you should start each day by "eating the frog"? Plus, the story behind the phrase "the whole kit and caboodle," and some book recommendations for language lovers. If you see the trash can as half-full, are you an optimist or a pessimist? A puzzle involving breakfast cereals, the difference between adept and deft, and the origin of the political term solon. And what in the world is a hoorah's nest?

FULL DETAILS

Is it appropriate to use emoticons in business emails? After all, you wouldn't write a smiley face in a printed letter, right? Martha and Grant discuss the point at which you start using those little symbols in correspondence. Call it "The Rubicon on the Emoticon." Judith Newman has more observations about emoticons in business correspondence in this New York Times piece.

http://nyti.ms/pKguDN
 
Why are non-commissioned Naval officers called petty officers? After all, there's nothing petty about them. The term comes from the French petit, meaning "under, less than, or ranking below in a hierarchy." Petty comes up in myriad instances of formal language, such as petty theft, which is a lesser charge than grand larceny.

To summarize something, we often use the phrase all told. But should it be all tolled? The correct phrase, all told, comes from an old use of the word tell meaning "to count," as in a bank teller. All told is an example of an absolute construction--a phrase that, in other words, can't be broken down and must be treated as a single entity.

What do parents say when they tuck their children in at night? How about good night, sleep tight, and see you on the big drum? Have you heard that one, which may have to do with an old regiment in the British Army?

How do you manage your time? Perhaps by eating the frog, which means "to do the most distasteful task first." This is also known as carrying guts to a bear.

http://bit.ly/stoi5n

From Puzzle Guy John Chaneski comes a great game for the breakfast table in the tradition of such cereal names as Cheerios and Wheaties. What kind of cereal does a hedge fund manager eat? Portfolios! And what do Liberal Arts majors pour in their bowls? Humanities!

What is the difference between adept and deft? It's similar to that between mastery and artistry. Adept often describes a person, as in, "Messi is adept at dribbling a soccer ball." Deft, on the other hand, is usually applied to the product of an act, such as "deft brush strokes."

There are some words we just love to mispronounce, like spatula as spatular, which rhymes with "bachelor."

If someone plans to make hay of something, they're going to take advantage of it. It comes from the idiom make hay while the sun shines, based on the fact that moving hay can be a real pain when it's dark and damp.

Martha has a follow-up to an earlier call about why hairstylists advise clients to use product on their hair. At least in the food business, product often refers to the item before it's ready for consumption. For example, coffee grounds might be called product, but once it has been brewed, it becomes coffee.

If you see the trash can as half full, does that make you an optimist or a pessimist? Since it's half full of garbage, as opposed to daisies or puppies, it's questionable. On the other hand, in the tweeted words of Jill Morris: "Some people look at the glass as half empty. I look at the glass as a weapon. You can never be too safe around pessimists."

http://twitter.com/#!/JillMorris/statuses/128573375114256385

If we're talking about the whole lot of something, we call it the whole kit and kaboodle. But what's a kaboodle? In Dutch, a "kit en boedel" refer to a house and everything in it. For the sake of the English idiom, we just slapped the "k" in front.
 
The holiday gift season is coming up, and Grant and Martha have some book recommendations. For the family, Grant has two great children's books: The Three Pigs by David Wiesner, a meta-narrative based on the classic title characters, and Elephant Wish, a touching cross-generational story by Lou Berger, the head writer of Sesame Street. Martha recommends The Word Project: Odd and Obscure Words beautifully illustrated by Polly M. Law. Stop by your local bookseller and pick up a copy for your sweetheart, a.k.a. your pigsney!

http://amzn.to/w4TN3f
http://amzn.to/rxTZYw
http://amzn.to/ty9q6F

If something's messy, it looks like a hoorah's nest. But what's a hoorah? It beats us. All we know is, it leaves its nest in a real state of confusion, and does it well enough to inspire a popular idiom.

The Twitter hashtag #Bookswithalettermissing has proved to be a popular one. We discussed some great examples in an earlier episode.

http://www.waywordradio.org/missing-letter/

But why not take a letter off the author as well? As in, Animal Far by George Owell, the story about an animal that ran away, prompting a nonchalant farmer to say, "Oh, well." (The joke's doubly funny if you know that the name "George" comes from the Greek for "farmer.")

