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Last update: 2010-08-16

Jim Champy, Best-Selling Management Book Author and Technology Consultant, Talks About How Innovative Companies Inspire to Keep Customers Coming Back

2010-08-16
Length: 19s

In this podcast, Jim Champy, chair of Perot Systems Corporation and co-author of the best-selling management book, Reengineering the Corporation, talks about his latest book, Inspire: Why Customers Come Back. This is the second of Champy's three books in a Financial Times (FT) Press series about new business models. The resources section has a link to Enterpriseleadership.org's podcast with Champy about his second book, Outsmart: How to Do What Your Competitors Can't.

 

Jim Champy has a talent for seeing the writing on boardroom walls - companies have to change the way they work if they want to be effective. No wonder Champy's book, Reengineering the Corporation, became an immediate best seller throughout the early 1990s. Over the years, Champy's has continued to crank out books and consulted about how companies must redefine business processes and their strategies if they want to compete.

 

Several years ago, Champy embarked on a journey to find out how companies have devised new ways to do things, and what we can learn from them. Using a filter of double-digit growth and triple-digit growth, he came up with more than 1,000 companies - ranging from mostly emerging companies to some major corporations. Champy's research has turned into a FT Press three book series about new business models pioneered by these high-growth companies. His Outsmart book features case studies about nine companies, such as Partsearch, that are innovating about how to deliver a better customer experience by combining high tech with high touch. Inspire, his latest book, includes eight concise case studies about how businesses, such as Puma and Stonyfield Yogurt, have become successful by inspiring their customers to be loyal for the long term. Deliver, Champy's third book in the series, will focus on how successful companies execute on their strategies.

 

Champy says that innovation was the key to driving double-digit growth at many of the companies he has profiled. Talking about Inspire, he says a company's vision directly can affect its sales success. "The new generation of customers value transparency and authenticity above all. If you want to keep your customers coming back, you need to learn how to define a consistent value proposition - one that will make your customers stay passionate about doing business with you."

 

In this podcast about Inspire, Champy discusses the role innovation plays in the Inspire paradigm, the top five characteristics of customer-centric companies, and the ways CIOs and CTOs can use technology to get closer to both internal customers and external customers.

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Exploring the Business Impact of "Vision Enactors" and the Characteristics of the "Generation Saavy' with Sherry Lowry

2010-07-29
Length: 26s

I bet you have known the following from personal experience: In every organization there are people whose leadership emphasis is on getting things done effectively, gracefully, and with authentic gratification from the work they do. The thing is, they often are not visible in the hierarchy. They capitalize on, rather than are frustrated or stymied by, differences in personalities. They epitomize follow-through and innovative ways to support talent around them by bringing into action each employee's greatest potential and distinctiveness. To support this her observations, Sherry Lowry has been formally collecting “evidence” since 2008, partly through observation and then through interviews, to identify more than 40 specific elements, behaviors, mind-sets, and demonstrated actions of people across five generations of age, who are, in effect - ageless. She believes we already have a group she says are “Generation Savvy” amongst us, operating seamlessly and successfully within every generation. Now let's talk with Sherry Lowry, Business Mentor and Collaboration Coach

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The New Polymath - Audio Interview with Author Vinnie Mirchandani

2010-07-21
Length: 26s

A Polymath—the Greek word for Renaissance Man—is someone who excels in many disciplines. From Leonardo da Vinci to Benjamin Franklin, we have relied on polymaths to innovate and find creative solutions to the problems of the day. How would these Renaissance men and women manage our current technology bounty? Which disciplines would they choose to focus on? Would they work on the architecture of next-generation green cities, or focus on nanotechnology?

The New Polymath is an enterprise that excels in multiple technologies—infotech, cleantech, healthtech, and other techs—and leverages multiple talent pools to create new medicine, new energy and new algorithms.

 

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Communicating like a CEO & Lessons for CIOs - A Conversation with Suzanne Bates - Author Speak Like a CEO and Motivate Like a CEO

2010-07-19
Length: 18s

In this podcast, Bates talks about what it means to speak like a CEO, what makes President Obama's communications style so effective, how CIOs can use good communications to maintain staff morale, and how gender differences in communications styles can affect your job performance.

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Stepping Up Pitney Bowes' Innovation Efforts as a Technology Leader - Michael J. Critelli, Retired CEO of Pitney Bowes

2010-07-04
Length: 19s

 

In this podcast, Michael J. Critelli, the retired CEO of Pitney Bowes, discusses how a change of thinking about the marketplace and customers' needs helped to step up Pitney Bowes' efforts to become a technology leader.

For decades, Pitney Bowes was known as a postage meter company. However, that all changed during the leadership of Michael J. Critelli, Pitney Bowes' retired CEO. In fact, between 2000 and 2007, Pitney Bowes invested $2.5 billion in 83 acquisitions, primarily in innovative software and innovative services businesses. The companies included MapInfo, Group 1 Software, PSI Group, and Imagitas. The company transformed itself into a $6 billion mail and document management solutions powerhouse. In this podcast, Critelli talks the many changes in business processes the company underwent to become a technology innovator. Now let's meet Michael J. Critelli, retired CEO of Pitney Bowes.

 

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Making a Case for Open Innovation in Economic Downturn with Tom DeGarmo, a principal at PricewaterhouseCoopers,

2010-06-17
Length: 16s

In this podcast, Tom DeGarmo, a principal in PricewaterhouseCooper's advisory practice, talks about why companies must practice open innovation, especially in this economic downturn. What do the Apple iPhone and Linux have in common? They are both products of some form of open innovation. Linux came about through the collaborative efforts of the 1,000 of developers who participate in the open source community. The 100s of applications for the iPhone mushroomed when Apple made the iPhone platform available to application developers. Other companies, such as Google and Microsoft, have followed in Apple's open innovation footsteps. Tom DeGarmo, a prinicpal with PricewaterhouseCoopers, first got exposed to open innovation when he worked at Bell Laboratories, AT&T's research arm, back in the 1980s. He says that Bell Laboratories' culture thrived on sharing experiences, ideas, and research for the sake of research. He says, "We took the best of what we learned and applied it to problems outside of the Lab." With traditional innovation, or what DeGarmo calls closed innovation, companies have ownership over their assets and their intellectual property. They look at how they can leverage their employee's expertise to solve problem. "This type of innovation can be somewhat limiting and very constraining. In a down economy, companies need to explore every avenue for innovation" Companies that practice open innovation, on the other hand, look outside for smart problem solvers. "Some of these people might have already solved your company's particular problem, might have people working on your particular problem, or and might have people with insight to share. You might find people who are working on totally unrelated problems. If you apply these problems to your situation, you might solve your problem. If you are open enough, you can take advantage of what the world has to offer." In this on-going series of innovation podcasts, DeGarmo provides insight from his research experience with open innovation, gives examples of open innovation communities, and gives CIOs and CTOs several takeways for using technology to carry out open innovation initiatives.…

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Driving Innovation Based on Disrupting the Status Quo with Adam Hartung, managing partner of Sparks Partners

2010-05-25
Length: 27s

In this podcast, Adam Hartung, managing partner of Spark Partners, discusses an innovation business model based on disrupting the status quo that gave way to an organization’s foundational success.

If you want to succeed, you have to grow. If you want to grow, you have to disrupt. That is the advice of Adam Hartung, managing partner of Sparks Partners and author of, Create Marketplace Disruption: How to Stay Ahead of the Competition. Hartung adds that you have to make it a basic fact of your organization that disruption is acceptable and possibly even desirable. He says, “Look at the kind of markets Virgin gets into. Sir Richard Branson and his team encourage disruptive ideas. What could be more disruptive than Virgin Galactic, selling seats on space flights? That's how Virgin has produced superior returns for investors, employees and suppliers.”

Hartung’s Sparks Partners goes beyond helping companies nurture innovative ideas and bringing them to market. Instead, Spark Partners prevents companies from short-circuiting innovation because they lock themselves in to the success formulas that have brought them to where they are. The company’s three-step innovation process includes the following:

Analyzing the external challenges that will disrupt an organization’s marketplace.

Opening the lock that keeps an organization’s best ideas from being implemented.

Converting ideas into success by creating white space within the organization where the ideas are safe and not hampered by established ways of doing things.

Hartung has much first-hand experience helping companies to take advantage of emerging technologies and new business models. He began his career as an entrepreneur, selling the first general-purpose computing platform to use the 8080 microprocessor when he was an undergraduate. At DuPont, Adam built a new division from nothing to over $600 million revenue in less than three years, opening subsidiaries on every populated continent and implementing new product development across both Europe and Asia. At Pepsi, Adam led the initiative to start Pizza Hut Home Delivery. He opened over 200 stores in less than two years. He also led the global expansion mergers and acquisition initiative acquiring several hundred additional sites. He played a lead role in the Kentucky Fried Chicken acquisition.

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Delivering an Innovative e-learning Environment for Employees - a Conversation with Bill Whitmore, CEO of AlliedBarton Security Services

2010-05-19
Length: 13s

In this podcast, Bill Whitmore, CEO of AlliedBarton Security Services, talks about creating an innovative e-learning environment to empower outsourced physical security personnel to deliver great results for customers, and to retain and deliver quality employees.

 

When Bill Whitmore joined AlliedBarton Security Services almost 30 years ago, this provider of on-site physical security personnel was in its infancy with one million in annual revenue. It also had a lofty commitment to invest in providing employees with quality training programs. Today, AlliedBarton ranks as the country's largest provider of physical security personnel to third parties. The company has more than $1.5 billion in annual revenues, more than 50,000 employees, and has about 100 offices around the country. About 200 of the Fortune 500 companies use security services from AlliedBarton.  Meanwhile, AlliedBarton has transformed itself from a training organization to developing an innovative culture based on leadership and employee development. In fact, this company has made Training magazine's Top 125 in training excellence for five years in a row.

 

Significant technology investments in a variety of e-learning programs underpin AlliedBarton's culture. For example, all security personnel can take the Dare to Be Great challenge, a 14-module online Master Security Course. The Allied Barton Edge, another e-learning program, provides all employees with more than 52 courses in a variety of disciplines. Harvard Business School Press administrators the program. The MyAlliedBarton.com site allows employees to collaborate with each other and to provide management with feedback about the training programs. Other online capabilities include the following: a customer connection, which enables AlliedBarton management to respond quickly to customers' concerns, and a performance management program that provides metrics about each employeee's training, development, and performance. Whitmore says, "All of these tools help us to evaluate and improve our current training programs, develop new programs, and create new services to offer our customers."

 

In this podcast, Whitmore talks about  the transformation of AlliedBarton's culture, the things that make it an innovative organization, the types of technology it has deployed to create an e-learning environment, the way it measures the effectiveness of its e-learning programs, and some takeaways for C-level executives who strive to create a more innovative company.

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Roger Hardy, CEO of Coastal Contacts, Talks About Building an Innovative E-Commerce Company to Change the Way Consumers Buy Glasses and Contact Lenses

2010-04-15
Length: 9s

In this podcast, Roger Hardy, CEO of Coastal Contacts, talks about using online technology in innovative ways to build a global e-commerce company to do two things: drive down the cost consumers pay for eyeglasses and contact glasses, and create a superior customer service model to eliminate customers' fears about buying these products online.

 

If you paid $400 for a pair of glasses with designer frames, then perhaps you need to go online and checkout Coastal Contacts, based in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Founded in 2000, Coastal Contacts bills itself as the world's largest online optical store. Consumers can buy brand name contact lenses from leading providers, such as Ciba Vision and Bausch & Lomb, at up to half the price of optical stores. The same goes for designer eyeglass frames from Gucci and Hugo Boss.

 

Roger Hardy, Coastal Contacts' founder and CEO, says that his company s has emerged as one of Canada's fastest growing companies. In fact, Hardy says that 2009 was a good year for the company with revenues growing about 17 percent. He attributes much of the company's success to investments in innovative technology to handle the volume of orders and to offer unprecedented customer service. In fact, during one 18-month period, the company fulfilled more than 1.5 million orders.  "Each week we seem to set a new record for sales," Hardy says.

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Dr. David Tennenhouse, partner at New Venture Partners, Talks About Different Approaches to Open Innovation

2010-04-07
Length: 26s

In this podcast, Dr. David Tennenhouse, a partner at New Venture Partners, a venture capital firm focused on corporate spinoffs, talks about different approaches to open innovation. New Venture Partners practices what Tennenhouse calls inside-outside open innovation.

 Tennenhouse has had much hands-on experience practicing inside-outside open innovation. He was previously a director of research at Intel. He says, "Many of Intel's corporate research projects made a successful transition to existing business units. Some projects created new business units, which is the gold standard for a research director. Many projects, however, did not have a natural home within the company. That situation allowed me to undertake the mission to spinoff the project or engage in inside-outside open innovation. The job included taking the benefits of the company's learning about the prospective product and influencing the ecosystem around us. The difficulty was to do this knowing we were not going to make and market the product."

 


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Dr. David Tennenhouse, partner at New Venture Partners, Talks About Different Approaches to Open Innovation

2010-04-07
Length: 26s

In this podcast, Dr. David Tennenhouse, a partner at New Venture Partners, a venture capital firm focused on corporate spinoffs, talks about different approaches to open innovation. New Venture Partners practices what Tennenhouse calls inside-outside open innovation.

 Tennenhouse has had much hands-on experience practicing inside-outside open innovation. He was previously a director of research at Intel. He says, "Many of Intel's corporate research projects made a successful transition to existing business units. Some projects created new business units, which is the gold standard for a research director. Many projects, however, did not have a natural home within the company. That situation allowed me to undertake the mission to spinoff the project or engage in inside-outside open innovation. The job included taking the benefits of the company's learning about the prospective product and influencing the ecosystem around us. The difficulty was to do this knowing we were not going to make and market the product."

 


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Using Open Innovation to Solve Tough Problems with Steve Shapiro of InnoCentive

2010-03-18
Length: 20s

n this podcast, Steve Shapiro, InnoCentive's vice president of strategic consulting, talks about how InnoCentive's open innovation model has helped companies solve the most challenging problems.


Founded in 1998 by three scientists working for Eli Lilly, the major pharamectuical company, InnoCentive became an independent company in 2001. To date InnoCentive, companies, such as Dow Chemical and Procter & Gamble, and not-for-profits have posted more than 900 challenges on InnoCentive. Research areas include everything from business processes to chemistry. Steven Shapiro, InnoCentive's vice president of strategic consulting, says that today corporations cannot depend on their internal research and development departments to solve their toughest problems. "They need to look at external resources. InnoCentive's enables these organizations to tap into a global network of more than 180,000 solvers who enjoy the challenge of competing for a cash reward. Our partnership with the Rockerfeller Foundation is helping to solve problems posted by not-for-profits working in poor countries."



 


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How CIOs can Reshape Their Company’s Business Model: C.K. Prahalad, best-selling author and academic

2010-03-10
Length: 23s

Despite the downturn in the economic, this is a great time to be a CIO or CTO. That’s the conclusion from C.K, Prahalad, the Paul and Ruth McCracken Distinguished University Professor of Strategy. He also wrote best-selling management books such as The New Age of Innovation: Driving Co-created Value Through Global Networks, and Fortune at the Bottom of the Pyramid: Eradicating Poverty Through Profit. In this podcast, Prahalad talks about how CIOs can use innovative technology to reshape their company’s business model, as well as drive new opportunities for poverty-stricken areas. (He calls the latter the bottom of the pyramid.)  

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Leadership Qualities Today's Global CIOs Must Possess to be Effective: Hank Leingang, Former Fortune 500 CIO

2010-03-05
Length: 25s

In this podcast, Hank Leingang, the former global CIO for the Bechtel Group and the former CIO for Viacom, talks about the leadership qualities global CIOs need in order to be effective across the enterprise.


Within the last five years, the qualities needed by global CIOs of Fortune 2500 companies have changed radically. The CIO role has become more pervasive, touching just about aspect of the enterprise, as well as every constituency the organization has. As a result, CIOs have to be more than  technologists. Of course, they need to understand how different technologies relate to one another to drive business processes.

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The Challenges of Driving Corporate Technology Innovation: Tom Koulopoulos, author of The Innovation Zone and Delphi Group founder

2010-02-19
Length: 19s

Many business gurus consider relentless innovation to be the United States' only remaining edge in a global marketplace marked by labor arbitrage and the competitive threats posed by exploding economies in China and elsewhere.

 

Tom Koulopoulos, the author of a new book, The Innovation Zone, and the founder of the Delphi Group, says, "While some progress is being made on the innovation front, too many U.S. companies still under perform when it comes to driving the type of sustained innovation needed to meet this competitive threat. On the other hand, many corporations are looking at operational innovation as a way to cope with the complexity technology brings."

 

In his book, Koulopoulos demonstrates how organizations can create and sustain a culture of innovation. Koulopoulos, who writes a blog called The Innovation Zone (http://www.tomkoulopoulos.com) says that if public and private organizations are serious about taking the lead in innovation and re-invigorating the marketplace and U.S. economy, they must move behind the hype of innovation and apply proven techniques and processes. His book provides a how-to-do blueprint for innovation process methods that organizations can put into practice. He says, "We need to stop singing innovation kumbaya and start delving into the practice and science of innovation."

 

Koulopoulos' insights about innovation have received wide praise from luminaries such as Peter Drucker, dee Hock, and Tom Peters who called Tom Koulopoulos' writing, "a brilliant vision of where we must take our enterprises to survive and thrive." According to Peter Drucker, Tom's writing "makes you question not only the way you run your business but the way you run yourself." He is also editor of the Delphi Report, a quarterly journal for business and technology leaders.

 

He sees signs that organizations are embedding innovation in their business practices, and that they have devoted both financial and staff resources to innovation. He says, "It's surprising to me that more companies actually are putting people in positions of authority with respect to innovation. They are not necessarily new people; they are folks that are already on staff, but they also are carrying that [innovation] badge."

 

In this second Enterpriseleadership.org podcast, Koulopoulos talks about the following:

the status of technology efforts in the U.S. corporations; the challenges of IT innovations in global corporations; the ways companies have used IT in innovative ways; the need for corporate education programs in innovation; the things CIOs and CTOs need to do to get involved in corporate innovation; and the way his organization works with clients to drive corporate innovation.…

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The Challenges of Driving Corporate Technology Innovation: Tom Koulopoulos, author of The Innovation Zone and Delphi Group founder

2010-02-19
Length: 19s

Many business gurus consider relentless innovation to be the United States' only remaining edge in a global marketplace marked by labor arbitrage and the competitive threats posed by exploding economies in China and elsewhere.

 

Tom Koulopoulos, the author of a new book, The Innovation Zone, and the founder of the Delphi Group, says, "While some progress is being made on the innovation front, too many U.S. companies still under perform when it comes to driving the type of sustained innovation needed to meet this competitive threat. On the other hand, many corporations are looking at operational innovation as a way to cope with the complexity technology brings."

 

In his book, Koulopoulos demonstrates how organizations can create and sustain a culture of innovation. Koulopoulos, who writes a blog called The Innovation Zone (http://www.tomkoulopoulos.com) says that if public and private organizations are serious about taking the lead in innovation and re-invigorating the marketplace and U.S. economy, they must move behind the hype of innovation and apply proven techniques and processes. His book provides a how-to-do blueprint for innovation process methods that organizations can put into practice. He says, "We need to stop singing innovation kumbaya and start delving into the practice and science of innovation."

 

Koulopoulos' insights about innovation have received wide praise from luminaries such as Peter Drucker, dee Hock, and Tom Peters who called Tom Koulopoulos' writing, "a brilliant vision of where we must take our enterprises to survive and thrive." According to Peter Drucker, Tom's writing "makes you question not only the way you run your business but the way you run yourself." He is also editor of the Delphi Report, a quarterly journal for business and technology leaders.

 

He sees signs that organizations are embedding innovation in their business practices, and that they have devoted both financial and staff resources to innovation. He says, "It's surprising to me that more companies actually are putting people in positions of authority with respect to innovation. They are not necessarily new people; they are folks that are already on staff, but they also are carrying that [innovation] badge."

 

In this second Enterpriseleadership.org podcast, Koulopoulos talks about the following:

the status of technology efforts in the U.S. corporations; the challenges of IT innovations in global corporations; the ways companies have used IT in innovative ways; the need for corporate education programs in innovation; the things CIOs and CTOs need to do to get involved in corporate innovation; and the way his organization works with clients to drive corporate innovation.…

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Steve Cakebread, former Salesforce.com Executive: Demystifying Cloud Computing and Web 2.0 Platforms

2010-02-10
Length: 19s

In this podcast, Steve Cakebread, the former president of Salesforce.com, takes the mystery out of cloud computing by explaining the complementary relationship of Salesforce.com, Google's Apps Engine, and Amazon's Web Services.

 

When Steve Cakebread joined Salesforce.com in 1999, the company had not even introduced its first product. That event happened two years later with the introduction of the single CRM product called Singular Edition people. Today, Salesforce.com has moved beyond CRM to become a diversified company in platforms such as knowledge management and service support. Cakebread says that these new platforms will help to spur the growth of the cloud computing industry.

Meanwhile, cloud computing has got a shot of adrenalin with the likes of Amazon.com's Web Services and Google.com's Apps Engine. Amazon.com built its business around store fronts and logistics, while Google.com's built its business around a consumer's ability to search. Cakebread says, "Amazon's Web services help businesses create those storage fronts on the fly through collaboration or cloud computing, as well as to provide businesses with additional storage and computing power. If you look at Google.com's Apps Engine, it is now creating developer platforms that make it easier to add information for consumers to share in businesses network."

Cakebread says that these three entities have a complementary relationship with each other through various relationships and partnerships. "Each of these technologies, even through they are considered cloud computing, all have different strengths. Salesforce.com is the business platform provider. Google.com focuses on search, while Amazon.com focuses on store fronts, logistics, storage, and computing power. All of these technologies are internally designed on the same technology platform as Oracle Solutions and blade services. The reality is that their architectures are very different, but they can be used by platform developers to achieve service and reliability."

In this podcast, Cakebread also discusses the key technologies that will benefit from cloud computing, the other areas in which both cloud computing and Web 2.0 will enable innovative enterprise applications, and the issues that need to be resolved before companies can deploy cloud computing widely.

