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Last update: 2013-05-10

Top 5: Reasons not to buy the Galaxy S4

2013-05-10

Reasons not to buy the Galaxy S4

If you're an Android fan with a short temper, please turn back now. Watching this video will just send you into hysterics.

Part of my job here at CNET is to play the devil's advocate, and sometimes that requires me to talk trash about products you love. This time around, I'm going to take a poke at a phone that we love as much as you do, the Samsung Galaxy S4.

You'd be hard pressed to find a smartphone on our site that comes more highly recommend than the S4, but that doesn't mean that it's right for absolutely everybody. So if you're about to press the "add to cart" button on a new Galaxy S4 and you need a friend to talk you down, I'm here for you. Now, go watch my video.

Originally posted at Top 5

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Mozilla CEO: Android, iOS leave lots of room for Firefox OS

2013-02-26

Mozilla CEO Gary Kovacs speaking about Firefox OS at Mobile World Congress 2013

(Credit: Stephen Shankland/CNET)

BARCELONA, Spain--With another 2 billion people hooking up to the Internet in the next five years, there's plenty of room for another mobile operating system, Mozilla Chief Executive Gary Kovacs said today in a sales pitch for his new Firefox OS.

Apple and Google have led the way in the smartphone market but can't cover the whole thing, he said in a speech to thousands at the Mobile World Congress show here, though he didn't mention the companies by name.

"I find it impossible to understand how 3, 4, 5, or 6 billion people are going to get their diverse needs satisfied by one or two or five companies, no matter how delicious those companies are," Kovacs said. "Is the farmer in the Indian countryside going to have the same needs and requirements as a lawyer sitting in New York?"

Firefox OS makes its debut (pictures) 1-2 of 15 Scroll Left Scroll Right

Mozilla has a mammoth challenge, though. Working in its favor is the fact that Firefox is a browser-based operating system, meaning that Web applications such as Facebook already work for it without the need for Mozilla to marshal an army of programmers to write apps.

But even that running start has its limits: even many static Web pages don't work well on mobile browsers, and making dynamic Web apps is a lot harder. New technologies such as camera-phone interfaces and hardware-accelerated 3D graphics help, and Mozilla is pushing hard to advance those standards and spread them to other mobile browsers.

Mozilla has rounded up a solid list of Firefox OS partners, including 18 carriers across the world and handset makers LG Electronics, Huawei, ZTE, Alcatel, Geeksphone, and possibly Sony. The allies plan to bring Firefox OS to developing markets starting in the second quarter and to the United States in 2014.

The app development and distribution ecosystem of iOS and Android is strong, but Kovacs had a slogan to counter that strength: "There's a Web for that." Many mobile apps simply repackage data already available on the Web, he said, pointing to an example of searching for a nearby restaurant, checking reviews, looking at menus, and making reservations.

"This is the Web. We're just taking it to mobile," Kovacs said. "Incumbent with that is 10 million developers already ready to go."

Related stories Firefox OS phone launches Tuesday in Spain at $3 a month Foxconn taking Firefox OS to tablets, not just phones Mozilla teams up with Foxconn to debut a Firefox OS tablet? Mozilla offers developers phones to write Firefox OS apps

Mozilla has experience taking on big established players, too. Internet Explorer ruled the Web when Firefox grew from the ashes of the vanquished Netscape browser project about a decade ago.

"We did this 10 years ago," Kovacs said, and Mozilla succeeded in its mission of keeping the Web open. "Today, the browser market is the most competitive it's ever been in the history of the Internet."

Now history is repeating itself on the mobile Web, where Firefox today is only rarely used but Google and Apple's browsers dominate. Both those companies' browsers are based on the WebKit browser engine, and Opera just signed up to use it, too.

"We have to make sure this shared opportunity is not something that one or two companies unnaturally control," Kovacs said.

Originally posted at Mobile World Congress

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Predictions for MWC 2013

2013-01-25

Mobile World Congress predictions

We are just one month away from the 2013 Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Spain, where the biggest names in the mobile industry will unveil new products.

We're having a difficult time containing our anticipation, especially since CES offered relatively few smartphone announcements. Year by year as the mobile industry grows, so to does the scope and importance of Mobile World Congress.