There's some confusion about the uses of at and by, particularly among those for whom English is a second language. Prepositions often cause trouble, because they don't translate perfectly. Nonetheless, it's important to know that in standard English, if someone is staying home, they're staying at home, not by home.

Here's a testy T-shirt slogan: "Polyamory is wrong! It's either multiamory or polyphilia. But mixing Greek and Latin roots? Wrong!"

http://www.patheos.com/blogs/unreasonablefaith/2010/03/polyamory-is-wrong/

Solon often pops up in headlines as a label for legislators. It is actually an eponym, referring to Solon, an esteemed lawgiver from ancient Athens who lay much of the groundwork for the original democracy. Nowadays, however, the term solon is commonly used ironically, since our legislators don't display the noble disinterest that Solon did a few millennia ago.

The great Leonard Bernstein once said, "a writer is a person for whom writing is more difficult than it is for other people." What are your favorite quotes on writing?

--

A Way with Words is funded by its listeners: http://waywordradio.org/donate

Get your language question answered on the air! Call or write with your questions at any time:

Email: words@waywordradio.org

Phone:
United States and Canada toll-free (877) WAY-WORD/(877) 929-9673
London +44 20 7193 2113
Mexico City +52 55 8421 9771

Donate: http://waywordradio.org/donate
Site: http://waywordradio.org/
Podcast: http://waywordradio.org/podcast/
Forums: http://waywordradio.org/discussion/
Newsletter: http://waywordradio.org/newsletter/
Twitter: http://twitter.com/wayword/
Skype: skype://waywordradio

Copyright 2011, Wayword LLC.

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Developing Future Business Leaders for High Performance - Video

2010-11-19 :: Bob Greifeld and L. Kevin Kelly

Bob Greifeld, CEO of NASDAQ OMX, and Kevin Kelly, CEO of Heidrick & Struggles, discuss the cultural and organizational challenges of finding and developing the right talent to fill future management positions in a fast-changing business environment. Topics of discussion include what to look for, the role of mentoring and establishing the work-life balance.…

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The Right Business Strategies for a Tough Economic Cycle - Video

2010-11-19 :: William D. Green, George Bodenheimer, and Jay S. Fishman

George Bodenheimer, president of ESPN and ABC Sports, and Jay Fishman, chairman and CEO of Travelers Companies, a leading insurance provider, join Bill Green, chairman and CEO of Accenture; and BusinessWeek Editor-in-Chief Steve Adler to talk about ways to channel strategic growth in the face of market adversity. They also discuss lessons learned and organizational necessities businesses must face in order to thrive … or just survive.…

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Podcastor Series 2 Episode 16

2008-03-14

A packed episode this week! We have interviews about Book Week and St Kyneburgha's day, Kiddie Minute, Just 30 Seconds and a mystery guest. Get in touch with us at: podcastor@castor.peterborough.sch.uk …

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Podcastor Series 2 Episode 15

2008-03-11

A short episode this week, but we still manage to cover maths week and St Kyneburgha's day! Also, we have another round of just 30 seconds - and it's Chumbler's first time in charge! The results have to be heard to be believed... Contact us at: podcastor@castor.peterborough.sch.uk …

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Podcastor Series 2 Episode 14

2008-02-04

This week, we have an interview with Natalie from Maple Class, our mystery guest, latest news and "Just 30 Seconds". We also have the first round of our Year 6 singing competition - some of the songs have to be heard to be believed! Let us know what you think by emailing us at: podcastor@castor.peterborough.sch.uk …

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Podcastor Series 2 Episode 13

2008-01-24

In Podcastor this week we have an interview with the newest member of our school, Maryam. We also have Kiddie Minute, Just 30 Seconds and a general knowledge quiz. Please let us know what you think by emailing us at: podcastor@castor.peterborough.sch.uk…

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Podcastor Series 2 Episode 12

2008-01-18

A short episode this week, as we introduce the three new presenters that will be joining Squidge this term. So let's say a big "Hello" to Chumbler, Deuce and Montgomery! Get in touch with us at: podcastor@castor.peterborough.sch.uk…