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Steve Cakebread, former Salesforce.com Executive: Demystifying Cloud Computing and Web 2.0 Platforms

2010-02-10
Length: 19s

In this podcast, Steve Cakebread, the former president of Salesforce.com, takes the mystery out of cloud computing by explaining the complementary relationship of Salesforce.com, Google's Apps Engine, and Amazon's Web Services.

 

When Steve Cakebread joined Salesforce.com in 1999, the company had not even introduced its first product. That event happened two years later with the introduction of the single CRM product called Singular Edition people. Today, Salesforce.com has moved beyond CRM to become a diversified company in platforms such as knowledge management and service support. Cakebread says that these new platforms will help to spur the growth of the cloud computing industry.

Meanwhile, cloud computing has got a shot of adrenalin with the likes of Amazon.com's Web Services and Google.com's Apps Engine. Amazon.com built its business around store fronts and logistics, while Google.com's built its business around a consumer's ability to search. Cakebread says, "Amazon's Web services help businesses create those storage fronts on the fly through collaboration or cloud computing, as well as to provide businesses with additional storage and computing power. If you look at Google.com's Apps Engine, it is now creating developer platforms that make it easier to add information for consumers to share in businesses network."

Cakebread says that these three entities have a complementary relationship with each other through various relationships and partnerships. "Each of these technologies, even through they are considered cloud computing, all have different strengths. Salesforce.com is the business platform provider. Google.com focuses on search, while Amazon.com focuses on store fronts, logistics, storage, and computing power. All of these technologies are internally designed on the same technology platform as Oracle Solutions and blade services. The reality is that their architectures are very different, but they can be used by platform developers to achieve service and reliability."

In this podcast, Cakebread also discusses the key technologies that will benefit from cloud computing, the other areas in which both cloud computing and Web 2.0 will enable innovative enterprise applications, and the issues that need to be resolved before companies can deploy cloud computing widely.

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Open Innovation Paradigm for Technology Development: Dr. Joel West, Associate Professor of Innovation and Entrepreneurship, San Jose State University College of Business

2010-02-03
Length: 28s

In this podcast, Dr. Joel West, an associate professor at San Jose State University's College of Business, talks about the open innovation paradigm for technology development. His teaching and research focus on innovation and entrepreneurship. Along with Henry Chesborough and Wim Vandaverbeke, West is editor of the book, Open Innovation: Researching a New Paradigm, published by Oxford University Press in 2006.

Working and living in the heart of Silicon Valley, Dr. Joel West cannot get away from technology innovation. In fact, his course offerings and research at the San Jose State University's College of Business focus on technology innovation and strategic management in technology companies. San Jose State University ranks at one of the top 25 research business schools in the U.S.

 Dr. West's interest goes beyond traditional innovation to the concept of open innovation. He defines it as the idea of using the market rather than the internal hierarchy, both as a source of innovation and a way to commercialize innovation. Open innovation also means treating innovation like anything else -- something that can be bought and sold on the open market not something that happens within a company. He says that a company can no longer depend on its internal resources to drive its innovation efforts.

 

His research in open source computing led him to looking at open innovation and a book on the subject. He was one of the co-authors with Henry Chesborough and Wim Vandaverbeke on the book, Open Innovation: Researching a New Paradigm (2006). He also writes several blogs about open innovation, including openinnovation.net, which describes his research and provides comments on other academicians' research projects.

 

In this podcast, Dr. West explores what powers the concept of open innovation and how it differs from traditional innovation efforts, such as research and development. He says that open innovation raises the question about how those companies that practice it differ from those organizations that have research and development programs. Henry Chesborough explored this in first book on open innovation published in 2003.

 

West says, "Companies that practice open innovation will do the same things they did before they adopted it. They might have a research and development department. Chesborough went one step further by looking at the revolutionary nature of open innovation. According to him, open innovation is a process that enables a company to find the best sources of innovation, and to find the best paths to commercialize that innovation. The company might accomplish these goals looking within company and looking outside the company. They might take other paths that they would not have considered if they did not know about open innovation."

 

Dr. West has two important takeaways for chief information officers, chief strategy officers, and chief technology officers: look for external resources who know how to make your products better or who have new products ideas, and find the best ways to bring these resources into your organization. He says, "You might look at university students, your suppliers and customers, or an open innovation community. You might have to look at all of these possibilities to find out which class of individuals or position in the value chain will provide the best ideas you want. Money does not always motivate people to share their ideas with you. Many people like the idea of a challenge to compete for recognition. You might have a content to find the best ideas."

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Open Innovation Paradigm for Technology Development: Dr. Joel West, Associate Professor of Innovation and Entrepreneurship, San Jose State University College of Business

2010-02-03
Length: 28s

In this podcast, Dr. Joel West, an associate professor at San Jose State University's College of Business, talks about the open innovation paradigm for technology development. His teaching and research focus on innovation and entrepreneurship. Along with Henry Chesborough and Wim Vandaverbeke, West is editor of the book, Open Innovation: Researching a New Paradigm, published by Oxford University Press in 2006.

Working and living in the heart of Silicon Valley, Dr. Joel West cannot get away from technology innovation. In fact, his course offerings and research at the San Jose State University's College of Business focus on technology innovation and strategic management in technology companies. San Jose State University ranks at one of the top 25 research business schools in the U.S.

 Dr. West's interest goes beyond traditional innovation to the concept of open innovation. He defines it as the idea of using the market rather than the internal hierarchy, both as a source of innovation and a way to commercialize innovation. Open innovation also means treating innovation like anything else -- something that can be bought and sold on the open market not something that happens within a company. He says that a company can no longer depend on its internal resources to drive its innovation efforts.

 

His research in open source computing led him to looking at open innovation and a book on the subject. He was one of the co-authors with Henry Chesborough and Wim Vandaverbeke on the book, Open Innovation: Researching a New Paradigm (2006). He also writes several blogs about open innovation, including openinnovation.net, which describes his research and provides comments on other academicians' research projects.

 

In this podcast, Dr. West explores what powers the concept of open innovation and how it differs from traditional innovation efforts, such as research and development. He says that open innovation raises the question about how those companies that practice it differ from those organizations that have research and development programs. Henry Chesborough explored this in first book on open innovation published in 2003.

 

West says, "Companies that practice open innovation will do the same things they did before they adopted it. They might have a research and development department. Chesborough went one step further by looking at the revolutionary nature of open innovation. According to him, open innovation is a process that enables a company to find the best sources of innovation, and to find the best paths to commercialize that innovation. The company might accomplish these goals looking within company and looking outside the company. They might take other paths that they would not have considered if they did not know about open innovation."

 

Dr. West has two important takeaways for chief information officers, chief strategy officers, and chief technology officers: look for external resources who know how to make your products better or who have new products ideas, and find the best ways to bring these resources into your organization. He says, "You might look at university students, your suppliers and customers, or an open innovation community. You might have to look at all of these possibilities to find out which class of individuals or position in the value chain will provide the best ideas you want. Money does not always motivate people to share their ideas with you. Many people like the idea of a challenge to compete for recognition. You might have a content to find the best ideas."

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Mastering Agility – How IT Can Drive Revenue: Michael Hugos, former Fortune 1000 CIO and Author

2010-01-27
Length: 18s

In this podcast, Michael Hugos provides insight from his CIO experience and his latest book, Business Agility – Sustainable Prosperity in a Relentlessly Competitive World.

Michael Hugos, the former CIO for Network Services Company, took a different track when he wrote his latest IT book. Business Agility – Sustainable Prosperity in a Relentlessly Competitive World provides business executives with tools and tips on how they can help IT professionals drive business revenue. He says that IT professionals tend to forget that the business is where the money is. That's why IT exists." He adds that technologies, such as cloud computing, open source and virtualization, will provide great cost benefits to the business. "We need to be in better position to guide these decisions."

Hugos has first-hand experience working with business executives to drive revenue at Network Services Company, an $8 billion cooperative of 86 distributors that market industrial products to major companies. Before this company became agile, the profit margin on coffee cups was practically nothing and getting smaller. Multiply this by Network Services' distributors who sell to 5,000 stores across the country. He says, "We banded together under this cooperative and worked closely with sales. Interesting things started to happen and ideas for making more money started to flow." The information-based, value-added services Hugos helped to devise returned a two percent to three percent profit margin. "If you do things right, you can earn more money or what he calls the agility dividend"

Hugos thinking is nothing new. He refers to the invisible hand theory which Adam Smith, the great British economist, came up with 250 years ago. He says, "The invisible hand pushes the price of all products to their cost of production. No amount of fast talking sales people and ball game tickets will change this."

The end result for Network Services was complete transparency for more products. Hugos says, "Out of the 50 items we came up with, we carried out 25 for them. For example, we could fill an order directly off a purchasing system or via EDI or XML. We now had a customized solution that made our paper cups more valuable."

In this podcast, Hugos provides some current IT enablers that will help an organization achieve speed and agility, give some examples of companies that have achieved both business and IT speed and agility, and offers takeaways to help CIOs assess the business impact of IT based on speed and agility.

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Mastering Agility – How IT Can Drive Revenue: Michael Hugos, former Fortune 1000 CIO and Author

2010-01-27
Length: 18s

In this podcast, Michael Hugos provides insight from his CIO experience and his latest book, Business Agility – Sustainable Prosperity in a Relentlessly Competitive World.

Michael Hugos, the former CIO for Network Services Company, took a different track when he wrote his latest IT book. Business Agility – Sustainable Prosperity in a Relentlessly Competitive World provides business executives with tools and tips on how they can help IT professionals drive business revenue. He says that IT professionals tend to forget that the business is where the money is. That's why IT exists." He adds that technologies, such as cloud computing, open source and virtualization, will provide great cost benefits to the business. "We need to be in better position to guide these decisions."

Hugos has first-hand experience working with business executives to drive revenue at Network Services Company, an $8 billion cooperative of 86 distributors that market industrial products to major companies. Before this company became agile, the profit margin on coffee cups was practically nothing and getting smaller. Multiply this by Network Services' distributors who sell to 5,000 stores across the country. He says, "We banded together under this cooperative and worked closely with sales. Interesting things started to happen and ideas for making more money started to flow." The information-based, value-added services Hugos helped to devise returned a two percent to three percent profit margin. "If you do things right, you can earn more money or what he calls the agility dividend"

Hugos thinking is nothing new. He refers to the invisible hand theory which Adam Smith, the great British economist, came up with 250 years ago. He says, "The invisible hand pushes the price of all products to their cost of production. No amount of fast talking sales people and ball game tickets will change this."

The end result for Network Services was complete transparency for more products. Hugos says, "Out of the 50 items we came up with, we carried out 25 for them. For example, we could fill an order directly off a purchasing system or via EDI or XML. We now had a customized solution that made our paper cups more valuable."

In this podcast, Hugos provides some current IT enablers that will help an organization achieve speed and agility, give some examples of companies that have achieved both business and IT speed and agility, and offers takeaways to help CIOs assess the business impact of IT based on speed and agility.

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Driving a Global Company's Collaborative/Cloud Computing Initiatives with Vid Byanna - Accenture

2010-01-20
Length: 15s

In this podcast Vid Byanna, executive director of Accenture's internal IT infrastructure, talks about his company's and collaborative computing, and cloud computing initiatives.

Each day the 177,000 employees at Accenture, a $19 billion global IT services company, must communicate effectively with 1,000 of customers in more than 120 countries. In fact, Accenture executives often find themselves looking for internal experts who can support specific customer engagements.  The traditional process has involved emailing one's network of colleagues to help with the search. Now these executives can use Accenture People, an internal version of LinkedIn, to search the company's global network of employees.

Accenture People comprises Accenture Collaboration 2.0, a global set of technology initiatives to improve knowledge sharing, enhance communication, and allow for dynamic collaboration within the organization. Technologies in this collaboration platform include social networking applications, greater search functionality, telepresence, and unified communications.

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Driving a Global Company's Collaborative/Cloud Computing Initiatives with Vid Byanna - Accenture

2010-01-20
Length: 15s

In this podcast Vid Byanna, executive director of Accenture's internal IT infrastructure, talks about his company's and collaborative computing, and cloud computing initiatives.

Each day the 177,000 employees at Accenture, a $19 billion global IT services company, must communicate effectively with 1,000 of customers in more than 120 countries. In fact, Accenture executives often find themselves looking for internal experts who can support specific customer engagements.  The traditional process has involved emailing one's network of colleagues to help with the search. Now these executives can use Accenture People, an internal version of LinkedIn, to search the company's global network of employees.

Accenture People comprises Accenture Collaboration 2.0, a global set of technology initiatives to improve knowledge sharing, enhance communication, and allow for dynamic collaboration within the organization. Technologies in this collaboration platform include social networking applications, greater search functionality, telepresence, and unified communications.

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Keeping an Eye on the Four Factes of Cloud Computing:Mark Lobel, Subject Expert at PricewaterhouseCoopers

2010-01-13
Length: 18s

In this podcast, Mark Lobel, a subject expert at PricewaterhouseCoopers, discusses the pros and cons of the four facets of cloud computing. He also touches on other cloud computing issues that should be of concern to CIOs.

 

Cloud computing has become an interesting and important subject on the minds of most CIOs. Its complexity has forced CIOs to think about what applications make sense to move to the cloud, what type of a cloud -- internal versus external, will work best for the organization, and how does an organization know its data will be secure?

 

PricewaterhouseCoopers recently published its quarterly Technology Forecast with an emphasis on cloud computing. Based on material in the report, Mark Lobel, a subject expert for PricewaterhouseCoopers, looks at cloud computing as having four facets. If one were to draw a matrix with four boxes, the top left box would include software as a service, and infrastructure as a service would be below it. The top right side of the matrix would include on-premises and off-premises or a combined public and private cloud application capability, and cloud bursting would be below it.

 

Software as a ServiceOn-Premises/Off-Premises-Public Versus Private Cloud CapabilityInfrastructure as a ServiceCloud Bursting

 

 

In this podcast, Lobel looks at the pros and cons for using each one of these cloud computing facets. He also looks at the overall strengths and weaknesses of the cloud computing industry; the way an organization's culture affects its approach to cloud computing; the ROI benefits of cloud computing; the way cloud computing will change applications development; and some takeaways CIOs should consider before deploying a cloud computing strategy.

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Keeping an Eye on the Four Factes of Cloud Computing:Mark Lobel, Subject Expert at PricewaterhouseCoopers

2010-01-13
Length: 18s

In this podcast, Mark Lobel, a subject expert at PricewaterhouseCoopers, discusses the pros and cons of the four facets of cloud computing. He also touches on other cloud computing issues that should be of concern to CIOs.

 

Cloud computing has become an interesting and important subject on the minds of most CIOs. Its complexity has forced CIOs to think about what applications make sense to move to the cloud, what type of a cloud -- internal versus external, will work best for the organization, and how does an organization know its data will be secure?

 

PricewaterhouseCoopers recently published its quarterly Technology Forecast with an emphasis on cloud computing. Based on material in the report, Mark Lobel, a subject expert for PricewaterhouseCoopers, looks at cloud computing as having four facets. If one were to draw a matrix with four boxes, the top left box would include software as a service, and infrastructure as a service would be below it. The top right side of the matrix would include on-premises and off-premises or a combined public and private cloud application capability, and cloud bursting would be below it.

 

Software as a ServiceOn-Premises/Off-Premises-Public Versus Private Cloud CapabilityInfrastructure as a ServiceCloud Bursting

 

 

In this podcast, Lobel looks at the pros and cons for using each one of these cloud computing facets. He also looks at the overall strengths and weaknesses of the cloud computing industry; the way an organization's culture affects its approach to cloud computing; the ROI benefits of cloud computing; the way cloud computing will change applications development; and some takeaways CIOs should consider before deploying a cloud computing strategy.

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Trends in Enterprise Storage—Cloud Computing Virtualization with Mike Karp, VP and Principal Analyst at Ptak-Noel Associates

2010-01-08
Length: 17s

In this podcast, Mike Karp, VP and Principal Analyst at Ptak-Noel Associates and founder of Infrastructure Analytics, talks about how technology trends, such as cloud computing and virtualization, will continue to reshape enterprise storage, and what CIOs must know to take advantage of these trends.…

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Peter Beckman of Argonne National Labs Talks about Optimizing Cloud Computing and Green Data Centers

2010-01-07
Length: 23s

In this podcast, Dr. Peter Beckman, director of leadership computing at Argonne National Laboratory. talks about both cloud computing and green IT at the Lab.

 

Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is one of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) oldest and largest national laboratories for science and engineering research. ANL uses its annual $540 million operating budget to support 100's of research projects of interest to numerous federal agencies, and academic research institutions. ANL is one of DOE's two largest supercomputing centers. The other one is at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

 

In addition to supercomputing, ANL also offers its researchers some less expensive alternatives, namely, grid computing, and soon, cloud computing. Peter Beckman, the ANL's director of leadership computing, says that grid computing is best suited for running applications at multiple sites in cycles available to users in many locations. He says, "On the other hand, cloud computing will enable scientists to build their own solutions as they need them and run them in the cloud. It will also enable the consolidation and sharing of Linux clusters hosted on our cloud. For example, hosting will enable you to expand your 32-node cluster to a 200-node cluster for a few days. "

 

Opportunities for cloud computing at ANL include everything form studying the genome to looking at data from CERN's supercollider to understanding the smallest particles in the galaxy.

 

Cloud computing at ANL will eliminate the need for scientists to do their work on a $100 million supercomputer. Beckman says cloud computing is very appealing to some of ANL's researchers. He say, "Cloud computing's bursty, pay-as-you go for cycles model will lower the cost of getting some projects done. It will allow for demand-driven, large allocations of resources, such as a 1,000's of processors for the next couple of week, better than going to a supercomputer. It will also eliminate the need to upgrade equipment." Beckman adds that ANL would like to push some of its cloud capabilities to commercial service such as amazon.com.

 

In addition to cloud computing, ANL is saving money by optimizing data center technologies, such as water-size economizing, to keep the supercomputer cool and energy efficient. In fact, the chip architecture of ANL's supercomputer uses the least amount of power possible to do its scientific calculations. Beckman says, "Our data center is a factor of two less power data centers that have a different architecture." During some of the winter months, ANL uses water-side economizing to reduce energy costs. The process involves sending the water outside to be cooled by the cooling tower, and then piping the cooled water through heat exchangers in the machine room. He says, "We can cool the machine for free. We'd like to expand the number of months we can do this for."

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Peter Beckman of Argonne National Labs Talks about Optimizing Cloud Computing and Green Data Centers

2010-01-07
Length: 23s

In this podcast, Dr. Peter Beckman, director of leadership computing at Argonne National Laboratory. talks about both cloud computing and green IT at the Lab.

 

Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is one of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) oldest and largest national laboratories for science and engineering research. ANL uses its annual $540 million operating budget to support 100's of research projects of interest to numerous federal agencies, and academic research institutions. ANL is one of DOE's two largest supercomputing centers. The other one is at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

 

In addition to supercomputing, ANL also offers its researchers some less expensive alternatives, namely, grid computing, and soon, cloud computing. Peter Beckman, the ANL's director of leadership computing, says that grid computing is best suited for running applications at multiple sites in cycles available to users in many locations. He says, "On the other hand, cloud computing will enable scientists to build their own solutions as they need them and run them in the cloud. It will also enable the consolidation and sharing of Linux clusters hosted on our cloud. For example, hosting will enable you to expand your 32-node cluster to a 200-node cluster for a few days. "

 

Opportunities for cloud computing at ANL include everything form studying the genome to looking at data from CERN's supercollider to understanding the smallest particles in the galaxy.

 

Cloud computing at ANL will eliminate the need for scientists to do their work on a $100 million supercomputer. Beckman says cloud computing is very appealing to some of ANL's researchers. He say, "Cloud computing's bursty, pay-as-you go for cycles model will lower the cost of getting some projects done. It will allow for demand-driven, large allocations of resources, such as a 1,000's of processors for the next couple of week, better than going to a supercomputer. It will also eliminate the need to upgrade equipment." Beckman adds that ANL would like to push some of its cloud capabilities to commercial service such as amazon.com.

 

In addition to cloud computing, ANL is saving money by optimizing data center technologies, such as water-size economizing, to keep the supercomputer cool and energy efficient. In fact, the chip architecture of ANL's supercomputer uses the least amount of power possible to do its scientific calculations. Beckman says, "Our data center is a factor of two less power data centers that have a different architecture." During some of the winter months, ANL uses water-side economizing to reduce energy costs. The process involves sending the water outside to be cooled by the cooling tower, and then piping the cooled water through heat exchangers in the machine room. He says, "We can cool the machine for free. We'd like to expand the number of months we can do this for."

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Down-to-Earth Talk about Cloud Computing & Web 2.0: Theresa Lanowitz, Former Gartner Consultant

2009-12-02
Length: 15s

In this podcast, Theresa Lanowitz , former Gartner Group analyst, provides some down-to-earth discussion about cloud computing as a disruptive technology, moving one step closer to pervasive utility computing.


Every household doesn't need its own energy grid. If you follow this logic, then each enterprise does not need to be in the business of creating massive infrastructure. Why not take advantage of the some of the world's largest infrastructure offered to you by Amazon.com's Web Services or Google Apps Engine? That the view of Theresa Lanowitz, a former Gartner Group research analyst and the founder of voke, a research firm focused on breakthrough technologies, such as cloud computing.

She says that while Salesforce.com has revolutionized customer relations marketing by elevating it as a platform as a service, Amazon.com and Google.com have the opportunity to share their knowledge and expertise with every enterprise. She adds, "By making their massively scalable, highly available, high-performance environment, and a solid security infrastructure available, both Amazon.com and Google.com have moved one step closer to software as a service and pervasive utility computing. As a result, companies will be able to lower the cost of doing business and to remain innovative, competitive, and profitable. Enterprises of all sizes need to focus on delivering value to the marketplace of their core competency, regardless of what it is."

In this podcast, Lanowitz discusses the following:

What type of impact Amazon.com Web Services and Google Apps Engine will have on cloud computing; What other areas of cloud computing and Web 2.0 will prevail; Why CIOs are hesitant to embrace cloud computing; and What three cloud computing takeaways CIOs need to think about in making decisions about this app?…

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Down-to-Earth Talk about Cloud Computing & Web 2.0: Theresa Lanowitz, Former Gartner Consultant

2009-12-02
Length: 15s

In this podcast, Theresa Lanowitz , former Gartner Group analyst, provides some down-to-earth discussion about cloud computing as a disruptive technology, moving one step closer to pervasive utility computing.