So what are our CNET editors expecting to see when they touch down in Barcelona next month? Well, I quizzed Senior editors Jessica Dolcourt and Brian Bennett on their predictions and used them as the basis of this week's CNET Top 5.

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Originally posted at Top 5

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Features you want in iPhone 5

2012-08-10

Features you want in iPhone 5 Subscribe:
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Two years ago, on the heels of the iPhone 4, CNET's David Carnoy asked readers to vote for their most-wanted features in the next iPhone. When Apple introduced the iPhone 4S a year later, we just kept this wish list going.

With over 40,000 votes collected at this point, I think it's safe to say that we have an adequate sample of what iPhone 5 features you want most. In this Top 5 video, we count them down. Simple as that.

iPhone 5: 15 most-wanted features (photos) 1-2 of 15 Scroll Left Scroll Right

Originally posted at Top 5

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Top 5 Android smartphones (summer 2012)

2012-07-06

Android phones (Summer 2012)

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There's never been a better time to buy an Android smartphone. Device manufacturers such as Samsung, HTC, LG, and Motorola are at the top of their game, pushing the limits of screen quality, battery life, and design.

CNET always keeps an up-to-date list of the best Android smartphones, and it's a list that sees a lot of turnover. But as smartphone manufacturers gear up for their iPhone 5 retaliation this fall, I figured it would be a good time to take a snapshot of the best Android smartphones for the summer of 2012.

For more phone recommendations, check out CNET's constantly updated list of top phones. And for more Top 5 videos, head over to our Top 5 blog, or subscribe in iTunes.

Originally posted at Top 5

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Smartphones under $50

2012-06-22

Smartphones under $50

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Smartphones are practically essential in this day and age. I mean, how else are we expected to upload pictures of our lunch on Facebook?

Unfortunately, there's still a misconception that smartphones are an expensive luxury item. Not true. I mean, data and messaging plans may bankrupt you, but the phones themselves can be found for next-to-nothing so long as you're on contract.

In this episode of Top 5, I'll count down CNET Senior Editor Jessica Dolcourt's favorite smartphones under $50, for June 2012. Not only that, but I'm using CNET's new interactive video player to show them off. Feel free to click on the review links mid-video, and then bounce back over to keep watching. Cool, eh?

For more phone recommendations, check out CNET's constantly updated list of top phones. And for more Top 5 videos, head over to our Top 5 blog, or subscribe in iTunes.

Originally posted at Top 5

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Dialed In No. 218: The final episode

2012-04-02 :: CNET.com

Dialed In Ep. 218: The Final Episode

It's so hard to say goodbye...but goodbye we must say. For CNET's Final Episode of Dialed In, we get the band back together, old guard and new. Bonnie and Nicole reminisce about old days when Dialed In was audio-only and they had to wrestle with the sound controls. Meanwhile, Brian recounts his clairvoyance, Lynn sets the record straight, and Kent keeps it real -- like, really real. I fulfill a final request, and nearly dent my thumb doing so.

And of course, we bring you CNET's review of the HTC One X and news about the Nokia Lumia 900 and of the mystery device that Sprint will finally announce this week. Because that's what we do.

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News
HTC One X review
HTC One X camera shoot-out
HTC Evo One to Sprint this week?
Nokia Lumia 900 available for preorder

Video goodbye
Jonathan blew us away with this thoughtful video goodbye he made us:

We're still here
Dialed In may be closing shop, but we're still here! We write mobile stories daily at http://dialedin.cnet.com. You can always send your questions and comments to dialedin@cnet.com, and reach out to us on Twitter, Google+, and Facebook.

Brian Bennett -- @boliverbennett
Bonnie Cha -- @bonnieCNET
Jessica Dolcourt -- @jdolcourt
Kent German -- @KentGerman
Lynn La -- @lynnlaaa
Nicole Lee -- @nicole
Stephen Beacham -- @stephenbeacham

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Dialed In No. 217: It's now or never for Windows Phone (podcast)

2012-03-26 :: CNET.com

Dialed In #217: It's now or never for Windows Phone

First, the bad news. Saying goodbye to this weekly Dialed In podcast isn't something that any of us expected to do for some time, but it's true: this week marks the second-to-last episode of CNET's cell phone podcast, and of most of CNET's podcasts in general, save the hilarious 404 with Jeff Bakalar and Justin Yu.