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Podcastor Series 2 Episode 11

2007-12-18

A very sad episode as we say goodbye to HanBan, Bob and Elfstar. They tell us all about their favourite times as part of the Podcastor team. Also in this episode is a fantastic interview we did with Martin Cross, an Olympic gold medallist who recently visited our school. There's also Kiddie Minute and much more! We hope you enjoy the episode and we will see you after Christmas! If you want to contact us, please email us at: podcastor@castor.peterborough.sch.uk …

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Podcastor Series 2 Episode 10

2007-12-04

The first of our Christmas episodes features a carol from our choir and a best/worst present survey. There's also Kiddie minute, Just 30 Seconds and an interview with our Book Quiz team. Thank you for listening - get in touch with us at: podcastor@castor.peterborough.sch.uk…

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Podcastor Series 2 Episode 9

2007-11-27

In this episode we announce the winner of our competition! We also have latest news, "Just 30 Seconds", a feature on Anti-bullying week and a mystery guest. We also have a lovely story as part of Kiddie Minute, featuring some of the children from Silver Birch class. Please let us know what you think by emailing us at: podcastor@castor.peterborough.sch.uk…

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Podcastor Series 2 Episode 8

2007-11-20

In this episode we have an interview, the final round of our competition and a report about our fundraising for Children In Need. There's also Kiddie Minute and the usual insanity that is "Just 30 Seconds". If you have any comments, please email them to us at: podcastor@castor.peterborough.sch.uk…

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Podcastor Series 2 Episode 7

2007-11-13

In this episode of Podcastor we have another mystery guest, our competition, kiddie minute and "Just 30 Seconds". Also, in latest news, we talk about the fireworks disco, our new Parent Governor and Rememberance Sunday. If you have any comments, please tell us by emailing us at: podcastor@castor.peterborough.sch.uk…

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Podcastor Series 2 Episode 6

2007-11-07

A short Podcastor this week, but we do have an interview with Helena and Alice from Chestnut Class about the play that they performed in front of the whole school! Also, it's the first week of our competition and four children are going to wow you with their impressions of Catherine Tait. Let us know what you think by emailing us at: podcastor@castor.peterborough.sch.uk…

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Podcastor Series 2 Episode 5

2007-10-16

In this episode we have an interview with Mrs Anderson, the teacher of Silver Birch class. We also introduce our new competition, listen to a song by the French Club and experience the first ever Kiddie Minute! Kiddie Minute is a chance for our Foundation Stage and Key Stage One children to have their own part of our podcast, and their singing this week is just lovely! There's no Podcastor next week, as it's half term! Please get in touch with us by emailing us at: podcastor@castor.peterborough.sch.uk…

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Podcastor Series 2 Episode 4

2007-10-09

This episode has an interview with Rector William from St Kyneburgha's Church here in the village. We also talk to some year 6 children that were involved in leading our recent Harvest Festival service. Our third interview this week is with Squidge from the Podcastor team, who did really well in the village conker championship. There's even a quiz and a survey as well! (There would have been "Just 30 seconds", some school news and announcements and a report on our school council, but an ICT gremlin seems to have stolen our recordings!) Let us know what you think by emailing us at: podcastor@castor.peterborough.sch.uk …

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Podcastor Series 2 Episode 3

2007-10-02

This week's episode features an interview with Mrs De'Ath (our reception teacher), an interview with the puppets that live in Mr Harper's class, a survey of our favourite TV programmes and much more! Please let us know what you think by emailing us at: podcastor@castor.peterborough.sch.uk…

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Podcastor Series 2 Episode 2

2007-09-25

In this episode we have an interview with the after school club, a quiz, a survey and much more (including a visit from an ex-Podcastor team member!) Let us know what you think by emailing us at: podcastor@castor.peterborough.sch.uk …

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Podcastor Series 2 Episode 1

2007-09-18

The first Podcastor of the new year! We have a new presenter joining the existing team, so welcome to Squidge (or Mollie, as she's better known!) This week we explain our new format, interview our new head teacher, tell you the latest news from school and find out what the children think of the term so far. Please tell us what you think by emailing us at: podcastor@castor.peterborough.sch.uk…