Every household doesn't need its own energy grid. If you follow this logic, then each enterprise does not need to be in the business of creating massive infrastructure. Why not take advantage of the some of the world's largest infrastructure offered to you by Amazon.com's Web Services or Google Apps Engine? That the view of Theresa Lanowitz, a former Gartner Group research analyst and the founder of voke, a research firm focused on breakthrough technologies, such as cloud computing.

She says that while Salesforce.com has revolutionized customer relations marketing by elevating it as a platform as a service, Amazon.com and Google.com have the opportunity to share their knowledge and expertise with every enterprise. She adds, "By making their massively scalable, highly available, high-performance environment, and a solid security infrastructure available, both Amazon.com and Google.com have moved one step closer to software as a service and pervasive utility computing. As a result, companies will be able to lower the cost of doing business and to remain innovative, competitive, and profitable. Enterprises of all sizes need to focus on delivering value to the marketplace of their core competency, regardless of what it is."

In this podcast, Lanowitz discusses the following:

What type of impact Amazon.com Web Services and Google Apps Engine will have on cloud computing; What other areas of cloud computing and Web 2.0 will prevail; Why CIOs are hesitant to embrace cloud computing; and What three cloud computing takeaways CIOs need to think about in making decisions about this app?…

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Business Impact of IT Requires Good Partnership with IT & Business:Susan Cramm, author & CIO Coach

2009-11-18
Length: 26s

In this podcast, Susan Cramm, author of, The Eight Things We Hate About IT, talks about how CIOs can improve their relationships with business partners to achieve a higher quality of business value. She also attacks some of the political issues that CIOs face on the job.

Regardless of the company's size, CIOs have the on-going challenge of creating business value or business impact of IT. Executive management needs to realize that CIOs and their IT team can’t deliver business impact on their own. According to Susan Cramm, a former CIO and founder of Valuedance, an IT leadership coaching firm, says that CIOs don’t own the four P’s needed to realize business impact -- people, processes, products, and profit and loss. Business partners manage these four things. Cramm, the author of the forthcoming book, The Eight Things We Hate About IT (Harvard Business School Press, says that CIOs and their senior leadership team need to partner with their business counterparts in order to deliver value to the organization.

"If you have a good strong leader and a relationship across the business for delivery of IT services, then you have a chance to move up the value chain and set up an investment governance process. Such a governance process will ensure that you have a full cycle of investment management in place. You just aren’t looking at things like a business plan, but managing those targeted business impacts through the duration of the program and subsequent projects. Moreover,  you are holding business leaders and IT accountable for the realization of that value."

In this podcast, Cramm, who writes and blogs for Harvard Business Review, talks about how CIOs can improve their relationships with business partners to achieve a higher quality of business value. She also attacks some of the political issues that CIOs face on the job.

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Business Impact of IT Requires Good Partnership with IT & Business:Susan Cramm, author & CIO Coach

2009-11-18
Length: 26s

In this podcast, Susan Cramm, author of, The Eight Things We Hate About IT, talks about how CIOs can improve their relationships with business partners to achieve a higher quality of business value. She also attacks some of the political issues that CIOs face on the job.

Regardless of the company's size, CIOs have the on-going challenge of creating business value or business impact of IT. Executive management needs to realize that CIOs and their IT team can’t deliver business impact on their own. According to Susan Cramm, a former CIO and founder of Valuedance, an IT leadership coaching firm, says that CIOs don’t own the four P’s needed to realize business impact -- people, processes, products, and profit and loss. Business partners manage these four things. Cramm, the author of the forthcoming book, The Eight Things We Hate About IT (Harvard Business School Press, says that CIOs and their senior leadership team need to partner with their business counterparts in order to deliver value to the organization.

"If you have a good strong leader and a relationship across the business for delivery of IT services, then you have a chance to move up the value chain and set up an investment governance process. Such a governance process will ensure that you have a full cycle of investment management in place. You just aren’t looking at things like a business plan, but managing those targeted business impacts through the duration of the program and subsequent projects. Moreover,  you are holding business leaders and IT accountable for the realization of that value."

In this podcast, Cramm, who writes and blogs for Harvard Business Review, talks about how CIOs can improve their relationships with business partners to achieve a higher quality of business value. She also attacks some of the political issues that CIOs face on the job.

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4G Wireless Disruptive Technology and What CIOs Need to Do Now: Dr. Scott Snyder

2009-11-11
Length: 23s

Soon, it will be 4G wireless. This technology will not only provide a staggering amount of bandwidth, but it will create new business models, as well as a new platform for innovation. As a result, CIOs to become 4G wireless savvy immediately. That's the advice of Dr. Scott Snyder, author of The New World of Wireless: How to Compete in 4G Revolution. Now let's meet Dr. Snyder, author, professor, and CEO of Decision Strategies International.

Every now and then a disruptive technology comes along and dramatically changes the way we live and work. In the mid-1990s it was the Internet and TCP-IP, and in 2000, it was the iPhone. Soon, it will be 4G wireless. Consider, for example, how it could make healthcare more pervasive. A doctor in Africa doesn't need to make a dangerous trip to treat patients at a remote village. With 4G wireless technology, he can treat these patients remotely.

Since the 1990s, 3G wireless has been in place, providing us with increasing amounts of bandwidth, speed, and the ability to download multi-media content in a more efficient way. Dr. Scott Snyder, author of the New World of Wireless: How to Compete in the 4G Revolution, says that many people think of 4G wireless, which is the next logical step in the progression of the technology, as just more bandwidth. "Yes, 4G wireless will offer up to 100 megabits per second to mobile users and one gigabit per second to fixed users. You are talking about a wireless connection that is 50 times faster than what you get in your home broadband connection. This is only part of the story. 4G wireless will provide a new paradigm that will alter the network and the handset, by enabling users to have more control over what type of content they get, and what type of services they can get from any location they might be in around the globe."

Snyder adds that user-centric capabilities will be the defining feature of 4G wireless. "Extremely intelligent handsets will have the ability to make decisions on your behalf, just like a remote control for your life. Because it is based on the cloud concept rather than a fixed network, 4G wireless has the capability to follow you around. You will have access to many networks without going back through a network. That's a scary proposition for wireless carriers that make money from people going through their network. This feature enables a whole variety of digital swarms or group behavior. Users can self-organize in this cloud without going through the structure of traditional networks."

As CEO of a Decision Strategies, a technology consulting firm, Snyder came across many executives who lacked awareness of what 4G wireless technology could do, not only to their business, but to their industry as a disruptive force and an innovation platform. The need to educate these executives propelled Snyder to write The New World of Wireless. His book is not just about what's happening with the technology, but how this technology could have broader social and business interactions to create new business models, new industries, and transformational type events.

Meanwhile, new standards for 4G wireless and experimental handsets loom on the horizon. Even aspects of the iPhone sheds light on what new business models might look like. Snyder says that because these weak signals will explode very fast, CIOs need to prepare for 4G wireless right now. "They need to start building wireless into their organization as a competency to be explored both as a communication platform, but also an innovation platform. They need to put the infrastructure in place to support both platforms and to leverage both to build an ecosystem with their customers, partners, vendors, and even your industry. They have to also start fostering wireless content, connectivity and allowing the digital swarm to take place both in your organization and in your ecosystem."

In this podcast, CIOs will learn the following:

The top three things they should be doing to prepare for 4G wireless Some of the ways they can innovate around 4G wireless to become more profitable and derive more marketplace, The new business models that 4G wireless will enable, and And the security issues that will confront this technology.…

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4G Wireless Disruptive Technology and What CIOs Need to Do Now: Dr. Scott Snyder

2009-11-11
Length: 23s

Soon, it will be 4G wireless. This technology will not only provide a staggering amount of bandwidth, but it will create new business models, as well as a new platform for innovation. As a result, CIOs to become 4G wireless savvy immediately. That's the advice of Dr. Scott Snyder, author of The New World of Wireless: How to Compete in 4G Revolution. Now let's meet Dr. Snyder, author, professor, and CEO of Decision Strategies International.

Every now and then a disruptive technology comes along and dramatically changes the way we live and work. In the mid-1990s it was the Internet and TCP-IP, and in 2000, it was the iPhone. Soon, it will be 4G wireless. Consider, for example, how it could make healthcare more pervasive. A doctor in Africa doesn't need to make a dangerous trip to treat patients at a remote village. With 4G wireless technology, he can treat these patients remotely.

Since the 1990s, 3G wireless has been in place, providing us with increasing amounts of bandwidth, speed, and the ability to download multi-media content in a more efficient way. Dr. Scott Snyder, author of the New World of Wireless: How to Compete in the 4G Revolution, says that many people think of 4G wireless, which is the next logical step in the progression of the technology, as just more bandwidth. "Yes, 4G wireless will offer up to 100 megabits per second to mobile users and one gigabit per second to fixed users. You are talking about a wireless connection that is 50 times faster than what you get in your home broadband connection. This is only part of the story. 4G wireless will provide a new paradigm that will alter the network and the handset, by enabling users to have more control over what type of content they get, and what type of services they can get from any location they might be in around the globe."

Snyder adds that user-centric capabilities will be the defining feature of 4G wireless. "Extremely intelligent handsets will have the ability to make decisions on your behalf, just like a remote control for your life. Because it is based on the cloud concept rather than a fixed network, 4G wireless has the capability to follow you around. You will have access to many networks without going back through a network. That's a scary proposition for wireless carriers that make money from people going through their network. This feature enables a whole variety of digital swarms or group behavior. Users can self-organize in this cloud without going through the structure of traditional networks."

As CEO of a Decision Strategies, a technology consulting firm, Snyder came across many executives who lacked awareness of what 4G wireless technology could do, not only to their business, but to their industry as a disruptive force and an innovation platform. The need to educate these executives propelled Snyder to write The New World of Wireless. His book is not just about what's happening with the technology, but how this technology could have broader social and business interactions to create new business models, new industries, and transformational type events.

Meanwhile, new standards for 4G wireless and experimental handsets loom on the horizon. Even aspects of the iPhone sheds light on what new business models might look like. Snyder says that because these weak signals will explode very fast, CIOs need to prepare for 4G wireless right now. "They need to start building wireless into their organization as a competency to be explored both as a communication platform, but also an innovation platform. They need to put the infrastructure in place to support both platforms and to leverage both to build an ecosystem with their customers, partners, vendors, and even your industry. They have to also start fostering wireless content, connectivity and allowing the digital swarm to take place both in your organization and in your ecosystem."

In this podcast, CIOs will learn the following:

The top three things they should be doing to prepare for 4G wireless Some of the ways they can innovate around 4G wireless to become more profitable and derive more marketplace, The new business models that 4G wireless will enable, and And the security issues that will confront this technology.…

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Green IT Book Podcast with Toby Velte

2009-11-06
Length: 16s

How does a guy with a Ph.D. in computational neuroscience wind up doing green IT initiatives at Microsoft? He also has co-authored a guidebook called Green IT: Reduce Your Information System's Environmental Impact While Adding to the Bottom Line. I’m talking about Dr. Tony Velte. In this podcast, he offers a concise framework for how you can green everything from your data centers to desktops. He also has co-authored books about cloud computing and virtualization. How let’s meet Dr. Toby Velte, a member of a Microsoft team focused on helping large enterprise groups with their IT strategies. That includes going green.

How does a guy with a Ph.D. in computational neuroscience wind up doing green IT initiatives at Microsoft and also co-writing a guidebook called Green IT: Reduce Your Information System's Environmental Impact While Adding to the Bottom Line and the upcoming? Dr. Toby J. Velte’s work in computational neuroscience focused on creating models that were very similar to the widespread enterprise networks found in most large companies and in government agencies. Contacts he made along the way helped him to secure a position at Microsoft helping large enterprise groups with their IT strategies, especially around green IT.

Velte’s green IT book provides a roadmap for how you can create a company-wide green IT program starting with your data centers, moving down to desktops, and  empowering individual business units to develop their own IT strategies. He says that the number one problem companies have with moving forward with green IT isn’t the technology or having adequate funds. It’s the people situation.” He urges companies to get all of their stakeholders together to try to understand what the green initiatives are going to look like at the end of the day, and how do they plan to measure success. Next, companies need to measure everything starting with power consumption. “Most companies don’t have the metrics in place. People need to understand what they have and what they are consuming. “ Once companies know what outcomes they want to achieve, then it’s time to execute the green IT program as if it were another IT initiative.

In most companies, green IT begins in the data center. In fact, that’s where it began at Microsoft. When Microsoft built its new data center outside of Quincy, Washington, it supplemented reliance on the power grid by use of water power.

Meanwhile, virtualization and cloud computing can also cut down on a data center’s power consumption. He says, “By moving business process out to the cloud, you are really turning over the power consumption issue to the service provider. With virtualization, can you eliminate the servers with low utilization, say around 15 percent, by moving those applications to virtualized servers. You can achieve upwards of 80 percent utilization with fewer servers.”

In this podcast, Velte talks about some of the practical measurements you can take to make sure your desktops and data centers are green, the ways you can translate those metrics into meaningful results, the steps you can take to reduce your reliance on the power grid, and a plan companies can follow to stay green.

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Green IT Book Podcast with Toby Velte

2009-11-06
Length: 16s

How does a guy with a Ph.D. in computational neuroscience wind up doing green IT initiatives at Microsoft? He also has co-authored a guidebook called Green IT: Reduce Your Information System's Environmental Impact While Adding to the Bottom Line. I’m talking about Dr. Tony Velte. In this podcast, he offers a concise framework for how you can green everything from your data centers to desktops. He also has co-authored books about cloud computing and virtualization. How let’s meet Dr. Toby Velte, a member of a Microsoft team focused on helping large enterprise groups with their IT strategies. That includes going green.

How does a guy with a Ph.D. in computational neuroscience wind up doing green IT initiatives at Microsoft and also co-writing a guidebook called Green IT: Reduce Your Information System's Environmental Impact While Adding to the Bottom Line and the upcoming? Dr. Toby J. Velte’s work in computational neuroscience focused on creating models that were very similar to the widespread enterprise networks found in most large companies and in government agencies. Contacts he made along the way helped him to secure a position at Microsoft helping large enterprise groups with their IT strategies, especially around green IT.

Velte’s green IT book provides a roadmap for how you can create a company-wide green IT program starting with your data centers, moving down to desktops, and  empowering individual business units to develop their own IT strategies. He says that the number one problem companies have with moving forward with green IT isn’t the technology or having adequate funds. It’s the people situation.” He urges companies to get all of their stakeholders together to try to understand what the green initiatives are going to look like at the end of the day, and how do they plan to measure success. Next, companies need to measure everything starting with power consumption. “Most companies don’t have the metrics in place. People need to understand what they have and what they are consuming. “ Once companies know what outcomes they want to achieve, then it’s time to execute the green IT program as if it were another IT initiative.

In most companies, green IT begins in the data center. In fact, that’s where it began at Microsoft. When Microsoft built its new data center outside of Quincy, Washington, it supplemented reliance on the power grid by use of water power.

Meanwhile, virtualization and cloud computing can also cut down on a data center’s power consumption. He says, “By moving business process out to the cloud, you are really turning over the power consumption issue to the service provider. With virtualization, can you eliminate the servers with low utilization, say around 15 percent, by moving those applications to virtualized servers. You can achieve upwards of 80 percent utilization with fewer servers.”

In this podcast, Velte talks about some of the practical measurements you can take to make sure your desktops and data centers are green, the ways you can translate those metrics into meaningful results, the steps you can take to reduce your reliance on the power grid, and a plan companies can follow to stay green.

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Constructing an Effective Future Enterprise Projects Roadmap for IT: Gerald Shields, Aflac’s CIO

2009-10-27
Length: 15s

In this podcast Shields talks about how this roadmap closed the gap between a project’s initial budget and its real cost. Now let’s join Gerald Shield, senior vice president and CIO of Alfac. Who would think that TV commercial featuring the antics of a wisecracking duck could improve a company’s brand recognition by 90 percent?  That’s what a few quacks did for Aflac, a Fortune 500 disability insurance company.  Now, Aflac associates have no trouble getting accepted into new business accounts. The payoff has meant a double digit annual growth rate since 2003, and there’s no end in sight. For 2008, Aflac had revenue of about $16.5 billion and more than 8,000 employees. The company insured more than40 million people in North American and Japan.Of course, Aflac isn’t resting on Nielsen ratings from the TV commercials to stay competitive. Accelerating growth continue to drive IT to find ways key departments can provide better value and services to external customers. In fact, in 2008, Gerald Shields, Aflac’s senior vice president and CIO, received an InfoWorld CTO 25 for adding a future IT projects roadmap into the company’s existing IT governance process. Shields says that this roadmap has helped to close the gap between a project’s initial budget and its real cost.” During Shield’s tenure, both Computerworld and InformationWeek 500 have consistently named Aflac as one of the Best Places to Work in IT. Meanwhile, he was also selected as one of Computerworld’s 100 Premier CIOs for 2006.In this podcast, Shields talks about the following:  ·        How the future IT projects roadmap has helped to improve IT’s relationship with the CIO,·        What payoffs the company has received from doing this type of roadmap,·        How the future IT projects roadmap has changed the governance process,·        What other CIOs can learn from the Aflac experience,·        How Shield’s measures and communicates the business impact of IT to Aflac’s constituents.…

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Constructing an Effective Future Enterprise Projects Roadmap for IT: Gerald Shields, Aflac’s CIO

2009-10-27
Length: 15s

In this podcast Shields talks about how this roadmap closed the gap between a project’s initial budget and its real cost. Now let’s join Gerald Shield, senior vice president and CIO of Alfac. Who would think that TV commercial featuring the antics of a wisecracking duck could improve a company’s brand recognition by 90 percent?  That’s what a few quacks did for Aflac, a Fortune 500 disability insurance company.  Now, Aflac associates have no trouble getting accepted into new business accounts. The payoff has meant a double digit annual growth rate since 2003, and there’s no end in sight. For 2008, Aflac had revenue of about $16.5 billion and more than 8,000 employees. The company insured more than40 million people in North American and Japan.Of course, Aflac isn’t resting on Nielsen ratings from the TV commercials to stay competitive. Accelerating growth continue to drive IT to find ways key departments can provide better value and services to external customers. In fact, in 2008, Gerald Shields, Aflac’s senior vice president and CIO, received an InfoWorld CTO 25 for adding a future IT projects roadmap into the company’s existing IT governance process. Shields says that this roadmap has helped to close the gap between a project’s initial budget and its real cost.” During Shield’s tenure, both Computerworld and InformationWeek 500 have consistently named Aflac as one of the Best Places to Work in IT. Meanwhile, he was also selected as one of Computerworld’s 100 Premier CIOs for 2006.In this podcast, Shields talks about the following:  ·        How the future IT projects roadmap has helped to improve IT’s relationship with the CIO,·        What payoffs the company has received from doing this type of roadmap,·        How the future IT projects roadmap has changed the governance process,·        What other CIOs can learn from the Aflac experience,·        How Shield’s measures and communicates the business impact of IT to Aflac’s constituents.…

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Guidelines for Building a Flexible Technology Architecture: Andy Mulholland, CTO of Capgemini

2009-10-22
Length: 25s

In this podcast, Andy Mulholland, Capgemini’s CTO, provides guidelines for how IT organizations can transition from monolithic applications to more flexible, granular technology architectures. He also talks about the Web services technologies in his books, Mashup Corporations, and Mesh Collaboration. Now let’s join Andy Mulholland, CTO of Capgemini, one of the world’s largest IT consulting firms.

Andy Mulholland, the CTO of the Capgemini, one of the world’s largest IT consulting firms, will be the first to tell you that large, monolithic software applications are inflexible and demand conformity.  For years, he says that IT organizations wrote business applications to follow this departmental, monolithic model. “Because of technical constraints, if a company did not think through everything it needed from the application and build it into this at the beginning, it became hard to do anything about it later. As a result, companies ended up with these monolithic applications that covered all possibilities.”

Today, Mulholland says that we are starting to see enterprises return to their core businesses, and to spin off what doesn’t fit. Along with that, the evolution toward Web services is really about how every department in an organization can create its own flexible shared services. He says that companies have to move from monolithic applications to more granular services. “The only way to do that quickly and efficiently is with nimble applications which operate flexibly off a data set and that provide a single version of a particular company’s truth.”

Mulholland is not suggesting that companies abandon their monolithic applications. He says, “Monolithic applications are great for capturing and protecting data about what companies do. But there is focus on how marketing can be better done, how to better understand customers, and how to build Web

services that drive revenue. He points to the ability of companies, such as DHL, FedEx, and UPS, to be service  oriented in the front office, but to have a consolidated architecture in the back office. .

In this podcast, Mulholland, provides guidelines for how IT organizations can make the transition from building monolithic applications to more flexible, granular technology architectures. He also talks about the Web services technologies in his books, Mashup Corporations, and Mesh Collaboration.

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Guidelines for Building a Flexible Technology Architecture: Andy Mulholland, CTO of Capgemini

2009-10-22
Length: 25s

In this podcast, Andy Mulholland, Capgemini’s CTO, provides guidelines for how IT organizations can transition from monolithic applications to more flexible, granular technology architectures. He also talks about the Web services technologies in his books, Mashup Corporations, and Mesh Collaboration. Now let’s join Andy Mulholland, CTO of Capgemini, one of the world’s largest IT consulting firms.

Andy Mulholland, the CTO of the Capgemini, one of the world’s largest IT consulting firms, will be the first to tell you that large, monolithic software applications are inflexible and demand conformity.  For years, he says that IT organizations wrote business applications to follow this departmental, monolithic model. “Because of technical constraints, if a company did not think through everything it needed from the application and build it into this at the beginning, it became hard to do anything about it later. As a result, companies ended up with these monolithic applications that covered all possibilities.”

Today, Mulholland says that we are starting to see enterprises return to their core businesses, and to spin off what doesn’t fit. Along with that, the evolution toward Web services is really about how every department in an organization can create its own flexible shared services. He says that companies have to move from monolithic applications to more granular services. “The only way to do that quickly and efficiently is with nimble applications which operate flexibly off a data set and that provide a single version of a particular company’s truth.”