CNET is taking a new direction with our video programming. We're going to collectively try out new formats and styles, including an exciting new show that Molly Wood is producing, called Always On. In the meantime, Brian, Lynn, and I aren't going anywhere. You'll be able to interact with us on Twitter, Facebook, and Google+, and see us on CNET.com and CNET TV.

Next, the good news. This week's episode isn't the goodbye. We focus on Windows Phone's important moment in the U.S. with the release of two major handsets and review three new devices before hitting the e-mail. But if you do want to say goodbye, we'll be playing your voice mail and reading your e-mail next Monday, our last episode. E-mail us at dialedin@cnet.com or send a voicemail at 1-866-402-2638 (hint: that spells "CNET.")

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It's do or die with Windows Phone
AT&T to sell Nokia Lumia 900 for $100 on April 8
HTC Titan II officially coming to AT&T April 8th
Microsoft, Nokia spending $24 million to educate developers
Nokia quietly establishes U.S. beachhead at T-Mobile

Headlines
Verizon: Capacity crunch coming to big cities next year
RIM, having lost its lead in Canada, looks to weak earnings
Leaked document details Verizon's LG Lucid
AT&T announces slew of other devices getting ICS update
T-Mobile will cut 1,900 jobs by closing 7 call centers

Reviews
ZTE Fury (Sprint)
Huawei Pinnacle (MetroPCS)
FitBit Ultra

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8 tips for ditching your cell phone contract early

2012-03-21 :: CNET.com

Ditch your cell phone contract

We talk a lot about early-termination fees, or ETFs, here at CNET because we have a love/hate relationship with signing a two-year service agreement (or three years if you're in countries like Canada). On the one hand, who doesn't love being able to own a $500 or $600 smartphone for $200, $50, or even a penny? You just can't swing that in the unlocked phone market.

On the other hand, few people enjoy being tied to a carrier, and to their carrier's phone selection, over the course of two years or longer. What if you change your mind about the service quality, what if your dream phone just came out on another carrier -- what if? Once you sign your name on the dotted line, there's little you can do to avoid an up-to-$350 fee to jump ship.

Carrier's insurance
ETFs may seem evil when you're trying to break free of a contract (remember, though, you signed it), but for carriers, they're a practical business measure for recouping costs. After all, carriers are the ones buying phones from Apple, Samsung, HTC, Motorola, and so on, which they then sell to you at cut rate along with your full-price service. Charging you an ETF helps recover carriers' upfront phone costs should you want or need to break the contract before your time is up.

With that in mind, here are some facts and tips you should tuck away for a rainy day.

(Credit: CNET)

0. ETFs deflate
Your ETF may cost somewhere near $350 when you just buy the phone, but carriers like AT&T, Verizon, Sprint, and T-Mobile will reduce your ETF a little each month, usually by $10 per billing cycle.

1. Keep an eye on that grace period
If you're new to a carrier and just bought a new phone you're unsure of, you'll usually have at least 14 days (or up to a month) to return it without penalty. The same applies to purchases from big-box stores like Best Buy. So if you're having second thoughts about that phone; don't wait to act.

2. A silver bullet you don't want
There is one ironclad way to get out of a contract without paying for your ETF: expire. I really, really don't recommend it (or faking your own death).

3. Report it
Carriers clearly want to offer you a great network experience, so you'll stick with their service rather than bail. If your service degrades over the course of your contract (or "materially changes") then you might be eligible for recourse like a signal booster or bill credit, or in extreme situations, a pronounced service drop-off might warrant releasing you from your obligations.

This snippet from Verizon's contract pretty much sums it up for all the post-paid carriers:

If you're a Postpay customer and a change to your Plan or this agreement has a material adverse effect on you, you can cancel the line of Service that has been affected within 60 days of receiving the notice with no Early Termination Fee if we fail to negate the change after you notify us of your objection to it.

In some cases, you may need to reach out in writing.