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Podcastor Episode 33

2007-07-25

The final Podcastor of the year! We have a general knowledge quiz, we remember our favourite bits of the year and we say goodbye to our Year 6 children. Hope you enjoy the episode - we'll see you in September! Email us at: podcastor@castor.peterborough.sch.uk …

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Podcastor Episode 32

2007-07-12

Our penultimate episode this year! We have shout outs, cupboard jokes, a quiz and an interview. Get yourself ready for next week's episode - a sort of "Greatest Hits" episode to say goodbye before the summer holidays. As always, feel free to contact us at podcastor@castor.peterborough.sch.uk…

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Podcastor Episode 31

2007-07-03

A jam packed episode this week! We have the final of our competition, lots of shout outs and an interview with Sophie. Also, who is the better singer - Mollie or Joe? You decide! If you have any comments, please email us at podcastor@castor.peterborough.sch.uk…

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Podcastor Episode 30

2007-06-20

A shortish episode this week, but we still have our competition, cupboard jokes and shout outs. There won't be an episode next week as our year 6 are away on a residential trip, but we'll be back with all the news from the trip the week after that! If you want to get in touch, please email us at: podcastor@castor.peterborough.sch.uk …

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Podcastor Episode 29

2007-06-13

Hi there! We've got a packed episode for you this week. We have the latest round of our competition, more cupboard jokes, lots of shout outs, a survey and more! And, we promise, not a sign of the time filler song from last week. Apart from Freya singing a bit of it for you, that is! If you want to make her promise not to do that anymore, email her at podcastor@castor.peterborough.sch.uk and tell her to stop!…

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Podcastor Episode 28

2007-06-06

We've had a small problem with this episode. Our microphones have gone all crackly! So, that means that this is quite a short episode - but we've still packed in some shout outs, some jokes and a time-filler song that is very ... er ... unusual! Email us at: podcastor@castor.peterborough.sch.uk and tell us what you think.…

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Podcastor Episode 27

2007-05-23

It's time for the first round of our competition! You've never heard nursery rhymes like these before... We also have a survey about music, interviews with the netball team and the first (and possibly last) cupboard joke section. Also, we have lots more of your shout outs. Let us know what you think by emailing us at: podcastor@castor.peterborough.sch.uk …

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Podcastor Episode 26

2007-05-15

Due to a small recording hiccup, we can't bring you the exciting first round of our singing competition this week - but it will be here in all its glory next week! This week we have an interview with Mollie from Balmoral Class, a birthday message for Miren, a survey about our favourite lessons and lots and lots of shouts out to our friends! Let us know what you think by emailing us at: podcastor@castor.peterborough.sch.uk…

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Podcastor Episode 25

2007-05-08

In this episode we're talking about films! We have a best friends quiz starring Josh and Connor, a guest appearance from Rachael and we introduce two new features - we are running a singing competition and we're looking for entries! Also, would you like to put a shout out to your mates on Podcastor? Well, now you can - just let us know what you want to say... Email us at: podcastor@castor.peterborough.sch.uk …

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Podcast Episode 24

2007-05-01

This week we have our last "Just 60 Seconds" for the time being. Instead, we have a new feature called "The Best Friend Quiz" - just how good a friend are you? This episode is all about sweets so we have a sweets interview and a sweets survey. Remember to eat healthy food, though! Please email us at podcastor@castor.peterborough.sch.uk and tell us what you think. …

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Podcastor Episode 23

2007-04-24

Welcome back for the final term of the school year! We have three new presenters to replace Fiona, Laura and William. Our new presenters are Hannah, Elf Star (Ella) and Bob (Freya) - and they're really pleased to be on Podcastor. Hear more about them in this episode and please send them an email at podcastor@castor.peterborough.sch.uk and say hi! …

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Podcastor Episode 22

2007-03-27

The last Podcastor before the Easter holidays and it's time to say "Goodbye" to William, Laura and Fiona! Their places will be taken by three year 5 children next term and, of course, Hasnain, Poppy and Faith will still be here. We have several interviews this week, and another "Just 60 Seconds". Podcastor will be back in two week's time. If you would like to get in touch, please email us at: podcastor@castor.peterborough.sch.uk…