Mulholland is not suggesting that companies abandon their monolithic applications. He says, “Monolithic applications are great for capturing and protecting data about what companies do. But there is focus on how marketing can be better done, how to better understand customers, and how to build Web

services that drive revenue. He points to the ability of companies, such as DHL, FedEx, and UPS, to be service  oriented in the front office, but to have a consolidated architecture in the back office. .

In this podcast, Mulholland, provides guidelines for how IT organizations can make the transition from building monolithic applications to more flexible, granular technology architectures. He also talks about the Web services technologies in his books, Mashup Corporations, and Mesh Collaboration.

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How Insightful CIOs Achieve Business Impact of IT: Ashwin Rangan, Former Walmart.com CIO

2009-10-16
Length: 27s

In this podcast, Ashwin Rangan, now the chief technology information for MarketShare Partners, talks about what it takes for a CIO to achieve business impact of IT.  Now let’s meet Ashwin Rangan.  He has capsulated his experience in a book called, Tomorrow’s CIO: Strategic Executive Conversations

 

 After becoming CIO of Walmart.com in 2005, Rangan had the challenge of making sure that the online store stayed up and running around the clock. He said, “It had experienced a number of unexpected outages. My challenge also included carrying out the value proposition of the Wal-Mart store brand – Always Low prices, Always, and Save More, Live Better. When you shop at Wal-Mart, either in the stores or online, we guarantee that your purchases will cost less than if you bought the same goods from another source.”

 

Once Rangan’s team got through taking the necessary remedial steps, the online store just wasn’t opened all of the time, but it could also scale significantly to handle peak periods. In fact, on the day after Thanksgiving in 2005, Walmart.com surpassed amazon.com as the site with the highest traffic in the e-commerce space. Rangan says, “We had more than 3.5 percent of the nation’s population shopping the store on that day. It was a proud day for all of us.”  

 

The following year, the Arkansas team asked Rangan and his team to create a global dot.com format. The transformative nature of the project would position Wal-Mart has having both a bricks and mortar and online presence in 12 different countries, including Canada, Mexico, the five countries in Central America, Brazil, Japan, the UK, Germany and Korea. He says, “The key question was how to institutionalize the largest brand in the brand world by turning the initial dot.com format into a global format. We had the challenge of ensuring a single format with multi-language, multi-fluencies, and multi-distribution capabilities. We also had to spearhead the global format from incubation to inception to proof of concept.”  

 

In 2007, Rangan’s team proved that the online global format would work.  He said, “We blueprinted the entire concept so that it would be carried out over the next couple of years. Like Walmart.com, our global online store was another transformative initiative for this major brand.”

 

Although Rangan officially retired from being a CIO in 2008, he is still creating business impact of IT, as well as communicating how other CIOs can achieve it. He is currently the chief information technology officer for MarketShare Partners, an industry leading analytics firm that makes marketing more measurable and accountable than never before. He says, “We are enabling some of the largest brands in the world to determine how best to make their investment decisions, and how to measure these investments. In addition to his role at MarketShare Partners, Rangan has also written a book, called Tomorrow’s CIO: Strategic Executive Conversations. Rob Carter, the global CIO for Fedex, says that Rangan puts forth “much sound advice around how to navigate this complex and continuously changing space [of IT].”

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How Insightful CIOs Achieve Business Impact of IT: Ashwin Rangan, Former Walmart.com CIO

2009-10-16
Length: 27s

In this podcast, Ashwin Rangan, now the chief technology information for MarketShare Partners, talks about what it takes for a CIO to achieve business impact of IT.  Now let’s meet Ashwin Rangan.  He has capsulated his experience in a book called, Tomorrow’s CIO: Strategic Executive Conversations

 

 After becoming CIO of Walmart.com in 2005, Rangan had the challenge of making sure that the online store stayed up and running around the clock. He said, “It had experienced a number of unexpected outages. My challenge also included carrying out the value proposition of the Wal-Mart store brand – Always Low prices, Always, and Save More, Live Better. When you shop at Wal-Mart, either in the stores or online, we guarantee that your purchases will cost less than if you bought the same goods from another source.”

 

Once Rangan’s team got through taking the necessary remedial steps, the online store just wasn’t opened all of the time, but it could also scale significantly to handle peak periods. In fact, on the day after Thanksgiving in 2005, Walmart.com surpassed amazon.com as the site with the highest traffic in the e-commerce space. Rangan says, “We had more than 3.5 percent of the nation’s population shopping the store on that day. It was a proud day for all of us.”  

 

The following year, the Arkansas team asked Rangan and his team to create a global dot.com format. The transformative nature of the project would position Wal-Mart has having both a bricks and mortar and online presence in 12 different countries, including Canada, Mexico, the five countries in Central America, Brazil, Japan, the UK, Germany and Korea. He says, “The key question was how to institutionalize the largest brand in the brand world by turning the initial dot.com format into a global format. We had the challenge of ensuring a single format with multi-language, multi-fluencies, and multi-distribution capabilities. We also had to spearhead the global format from incubation to inception to proof of concept.”  

 

In 2007, Rangan’s team proved that the online global format would work.  He said, “We blueprinted the entire concept so that it would be carried out over the next couple of years. Like Walmart.com, our global online store was another transformative initiative for this major brand.”

 

Although Rangan officially retired from being a CIO in 2008, he is still creating business impact of IT, as well as communicating how other CIOs can achieve it. He is currently the chief information technology officer for MarketShare Partners, an industry leading analytics firm that makes marketing more measurable and accountable than never before. He says, “We are enabling some of the largest brands in the world to determine how best to make their investment decisions, and how to measure these investments. In addition to his role at MarketShare Partners, Rangan has also written a book, called Tomorrow’s CIO: Strategic Executive Conversations. Rob Carter, the global CIO for Fedex, says that Rangan puts forth “much sound advice around how to navigate this complex and continuously changing space [of IT].”

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Developing Smart Grid Technology for a Public Utility with Andres Carvallo, CIO of Austin Energy

2009-09-09
Length: 24s

Despite the economy, Austin, Texas, has seen a spike in major businesses, such as google.com and Hewlett-Packard, moving into the area, as well as more people relocating there to find jobs. Meanwhile, Austin Energy, the nation’s ninth largest community-owned electric utility, is making sure it can meet the power demands of its one million residential customers and 41,000 businesses, and continues to return more than $1.5 billion in profits back to the community.

If all goes as planned, Austin Energy could become the country’s first electrical utility to deliver Smart Grid technology. A Smart Grid delivers electricity from suppliers to consumers using digital technology to save energy, reduce cost, and increase reliability and transparency.   

 

Perhaps, the credit for putting Austin Energy on its Smart Grid journey belongs to Andres Carvallo, the organization’s CIO. In fact, this year Computerworld Honors Program’s recognized the outstanding significance of Carvallo’s Smart Grid work in the energy field. Carvallo just could become the first CIO to deliver the country’s first Smart Grid for a public utility.

 

The genesis for the Smart Grid began in 2003 when Carvallo was working on automation and efficiency and optimization of the business. In 2004, after reading the Electric Power Research Institute’s white paper on the Intelligrid, Carvallo thought it would be possible to use similar technology for Austin Energy. In fact, not wanting to infringe on the Intelligrid trademark, he coined the term Smart Grid.   In 2007, he gave his first speech about the Smart Grid. With the support of executive management, Carvallo’s team began working on Austin Energy’s Smart Grid, which seamlessly integrates four disciplines: energy, communications, software, and hardware.

 

He says, “Together these four disciplines help to redefine how we generate, distribute, and consume electricity. The project goes beyond how we collect data and move it, and how safely we do it. The decisions will be able to make about that data will affect production, distribution, and consumption of energy, from turning on and off devices, to managing plug-in hybrid electric vehicles in the house. “

 

Of course, as a public utility Austin Energy must abide by the North American Electrical Reliability Council’s standards and regulations for infrastructure protection and cyber security. Carvallo says, “We will become compliant this year.” Meanwhile, he has been one of eight people working on the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s cyber security standards for Smart Grids. He says, “We are awaiting the publication of the interim Smart Grid standards.”

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Tutorial on Data Center Transformation to Increase Business Value: John Bennett of Hewlett-Packard

2009-08-26
Length: 22s

Transforming the data center to provide better business value ranks as a high priority for CIOs this year, according to a survey done by Hewlett-Packard. John Bennett, HP’s worldwide director of data center transformation solutions, says that CIOs face two data center transformation challenges – aging facilities, and refocusing of IT’s priorities away from just managing an infrastructure. He says, “The average data center is more than 25 years old and was not designed to meet the needs of an infrastructure that needs to deploy applications on demand. Meanwhile, IT organizations need to provide an applications environment that more closely aligns with the business, and to spend more of the IT budget on business priorities, management, and maintenance. “ In this tutorial, Bennett helps CIOs to make the business case for a data center transformation based on the simple philosophy: “spend to save to spend to grow.” He says that much of the infrastructure work can be self-funding as a result of cost savings.  “However, to accomplish this, you need to do more than talk about return on investment or total cost of ownership. You also need to make sure this transformation is aligned, supported, or connected to the overall business strategy, as well as the stakeholders’ plans that comprise the strategy. Because a transformation of this type can range in the tens of millions of dollars, CIOs also need to align the project with the internal financial measurements and the resources of the business. After all, you’re competing with other projects that want some of those dollars. Even if you get approval from the board or executive management, the project won’t go as intended unless you have done your homework.” HP has earned its bragging rights when it comes to how to handle a data center transformation. In early 2000, HP found itself with about 85 data centers around the world, along with a 1,000 server rooms, and more than 5,000 applications. Bennett says, “Every time we acquired a company, such as Compaq, we inherited more data centers.”  When Randy Mott, the current CIO joined HP, he immediately got the board’s approval to undertake a three-year IT transformation project, which included consolidating the data centers and standardizing the infrastructure. The company put three data centers in place (each one tied to a backup site), doubled storage capacity, tripled network bandwidth, and improved disaster recovery and business continuity. Bennett says, “We reduced our total IT spending from four percent to two percent of revenue. We reduced energy consumption by 60 percent, and networking costs by 50 percent. Overall, we improved our capability to execute on mergers and acquisitions. We now can assimilate or acquire an organization and make it part of HP very quickly.

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Tutorial on Data Center Transformation to Increase Business Value: John Bennett of Hewlett-Packard

2009-08-26
Length: 22s

Transforming the data center to provide better business value ranks as a high priority for CIOs this year, according to a survey done by Hewlett-Packard. John Bennett, HP’s worldwide director of data center transformation solutions, says that CIOs face two data center transformation challenges – aging facilities, and refocusing of IT’s priorities away from just managing an infrastructure. He says, “The average data center is more than 25 years old and was not designed to meet the needs of an infrastructure that needs to deploy applications on demand. Meanwhile, IT organizations need to provide an applications environment that more closely aligns with the business, and to spend more of the IT budget on business priorities, management, and maintenance. “ In this tutorial, Bennett helps CIOs to make the business case for a data center transformation based on the simple philosophy: “spend to save to spend to grow.” He says that much of the infrastructure work can be self-funding as a result of cost savings.  “However, to accomplish this, you need to do more than talk about return on investment or total cost of ownership. You also need to make sure this transformation is aligned, supported, or connected to the overall business strategy, as well as the stakeholders’ plans that comprise the strategy. Because a transformation of this type can range in the tens of millions of dollars, CIOs also need to align the project with the internal financial measurements and the resources of the business. After all, you’re competing with other projects that want some of those dollars. Even if you get approval from the board or executive management, the project won’t go as intended unless you have done your homework.” HP has earned its bragging rights when it comes to how to handle a data center transformation. In early 2000, HP found itself with about 85 data centers around the world, along with a 1,000 server rooms, and more than 5,000 applications. Bennett says, “Every time we acquired a company, such as Compaq, we inherited more data centers.”  When Randy Mott, the current CIO joined HP, he immediately got the board’s approval to undertake a three-year IT transformation project, which included consolidating the data centers and standardizing the infrastructure. The company put three data centers in place (each one tied to a backup site), doubled storage capacity, tripled network bandwidth, and improved disaster recovery and business continuity. Bennett says, “We reduced our total IT spending from four percent to two percent of revenue. We reduced energy consumption by 60 percent, and networking costs by 50 percent. Overall, we improved our capability to execute on mergers and acquisitions. We now can assimilate or acquire an organization and make it part of HP very quickly.

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Expanding the Use of Web 2.0 Technologies to Drive Business Value: Paul Heller, Vanguard Group’s CIO

2009-08-20
Length: 13s

The Vanguard Group, one of the largest mutual funds companies in the country, has managed to live up to its name for the past 35 years. Today, Vanguard manages about $1.1 trillion in assets with roughly the same amount of employees it has had for the past decade. Vanguard also differs greatly from its publicly traded competitors, such as Fidelity Investments. Vanguard’s customers – both retail and institutional -- literally own the company. Eighty percent of Vanguard’s business takes place through its various Web sites. The rest of the business occurs either via the telephone or mail. By leveraging its unique structure and technology prowess, Vanguard has some of the lowest management fees of any mutual fund company.  Paul Heller, Vanguard’s CIO, says that technology enables the company to focus on its core mission – preserving and creating wealth for customers.   In 2007, Vanguard received an annual InformationWeek 500 award for being the third best and most innovative company in the country. At that time, the company unveiled its $10 million portal which gives employees better tools to facilitate communications with each other. Much has happened in the past two years. Heller says that the company has expanded its use of Web 2.0 tools both for employees and customers. He says, “For years, we have been hosting e-meetings with our institutional customers. We are now doing this on the retail side where we will invite 25,000 people to a meeting on a specific topic. They can see each others’ questions. “

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Expanding the Use of Web 2.0 Technologies to Drive Business Value: Paul Heller, Vanguard Group’s CIO

2009-08-20
Length: 13s

The Vanguard Group, one of the largest mutual funds companies in the country, has managed to live up to its name for the past 35 years. Today, Vanguard manages about $1.1 trillion in assets with roughly the same amount of employees it has had for the past decade. Vanguard also differs greatly from its publicly traded competitors, such as Fidelity Investments. Vanguard’s customers – both retail and institutional -- literally own the company. Eighty percent of Vanguard’s business takes place through its various Web sites. The rest of the business occurs either via the telephone or mail. By leveraging its unique structure and technology prowess, Vanguard has some of the lowest management fees of any mutual fund company.  Paul Heller, Vanguard’s CIO, says that technology enables the company to focus on its core mission – preserving and creating wealth for customers.   In 2007, Vanguard received an annual InformationWeek 500 award for being the third best and most innovative company in the country. At that time, the company unveiled its $10 million portal which gives employees better tools to facilitate communications with each other. Much has happened in the past two years. Heller says that the company has expanded its use of Web 2.0 tools both for employees and customers. He says, “For years, we have been hosting e-meetings with our institutional customers. We are now doing this on the retail side where we will invite 25,000 people to a meeting on a specific topic. They can see each others’ questions. “

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A Tactical Plan for Deploying External Social Media: Dave Evans, Social Media Strategist & Author

2009-08-14
Length: 23s

Whether you are a chief information officer or a chief marketing officer, you need to know how to leverage technology, especially social media, to understand how customers perceive your brand both positively and negatively, and what changes you need to make to your products to get more positive responses. You have the challenge of influencing 1,000s of daily online conversations you can’t control. After all, these aren’t your conversations. Dave Evans, a social media strategist and author of Social Media Marketing – an Hour a Day, says that you need to create an external social media experience that your customers will talk about in a way that invokes others to buy your products. He adds, “This is a big change from asking your advertising agency to change the message because customers’ aren’t getting it. “

Evans’s social media strategy firm, Digital Voodoo, has helped many well-known companies come to grips with the impact of social media, and to recommend changes to their brand, product, or service to position it for success using external social media. Take the work Evan’s firm did for Meredith Publishing, which produces well-known magazines such as Parents, Better Homes and Gardens, and More. His firm created a strong engagement between Meredith’s individual print and online subject subscribers via the content discussions which they engaged. He says, “We gauged success in terms of page views –the base line indicator for publishers– and the size of the community as it grew over time.”


Evan’s following as a social media marketing strategist caught the eye of John Wiley & Sons. He was asked to write a book to fit into Wiley’s An Hour a Day series. Unlike other social media marketing books, Evans’  book provides a daily plan for how you can approach social media both strategically and tactically. For example, in one exercise, he tells you to go to IBM’s blog and read about the policies for selecting bloggers. He says, “If you don’t have the right social media strategy, you’ll wander all over the place. On the other hand, having the strategy right doesn’t mean you can turn the job over to the operational side of your business and say, ‘Now go to do this.’ The book allows you to select the things you want to work on.” 

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A Tactical Plan for Deploying External Social Media: Dave Evans, Social Media Strategist & Author

2009-08-14

In this podcast, Evans also talks about the relationship between social media and CRM, and the impact social media will have on wireless technology, known as the digital swarm.

Whether you are a chief information officer or a chief marketing officer, you need to know how to leverage technology, especially social media, to understand how customers perceive your brand both positively and negatively, and what changes you need to make to your products to get more positive responses. You have the challenge of influencing 1,000s of daily online conversations you can’t control. After all, these aren’t your conversations. Dave Evans, a social media strategist and author of Social Media Marketing – an Hour a Day, says that you need to create an external social media experience that your customers will talk about in a way that invokes others to buy your products. He adds, “This is a big change from asking your advertising agency to change the message because customers’ aren’t getting it. “

Evans’s social media strategy firm, Digital Voodoo, has helped many well-known companies come to grips with the impact of social media, and to recommend changes to their brand, product, or service to position it for success using external social media. Take the work Evan’s firm did for Meredith Publishing, which produces well-known magazines such as Parents, Better Homes and Gardens, and More. His firm created a strong engagement between Meredith’s individual print and online subject subscribers via the content discussions which they engaged. He says, “We gauged success in terms of page views –the base line indicator for publishers– and the size of the community as it grew over time.”

 

Evan’s following as a social media marketing strategist caught the eye of John Wiley & Sons. He was asked to write a book to fit into Wiley’s An Hour a Day series. Unlike other social media marketing books, Evans’  book provides a daily plan for how you can approach social media both strategically and tactically. For example, in one exercise, he tells you to go to IBM’s blog and read about the policies for selecting bloggers. He says, “If you don’t have the right social media strategy, you’ll wander all over the place. On the other hand, having the strategy right doesn’t mean you can turn the job over to the operational side of your business and say, ‘Now go to do this.’ The book allows you to select the things you want to work on.” 

 


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A Tactical Plan for Deploying External Social Media: Dave Evans, Social Media Strategist & Author

2009-08-14
Length: 23s

Whether you are a chief information officer or a chief marketing officer, you need to know how to leverage technology, especially social media, to understand how customers perceive your brand both positively and negatively, and what changes you need to make to your products to get more positive responses. You have the challenge of influencing 1,000s of daily online conversations you can’t control. After all, these aren’t your conversations. Dave Evans, a social media strategist and author of Social Media Marketing – an Hour a Day, says that you need to create an external social media experience that your customers will talk about in a way that invokes others to buy your products. He adds, “This is a big change from asking your advertising agency to change the message because customers’ aren’t getting it. “

Evans’s social media strategy firm, Digital Voodoo, has helped many well-known companies come to grips with the impact of social media, and to recommend changes to their brand, product, or service to position it for success using external social media. Take the work Evan’s firm did for Meredith Publishing, which produces well-known magazines such as Parents, Better Homes and Gardens, and More. His firm created a strong engagement between Meredith’s individual print and online subject subscribers via the content discussions which they engaged. He says, “We gauged success in terms of page views –the base line indicator for publishers– and the size of the community as it grew over time.”


Evan’s following as a social media marketing strategist caught the eye of John Wiley & Sons. He was asked to write a book to fit into Wiley’s An Hour a Day series. Unlike other social media marketing books, Evans’  book provides a daily plan for how you can approach social media both strategically and tactically. For example, in one exercise, he tells you to go to IBM’s blog and read about the policies for selecting bloggers. He says, “If you don’t have the right social media strategy, you’ll wander all over the place. On the other hand, having the strategy right doesn’t mean you can turn the job over to the operational side of your business and say, ‘Now go to do this.’ The book allows you to select the things you want to work on.” 

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Tactics, Tools, and Strategies for Business Success: Lon Safko, co-author of The Social Media Bible

2009-08-07
Length: 14s

Renaissance man best describes Lon Safko. He is an author, inventor, entrepreneur, motivational speaker, and executive coach. He created the first computer to save a human life. The Smithsonian in Washington, D.C. houses that computer, 17 of Safko’s other inventions, and his more than 30,000 papers. Safko’s latest endeavor is social media. In fact, he co-authored The Social Media Bible: Tactics, Tools, and Strategies for Business Success. This 844-page tome became the largest and most comprehensive publishing effort in John Wiley & Sons’ 202 year history.

Safko says The Social Media Bible came about because the business community wanted something more comprehensive than just another vertical business book. He says, “When we asked the business community what they wanted – they told us ‘a resource that explains all of this stuff that we've been hearing about, , , , , yeah, what are people talking about with their blogs and tweets anyway?’ They just wanted to be part of the conversation, and have someone explain it in their terms.”

Obviously with a topic as constantly moving as social media, no single person could be the expert on it all. Safko and his co-author David K. Brake determined the best way to become the definitive voice is to let others speak. Safko says, “We spent the better part of a year researching, interviewing, connecting and having conversations with 100 of experts from all aspects of the social media movement. We began the task of aggregating and editing thousands of blog posts, vlogs, podcasts, wikis, emails, interviews, presentations, and more – all with permission of course – and all from real life residents of this realm we call social media.” As a result, the book offers vignettes and essays from luminaries such as Biz Stone, co-founder of www.twitter.com; Vinton Cerf, father of the Internet and futurist; and Peter Booth Wiley, chairman of the board of John Wiley & Sons.…

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Elasticity Provides More Business Capabilities: Kishore Swaminathan, Accenture's Chief Scientist

2009-07-28
Length: 21s

Every year, Accenture, the $19 billion technology service and outsourcing firm, does a thorough analysis to identify the major technology trends that will change the underlying business models and capabilities. In 2009, research conducted by Dr. Kishore Swaminathan, Accenture's chief scientist, identified four major trends that will define the technology landscape over the next five years: Internet computing, data management, mobility, and convergence of unified communications, collaboration, community, and content distribution. He says, "These technology trends will give businesses a new capability that we call elasticity. They will allow every aspect of a business -- from IT to businesses process to how a company innovates -- to be more flexible, and to expand, contract and change, depending on current market conditions." 