4. Freeze it
If you're more concerned about pausing service rather than abandoning it, you can temporarily freeze your account. Each of the Big Four carriers participates in seasonal suspension, usually without billing (your ETF won't budge) or with billing (you'll pay every month not to use your phone, but you'll work off your ETF cap). It's more ideal for long vacations (Verizon's offer tops out at 180 days), and it usually extends to people who have paid their bills in full.

For instance, Sprint charges $8.99 per month for up to six consecutive months, and AT&T charges $10 per month to suspend the account, and T-Mobile will hold your phone number and rate plan for six months without penalty.

5. Swap your service
One of the theoretically simplest, cheapest, and most clever ways to avoid breaking your contract is to pass it off to somebody else. You'll have to go through some paperwork and phone calls with customer service, but if you can find someone to pay out your contract for you, you can avoid the fee and still be free.

Carriers won't charge you to swap the deed, called a transfer of responsibility, but finding a replacement can be tricky. There's always Craigslist or eBay, but a surer solution is to go through a service like CelltradeUSA. You can think of the Web site and others like it as a brokerage for buying up and selling contracts. The business will collect a $20 fee to move ahead with any swaps, but it will walk you through the legal steps. "Sellers" often offer the phone and accessories at cut rates, or as part of the deal.

Dialed In #216: All about ETFS (early termination fees)

I have not personally tried any services like CelltradeUSA or any others, but I did spend some time looking into the business a while ago, and found positive writeups. (Disclosure: The Celltrade service is powered by CNET cell phone reviews.)

6. When all else fails, escalate
I want to idle on hold for a customer service representative as much as the next person, but I'd rather invest a half hour of my day to settle an issue or clear up confusion than suffer in silence. In my experience, asking to speak to a supervisor can open new doors or supply critical additional information. Being a squeaky wheel--but a polite one--often pays off.

Carriers often respond speedily to Twitter complaints.

(Credit: Screenshot by Jessica Dolcourt/CNET)

7. Take it to Twitter
In addition, carriers have become extremely responsive to Twitter and Facebook queries, and often have a customer care account in addition to their regular online persona. For carriers, social media offers a chance to interact with -- and with luck, assuage -- disgruntled subscribers on a more personal level.

8. Arbitration, your last resort
Consulting a lawyer is another angle I wouldn't encourage outside of rare, extreme situations. About a year ago, the Supreme Court decided that carriers could shield themselves from class action suits (full PDF) by offering arbitration instead. When you sign a contract, you waive the right to levy a class action suit. Yet, if you do think that you're unlawfully being charged, you could approach a lawyer to sue in small claims on your own, or approach the carrier to arbitrate a case. The carrier generally shoulders arbitration costs.

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Dialed In #216, Special Edition: All about ETFs (podcast)

2012-03-21 :: CNET.com

Dialed In #216: All about ETFS (early termination fees)

Early-termination fees got you down? ETFs are fees that phone carriers charge customers in case they want to cancel their contracts early. Agreements usually last two years, but if you want to leave a carrier before then, the company uses ETFs as a way to recuperate money from selling you a subsidized phone. Some argue, however, that these fees are grossly expensive and exploitative. Our main advice is to read the terms of your agreement carefully and drum up a lot of attention with your carrier if things aren't going exactly the way you think they should be. For more information on ETFs, be sure to check out Jessica Dolcourt's piece, "8 tips for ditching your cell phone contract early."

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Dialed In #215: The agony and ecstasy of Mike Daisey (podcast)

2012-03-19 :: CNET.com

Dialed In #215: The agony and ecstasy of Mike Daisey

Actor Mike Daisey's one-man show on his depiction of deplorable working conditions at Apple's iPhone factory took a sharp turn when Daisey's "facts" were revealed as partial fiction. It isn't just Daisey's shaky credibility that's on the line, nor the news outlets that publicized his work as first-hand source material--CNET included--but also the message he's worked so hard to drive home.

We also take a closer look at the benefits of unlimited data--or not--and check out one of the most intense workout accessories that does more than just play your music while you run.