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Podcastor Episode 21

2007-03-20

A special episode as we say goodbye to two people who have been with our school for a long time - Mrs Marriage and Mrs Snart. All of us at Castor School wish them both well in their retirement. If you have any memories of either of these two people that you would like to share, please email us at : podcastor@castor.peterborough.sch.uk …

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Podcastor Episode 20

2007-03-13

A special sport edition. We have a survey of favourite sports, we ask our presenters which sports they play and we interview Charlotte about her sporting activities. We also have a competition and the latest round of "Just 60 Seconds". If you want to get in touch with us, please email us at: podcastor@castor.peterborough.sch.uk…

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Podcastor Episode 19

2007-03-06

Welcome to the 19th episode of Podcastor! This episode goes behind the scenes of Podcastor and tells you a little bit about how we produce the show. We also have an interview with Mr Harper, the teacher that helps us put the show together. On top of all that we have "Just 60 Seconds", a memory quiz and a very true to life play! Let us know what you think of the show by emailing podcastor@castor.peterborough.sch.uk …

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Kinky Sex Radio - 023 - Naughty Books and Naughty Websites

2007-02-28 :: Prof. Tom

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Podcastor Episode 18

2007-02-27

A Simpsons episode! We have Simpsons impressions, a Simpsons quiz, a Simpsons survey and a Simpsons competition! We have also found time for our regualr features, including "Just 60 Seconds". Please email competition entries and other comments to: podcastor@castor.peterborough.sch.uk…

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Podcastor Episode 17

2007-02-20

Our technology episode. We have a competition, Has's top technology tips, two technology surveys and much more - including another round of "Just 60 Seconds". If you want to enter the competition or send us your comments, our email address is: podcastor@castor.peterborough.sch.uk …

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Kinky Sex Radio - ** BONUS SHOW ** Prof. Tom Presents The Art of Electric Play

2007-02-14 :: Prof. Tom

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Podcastor Episode 16

2007-02-06

This week we have a special animals episode. We also have a report on the Candlemas service that we attended at Peterborough Cathederal, and the latest round of "Just 60 Seconds". Please let us know what you think by emailing us at: podcastor@castor.peterborough.sch.uk …

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Podcastor Episode 15

2007-01-30

A special episode this week! Our Head Teacher is retiring at Easter, and last week we held interviews and chose our new head. In this Podcastor, we interview several people around the school and ask them what they think about the chosen candidate. Please email us at: podcastor@castor.peterborough.sch.uk and tell us what you think!…

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Podcastor Episode 14

2007-01-23

In the fourteenth episode of Podcastor we have a report on school dinners, Faith's Random Poem and the second round of "Just 60 Seconds"! We hope you enjoy the show - please let us know what you think by emailing: podcastor@castor.peterborough.sch.uk…

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Podcastor Episode 13

2007-01-16

Welcome to the thirteenth episode of Podcastor - we hope it won't be too unlucky! We have two quizzes this week, an interview about the Ancient Greeks and our first "Just 60 Seconds" feature! Please let us know what you think at: podcastor@castor.peterborough.sch.uk…

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Podcastor Episode 12

2007-01-09

The first Podcastor of the new term and we have three new presenters joining our team! They are Has, Pop and Faith and we introduce them in this episode. We also have a fun times tables quiz as well as jokes and more! We hope you enjoy this episode - please tell us what you think at: podcastor@castor.peterborough.sch.uk…

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Podcastor Episode 11

2006-12-19

The final episode of Podcastor before Christmas. We have some lovely singing, several interviews and the results of the presents survey for year 5 and 6. We would like to wish a happy Christmas to all our listeners and look forward to seeing you again in January! Please email us and tell us what you think: podcastor@castor.peterborough.sch.uk…

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Podcastor Episode 10 (Take 2!)