 

To derive more revenue and business value from this elasticity, businesses must get all of these four technologies just right. Take Internet computing, For example. Swaminathan says that transformational technology trends often pose a dilemma for CIOs who now face a possible change to their applications, the enterprise architecture, or the business models. "You have several choices: You can commit to a major change that will take much time and money, and you won't see much business value right away. On the other hand, you can ignore the trend or put it aside, and then you can wait until you have no choice but to spend a lot of money and embrace the new trend. Many CIOs need to go experiment and get comfortable with things, such as how to source storage, or software as a service (SaaS). They have to understand the pros and cons."

 

Swaminathan says that many CIOs he has spoken with have a visceral reaction to SaaS, especially with security and data privacy issues. He adds that the visceral reaction is fine. "Ultimately, CIOs have to make a business decision based on solid empirical data. They have to get Internet computing right in the long run, but for the short term they need to experiment, gather as much data as possible, and learn about the model. Unless they are comfortable with a new technology, they shouldn't put in it on a critical path."

 

Accenture definitely practices what it preaches about technology trends. In fact, Accenture acquires as much first-experience with a technology before deploying it. Swaminathan says, "We try to determine if we have a successful model or not." Accenture's approach to collaboration mirrors this practice. The company has created a version of LinkedIn, called PeoplePages, where more than 100,000 Accenture employees have already posted their professional profiles. Swaminathan says the site enables employees to find communities or individuals with certain expertise. Meanwhile, the company has begun a project to put its collective knowledge into the Accenture Encyclopedia, modeled after Wikipedia. He says, "We're encouraged by the progress we have made to date." Accenture also has developed its own version of YouTube, where employees can use video to convey difficult concepts and then distribute those videos to colleagues.

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Elasticity Provides More Business Capabilities: Kishore Swaminathan, Accenture's Chief Scientist

2009-07-28
Length: 21s

Every year, Accenture, the $19 billion technology service and outsourcing firm, does a thorough analysis to identify the major technology trends that will change the underlying business models and capabilities. In 2009, research conducted by Dr. Kishore Swaminathan, Accenture's chief scientist, identified four major trends that will define the technology landscape over the next five years: Internet computing, data management, mobility, and convergence of unified communications, collaboration, community, and content distribution. He says, "These technology trends will give businesses a new capability that we call elasticity. They will allow every aspect of a business -- from IT to businesses process to how a company innovates -- to be more flexible, and to expand, contract and change, depending on current market conditions." 

 

To derive more revenue and business value from this elasticity, businesses must get all of these four technologies just right. Take Internet computing, For example. Swaminathan says that transformational technology trends often pose a dilemma for CIOs who now face a possible change to their applications, the enterprise architecture, or the business models. "You have several choices: You can commit to a major change that will take much time and money, and you won't see much business value right away. On the other hand, you can ignore the trend or put it aside, and then you can wait until you have no choice but to spend a lot of money and embrace the new trend. Many CIOs need to go experiment and get comfortable with things, such as how to source storage, or software as a service (SaaS). They have to understand the pros and cons."

 

Swaminathan says that many CIOs he has spoken with have a visceral reaction to SaaS, especially with security and data privacy issues. He adds that the visceral reaction is fine. "Ultimately, CIOs have to make a business decision based on solid empirical data. They have to get Internet computing right in the long run, but for the short term they need to experiment, gather as much data as possible, and learn about the model. Unless they are comfortable with a new technology, they shouldn't put in it on a critical path."

 

Accenture definitely practices what it preaches about technology trends. In fact, Accenture acquires as much first-experience with a technology before deploying it. Swaminathan says, "We try to determine if we have a successful model or not." Accenture's approach to collaboration mirrors this practice. The company has created a version of LinkedIn, called PeoplePages, where more than 100,000 Accenture employees have already posted their professional profiles. Swaminathan says the site enables employees to find communities or individuals with certain expertise. Meanwhile, the company has begun a project to put its collective knowledge into the Accenture Encyclopedia, modeled after Wikipedia. He says, "We're encouraged by the progress we have made to date." Accenture also has developed its own version of YouTube, where employees can use video to convey difficult concepts and then distribute those videos to colleagues.

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Elasticity Provides More Business Capabilities: Kishore Swaminathan, Accenture's Chief Scientist

2009-07-25
Length: 21s

Every year Accenture identifies the major technology trends that will transform business. This year, Dr. Kishore Swaminathan, Accenture's chief scientist, has identified these four trends: Internet computing, data management, mobility, and convergence of different forms of communications. According to Swaminathan these trends will give businesses a new capability called elasticity. Every aspect of the business will be able to expand, contract, and change according to market conditions. In this podcast, Swaminathan talks about these four technology trends and how Accenture is carrying them out. Now let's join Dr. Kishore Swaminathan, chief scientist at Accenture.

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Elasticity Provides More Business Capabilities: Kishore Swaminathan, Accenture's Chief Scientist

2009-07-25
Length: 21s

Every year Accenture identifies the major technology trends that will transform business. This year, Dr. Kishore Swaminathan, Accenture's chief scientist, has identified these four trends: Internet computing, data management, mobility, and convergence of different forms of communications. According to Swaminathan these trends will give businesses a new capability called elasticity. Every aspect of the business will be able to expand, contract, and change according to market conditions. In this podcast, Swaminathan talks about these four technology trends and how Accenture is carrying them out. Now let's join Dr. Kishore Swaminathan, chief scientist at Accenture.

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From Networking to Social Media the Cisco Way: Marie Hattar, Cisco VP of network & security systems

2009-07-20
Length: 12s

Consumer products companies such as Procter & Gamble aren’t the only ones reaping the benefit of social media. A world leader in networking, Cisco Systems isn’t resting on its laurel when it comes to Web 2.0 tools and technologies, especially social media. The company is integrating social media with customer and partner communications. This approach includes using Facebook to leverage the AXP developer Contest and other groups to grow new communities.

For example, the company is also linking Cisco Twitter followers with Facebook, as well as communicating through blogs (Cisco Geeks), cross-promoting social media sites on invitation, banner ads, etc., outreach through YouTube for User/Partner/Sales submitted segments, communications through the LinkedIn Cisco professionals Group, and more.

One of the more interesting things Cisco has recently done is launching The Realm, a multi-dimensional, animated webisode campaign that consists of super hero security characters and villains that Cisco developed with well-known Marvel Comics illustrator Mike Mayhew. The characters are linked to real-life Cisco engineers, as well as its products, but uses entertainment to appeal to the Web 2.0 crowd.

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From Networking to Social Media the Cisco Way: Marie Hattar, Cisco VP of network & security systems

2009-07-20
Length: 12s

Consumer products companies such as Procter & Gamble aren’t the only ones reaping the benefit of social media. A world leader in networking, Cisco Systems isn’t resting on its laurel when it comes to Web 2.0 tools and technologies, especially social media. The company is integrating social media with customer and partner communications. This approach includes using Facebook to leverage the AXP developer Contest and other groups to grow new communities.

For example, the company is also linking Cisco Twitter followers with Facebook, as well as communicating through blogs (Cisco Geeks), cross-promoting social media sites on invitation, banner ads, etc., outreach through YouTube for User/Partner/Sales submitted segments, communications through the LinkedIn Cisco professionals Group, and more.

One of the more interesting things Cisco has recently done is launching The Realm, a multi-dimensional, animated webisode campaign that consists of super hero security characters and villains that Cisco developed with well-known Marvel Comics illustrator Mike Mayhew. The characters are linked to real-life Cisco engineers, as well as its products, but uses entertainment to appeal to the Web 2.0 crowd.

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A Blueprint for Stepping into The Innovation Zone: Tom Koulopoulos, author and Delphi Group founder

2009-07-09
Length: 17s

Many business gurus consider relentless innovation to be the United States’ only remaining edge in a global marketplace marked by labor arbitrage and the competitive threats posed by exploding economies in China and elsewhere. Tom Koulopoulos, the author of a new book, The Innovation Zone, and the founder of the Delphi Group, says, “While some progress is being made on the innovation front, too many U.S. companies still are underperforming when it comes to driving the type of sustained innovation needed to meet this competitive threat. In his book, Koulopoulos demonstrates how organizations can create and sustain a culture of innovation. Koulopoulos, who writes a blog called The Innovation Zone (http://www.tomkoulopoulos.com) says that if public and private organizations are serious about taking the lead in innovation and re-invigorating the marketplace and U.S. economy, they must move behind the hype of innovation and apply proven techniques and processes. His book provides a how-to-do blueprint for innovation process methods that organizations can put into practice. He says, “We need to stop singing innovation kumbaya and start delving into the practice and science of innovation.” Koulopoulos’ insights about innovation have received wide praise from luminaries such as Peter Drucker, dee Hock, and Tom Peters who called Tom Koulopoulos' writing, “a brilliant vision of where we must take our enterprises to survive and thrive.” According to Peter Drucker, Tom's writing “makes you question not only the way you run your business but the way you run yourself.” He is also editor of the Delphi Report, a quarterly journal for business and technology leaders. He sees signs that organizations are embedding innovation in their business practices, and that they have devoted both financial and staff resources to innovation. He says, “It’s surprising to me that more companies actually are putting people in positions of authority with respect to innovation. They are not necessarily new people; they are folks that are already on staff, but they also are carrying that [innovation] badge.”…

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A Blueprint for Stepping into The Innovation Zone: Tom Koulopoulos, author and Delphi Group founder

2009-07-09
Length: 17s

Many business gurus consider relentless innovation to be the United States’ only remaining edge in a global marketplace marked by labor arbitrage and the competitive threats posed by exploding economies in China and elsewhere. Tom Koulopoulos, the author of a new book, The Innovation Zone, and the founder of the Delphi Group, says, “While some progress is being made on the innovation front, too many U.S. companies still are underperforming when it comes to driving the type of sustained innovation needed to meet this competitive threat. In his book, Koulopoulos demonstrates how organizations can create and sustain a culture of innovation. Koulopoulos, who writes a blog called The Innovation Zone (http://www.tomkoulopoulos.com) says that if public and private organizations are serious about taking the lead in innovation and re-invigorating the marketplace and U.S. economy, they must move behind the hype of innovation and apply proven techniques and processes. His book provides a how-to-do blueprint for innovation process methods that organizations can put into practice. He says, “We need to stop singing innovation kumbaya and start delving into the practice and science of innovation.” Koulopoulos’ insights about innovation have received wide praise from luminaries such as Peter Drucker, dee Hock, and Tom Peters who called Tom Koulopoulos' writing, “a brilliant vision of where we must take our enterprises to survive and thrive.” According to Peter Drucker, Tom's writing “makes you question not only the way you run your business but the way you run yourself.” He is also editor of the Delphi Report, a quarterly journal for business and technology leaders. He sees signs that organizations are embedding innovation in their business practices, and that they have devoted both financial and staff resources to innovation. He says, “It’s surprising to me that more companies actually are putting people in positions of authority with respect to innovation. They are not necessarily new people; they are folks that are already on staff, but they also are carrying that [innovation] badge.”…

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Making Social Media the Corporate Norm for a Fortune 500 Company: Diane Bryant, Intel's CIO

2009-06-25
Length: 17s

With more than $30 billion in annual revenue, Intel Corporation both innovates and invents microprocessor technologies that reside at the heart of most of the PCs and servers. Likewise, Intel also innovates and invents when it comes to deploying social media, both within the company and with external customers. In fact, in 2003, instant messaging became the company's first collaboration method outside of email and audio conferencing. Diane Bryant, Intel's vice president and CIO, says, "Within less than three years, we went from not using instant messaging to a 90 percent adoption rate." As a globally diverse company with more 83,000 employees, numerous suppliers, and millions of external customers, Intel has continued to keep pace with effective ways for all constituencies to collaborate effectively. In 2004, the company began internal blogging with the CEO leading the charge. Two years later, Intel opened up external blogging as a way to reach out and communicate directly with specific manufacturers that use Intel products, and with end users. Bryant says, "As the devices based on the Intel architecture have become more solutions-based and directed at end users around the world, we needed to have direct connection with these end users. Social media or social networking provided us access to this external community." In 2008, Intel launched Open Port, a series of external communities for end users. Bryant says that today more than 75 percent of all the content on these communities comes from end users, not Intel. "We have seen a strong viral pick up on solutions. We have examples of customers coming together to solve their real problems." Intel also uses social media for software development. Some of these software development communities allow people to collaborate about how they have optimized their software suite for the Intel architecture." While Intel has begun to reap the benefits of social media, this company knows that the pervasive nature of social media means that proper controls need to exist. Bryant says, "Most executives I talk to say that their social media initiatives tend to self-police themselves." Intel has adopted a code of conduct that defines how people must act when they engage in all forms of Intel electronic communications, both internally and externally. The code also has provisions for maintaining legal compliance.…

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Making Social Media the Corporate Norm for a Fortune 500 Company: Diane Bryant, Intel's CIO

2009-06-25
Length: 17s

With more than $30 billion in annual revenue, Intel Corporation both innovates and invents microprocessor technologies that reside at the heart of most of the PCs and servers. Likewise, Intel also innovates and invents when it comes to deploying social media, both within the company and with external customers. In fact, in 2003, instant messaging became the company's first collaboration method outside of email and audio conferencing. Diane Bryant, Intel's vice president and CIO, says, "Within less than three years, we went from not using instant messaging to a 90 percent adoption rate." As a globally diverse company with more 83,000 employees, numerous suppliers, and millions of external customers, Intel has continued to keep pace with effective ways for all constituencies to collaborate effectively. In 2004, the company began internal blogging with the CEO leading the charge. Two years later, Intel opened up external blogging as a way to reach out and communicate directly with specific manufacturers that use Intel products, and with end users. Bryant says, "As the devices based on the Intel architecture have become more solutions-based and directed at end users around the world, we needed to have direct connection with these end users. Social media or social networking provided us access to this external community." In 2008, Intel launched Open Port, a series of external communities for end users. Bryant says that today more than 75 percent of all the content on these communities comes from end users, not Intel. "We have seen a strong viral pick up on solutions. We have examples of customers coming together to solve their real problems." Intel also uses social media for software development. Some of these software development communities allow people to collaborate about how they have optimized their software suite for the Intel architecture." While Intel has begun to reap the benefits of social media, this company knows that the pervasive nature of social media means that proper controls need to exist. Bryant says, "Most executives I talk to say that their social media initiatives tend to self-police themselves." Intel has adopted a code of conduct that defines how people must act when they engage in all forms of Intel electronic communications, both internally and externally. The code also has provisions for maintaining legal compliance.…

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Using Web and Social Media to Expand Marketing Reach: Brian Scudamore 1-800-Got-Junk? founder and CEO

2009-06-16
Length: 16s

The Dr. Phil Show. The New York Times. Oprah. The media spotlight shines brightly on 1-800-Got-Junk? and its 1,000 big blue shiny trucks. Since it started in 1989, 1-800-Got-Junk? has hauled way more than one million truckloads of refuse from home and businesses. In fact, 1-800-Got-Junk? has become one of the North America’s fastest growing companies with 335 franchise locations in the United States, Canada, and Australia. The recipe for 1-800-Got-Junk?’s success includes a touch of Horatio Alger, a dash of best practices from well-known companies much as McDonalds, a blue-ribbon workplace, and a blend of the right Web-based tools and technologies, including social media. Originally known as The Rubbish Boys, Brian Scudamore,1-800-Got-Junk?’s founder and CEO, rebranded the company in 1998 to take advantage of its e-commerce business model, called JunkNet. All of the booking and dispatching task of franchisees’ customer calls go through JunkNet, which acts as a central repository for customers’ information and histories, and manages company accounting functions. A wireless interface built by 1-800-Got-Junk?’s IT department enables franchisees’ truck drivers to use their cell phones to view bookings in real time throughout the day. As a result, drivers can take on additional jobs. Now 1-800-Got-Junk? is extending its Web-based reach to use social media to get its marketing message to potential customers, and prospective franchisees, as well as to keep in touch with current franchisees. In this podcast, Brian Scudamore talks about the transition to Web-based marketing, and the business benefit of using social media.…

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Using Web and Social Media to Expand Marketing Reach: Brian Scudamore 1-800-Got-Junk? founder and CEO

2009-06-16
Length: 16s

The Dr. Phil Show. The New York Times. Oprah. The media spotlight shines brightly on 1-800-Got-Junk? and its 1,000 big blue shiny trucks. Since it started in 1989, 1-800-Got-Junk? has hauled way more than one million truckloads of refuse from home and businesses. In fact, 1-800-Got-Junk? has become one of the North America’s fastest growing companies with 335 franchise locations in the United States, Canada, and Australia. The recipe for 1-800-Got-Junk?’s success includes a touch of Horatio Alger, a dash of best practices from well-known companies much as McDonalds, a blue-ribbon workplace, and a blend of the right Web-based tools and technologies, including social media. Originally known as The Rubbish Boys, Brian Scudamore,1-800-Got-Junk?’s founder and CEO, rebranded the company in 1998 to take advantage of its e-commerce business model, called JunkNet. All of the booking and dispatching task of franchisees’ customer calls go through JunkNet, which acts as a central repository for customers’ information and histories, and manages company accounting functions. A wireless interface built by 1-800-Got-Junk?’s IT department enables franchisees’ truck drivers to use their cell phones to view bookings in real time throughout the day. As a result, drivers can take on additional jobs. Now 1-800-Got-Junk? is extending its Web-based reach to use social media to get its marketing message to potential customers, and prospective franchisees, as well as to keep in touch with current franchisees. In this podcast, Brian Scudamore talks about the transition to Web-based marketing, and the business benefit of using social media.…

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Part #2: Straight Talk about the CMDB Imperative: Carlos Casanova, author and former MetLife IT Executive

2009-06-11
Length: 14s

During his tenure as the senior enterprise architect for MetLife, Inc., Carlos Casanova realized that carrying out an enterprise configuration management database (CMDB) became one of the most influential actions an IT organization can take to improve service delivery, and to bridge the gap between technology and the business. Casanova has done two things to make it easier for large IT organizations to deal with what he calls the CMDB imperative. First, he is president of K2 Solutions Group. His firm offers professional services to support the delivery of IT service initiatives, such as the CMDB. Second, he is the co-author with Glenn O’Donnell of The CMDB Imperative: How to realize the dream and avoid the nightmares. He says with a well-designed CMDB in place, companies can better position themselves to manage and optimize IT infrastructure, applications, and services; automate more IT management tasks; and restrain burgeoning costs. His book presents a start-to-finish implementation methodology that works and describes how the CMDB is shifting to the superior configuration management system, the CMDB renamed and overhauled in ITIL v.3.…

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Part #1: Straight Talk about the CMDB Imperative: Carlos Casanova, author and former MetLife IT Executive

2009-06-11
Length: 17s

During his tenure as the senior enterprise architect for MetLife, Inc., Carlos Casanova realized that carrying out an enterprise configuration management database (CMDB) became one of the most influential actions an IT organization can take to improve service delivery, and to bridge the gap between technology and the business. Casanova has done two things to make it easier for large IT organizations to deal with what he calls the CMDB imperative. First, he is president of K2 Solutions Group. His firm offers professional services to support the delivery of IT service initiatives, such as the CMDB. Second, he is the co-author with Glenn O’Donnell of The CMDB Imperative: How to realize the dream and avoid the nightmares. He says with a well-designed CMDB in place, companies can better position themselves to manage and optimize IT infrastructure, applications, and services; automate more IT management tasks; and restrain burgeoning costs. His book presents a start-to-finish implementation methodology that works and describes how the CMDB is shifting to the superior configuration management system, the CMDB renamed and overhauled in ITIL v.3.…

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Part #2: Straight Talk about the CMDB Imperative: Carlos Casanova, author and former MetLife IT Executive

2009-06-11
Length: 14s

During his tenure as the senior enterprise architect for MetLife, Inc., Carlos Casanova realized that carrying out an enterprise configuration management database (CMDB) became one of the most influential actions an IT organization can take to improve service delivery, and to bridge the gap between technology and the business. Casanova has done two things to make it easier for large IT organizations to deal with what he calls the CMDB imperative. First, he is president of K2 Solutions Group. His firm offers professional services to support the delivery of IT service initiatives, such as the CMDB. Second, he is the co-author with Glenn O’Donnell of The CMDB Imperative: How to realize the dream and avoid the nightmares. He says with a well-designed CMDB in place, companies can better position themselves to manage and optimize IT infrastructure, applications, and services; automate more IT management tasks; and restrain burgeoning costs. His book presents a start-to-finish implementation methodology that works and describes how the CMDB is shifting to the superior configuration management system, the CMDB renamed and overhauled in ITIL v.3.…

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Part #1: Straight Talk about the CMDB Imperative: Carlos Casanova, author and former MetLife IT Executive

2009-06-11
Length: 17s

During his tenure as the senior enterprise architect for MetLife, Inc., Carlos Casanova realized that carrying out an enterprise configuration management database (CMDB) became one of the most influential actions an IT organization can take to improve service delivery, and to bridge the gap between technology and the business. Casanova has done two things to make it easier for large IT organizations to deal with what he calls the CMDB imperative. First, he is president of K2 Solutions Group. His firm offers professional services to support the delivery of IT service initiatives, such as the CMDB. Second, he is the co-author with Glenn O’Donnell of The CMDB Imperative: How to realize the dream and avoid the nightmares. He says with a well-designed CMDB in place, companies can better position themselves to manage and optimize IT infrastructure, applications, and services; automate more IT management tasks; and restrain burgeoning costs. His book presents a start-to-finish implementation methodology that works and describes how the CMDB is shifting to the superior configuration management system, the CMDB renamed and overhauled in ITIL v.3.…

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Lessons Learned About Surviving Major Business Cycles: Dave Hitz, co-founder of NetApp