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Separating fact from fiction
Apple fan's faith put to the test (Q&A)
Mike Daisey took aim at Apple, now challenges Chinese translator
This American Life retracts episode on Apple and Foxconn
Mike Daisey gets standing ovation at last N.Y. performance
Retraction and all, Foxconn still in crosshairs
Mike Daisey says radio show used out-of-context comments

News
Leave AT&T's unlimited plan and save
Verizon reconfirms 4G LTE for all future smartphones
Simple hack runs Verizon's LTE iPad on AT&T's 3G network
Sony Xperia Sola follows fingers, performs NFC tricks
HTC confirms slew of Ice Cream Sandwich updates
ICS upgrade hitting Samsung Nexus S shortly
Nokia Lumia 610 can double as Wi-Fi hotspot

Reviews
LG Connect 4G (MetroPCS)
Samsung Galaxy S II (U.S. Cellular)
Motorola MotoActv
ZTE Score (Cricket Wireless)

Special episode alert! Getting out of a contract isn't impossible, but it is really, really hard to do. Join us for a special episode of Dialed In this Wednesday, March 21 at 11 a.m. PT, 2 p.m. ET.

We'll be talking about why early termination fees, or ETFs, exist, the agony of being stuck in one you're desperately trying to shed, and how you can get out your contract early. We'll be taking live calls and reading e-mails. Share your rants, horror stories, and tips about early-termination fees and your cell phone coverage.

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Dialed In #214: The iPad '3' shines a light on the iPhone '5'

2012-03-12 :: CNET.com

Dialed In podcast #214: The iPad '3' shines a light on the iPhone '5'

Even if you never plan to get one, the third-generation iPad is important for the wireless industry as a whole. Apple has once again set the bar when it comes to jaw-dropping screen resolution. That and its 4G LTE connectivity portend good things for the next-generation iPhone, which could carry some of the same (or similar) technology.

We also weigh in on T-Mobile's recent statement that all those carrier subsidies that make a $200 superphone purchase possible as "bad" for the industry. T-Mobile's CMO Cole Brodman is correct about some things, but as for "hurting" the industry...well, it just depends on where you sit.

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"New" iPad stirs things up
The new iPad has 4G LTE, but should you care?
Verizon's 4G LTE iPads will hot spot at launch, but not AT&T's
New iPad first tablet with Bluetooth 4.0: Should you care?
What the new iPad tells us about the next iPhone

News
T-Mobile exec: Subsidies are hurting wireless industry Apple's iPhone fails to close gap against Samsung in China Verizon officially dishing out ICS to more than 12 devices Sprint announces $20 smartphone, the ZTE Fury Messaging LG Rumor Reflex jumps on Sprint, Boost in March Sprint wants all your wireless connections, from phones to dog collars Quad-core HTC One X passes FCC en route to U.S. carrier

Reviews
Samsung Rugby Smart (AT&T)
Samsung Brightside (Verizon)
Sony Xperia S (unlocked)
Motorola Elite Sliver Bluetooth headset

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Dialed In No. 213: Wrapping up Mobile World Congress, not wires (podcast)

2012-03-05 :: CNET.com

Dialed In #213: Wrapping up Mobile World Congress, not wires (podcast)

Now that Mobile World Congress is officially over, we get a chance to discuss the most newsworthy items that came out of the expo (hint: you guessed it, we ended up mostly talking about Nokia and the 808 PureView... oops). We also chat about the future surrounding other means of wireless technology, including Bluetooth 4.0, NFC chips, and Google Wallet.

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Stories
Mobile World Congress awes and entertains
The power of Bluetooth 4.0: It'll change your life
Apple sends out invites for March 7 iPad event
NFC: More than just mobile payments
Samsung Galaxy S III to debut by April?
T-Mobile turns to Huawei for next MyTouch smartphones
Don't know Huawei or ZTE? You will soon
Square launches iPad app; adios, cash register
LG's WCD-800 goes wireless to power your phone
Sprint flaunts snappy Google Wallet video

Reviews
ZTE Chorus (Cricket Wireless)

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Dialed In #212: Mobile World Congress madness begins (podcast)

2012-02-27 :: CNET.com

Can't make it to Barcelona, Spain, this year for Mobile World Congress? Don't fret, just check out the latest episode of Dialed In. We chat about all the phone news to come out so far at MWC including quad-core handsets from HTC, Samsung, LG, Sony, and newcomer Huawei.