2006-12-13

The tenth episode of Podcastor, now including the promised recorders that weren't in last night's release! As always, please email us and tell us what you think. We are at: podcastor@castor.peterborough.sch.uk…

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Podcastor Episode 10

2006-12-12

The tenth episode of Podcastor has an interview, a quiz and a presents guide for year 3 and 4. The recorders promised in the start of this episode aren't included at present - look out for an updated version tomorrow! Please email us at: podcastor@castor.peterborough.sch.uk …

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Podcastor Episode 9

2006-12-05

This week, we have our first festive edition. It contains an interview with the two leading characters in our Key Stage 2 Christmas Performance and a survey of Year 1 and 2 pupils where they tell us what they would most like for Christmas. There's also a quiz and much more! If you have any comments, please contact us at: podcastor@castor.peterborough.sch.uk…

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Podcastor Episode 8

2006-11-28

In this week's episode we have the result of our C-Factor competition! Will it be Funky Faith or the Castor Bros? Listen to find out! We also have a book quiz, a Simpsons quiz and much more. Let us know what you think at: podcastor@castor.peterborough.sch.uk …

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Podcastor Episode 7

2006-11-21

Welcome to the 7th Podcastor! In this episode, we have an interview with Faith about the book quiz, a times tables quiz and the final of the C Factor! Also, we have our new tunes in the show. Email us and let us know what you think! podcastor@castor.peterborough.sch.uk…

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Podcastor Episode 6

2006-11-14

Welcome to the sixth episode of Podcastor! In this episode we have full coverage of our girls' football teams as they take part in a city wide tournament. We also have another episode of the C Factor and a new feature, the clock quiz. We really hope you enjoy our podcast. Email us at: podcastor@castor.peterborough.sch.uk…

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Podcastor Episode 5

2006-11-07

The fifth episode of Podcastor! This week we have two interviews, a memory quiz, the C Factor, a story and we read some of the emails that we have recieved. We hope you enjoy it! Feel free to contact us at: podcastor@castor.peterborough.sch.uk …

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François Bergeron

2006-11-05 :: Alban Peignier
Length: 9m 2s

Extrait 2 : Désert rebel, quand le documentaire explique la musique…

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François Bergeron

2006-11-05 :: Alban Peignier
Length: 9m 29s

Extrait 1 : Le projet "culture et resistance"…

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Radio Dupains

2006-11-05 :: Alban Peignier
Length: 54m 55s

Les Dupains font leur radio sur Esperanzah! Antenne décousue mais instructrice sur les origines du groupe de Port-de-Bouc. Retour sur la culture occitane, sa musiques.…

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Desert Rebel : Rencontre avec François Bergeron et Farid Merabet

2006-11-05 :: Alban Peignier
Length: 52m 1s

Désert Rebel ou un chapitre du projet de François Bergeron : "Culture et resistance". Objectif, trouver des moyens alternatifs pour financer des aventures culturelles communes. Une histoire d'état d'esprit... à découvrir sur Radio Esperanzah…

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Podcastor Episode 4

2006-10-31

Welcome to Podcastor Episode 4! In this week's show we have an interview, a quiz, the next round of the C factor and a radio play we wrote ourselves. If you have any comments, please contact us at: podcastor@castor.peterborough.sch.uk…

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Kinky Sex Radio - :42 Second Promo

2006-10-18 :: Prof. Tom and Miss Gypsy

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Kinky Sex Radio - ** BONUS SHOW ** Prof. Tom Presents Fat admirer, chubby chaser and size kinks

2006-10-18 :: Prof. Tom

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Podcastor Episode 3

2006-10-17

Welcome to Podcastor Episode 3! In this week's show we have an interview, a quiz and the first ever C-Factor! If you have any comments, please contact us at: podcastor@castor.peterborough.sch.uk…

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Podcastor Episode 2

2006-10-10

Welcome to Podcastor Episode 2! In this week's show we have interviews, a quiz and much more. If you have any comments, please contact us at: podcastor@castor.peterborough.sch.uk…

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Podcastor Episode 1

2006-10-03

The first episode of a podcast produced by year 6 children from Castor Primary School. We hope you enjoy it!…

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Kinky Sex Radio - 022- Kinky Kollege | Enemas Debate Settled | Kinky/Poly for the first time | Semen cure depression

2006-09-27 :: Prof. Tom

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