2009-06-03
Length: 29s

How to Castrate a Bull – Unexpected Lessons on Risk, Growth, and Success in Business might seem like an unlikely title for a business book. But Dave Hitz drew from his ranch hand experience to take NetApp from a startup to a $3.3 billion network storage company. Hitz, a then college dropout who liked to solve puzzles, co-founded NetApp in 1992, along with two other colleagues. His book covers the hard lessons learned during the company’s major business cycles, including the dot.com bust. It might be hard to believe that NetApp, one of the fastest growing technology companies, began as an idea scribbled on a napkin by Dave Hitz. Risk and ambition permeated the company in the early 1990s. NetApp gave birth to a new storage device category called the network filer. Revenues doubled every year until the company reached $1 billion in revenue in 2001. After the dot.com bust of 2001, NetApp’s revenues quickly declined to $800 million for fiscal 2002 and the stock fell from $150 a share to $6 a share. Hitz says, "We had designed NetApp for growth, and when the growth stopped, everything broke, but this time in a bad way.” He says the company survived the crash because it had diversified its customer base, adding banks, telecom providers, and other enterprises and the federal government. These organizations helped to leverage the impact from the dotcom and tech companies that had provided the bulk of the company's revenues. NetApp faced other challenges when it moved to direct sales from indirect sales, added support for Windows to a product line based on Unix, and embraced storage area networks when the company was totally focused on network-attached storage devices. What does Hitz have to say about the current economic downturn? “The current downturn is creating a similar attitude change. There are some hints in today's tech world that it is going to happen again. We might hear CIOs saying they aren’t going to build another data center. This downturn will be the catalyst that leads to an even more heated market for data center virtualization and cloud computing. With that in mind, now is not the time for grandiose plans. Customers are not thinking about grandiose right now. They want to hear about saving some money." Today, NetApp ranks third in market capitalization in its industry, behind EMC and Seagate Technology and ahead of Western Digital, Brocade, and Quantum. In total revenue, NetApp ranks fourth behind EMC, Seagate, Western Digital. NetApp also has a long history of making “Best Place to Work” lists. For seven years in a row, NetApp has appeared on Fortune’s 100 Best Companies to Work For.…

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Lessons Learned About Surviving Major Business Cycles: Dave Hitz, co-founder of NetApp

2009-06-03
Length: 29s

How to Castrate a Bull – Unexpected Lessons on Risk, Growth, and Success in Business might seem like an unlikely title for a business book. But Dave Hitz drew from his ranch hand experience to take NetApp from a startup to a $3.3 billion network storage company. Hitz, a then college dropout who liked to solve puzzles, co-founded NetApp in 1992, along with two other colleagues. His book covers the hard lessons learned during the company’s major business cycles, including the dot.com bust. It might be hard to believe that NetApp, one of the fastest growing technology companies, began as an idea scribbled on a napkin by Dave Hitz. Risk and ambition permeated the company in the early 1990s. NetApp gave birth to a new storage device category called the network filer. Revenues doubled every year until the company reached $1 billion in revenue in 2001. After the dot.com bust of 2001, NetApp’s revenues quickly declined to $800 million for fiscal 2002 and the stock fell from $150 a share to $6 a share. Hitz says, "We had designed NetApp for growth, and when the growth stopped, everything broke, but this time in a bad way.” He says the company survived the crash because it had diversified its customer base, adding banks, telecom providers, and other enterprises and the federal government. These organizations helped to leverage the impact from the dotcom and tech companies that had provided the bulk of the company's revenues. NetApp faced other challenges when it moved to direct sales from indirect sales, added support for Windows to a product line based on Unix, and embraced storage area networks when the company was totally focused on network-attached storage devices. What does Hitz have to say about the current economic downturn? “The current downturn is creating a similar attitude change. There are some hints in today's tech world that it is going to happen again. We might hear CIOs saying they aren’t going to build another data center. This downturn will be the catalyst that leads to an even more heated market for data center virtualization and cloud computing. With that in mind, now is not the time for grandiose plans. Customers are not thinking about grandiose right now. They want to hear about saving some money." Today, NetApp ranks third in market capitalization in its industry, behind EMC and Seagate Technology and ahead of Western Digital, Brocade, and Quantum. In total revenue, NetApp ranks fourth behind EMC, Seagate, Western Digital. NetApp also has a long history of making “Best Place to Work” lists. For seven years in a row, NetApp has appeared on Fortune’s 100 Best Companies to Work For.…

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Think Again, If You Think You're Secure - Get Set for the Unexpected: Ira Winkler, Security Expert

2009-05-20
Length: 26s

If you think your organization's security measures are bulletproof, then think again. Give Ira Winkler, along with his team of security expert from Internet Security Advisors, a few hours to simulate what it would take insurgents to bring down critical systems, or to electronically pilfer millions of dollars. A former intelligence and security analyst with the National Security Agency, Winkler's security consulting firm, Internet Security Advisors, acts as a trusted partner in helping Fortune 500, public utilities, and government agencies conduct penetration tests. His firm also mitigates the problems found in the simulation, and carries out awareness training. Winkler's penetration tests run the gamut from breaking into some of the world's largest corporations to breaking into the nation's largest power grid. As a result, the media has given Winkler the title of Modern James Bond. He has put his experience to work in his three books: Spies Among US, Zen and the Art of Information Security, and Corporate Espionage. Winkler says that he would give a poor rating to the security infrastructure of most Fortune 1000 companies. "Of course, the strength of security varies from company to company. In many cases, the security is so poor that I can walk out of the company with their crown jewels within a few hours. CIOs of these companies have something to worry about, especially now with the economic downturn with most companies."…

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Think Again, If You Think You're Secure - Get Set for the Unexpected: Ira Winkler, Security Expert

2009-05-20
Length: 26s

If you think your organization's security measures are bulletproof, then think again. Give Ira Winkler, along with his team of security expert from Internet Security Advisors, a few hours to simulate what it would take insurgents to bring down critical systems, or to electronically pilfer millions of dollars. A former intelligence and security analyst with the National Security Agency, Winkler's security consulting firm, Internet Security Advisors, acts as a trusted partner in helping Fortune 500, public utilities, and government agencies conduct penetration tests. His firm also mitigates the problems found in the simulation, and carries out awareness training. Winkler's penetration tests run the gamut from breaking into some of the world's largest corporations to breaking into the nation's largest power grid. As a result, the media has given Winkler the title of Modern James Bond. He has put his experience to work in his three books: Spies Among US, Zen and the Art of Information Security, and Corporate Espionage. Winkler says that he would give a poor rating to the security infrastructure of most Fortune 1000 companies. "Of course, the strength of security varies from company to company. In many cases, the security is so poor that I can walk out of the company with their crown jewels within a few hours. CIOs of these companies have something to worry about, especially now with the economic downturn with most companies."…

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Balancing the Efficiency of IT with Driving Business Value from IT: CIO of Freescale Semiconductor

2009-05-18
Length: 11s

In 2005, Freescale Semiconductor, the $5.7 billion global leader in the design and manufacture of embedded semiconductors, began rolling out an integrated manufacturing system. The company, however, acknowledged a lack of progress automating some of the key semiconductor manufacturing steps involving IT systems, such as process control. That year, Sam Coursen, the former CIO of NCR Corporation, stepped into the CIO role at Freescale Semiconductor. Armed with experience transforming NCR's IT organization, Coursen immediately launched a strategic program with manufacturing management. The business impact of IT for this program returned about $38 million to shareholders. He says, "We began a multi-year program to close those gaps, and to become equal to or better than the best-in-class practice for each of those manufacturing processes. That resulted in substantial savings." In this podcast, Coursen talks about the steps he has taken to ensure that his company continues to derive business impact from IT. He also provides the three things CIOs should do it they want to ensure that IT initiatives result in business impact, and the takeaways CIOs can use for working with their CFOs on capital IT investment decisions.…

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Balancing the Efficiency of IT with Driving Business Value from IT: CIO of Freescale Semiconductor

2009-05-18
Length: 11s

In 2005, Freescale Semiconductor, the $5.7 billion global leader in the design and manufacture of embedded semiconductors, began rolling out an integrated manufacturing system. The company, however, acknowledged a lack of progress automating some of the key semiconductor manufacturing steps involving IT systems, such as process control. That year, Sam Coursen, the former CIO of NCR Corporation, stepped into the CIO role at Freescale Semiconductor. Armed with experience transforming NCR's IT organization, Coursen immediately launched a strategic program with manufacturing management. The business impact of IT for this program returned about $38 million to shareholders. He says, "We began a multi-year program to close those gaps, and to become equal to or better than the best-in-class practice for each of those manufacturing processes. That resulted in substantial savings." In this podcast, Coursen talks about the steps he has taken to ensure that his company continues to derive business impact from IT. He also provides the three things CIOs should do it they want to ensure that IT initiatives result in business impact, and the takeaways CIOs can use for working with their CFOs on capital IT investment decisions.…

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Business Impact of IT Fueled Dollar General's Explosive Growth: Bruce Ash, Former Dollar General CIO

2009-05-14
Length: 14s

If you're a CIO for a rapidly growing retail chain, you had better make sure you can deliver the business impact of IT to the organization. Bruce Ash has done just that repeatedly. He spent about 20 years developing IT infrastructures to support two major retailers --Talbots and Dollar General. During Ash's 10-year stint as CIO with Talbots, the company grew from 175 stores to 900 stores in four countries. On the other hand, Dollar General's explosive growth was like nothing Ash had ever experienced before at Talbots. Ash's nine-year tenure as CIO coincided with the company's expansion from 4,000 stores to 8,000 stores in 35 states. He said, "One year we opened 700 stores and three distribution centers to support the additional stores. Some retailers don't even have 700 stores." Some retail analysts say that Sam Walton's original vision for Wal-Mart resembled that of today's Dollar General. This modern version of the neighborhood general store sells everything from apparel to toys from electronics to household goods, all at prices most people can afford to pay. Each Dollar General stores carries more than 5,400 core products from America's most trust brands and manufacturers. As CIO of Dollar General, Ash became the linchpin between the business community, the corporate leadership team, the company's strategy, and the deployment of IT. He says, "The business impact of IT came from building the infrastructure to support the company's fast-paced growth strategy. It included bringing in a point of sale system that improved both our customer experience and our supply chain. We could process a variety of alternative payment methods. As a result, customers could get through the checkout line faster. The merchandise information this system captured enabled us to have perpetual inventory in the stores, including automatic stock replenishment."…

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Business Impact of IT Fueled Dollar General's Explosive Growth: Bruce Ash, Former Dollar General CIO

2009-05-14
Length: 14s

If you're a CIO for a rapidly growing retail chain, you had better make sure you can deliver the business impact of IT to the organization. Bruce Ash has done just that repeatedly. He spent about 20 years developing IT infrastructures to support two major retailers --Talbots and Dollar General. During Ash's 10-year stint as CIO with Talbots, the company grew from 175 stores to 900 stores in four countries. On the other hand, Dollar General's explosive growth was like nothing Ash had ever experienced before at Talbots. Ash's nine-year tenure as CIO coincided with the company's expansion from 4,000 stores to 8,000 stores in 35 states. He said, "One year we opened 700 stores and three distribution centers to support the additional stores. Some retailers don't even have 700 stores." Some retail analysts say that Sam Walton's original vision for Wal-Mart resembled that of today's Dollar General. This modern version of the neighborhood general store sells everything from apparel to toys from electronics to household goods, all at prices most people can afford to pay. Each Dollar General stores carries more than 5,400 core products from America's most trust brands and manufacturers. As CIO of Dollar General, Ash became the linchpin between the business community, the corporate leadership team, the company's strategy, and the deployment of IT. He says, "The business impact of IT came from building the infrastructure to support the company's fast-paced growth strategy. It included bringing in a point of sale system that improved both our customer experience and our supply chain. We could process a variety of alternative payment methods. As a result, customers could get through the checkout line faster. The merchandise information this system captured enabled us to have perpetual inventory in the stores, including automatic stock replenishment."…

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Speak like a CEO; Motivate Like a CEO--Lessons for CIOs:Suzanne Bates, best-selling book author

2009-04-30
Length: 17s

What do President Obama and Jack Welch have in common? They're both excellent communicators. Although they have different communications styles, they both know how to command attention and to get results. They also both know how to inspire and to motivate others. If you want to move up the IT ladder, you, undoubtedly, need to have good technical skills and solid business experience. On the other hand, if you want to earn that CIO seat at the executive table, your better hone your communications skills. You might start by going to amazon.com and ordering either Motivate like a CEO - Communicate Your Strategic Vision and Inspire People to Act! or Speak Like a CEO - Secrets to Commanding Attention and Getting Results. Suzanne Bates, the author, is CEO of Bates Communications, an executive communications consultancy, and a former award-winning television anchor and reporter. When Jose Alvarez, president and CEO of Stop & Shop Supermarket Co. wanted to improve his communications skills, he turned to Bates Communications, based in Boston, Massachusetts. The firm offers everything from formal strategic communications consulting to executive presence seminars and workshops. Clients include Blue Cross Blue Shield, Dow Chemical, Fidelity, and Mellon/Bank of New York. Bates says that the company's mission is to transform leaders into powerful communicators who get business results. She says that many leaders get promoted because of their business and technical skills. "When you reach the leadership of a C-level position, your primary role is to communicate the organization's vision, strategy, and values. You need good communication skills if want to inspire, to motivate, and to align the organization with the vision and strategy. Even middle managers need good communications skills. In many cases, communications is the missing link that holds people back from reaching their full potential." During her 20-year year in television news reporting, Bates interviewed 1,000 of political leaders, CEOs, experts, authors, and celebrities. She says that some people were better speakers than others. After Suzanne started working with executives at Bates Communications, she realized that good communications skills aren't necessarily an innate ability. "It's something you can learn. Leaders, like Jack Welch and President Obama, have learned to develop their own compelling communications style. All writing and all speaking has to come from inside. Many executives struggle with bringing out their authentic voice. It takes practice."…

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Speak like a CEO; Motivate Like a CEO--Lessons for CIOs:Suzanne Bates, best-selling book author

2009-04-30
Length: 17s

What do President Obama and Jack Welch have in common? They're both excellent communicators. Although they have different communications styles, they both know how to command attention and to get results. They also both know how to inspire and to motivate others. If you want to move up the IT ladder, you, undoubtedly, need to have good technical skills and solid business experience. On the other hand, if you want to earn that CIO seat at the executive table, your better hone your communications skills. You might start by going to amazon.com and ordering either Motivate like a CEO - Communicate Your Strategic Vision and Inspire People to Act! or Speak Like a CEO - Secrets to Commanding Attention and Getting Results. Suzanne Bates, the author, is CEO of Bates Communications, an executive communications consultancy, and a former award-winning television anchor and reporter. When Jose Alvarez, president and CEO of Stop & Shop Supermarket Co. wanted to improve his communications skills, he turned to Bates Communications, based in Boston, Massachusetts. The firm offers everything from formal strategic communications consulting to executive presence seminars and workshops. Clients include Blue Cross Blue Shield, Dow Chemical, Fidelity, and Mellon/Bank of New York. Bates says that the company's mission is to transform leaders into powerful communicators who get business results. She says that many leaders get promoted because of their business and technical skills. "When you reach the leadership of a C-level position, your primary role is to communicate the organization's vision, strategy, and values. You need good communication skills if want to inspire, to motivate, and to align the organization with the vision and strategy. Even middle managers need good communications skills. In many cases, communications is the missing link that holds people back from reaching their full potential." During her 20-year year in television news reporting, Bates interviewed 1,000 of political leaders, CEOs, experts, authors, and celebrities. She says that some people were better speakers than others. After Suzanne started working with executives at Bates Communications, she realized that good communications skills aren't necessarily an innate ability. "It's something you can learn. Leaders, like Jack Welch and President Obama, have learned to develop their own compelling communications style. All writing and all speaking has to come from inside. Many executives struggle with bringing out their authentic voice. It takes practice."…

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Accelerating IT Initiatives Despite Tough Economy: Tim Schaefer, Northwestern Mutual’s CIO

2009-04-28
Length: 14s

Some insurance companies, such as AIG, have put themselves in dire financial circumstances. The billion in these companies have received in federal bailout money has added fuel to the economic downturn. On the other hand, the $21 billion Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company doesn’t need one cent of taxpayers’ dollars to preserve its customers’ wealth. This 150-year old, highly profitable company has more than $1 trillion of life insurance protection in force. Products include life insurance, long-term care insurance, disability insurance, annuities, mutual funds, and employee benefit services. In fact, the company maintains the highest available ratings for insurance financial strength from all four major ratings agencies. Despite the economic downturn, Northwestern Mutual isn’t about to rest on its financial strength. In fact, this company has continued to invest in areas, such as information technology, that can provide great value in terms of productivity, improved businesses processes, and revenues. Tim Schaefer, Northwestern Mutual’s chief information officer, says, “We can’t loose sight of the fact that we are in a downturn, but we don’t want to completely give away our opportunity to pursue some strategic projects for the business.” As CIO for Northwestern Mutual, Schaefer leads 1,300 employees and 1,000 contractors in advancing the company’s strategy, for which relationships among customers, representatives, and executives drive the business forward. One of his key responsibilities is to carry out a strategic IT plan to bring the IT organization to a higher level of solutions and systems delivery maturity and business process enablement. His other priorities include helping the company remain customer-centric, making better use of analytics, and integrating product lines to strengthen financial offerings.…

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Accelerating IT Initiatives Despite Tough Economy: Tim Schaefer, Northwestern Mutual’s CIO

2009-04-28
Length: 14s

Some insurance companies, such as AIG, have put themselves in dire financial circumstances. The billion in these companies have received in federal bailout money has added fuel to the economic downturn. On the other hand, the $21 billion Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company doesn’t need one cent of taxpayers’ dollars to preserve its customers’ wealth. This 150-year old, highly profitable company has more than $1 trillion of life insurance protection in force. Products include life insurance, long-term care insurance, disability insurance, annuities, mutual funds, and employee benefit services. In fact, the company maintains the highest available ratings for insurance financial strength from all four major ratings agencies. Despite the economic downturn, Northwestern Mutual isn’t about to rest on its financial strength. In fact, this company has continued to invest in areas, such as information technology, that can provide great value in terms of productivity, improved businesses processes, and revenues. Tim Schaefer, Northwestern Mutual’s chief information officer, says, “We can’t loose sight of the fact that we are in a downturn, but we don’t want to completely give away our opportunity to pursue some strategic projects for the business.” As CIO for Northwestern Mutual, Schaefer leads 1,300 employees and 1,000 contractors in advancing the company’s strategy, for which relationships among customers, representatives, and executives drive the business forward. One of his key responsibilities is to carry out a strategic IT plan to bring the IT organization to a higher level of solutions and systems delivery maturity and business process enablement. His other priorities include helping the company remain customer-centric, making better use of analytics, and integrating product lines to strengthen financial offerings.…

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Leading Geeks Through Uncertainty:Paul Glen, author, columnist, and IT Management Consultant

2009-04-22
Length: 13s

TalkAway -- The award-winning author of Leading Geeks and an IT management consultant provides tips for managing the people side of IT during this economic downturn. General Motors. Motorola. Panasonic. These companies began 2009 by announcing massive layoffs. The economic downturn has just about everyone questioning their job security. What will it take to find another one? While IT plays a key role in running the systems that power organizations, IT people aren't immune from layoffs, as CIOs struggle to cut costs and to do more with less. To get some answers on how CIOs and their staff can cope with this situation, enterpriseleadership.org turned to Paul Glen, the author of the award-winning book, Leading Geeks -- How to Lead and Manage People Who Drive Technology, and a management columnist for Computerworld. He has more than 10 years of experience delivering and managing IT products and services. He has taught at MBA programs at the University of Southern California and Loyola Marymount University. In fact, many graduate programs often cite his book in courses about managing technical professionals.…

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Leading Geeks Through Uncertainty:Paul Glen, author, columnist, and IT Management Consultant

2009-04-22
Length: 13s

TalkAway -- The award-winning author of Leading Geeks and an IT management consultant provides tips for managing the people side of IT during this economic downturn. General Motors. Motorola. Panasonic. These companies began 2009 by announcing massive layoffs. The economic downturn has just about everyone questioning their job security. What will it take to find another one? While IT plays a key role in running the systems that power organizations, IT people aren't immune from layoffs, as CIOs struggle to cut costs and to do more with less. To get some answers on how CIOs and their staff can cope with this situation, enterpriseleadership.org turned to Paul Glen, the author of the award-winning book, Leading Geeks -- How to Lead and Manage People Who Drive Technology, and a management columnist for Computerworld. He has more than 10 years of experience delivering and managing IT products and services. He has taught at MBA programs at the University of Southern California and Loyola Marymount University. In fact, many graduate programs often cite his book in courses about managing technical professionals.…

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How CIOs Can Protect Their Companies: Brian Wolfe, Security Expert, Laurus Technologies

2009-04-16
Length: 14s

It’s hard to avoid all of the news stories about the economic downturn, company layoffs, or employees being asked to take drastic pay cuts. Most employees understand that businesses have no choice but to reduce their costs. On the other hand, those disgruntle employees or former employees in dire financial straits could find themselves doing things they wouldn’t normally do. As a result, these employees could pose a whole new set of security threats to an organization. Brian Wolfe, a security expert and co-founder of Laurus Technologies, an IT consulting firm specializing in security, says that companies must have controls in place to make sure that people can’t do things, such as authorizing a purchase order to a fictitious vendor, and having funds disbursed to a company that never receives the goods.” Meanwhile, security breaches still continue to plague America at the rate of about one a week. In fact, within the first few months of 2009, Merrill Lynch, Continental Airlines, the Federal Aviation Administration, and the United States Postal Security all became victims of security breaches. Wolfe says that CIOs do have something to worry about. He adds that about 75 companies out of the Fortune 1000 have an ISO 27001 certification for security. “ CIOs must think about whether or not they have the proper security controls in place to both prevent on-going threats, and these newer threats. They need to have some access controls that clearly delineate between the software development area, test and quality assurance, and product. The goal here is make sure that no one person is in a position to introduce fraudulent or malicious code or data into some critical applications. CIOs also need to cover all of their bases with respect to vulnerability assessment, and penetration testing, especially data loss or data leakage prevention.”…

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How CIOs Can Protect Their Companies: Brian Wolfe, Security Expert, Laurus Technologies