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Stories Mobile World Congress day 1: What you missed Huawei: Our Ascend D Quad is world's fastest smartphone LG Optimus Vu--another 5-inch, pen-friendly Android phone Samsung Galaxy Beam flexes projection power HTC adds One S to lineup, coming to T-Mobile (hands on) Compact One V last to join HTC lineup sans carrier Sony shows off stylish new Xperia P and U Huawei claims first ever quad-core 10-inch tablet Nokia unveils Lumia 610 and the 900 goes global Nokia's 808 PureView has a whopping 41-megapixel camera

Reviews Jabra Sport stereo Bluetooth headset

Originally posted at Mobile World Congress

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Dialed In #211: The Mobile World Congress lowdown (podcast)

2012-02-21 :: CNET.com

Do you hear that? It's the sound of our quickening heartbeats as we wait for smartphone after smartphone to show its glossy black face at Mobile World Congress next month. Join us as we take you on a tour of the phones and tablets to expect, bring you some news that might make you mad, and help one reader find his perfect phone.



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Mobile World Congress preview LG Optimus Vu HTC Endeavor/HTC One X LG X3 HTC Droid Incredible 3 Samsung Galaxy Ace 2, Galaxy Mini 2 Nokia: Something high-end? Sony (Xperia Sola?) ZTE Mimosa

Quick hits Samsung Galaxy S II lovefest expanding to U.S. Cellular U.S. Cellular pushing ahead its 4G plans HTC to bless more U.S. phones with Ice Cream Sandwich Feds to automakers: Block drivers' tweets, texts, surfing Dish looks to FCC for cues on its spectrum strategy BlackBerry Playbook OS 2 arrives, built-in e-mail and all

Review Pantech Burst (AT&T)

Upcoming reviews ZTE Score ZTE Chorus

Contact us! E-mail: dialedin@cnet.com Voice mail: 1-866-402-2638 CNET podcasts: podcast.cnet.com

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Dialed In #210: We kinda heart the Samsung Galaxy Note (podcast)

2012-02-14 :: CNET.com

It's Valentine's Day, which means it's time to share a little love.

There's some of that for the top two phones we reviewed this past week: the keyboard-crazy Motorola Droid 4 for Verizon and AT&T's gigantic Samsung Galaxy Note. But just because Cupid's in the area doesn't mean he's shot the Scrooge in us, too. We still have plenty of quibbles--especially when it comes to carriers like AT&T and Sprint that are raising the price of upgrade fees when customers buy a new phone. All that plus more (and cupcakes!) on this week's episode of Dialed In.



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All about the jumbo Samsung Galaxy Note Samsung Galaxy Note full review Samsung Galaxy Note pocket test: 'The wrong type of bulge' (video) Pink Samsung Galaxy Note en route, looking rosy

A pox on your upgrade fees Down with upgrade fees Sprint 'Upgrade Now' program to offer prorated fees

Quick hits Will the PlayStation Vita OS land on smartphones, tablets? HTC further details Ice Cream Sandwich for select devices Apple will reportedly unveil iPad 3 in early March Justice Department set to OK Google-Motorola deal, WSJ says Sprint gets the Nextel monkey off its back LG goes big with 5-inch Optimus Vu

Reviews Motorola Droid 4 (Verizon) LG Marquee (Boost Mobile) BlackBerry Curve 9370 (Verizon) Samsung SPH-M370 (Sprint) Jabra Supreme Bluetooth headset

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Dialed In No. 209: Windows Phone 8 details leak, HTC Sense is too weak

2012-02-06 :: CNET.com

This week's podcast is my first time ever hosting, so please excuse all the awkwardness as I get my sea legs going.

To compensate, I offer you a lively discussion about the new details surrounding Windows Phone 8. So far, there's word of a multicore processor in the works, as well as integration with the Windows 8 desktop and tablet operating system.

We also debate the merits of HTC's Sense skin. Some of us think it's just fine and dandy (we still get a kick out of that retro clock on the phones), but others believe it's time for a change. Especially when compared to Android's beautiful Ice Cream Sandwich OS.

And lastly, we offer some recent news headlines in the mobile industry, including purchasing details for the Samsung Galaxy S III (it's coming in May), and the Galaxy Note (it's available for preorder).



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Stories
Windows Phone 8 details reportedly leak
Should HTC blow up Sense?
Superslim Samsung Galaxy S III could drop in May
Military, government officials could get secure Android phones
Google Wallet app surfaces on unlocked Galaxy Nexus
Samsung's Galaxy Note phablet now ready for preorder
Verizon Galaxy Nexus loses Google support?

Reviews
Samsung Replenish (Boost Mobile)
MyTouch Q by LG (T-Mobile)
MyTouch by LG (T-Mobile)

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Dialed In #208: AT&T complains, Razr Maxx astounds

2012-01-30 :: CNET.com

Looks like AT&T just can't stop complaining about the FCC meddling in its business, but CNET mobile section editor Kent German just isn't having it.

We also discuss exactly how awesome we think the Motorola Droid Razr is, but is it a little too late for Droid Razr owners? In addition, other news rocked the smartphone world, including former Palm CEO Jon Rubinstein saying bye-bye to HP, recent co-CEO of RIM Mike Lazaridis injecting a massive amount of his own cash to boost the company's stock price, plus the value of possible Verizon family data plans.

Later in the show we all go gaga over the Sony Xperia S dream phone likely landing on AT&T and try to figure out if the Samsung Galaxy Note tablet/phone hybrid makes sense.



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Stories Hey, AT&T, quit whining! Former Palm CEO Rubinstein out at HP Ex-RIM CEO Lazaridis to buy $50M in additional stock Is Verizon readying a family data plan? Sony's lovely Xperia S may land on AT&T soon The Motorola Droid Razr should have gone Maxx to start with

Reviews LG Spectrum (Verizon Wireless) Motorola Droid Razr Maxx (Verizon Wireless) …

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Dialed In #207: A new beginning for BlackBerry? (podcast)

2012-01-23 :: CNET.com

At BlackBerry-maker RIM, it's out with the old and in with the new--at least as CEOs go.

Last night's news of Thorsten Heins' ascent at our favorite Canadian smartphone company got us thinking long and hard about what the new leadership means for RIM, especially since Heins isn't exactly a newcomer to the company. CNET News' Roger Cheng joins the Dialed In crew.

Later in the show, Lynn shares Virgin Mobile's throttling plans, and Brian talks all about an iPhone look-alike that's more than what it seems.



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Inside RIM's CEO reboot RIM's co-CEOs step down RIM's leadership shakeup too little, too late? Ten things RIM's new CEO must do right away Who is RIM CEO Thorsten Heins anyway? Wall Street's reaction to RIM's new CEO: Who cares?

Mobile headline news Android will be the platform of choice for developers, study says Virgin Mobile will throttle data speeds come March T-Mobile's 'secret menu': Extra goodies you need to ask for Sony may have a phone running Windows Phone 7

Reviews Samsung Galaxy Attain 4G (MetroPCS) Meizu MX hands-on: iPhone style, Android power

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Dialed In No. 206: Phones go big at CES (podcast)

2012-01-12 :: CNET.com

Between a new Motorola Droid, some slick Sony models, and a powerful punch from Windows Mobile, the Dialed In team was crazy with new phones at CES. Join us as we discuss the hits and misses from Las Vegas.



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CES 2012 Highlights Motorola's Droid 4 is the greatest Android keyboard slider yet Motorola Droid Maxx promises pumped-up battery life Sony Xperia Ion bets big on HD cameras, AT&T 4G LTE LG unveils Spectrum smartphone at CES …

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Dialed In No. 205: CES 2012 Preview

2012-01-06 :: CNET.com

Dialed In #205: CES 2012 Preview

In this edition of Dialed In, we chat about what slick smartphones and other cool mobile gear we expect to see at the upcoming CES 2012 trade show in Las Vegas, from Android Ice Cream Sandwich to new Windows Mango handsets from Nokia. Bonus: meet our newest and ultracool team member, Lynn La.