2009-04-16
Length: 14s

It’s hard to avoid all of the news stories about the economic downturn, company layoffs, or employees being asked to take drastic pay cuts. Most employees understand that businesses have no choice but to reduce their costs. On the other hand, those disgruntle employees or former employees in dire financial straits could find themselves doing things they wouldn’t normally do. As a result, these employees could pose a whole new set of security threats to an organization. Brian Wolfe, a security expert and co-founder of Laurus Technologies, an IT consulting firm specializing in security, says that companies must have controls in place to make sure that people can’t do things, such as authorizing a purchase order to a fictitious vendor, and having funds disbursed to a company that never receives the goods.” Meanwhile, security breaches still continue to plague America at the rate of about one a week. In fact, within the first few months of 2009, Merrill Lynch, Continental Airlines, the Federal Aviation Administration, and the United States Postal Security all became victims of security breaches. Wolfe says that CIOs do have something to worry about. He adds that about 75 companies out of the Fortune 1000 have an ISO 27001 certification for security. “ CIOs must think about whether or not they have the proper security controls in place to both prevent on-going threats, and these newer threats. They need to have some access controls that clearly delineate between the software development area, test and quality assurance, and product. The goal here is make sure that no one person is in a position to introduce fraudulent or malicious code or data into some critical applications. CIOs also need to cover all of their bases with respect to vulnerability assessment, and penetration testing, especially data loss or data leakage prevention.”…

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Getting Business Impact of IT to Flow at The Coca-Cola Company & At Other Companies: Interview with Jack Bergstrand

2009-04-08
Length: 14s

Have you had your Coke today? Jack Bergstrand knows what it takes for a $30 billion beverage company to maintain its global brand. During his 25-year career with The Coca-Cola Company, he gained much operational and strategic experience running everything from manufacturing to marketing, and even IT. In fact, as vice president of business systems, Bergstrand overhauled the company's global IT operations. Today, Bergstrand heads Brand Velocity, a consulting firm focused on helping Fortune 500 companies improve the business impact of IT across large-scale technology projects. Now let's meet Jack Bergstrand, CEO of Brand Velocity.…

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Using Technology in Innovative Ways: Norman Jacknis, Former CIO of Westchester County, NY

2009-04-02
Length: 14s

Dr. Norman Jacknis has much experience finding innovative ways to use technology. For 10 years, he served as the CIO for Westchester Country, one of the most prosperous counties in New York State. His mission focused on working with business leaders to create real business impact from IT. Because he had extensive knowledge of the business, Dr. Jacknis used every opportunity to speak to the CEO, who he reported to, about how to improve things, some of which didn't necessarily involve technology, but management issues or policy issues. He says, "I wasn't afraid to say we can use technology here, but you first need to address this issue." One of Dr. Jacknis' innovative solutions involved establishing a unit that analyzed all of the data Westchester County collected from its transactional systems. He says, "We fed the analyzed data back to the business lines according to what actions made them successful and visa versa, based on long-term criteria. For example, the police department might look at programs that kept repeat offenders out of jail or programs that helped to prevent traffic accidents." Under Dr. Jacknis leadership, Westchester County earned many technology innovation awards, including the Center for Digital Government's top ten digital countries in the country, and American City & County's Crown Communities Awards for technology. Government Technology Magazine named Dr. Jacknis as one of the country's Top 25 Doers, Dreamers, and Drivers who broke bureaucratic inertia to better serve the public. In 2008, Dr. Jacknis left his post at Westchester County and joined a think tank within Cisco Systems, established by John Chambers, Cisco's CEO. He says, "People kept asking Chambers what they needed to do if they wanted to run a successful business such as Cisco." As director of the state and local government strategic consulting unit within Cisco's Internet Business Solutions Group, Dr. Jacknis speaks to business leaders and government professionals about how to use technology in innovative ways in their organization. He says, "We don't charge anything, we don't sell anything, and we don't ever talk about products, especially Cisco's products. We are out there as strategic advisors." Because many government agencies have an interest in Web 2.0 technologies, Dr. Jacknis is working on a concept within the government to take advantage of Web 2.0's collaboration capabilities. He says, "We give them examples of how it has been used successfully, how they can apply these examples to their needs, and how it is meaningful to political leaders. We might talk about the Web site Samsung set up for customers to help each other. People trust more what they hear from other customers. In return, Samsung is getting loyal customers, and free market research."…

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Using Technology in Innovative Ways: Norman Jacknis, Former CIO of Westchester County, NY

2009-04-02
Length: 14s

Dr. Norman Jacknis has much experience finding innovative ways to use technology. For 10 years, he served as the CIO for Westchester Country, one of the most prosperous counties in New York State. His mission focused on working with business leaders to create real business impact from IT. Because he had extensive knowledge of the business, Dr. Jacknis used every opportunity to speak to the CEO, who he reported to, about how to improve things, some of which didn't necessarily involve technology, but management issues or policy issues. He says, "I wasn't afraid to say we can use technology here, but you first need to address this issue." One of Dr. Jacknis' innovative solutions involved establishing a unit that analyzed all of the data Westchester County collected from its transactional systems. He says, "We fed the analyzed data back to the business lines according to what actions made them successful and visa versa, based on long-term criteria. For example, the police department might look at programs that kept repeat offenders out of jail or programs that helped to prevent traffic accidents." Under Dr. Jacknis leadership, Westchester County earned many technology innovation awards, including the Center for Digital Government's top ten digital countries in the country, and American City & County's Crown Communities Awards for technology. Government Technology Magazine named Dr. Jacknis as one of the country's Top 25 Doers, Dreamers, and Drivers who broke bureaucratic inertia to better serve the public. In 2008, Dr. Jacknis left his post at Westchester County and joined a think tank within Cisco Systems, established by John Chambers, Cisco's CEO. He says, "People kept asking Chambers what they needed to do if they wanted to run a successful business such as Cisco." As director of the state and local government strategic consulting unit within Cisco's Internet Business Solutions Group, Dr. Jacknis speaks to business leaders and government professionals about how to use technology in innovative ways in their organization. He says, "We don't charge anything, we don't sell anything, and we don't ever talk about products, especially Cisco's products. We are out there as strategic advisors." Because many government agencies have an interest in Web 2.0 technologies, Dr. Jacknis is working on a concept within the government to take advantage of Web 2.0's collaboration capabilities. He says, "We give them examples of how it has been used successfully, how they can apply these examples to their needs, and how it is meaningful to political leaders. We might talk about the Web site Samsung set up for customers to help each other. People trust more what they hear from other customers. In return, Samsung is getting loyal customers, and free market research."…

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Blogging About The User-Centric Enterprise Architecture and The TotalCIO:Andy Blumenthal, Federal CTO

2009-03-27
Length: 17s

Few CIOs or CTO blog about IT. Andy Blumenthal, on the other hand, has plenty to say about enterprise architecture and what he calls the TotalCIO. Blumenthal works as CTO for the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives (ATF). His user-centric enterprise architecture blog promotes the adoption of sound business and technology planning and governance. That goes for both private and public sectors. His TotalCIO blog promotes a customer-centric focus on IT leadership. It can lead to mission excellence, not mission impossible. As the protector of our nation, the ATF works to reduce violent crimes and to prevent terrorism. Blumenthal, working in conjunction with the CIO, plans and carries out strategic technology solutions to help ATF's special agents and investigators to do their jobs better. His responsibilities including developing technology solutions and improvements, incorporating new emerging technology solutions and best practices, and guiding the enterprise architecture planning and governance process. He also reaches out both internally and externally to communicate and to collaborate about shared IT interests, especially around enterprise architecture, governance, emerging technology, and IT leadership. Blumenthal says he has developed a special methodology for enterprise architecture called user-centric enterprise architecture. "It focuses on first defining the users and their requirements and then building the appropriate solutions for them. It also includes having central IT governance to ensure that money gets well spent on the best solutions possible."…

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Blogging About The User-Centric Enterprise Architecture and The TotalCIO:Andy Blumenthal, Federal CTO

2009-03-27
Length: 17s

Few CIOs or CTO blog about IT. Andy Blumenthal, on the other hand, has plenty to say about enterprise architecture and what he calls the TotalCIO. Blumenthal works as CTO for the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives (ATF). His user-centric enterprise architecture blog promotes the adoption of sound business and technology planning and governance. That goes for both private and public sectors. His TotalCIO blog promotes a customer-centric focus on IT leadership. It can lead to mission excellence, not mission impossible. As the protector of our nation, the ATF works to reduce violent crimes and to prevent terrorism. Blumenthal, working in conjunction with the CIO, plans and carries out strategic technology solutions to help ATF's special agents and investigators to do their jobs better. His responsibilities including developing technology solutions and improvements, incorporating new emerging technology solutions and best practices, and guiding the enterprise architecture planning and governance process. He also reaches out both internally and externally to communicate and to collaborate about shared IT interests, especially around enterprise architecture, governance, emerging technology, and IT leadership. Blumenthal says he has developed a special methodology for enterprise architecture called user-centric enterprise architecture. "It focuses on first defining the users and their requirements and then building the appropriate solutions for them. It also includes having central IT governance to ensure that money gets well spent on the best solutions possible."…

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Wading Through the Muck of IT Politics:Thomas L. Pettibone, Former Fortune 50 CIO

2009-03-16
Length: 13s

When troubled IT organizations need help, then Transition Partners can provide the perfect solution. This IT consultancy specializes in turning around ineffective IT organizations by providing them with experienced IT leaders and established business processes. The company's client base includes Aramark, Bates Advertising, Hilton Hotels, and Ingersoll Rand. Transition Partners specializes in handling the one problem most CIOs don't like to talk about -- dealing with the politics of IT. Thomas L. Pettibone, Transition Partners' founder, has waded through a lot of political muck in his 18-year IT career. In fact, after working as a CIO for several Fortune 50 companies, he concluded that he often found himself in a no-win position and that he'd be happier being on his own as part of an interim team, parting friends with the organization at the end of the day. He says, "When it comes to allocating funds and delivering services, the CIO has to be the judge and the jury. The demand always exceeds the supply. The CIO often winds either saying No to the end-user executive or trying to deliver something on a shoestring. Either way, the CIO loses politically." Pettibone and his Transition Partners staff have a good track record helping some wounded IT organizations, as well as wounded companies, achieve real business value from IT. In fact, the bankrupt TransWorld Airways, now part of American Airlines, was one of Transition Partners' first clients. Pettibone says, "TWA was a mess. Most of the top IT management had left. Things ran poorly. The company was close to signing a terrible outsourcing deal." The Transition Partner's team took over the IT department, and within 12 months had created a high-performance IT organization, delivering high reliability and good end-user satisfaction. Pettibone says, "IT was one of the bright spots when American Airlines acquired TWA." Several years later, Transition Partners worked with Tsumura Consumer Products. He says, "The new CIO was being held hostage by several of his IT lieutenants. They wanted hefty bonuses or else they would disrupt operations. We parachuted in, fired the offenders, and took over the IT operational responsibility with no business interruption. Within six months, we rebuilt the IT organization. The parting comment from the CIO was great. He said that we took the gun away from his head." People within an IT organization usually know what's going on. Computer systems don't breakdown by themselves. The problems that arise between IT and the business often relate to management issues. After signing on with a new client, the Transition Partners' team immediately sits down with the IT organization and lays out what it plans to do as turnaround people. Pettibone says, "We tell them that we seek their support with our processes and methods to correct the situation. We emphasize that within a year or shorter, we'll leave and they'll be the recipients of the benefits we can create together. Of course, someone has to be appointed to lead IT. It's a chance for someone to move up in the organization."…

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Wading Through the Muck of IT Politics:Thomas L. Pettibone, Former Fortune 50 CIO

2009-03-16
Length: 13s

When troubled IT organizations need help, then Transition Partners can provide the perfect solution. This IT consultancy specializes in turning around ineffective IT organizations by providing them with experienced IT leaders and established business processes. The company's client base includes Aramark, Bates Advertising, Hilton Hotels, and Ingersoll Rand. Transition Partners specializes in handling the one problem most CIOs don't like to talk about -- dealing with the politics of IT. Thomas L. Pettibone, Transition Partners' founder, has waded through a lot of political muck in his 18-year IT career. In fact, after working as a CIO for several Fortune 50 companies, he concluded that he often found himself in a no-win position and that he'd be happier being on his own as part of an interim team, parting friends with the organization at the end of the day. He says, "When it comes to allocating funds and delivering services, the CIO has to be the judge and the jury. The demand always exceeds the supply. The CIO often winds either saying No to the end-user executive or trying to deliver something on a shoestring. Either way, the CIO loses politically." Pettibone and his Transition Partners staff have a good track record helping some wounded IT organizations, as well as wounded companies, achieve real business value from IT. In fact, the bankrupt TransWorld Airways, now part of American Airlines, was one of Transition Partners' first clients. Pettibone says, "TWA was a mess. Most of the top IT management had left. Things ran poorly. The company was close to signing a terrible outsourcing deal." The Transition Partner's team took over the IT department, and within 12 months had created a high-performance IT organization, delivering high reliability and good end-user satisfaction. Pettibone says, "IT was one of the bright spots when American Airlines acquired TWA." Several years later, Transition Partners worked with Tsumura Consumer Products. He says, "The new CIO was being held hostage by several of his IT lieutenants. They wanted hefty bonuses or else they would disrupt operations. We parachuted in, fired the offenders, and took over the IT operational responsibility with no business interruption. Within six months, we rebuilt the IT organization. The parting comment from the CIO was great. He said that we took the gun away from his head." People within an IT organization usually know what's going on. Computer systems don't breakdown by themselves. The problems that arise between IT and the business often relate to management issues. After signing on with a new client, the Transition Partners' team immediately sits down with the IT organization and lays out what it plans to do as turnaround people. Pettibone says, "We tell them that we seek their support with our processes and methods to correct the situation. We emphasize that within a year or shorter, we'll leave and they'll be the recipients of the benefits we can create together. Of course, someone has to be appointed to lead IT. It's a chance for someone to move up in the organization."…

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Part 2 - Hank Leingang, Betchel CIO: Get Ready to Maximize the Business Impact of IT

2009-03-06
Length: 9s

Part 2 - Hank Leingang -Being a CIO is a touch job. No one knows that better than Hank Leingang, the former global CIO for the Betchel Group, Inc., and the former CIO for Viacom. As CEO of ITM Software, which BMC Software recently acquired, Leingang worked with both CIOs and their executive teams to maximize the business impact of IT. His IT consulting firm, ThinkLift, also helped CIOs and their IT teams to achieve business impact. So what's the business impact of IT? It's really about running IT as a true business that makes growth opportunities happen. Leingang says that achieving business impact means that the IT organization has evolved through five stages beginning with a stable applications portfolio, developing automated support for processes and functions, carrying out an ERP implementation, enabling a business transformation, and delivering business products and services developed by IT or that containing IT components. He says, "Customers benefit from the results of these IT activities." Where can you see visible proof of the business impact of IT across the organization and how do you measure the outcome? Leingang lists four areas where you can see it: enabling of individual productivity, enhancing group productivity, enabling a function or a process, and delivering products and services to customers of the enterprise. He says that you can measure it by profit and loss cost reductions, improvements in revenues, and an increase in shareholder value. He says, "At the end of the day, whatever business case that is developed from the associated IT activities has to contribute to all of these."…

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Part 1 - Hank Leingang, Betchel CIO: Get Ready to Maximize the Business Impact of IT

2009-03-06
Length: 15s

Being a CIO is a touch job. No one knows that better than Hank Leingang, the former global CIO for the Betchel Group, Inc., and the former CIO for Viacom. As CEO of ITM Software, which BMC Software recently acquired, Leingang worked with both CIOs and their executive teams to maximize the business impact of IT. His IT consulting firm, ThinkLift, also helped CIOs and their IT teams to achieve business impact. So what's the business impact of IT? It's really about running IT as a true business that makes growth opportunities happen. Leingang says that achieving business impact means that the IT organization has evolved through five stages beginning with a stable applications portfolio, developing automated support for processes and functions, carrying out an ERP implementation, enabling a business transformation, and delivering business products and services developed by IT or that containing IT components. He says, "Customers benefit from the results of these IT activities." Where can you see visible proof of the business impact of IT across the organization and how do you measure the outcome? Leingang lists four areas where you can see it: enabling of individual productivity, enhancing group productivity, enabling a function or a process, and delivering products and services to customers of the enterprise. He says that you can measure it by profit and loss cost reductions, improvements in revenues, and an increase in shareholder value. He says, "At the end of the day, whatever business case that is developed from the associated IT activities has to contribute to all of these."…

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Part 2 - Hank Leingang, Betchel CIO: Get Ready to Maximize the Business Impact of IT

2009-03-06
Length: 9s

Part 2 - Hank Leingang -Being a CIO is a touch job. No one knows that better than Hank Leingang, the former global CIO for the Betchel Group, Inc., and the former CIO for Viacom. As CEO of ITM Software, which BMC Software recently acquired, Leingang worked with both CIOs and their executive teams to maximize the business impact of IT. His IT consulting firm, ThinkLift, also helped CIOs and their IT teams to achieve business impact. So what's the business impact of IT? It's really about running IT as a true business that makes growth opportunities happen. Leingang says that achieving business impact means that the IT organization has evolved through five stages beginning with a stable applications portfolio, developing automated support for processes and functions, carrying out an ERP implementation, enabling a business transformation, and delivering business products and services developed by IT or that containing IT components. He says, "Customers benefit from the results of these IT activities." Where can you see visible proof of the business impact of IT across the organization and how do you measure the outcome? Leingang lists four areas where you can see it: enabling of individual productivity, enhancing group productivity, enabling a function or a process, and delivering products and services to customers of the enterprise. He says that you can measure it by profit and loss cost reductions, improvements in revenues, and an increase in shareholder value. He says, "At the end of the day, whatever business case that is developed from the associated IT activities has to contribute to all of these."…

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Part 1 - Hank Leingang, Betchel CIO: Get Ready to Maximize the Business Impact of IT

2009-03-06
Length: 15s

Being a CIO is a touch job. No one knows that better than Hank Leingang, the former global CIO for the Betchel Group, Inc., and the former CIO for Viacom. As CEO of ITM Software, which BMC Software recently acquired, Leingang worked with both CIOs and their executive teams to maximize the business impact of IT. His IT consulting firm, ThinkLift, also helped CIOs and their IT teams to achieve business impact. So what's the business impact of IT? It's really about running IT as a true business that makes growth opportunities happen. Leingang says that achieving business impact means that the IT organization has evolved through five stages beginning with a stable applications portfolio, developing automated support for processes and functions, carrying out an ERP implementation, enabling a business transformation, and delivering business products and services developed by IT or that containing IT components. He says, "Customers benefit from the results of these IT activities." Where can you see visible proof of the business impact of IT across the organization and how do you measure the outcome? Leingang lists four areas where you can see it: enabling of individual productivity, enhancing group productivity, enabling a function or a process, and delivering products and services to customers of the enterprise. He says that you can measure it by profit and loss cost reductions, improvements in revenues, and an increase in shareholder value. He says, "At the end of the day, whatever business case that is developed from the associated IT activities has to contribute to all of these."…

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Nathan Langston, CIO for Boy Scouts of America:Achieving Business Impact

2009-03-05
Length: 17s

Nathan Langston knows what it takes for the almost 100-year old Boy Scouts of America to train five million youths in citizenship, character development, and self-reliance through participation in outdoor activities, educational programs, and career-oriented programs in partnership with community organizations. About 15 years ago, Langston, got into scouting as a volunteer leader and then served as a scoutmaster and a committee chairman. Today, Langston serves as the national director of the administration group at the Boy Scouts of America's Dallas headquarters. Langston wears many hats at the largest youth organization in the U.S. He not only serves as the CIO overseeing IT, but he manages the national service desk, portfolio management, properties and treasuries, and health and risk management. He says that his technology hat demands the most time and holds the most interest for him. Like most organizations dealing with tight dollars, the Boy Scouts of America needs to make sure that its technology investments result in a business impact. Employees, however, don't drive business impact as much as the volunteers do. In fact, the Boy Scouts operates locally through units sponsored and operated by churches, clubs, and civic associations. Volunteers lead each unit. Local councils consist of some paid professionals and volunteers. Langston says, "Business impact for us is all about helping our volunteers to enjoy the programs and for our youth to progress on the path to eagle scout. We look at this benchmark in whatever decisions we make." Langston says that these volunteers demand improvements in technology. "As their time gets squeezed and squeezed with our other things, they need to have the administrative side of scouting simplified so they provide the activities to our youths." One such technology investment includes the online reporting of all volunteers within each unit. This yearly task has always been a paper-based process. Within the first three months after the system went live, more than 100 councils adopted the process. Today, more than 80 percent of all scouting units, which represent three million youths, use this process. A new social networking investment promises to have significant business impact for volunteers, scouts, and the paid staff. Langston says that you need to belong to a Boy Scout unit in order to participate in this social networking community. "The site assures everyone that you have a legitimate connection to the Boy Scouts of America. It's unique in that we're including paid staffers. For the first time, everyone will have the chance to gather around an electronic campfire to talk about how we can resolve issues. We can communicate best practices, not only to a unit, but across the U.S. On the business side, Langston says the organization has made several IT investments to improve the staff's ability to get information from a system consolidation that occurred a decade ago. "Our people kept saying they couldn't get access to the information needed to help facilitate the volunteers. At first the CEO had some skepticism about how many staffers would use the internal, Web-based portal. We had some people who were adverse to technology. Today, everyone uses this portal to keep track of fund raising, membership, and other important information. It's the most widely tool we have."…

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Nathan Langston, CIO for Boy Scouts of America:Achieving Business Impact