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Stories That's a phone in my pocket, but I'm still happy to see you Faster phones and more Ice Cream Sandwich at CES 2012 Sony Ericsson teases its upcoming CES smartphone RIM puts resources behind single BlackBerry 10 device, report says AT&T amps up its 4G LTE network

Reviews Nokia Lumia 710 (black, T-Mobile) …

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Dialed In 202: Meet CNET's newest mobile editor! (podcast)

0000-00-00 :: CNET.com

Who is Brian Bennett?

None other than CNET's newest cell phone editor! The New York-based Brian will share his expertise weekly on Dialed In. We also welcome another newcomer, the LG Nitro HD, which answers the question: can LG make a kill…

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Dialed In #201: Too polite for a fanboy brawl

0000-00-00 :: CNET.com

With a thirst for intellectual skirmish and good-natured trash-talking, I rounded up two special guest hosts for this week's Dialed In: Antuan Goodwin, Android enthusiast and co-host of CNET's Android Atlas podcast; and Roger Cheng, a CNET News mob…

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Dialed In #200: Mimosas, battery revolutions, and the Galaxy Nexus (podcast)

0000-00-00 :: CNET.com

Dialed In has reached another milestone--its 200th episode!--and that calls for a celebration, don'tcha think? We do, which is why we broke out the champagne, party hats, and noise makers.

Of course, the talk of everything cell phones takes…

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Dialed In 199: We'll miss you, Nicole (podcast)

0000-00-00 :: CNET.com

It's a sad day in the Dialed In studio, with our beloved Nicole announcing that she's leaving us to break new ground over at TWiT. Our hearts will go on, Celine Dione style, so make sure you watch to the end for our special tribute and two surprise…

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Dialed In #198: Too many Verizon superphones!

0000-00-00 :: CNET.com

Is there such thing as too much of a good thing? Verizon comes out swinging with superphones galore, we take a look at the next generation of Windows Phone handsets, and we have a good old-fashioned rant against a very very weird phone. All that and…

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Dialed In #197: Zombie phones returned from the dead

0000-00-00 :: CNET.com

This is one thriller of a show you can't miss! Stephen sets the mood with some intros that will make you scream, we consider what it takes to bring Nokia back from the dead, and if RIM and Web OS have a chance at reversing their own decrepitude.

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Dialed In 196: Galaxy Nexus, Droid Razr, and more

0000-00-00 :: CNET.com

It was a crazy week in cell phone land, what with the Droid Razr and the Galaxy Nexus making their worldwide debut on the same day. And it's not over yet, as Nokia and Microsoft have an announcement of their own coming up this week. Is there such a …

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Dialed In 195: CTIA hangover with a dash of iPhone

0000-00-00 :: CNET.com

Yes, it's that time of year again: time for the annual Apple iPhone harvest. This time, it's the iPhone 4S, which looks a lot like the old model, but with some pretty substantial improvements. We also discuss last week's CTIA trade show where we saw…

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Dialed In 194: CTIA preview (podcast)

0000-00-00 :: CNET.com

The CTIA Fall 2011 show kicks off on Tuesday, and Nicole and Jessica are in sunny San Diego to bring you all the latest announcements and hands-ons with new devices. Lucky for us (and you), Jessica had a few spare minutes between prepping the show a…

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Dialed In episode 204: The mighty Galaxy Nexus has landed! (podcast)

0000-00-00 :: CNET.com

There we were last week, minding our own business, when Verizon surprised us all by announcing it would release its Galaxy Nexus flagship phone the following day.

Well, we hopped to it and managed to get a device early and publish the fir…

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Dialed In #203: WebOS is doomed to fail! (podcast)

0000-00-00 :: CNET.com

Is HP's WebOS doomed to fail and destined to die a slow, unremarkable death? Yes! Sorry if you're one of the few still clinging to this irrelevant operating system, but its days are numbered. In this episode of Dialed In we discuss the dim future of We…

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Dialed In (MP3)

Smartphone technology is improving rapidly as our personal devices continue to evolve. Each week cell phone editors Brian Bennett, Lynn La and Jessica Dolcourt meet to discuss the latest cell phone news and answer your questions. Listeners can email us at dialedin@cnet.com or call at 866/402-2638 (CNET) and be a part of the show. Join us to find out what's in, what's out and what's coming next. Visit the blog at http://dialedin.cnet.com.

Dialed In (MP3)


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