2009-03-05
Length: 17s

Nathan Langston knows what it takes for the almost 100-year old Boy Scouts of America to train five million youths in citizenship, character development, and self-reliance through participation in outdoor activities, educational programs, and career-oriented programs in partnership with community organizations. About 15 years ago, Langston, got into scouting as a volunteer leader and then served as a scoutmaster and a committee chairman. Today, Langston serves as the national director of the administration group at the Boy Scouts of America's Dallas headquarters. Langston wears many hats at the largest youth organization in the U.S. He not only serves as the CIO overseeing IT, but he manages the national service desk, portfolio management, properties and treasuries, and health and risk management. He says that his technology hat demands the most time and holds the most interest for him. Like most organizations dealing with tight dollars, the Boy Scouts of America needs to make sure that its technology investments result in a business impact. Employees, however, don't drive business impact as much as the volunteers do. In fact, the Boy Scouts operates locally through units sponsored and operated by churches, clubs, and civic associations. Volunteers lead each unit. Local councils consist of some paid professionals and volunteers. Langston says, "Business impact for us is all about helping our volunteers to enjoy the programs and for our youth to progress on the path to eagle scout. We look at this benchmark in whatever decisions we make." Langston says that these volunteers demand improvements in technology. "As their time gets squeezed and squeezed with our other things, they need to have the administrative side of scouting simplified so they provide the activities to our youths." One such technology investment includes the online reporting of all volunteers within each unit. This yearly task has always been a paper-based process. Within the first three months after the system went live, more than 100 councils adopted the process. Today, more than 80 percent of all scouting units, which represent three million youths, use this process. A new social networking investment promises to have significant business impact for volunteers, scouts, and the paid staff. Langston says that you need to belong to a Boy Scout unit in order to participate in this social networking community. "The site assures everyone that you have a legitimate connection to the Boy Scouts of America. It's unique in that we're including paid staffers. For the first time, everyone will have the chance to gather around an electronic campfire to talk about how we can resolve issues. We can communicate best practices, not only to a unit, but across the U.S. On the business side, Langston says the organization has made several IT investments to improve the staff's ability to get information from a system consolidation that occurred a decade ago. "Our people kept saying they couldn't get access to the information needed to help facilitate the volunteers. At first the CEO had some skepticism about how many staffers would use the internal, Web-based portal. We had some people who were adverse to technology. Today, everyone uses this portal to keep track of fund raising, membership, and other important information. It's the most widely tool we have."…

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When It Comes to Building an Enterprise Architecture, CIOs Need to Focus on the Journey, not the Destination: Len Fehskens, vice president and global professional lead for The Open Group

2009-02-25
Length: 20s

Building a robust enterprise architecture that can meet the needs of a business isn’t an option, it’s something every organization has to do. And asking about the ROI on an enterprise architecture project is like asking about what’s the return on investment of your physical plant. You need to focus on making sure your enterprise architecture delivers real business value. That’s the authoritative conclusion from Len Fehskens, The Open Group’s resident expert about anything having to do with enterprise architecture. Fehskens’ official title is vice president and global profession lead for The Open Group. CIOs interested in all aspects of enterprise architecture construction, especially service-oriented architecture, might consider getting a company-membership in The Open Group. A merger of the X Open group and the Open Systems Foundation, The Open Group is a consortium of IT vendors and users that focuses on the development of open standards for enterprise architecture, as well as the professional certification for enterprise architects. The organization focuses on the concept of Boundaryless Information Flow, which is the integration of enterprise applications (including legacy components), the exchange of information between those applications, and the standards to support these things. These efforts have led to the creation of The Open Group Architecture Framework or TOGAF. The current version spells out types of enterprise architectures – the business architecture, the data architecture, the technology architecture, and the application architecture. When it comes to the complex subjects of enterprise architecture and service-oriented architecture, Fehskens, in this podcast, dispels much good advice from the dozens of conversations he had had with members of The Open Group. He says that you can’t do an entire enterprise architecture project as a separate effort and expect that it’s going to come out right. The best way to do an enterprise architecture project, according to Fehskens, is to do it proje…

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When It Comes to Building an Enterprise Architecture, CIOs Need to Focus on the Journey, not the Destination: Len Fehskens, vice president and global professional lead for The Open Group

2009-02-25
Length: 20s

Building a robust enterprise architecture that can meet the needs of a business isn’t an option, it’s something every organization has to do. And asking about the ROI on an enterprise architecture project is like asking about what’s the return on investment of your physical plant. You need to focus on making sure your enterprise architecture delivers real business value. That’s the authoritative conclusion from Len Fehskens, The Open Group’s resident expert about anything having to do with enterprise architecture. Fehskens’ official title is vice president and global profession lead for The Open Group. CIOs interested in all aspects of enterprise architecture construction, especially service-oriented architecture, might consider getting a company-membership in The Open Group. A merger of the X Open group and the Open Systems Foundation, The Open Group is a consortium of IT vendors and users that focuses on the development of open standards for enterprise architecture, as well as the professional certification for enterprise architects. The organization focuses on the concept of Boundaryless Information Flow, which is the integration of enterprise applications (including legacy components), the exchange of information between those applications, and the standards to support these things. These efforts have led to the creation of The Open Group Architecture Framework or TOGAF. The current version spells out types of enterprise architectures – the business architecture, the data architecture, the technology architecture, and the application architecture. When it comes to the complex subjects of enterprise architecture and service-oriented architecture, Fehskens, in this podcast, dispels much good advice from the dozens of conversations he had had with members of The Open Group. He says that you can’t do an entire enterprise architecture project as a separate effort and expect that it’s going to come out right. The best way to do an enterprise architecture project, according to Fehskens, is to do it proje…

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Why Adaptive Companies Succeed In A Networked Business Environment: Amit S. Mukherjee, Author Of The Spider’s Strategy And Founder Of Ishan Advisors

2009-02-18
Length: 23s

In 2000 a fire at the Philips chip plant in New Mexico sent shockwaves through the telecom industry. Nokia and Ericsson – the two major telecom companies that used the chips– handled this event very differently. Nokia had the processes to deal with it immediately and worked with partners to adapt to what happened. Because Ericsson didn’t have processes in place to deal with this event, it, on the other hand, lost hundreds of millions of dollars immediately. By 2004 Ericsson saw its revenues decline 52 percent from pre-fire levels. The face of the mobile phone industry had changed forever, all because of a fire that had been contained in ten minutes. Dr. Amit S. Mukherjee, who conducts executive education seminars for C-level executives of major companies such as ConAgra, Johnson & Johnson, and Kraft, has studied why some companies, such as Nokia, can survive crisis. In fact, Dr. Mukherjee’s book, The Spider’s Strategy: Creating Networks to Avert Crisis, Create Change, and Really Get Ahead, draws from his exclusive interviews with top executives at more than 500 manufacturing and retail companies to look at the importance of living in a networked world -- one in which each company partners with a set of other companies. Dr. Mukherjee says that Nokia was able to adapt rapidly after the fire because it had already created the capabilities (built into its strategy, processes, and values, and supported by technology) to carefully work with its network of partners on crises (and opportunities) that no one could’ve reasonably predicted. He says, “Just contrast this event with what’s happening in the U.S. financial industry. Despite the extensive networking of financial firms, neither executives of individual companies nor regulators have considered the importance of such capabilities. So, they, like Ericsson, got caught flatfooted when disaster struck.”…

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Why Adaptive Companies Succeed In A Networked Business Environment: Amit S. Mukherjee, Author Of The Spider’s Strategy And Founder Of Ishan Advisors

2009-02-18
Length: 23s

In 2000 a fire at the Philips chip plant in New Mexico sent shockwaves through the telecom industry. Nokia and Ericsson – the two major telecom companies that used the chips– handled this event very differently. Nokia had the processes to deal with it immediately and worked with partners to adapt to what happened. Because Ericsson didn’t have processes in place to deal with this event, it, on the other hand, lost hundreds of millions of dollars immediately. By 2004 Ericsson saw its revenues decline 52 percent from pre-fire levels. The face of the mobile phone industry had changed forever, all because of a fire that had been contained in ten minutes. Dr. Amit S. Mukherjee, who conducts executive education seminars for C-level executives of major companies such as ConAgra, Johnson & Johnson, and Kraft, has studied why some companies, such as Nokia, can survive crisis. In fact, Dr. Mukherjee’s book, The Spider’s Strategy: Creating Networks to Avert Crisis, Create Change, and Really Get Ahead, draws from his exclusive interviews with top executives at more than 500 manufacturing and retail companies to look at the importance of living in a networked world -- one in which each company partners with a set of other companies. Dr. Mukherjee says that Nokia was able to adapt rapidly after the fire because it had already created the capabilities (built into its strategy, processes, and values, and supported by technology) to carefully work with its network of partners on crises (and opportunities) that no one could’ve reasonably predicted. He says, “Just contrast this event with what’s happening in the U.S. financial industry. Despite the extensive networking of financial firms, neither executives of individual companies nor regulators have considered the importance of such capabilities. So, they, like Ericsson, got caught flatfooted when disaster struck.”…

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BSM, CMDB, And ITIL V3 -- The IT Management Trio Sticks Together For The Better:Paul Burns, Senior Analyst With Enterprise Management Associates

2009-02-11
Length: 16s

Within the past five years, CIOs have seen a broad shift from focusing on the technology aspects of IT management to concentrating on the service management aspects, especially emphasis on how these services help businesses succeed. For example, version 3 of the IT Infrastructure Library or ITIL v3 has a more logical and intuitive structure than ITIL v2. As a result, people can relate better to this new framework in ITIL v3. Each of the five ITIL v3 books centers on a service lifecycle, such as service strategy, design, transition, operation, and continual service improvement. Because of the lifecycle approach, people can drill down on the portions of the IT issues and problems they're having at a particular time, and get the answers they need. Business service management or BSM and configuration database management or CMDB have always been a focus on ITIL. However, ITIL v3 now acknowledges both BSM and CMDB. ITIL v3 has renamed CMDB as the configuration management system and also has changed the definition to bring all of an organization's configuration management together. To this end, an organization will have a number of CMDBs, some of which will be specialized, such as server management. Through federation, all of these CMDBs will represent an organization's configuration management system. Paul Burns, a senior analyst with Enterprise Management Associates (EMA), a consultancy that specializes in all aspects of IT management, says that BSM and CMDB will spread the adoption of ITIL v3. He says, "Now that ITIL is talking about BSM and CMDB, you have all of the vendors talking about ITIL, too."…

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BSM, CMDB, And ITIL V3 -- The IT Management Trio Sticks Together For The Better:Paul Burns, Senior Analyst With Enterprise Management Associates

2009-02-11
Length: 16s

Within the past five years, CIOs have seen a broad shift from focusing on the technology aspects of IT management to concentrating on the service management aspects, especially emphasis on how these services help businesses succeed. For example, version 3 of the IT Infrastructure Library or ITIL v3 has a more logical and intuitive structure than ITIL v2. As a result, people can relate better to this new framework in ITIL v3. Each of the five ITIL v3 books centers on a service lifecycle, such as service strategy, design, transition, operation, and continual service improvement. Because of the lifecycle approach, people can drill down on the portions of the IT issues and problems they're having at a particular time, and get the answers they need. Business service management or BSM and configuration database management or CMDB have always been a focus on ITIL. However, ITIL v3 now acknowledges both BSM and CMDB. ITIL v3 has renamed CMDB as the configuration management system and also has changed the definition to bring all of an organization's configuration management together. To this end, an organization will have a number of CMDBs, some of which will be specialized, such as server management. Through federation, all of these CMDBs will represent an organization's configuration management system. Paul Burns, a senior analyst with Enterprise Management Associates (EMA), a consultancy that specializes in all aspects of IT management, says that BSM and CMDB will spread the adoption of ITIL v3. He says, "Now that ITIL is talking about BSM and CMDB, you have all of the vendors talking about ITIL, too."…

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Lessons Learned From A Three-year SOA Deployment In The Banking Industry: Tony Bishop, Former IT Executive With Wachovia’s Corporate Investment Banking Division

2009-02-04
Length: 18s

In 2004, the $6 billion Corporate Investment Banking division of Wachovia, one of the largest banks in the country, launched a multi-million dollar, end-to-end, service-oriented delivery platform. Working with the CIO, Tony Bishop, the division's senior vice president and chief architect, spearheaded the three-year transformation program, driven by critical business strategies of being able to compete, using technology, against the best in the industry. Bishop says, "We wanted the ability to leverage and to reuse technology, and to do it at a lower investment cost than our competitors." Service-oriented architecture (SOA) formed the underpinning of this platform transformation. Bishop says, "We needed an efficient way to align the functionality with where it was needed to respond to market changes." While the project turned out to be a success, Bishop says that the bank derived many incremental benefits during the three years of the project implementation. He says, "We had many checkpoints along the way to make sure we were making the right investments in people and in technology" Bishop is now applying what he learned at Wachovia, as well as in other industries, in his latest venture, Adaptivity, an IT business transformation consulting firm. He says that adaptivity to everything is the one thing he learned throughout his career, especially at Wachovia.…

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Lessons Learned From A Three-year SOA Deployment In The Banking Industry: Tony Bishop, Former IT Executive With Wachovia’s Corporate Investment Banking Division

2009-02-04
Length: 18s

In 2004, the $6 billion Corporate Investment Banking division of Wachovia, one of the largest banks in the country, launched a multi-million dollar, end-to-end, service-oriented delivery platform. Working with the CIO, Tony Bishop, the division's senior vice president and chief architect, spearheaded the three-year transformation program, driven by critical business strategies of being able to compete, using technology, against the best in the industry. Bishop says, "We wanted the ability to leverage and to reuse technology, and to do it at a lower investment cost than our competitors." Service-oriented architecture (SOA) formed the underpinning of this platform transformation. Bishop says, "We needed an efficient way to align the functionality with where it was needed to respond to market changes." While the project turned out to be a success, Bishop says that the bank derived many incremental benefits during the three years of the project implementation. He says, "We had many checkpoints along the way to make sure we were making the right investments in people and in technology" Bishop is now applying what he learned at Wachovia, as well as in other industries, in his latest venture, Adaptivity, an IT business transformation consulting firm. He says that adaptivity to everything is the one thing he learned throughout his career, especially at Wachovia.…

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What Happens To Business When The Net Generation Gets Its Hands On Wikinomics:Don Tapscott, Best-Selling Author and Chairman of Ngenera Insight

2009-01-29
Length: 15s

Social collaboration via the Internet changed the direction of the 2008 presidential election. Whether you like it or not, social collaboration has begun to change the way major companies, such as Procter & Gamble, do business. Things will continue to evolve as more and more members of the net generation, young people comfortable with MySpace and Facebook, enter the work force. No one has better prepared executives for the future than Don Tapscott, author and chairman of nGenera Insight, a technology think tank that looks at new business models. Tapscott consistently identifies and explains the next business imperatives and defines the business models and strategies that the new imperatives require. Published in 2006 and updated in 2008, his book, Wikinomics: How Mass Collaboration Changes Everything, has appeared on the New York Times and BusinessWeek bestseller lists, and has been translated into 19 languages. Based on the largest investigation of strategic IT in business ever conducted, Wikinomics explains how businesses can tap the full potential of the emerging networked economy and its self-organized, mass-participatory communities. Tapscott’s latest book, Grown Up Digital: How the Net Generation is Changing the World, explores how the first generation to grow up with the Internet is redefining today's workplace, marketplace, schools, family and government—how they learn and work and what power and influence they hold. This is an indispensable message for all organizations that seek to turn the net generation’s talents and worldview to competitive advantage. Also based on a multi-million dollar research project, Grown Up Digital carries forward the groundbreaking ideas first expressed in Don's bestseller Growing Up Digital.…

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What Happens To Business When The Net Generation Gets Its Hands On Wikinomics:Don Tapscott, Best-Selling Author and Chairman of Ngenera Insight

2009-01-29
Length: 15s

Social collaboration via the Internet changed the direction of the 2008 presidential election. Whether you like it or not, social collaboration has begun to change the way major companies, such as Procter & Gamble, do business. Things will continue to evolve as more and more members of the net generation, young people comfortable with MySpace and Facebook, enter the work force. No one has better prepared executives for the future than Don Tapscott, author and chairman of nGenera Insight, a technology think tank that looks at new business models. Tapscott consistently identifies and explains the next business imperatives and defines the business models and strategies that the new imperatives require. Published in 2006 and updated in 2008, his book, Wikinomics: How Mass Collaboration Changes Everything, has appeared on the New York Times and BusinessWeek bestseller lists, and has been translated into 19 languages. Based on the largest investigation of strategic IT in business ever conducted, Wikinomics explains how businesses can tap the full potential of the emerging networked economy and its self-organized, mass-participatory communities. Tapscott’s latest book, Grown Up Digital: How the Net Generation is Changing the World, explores how the first generation to grow up with the Internet is redefining today's workplace, marketplace, schools, family and government—how they learn and work and what power and influence they hold. This is an indispensable message for all organizations that seek to turn the net generation’s talents and worldview to competitive advantage. Also based on a multi-million dollar research project, Grown Up Digital carries forward the groundbreaking ideas first expressed in Don's bestseller Growing Up Digital.…

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How Senior IT Executives Can Benefit From A Professional Organization:Robert Keefe, President Of The Society For Information Management

2009-01-21
Length: 19s

Fortune magazine has called the 40-year-old Society for Information Management or SIM the IT field's top professional group. In fact, Robert Keefe, CIO of the $1.8 billion dollar Mueller Water Products, attributes his successful career in IT to his involvement with SIM. Keefe is SIM's current president. Membership in SIM is open to qualified senior IT professionals, academics, and consultants. SIM currently has about 3,600 members in 36 U.S. chapters. (Yes, each SIM chapter does due diligence on each prospective member.) SIM's offerings fall into several categories: information exchange through chapter meetings, educational programs, and chapter-sponsored venues, such as the MIT Sloan School CIO Symposium. SIM also holds an annual conference called the SIMposium. About 16 years ago, Keefe went through SIM's year-long Leadership Forum. He says, "At the time I took the course I wasn't a CIO. I quickly landed a CIO position and then had my company join SIM's Advanced Practices Council." Each year about 300 professionals attend monthly Leadership Forum classes in 10 major cities. Keefe says, "These people have good IT skills and business acumen, but this program helps them to think outside of the box." The course curriculum blends about 40 different pieces of media, mostly books ranging from The Old Man in the Sea to The Innovator's Dilemma. The Advanced Practices Council, another SIM educational program, consists of about 40 member companies that contract with academics to do IT research. The research can range from a look at new, emerging technologies to different segments of IT leadership. Recently, Boston University delivered a paper about the competitive levers for leading innovation in the 20th century. Keefe says, "It's not all about technology but how business models are changing. For example, google.com gives away a search engine, but charges for it through advertising. How do compelling changes in the marketplace like this one translate into decisions that a CIO must make?"…

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How Senior IT Executives Can Benefit From A Professional Organization:Robert Keefe, President Of The Society For Information Management

2009-01-21
Length: 19s

Fortune magazine has called the 40-year-old Society for Information Management or SIM the IT field's top professional group. In fact, Robert Keefe, CIO of the $1.8 billion dollar Mueller Water Products, attributes his successful career in IT to his involvement with SIM. Keefe is SIM's current president. Membership in SIM is open to qualified senior IT professionals, academics, and consultants. SIM currently has about 3,600 members in 36 U.S. chapters. (Yes, each SIM chapter does due diligence on each prospective member.) SIM's offerings fall into several categories: information exchange through chapter meetings, educational programs, and chapter-sponsored venues, such as the MIT Sloan School CIO Symposium. SIM also holds an annual conference called the SIMposium. About 16 years ago, Keefe went through SIM's year-long Leadership Forum. He says, "At the time I took the course I wasn't a CIO. I quickly landed a CIO position and then had my company join SIM's Advanced Practices Council." Each year about 300 professionals attend monthly Leadership Forum classes in 10 major cities. Keefe says, "These people have good IT skills and business acumen, but this program helps them to think outside of the box." The course curriculum blends about 40 different pieces of media, mostly books ranging from The Old Man in the Sea to The Innovator's Dilemma. The Advanced Practices Council, another SIM educational program, consists of about 40 member companies that contract with academics to do IT research. The research can range from a look at new, emerging technologies to different segments of IT leadership. Recently, Boston University delivered a paper about the competitive levers for leading innovation in the 20th century. Keefe says, "It's not all about technology but how business models are changing. For example, google.com gives away a search engine, but charges for it through advertising. How do compelling changes in the marketplace like this one translate into decisions that a CIO must make?"…

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Common Sense Advice About Deploying BSM And Understanding Its Relationship To ITIL:Dr. Jerry N. Luftman, Executive Director Of Graduate IS Programs At Stevens Institute Of Technology

2009-01-15
Length: 24s

When Dr. Jerry N. Luftman established the information systems graduate programs at Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken, New Jersey, he didn't envision that it would someday become one of the world's largest, with more than 1,000 students. Most of the graduate students have at least 10 years of professional experience. The effective alignment between IT (or IS) with the needs of the business has become a critical part of the curriculum and a major research area for Dr. Luftman. Students put themselves in the tactical role of a CIO, and then in the strategic role where a CIO builds business strategy driven by IT. During the past 20 years, many processes have evolved to improve the over arching relationship between IT and the business. Business service management or BSM has emerged as an important concept for improving availability and performance. It's also a complement to the IT Infrastructure Library or ITIL. BSM tries to ensure that IT processes are in harmony with the business processes so IT can improve the business's services. Specifically, BSM looks at what affect each of the different services and the technologies supported by IT can have on the business.…

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Common Sense Advice About Deploying BSM And Understanding Its Relationship To ITIL:Dr. Jerry N. Luftman, Executive Director Of Graduate IS Programs At Stevens Institute Of Technology

2009-01-15
Length: 24s

When Dr. Jerry N. Luftman established the information systems graduate programs at Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken, New Jersey, he didn't envision that it would someday become one of the world's largest, with more than 1,000 students. Most of the graduate students have at least 10 years of professional experience. The effective alignment between IT (or IS) with the needs of the business has become a critical part of the curriculum and a major research area for Dr. Luftman. Students put themselves in the tactical role of a CIO, and then in the strategic role where a CIO builds business strategy driven by IT. During the past 20 years, many processes have evolved to improve the over arching relationship between IT and the business. Business service management or BSM has emerged as an important concept for improving availability and performance. It's also a complement to the IT Infrastructure Library or ITIL. BSM tries to ensure that IT processes are in harmony with the business processes so IT can improve the business's services. Specifically, BSM looks at what affect each of the different services and the technologies supported by IT can have on the business.…

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What It Takes To Enable The Next Generation Enterprise:Steve Papermaster, Chairman And Ceo Of Ngenera

2009-01-09
Length: 17s

The first generation Web focused on pushing out content in a one-way mode. In contrast, Web 2.0 provides a very dynamic, highly interactive user experience, similar to consumer Web sites, such as amazon.com or ebay.com. Steve Papermaster, chairman and CEO of nGenera, a company that offers a platform for transforming next generation enterprises, says, “You don’t notice the technology. Instead, you’re completely tied in with your environment. It’s like you become one with it.” Enterprise 2.0, Web 2.0 technologies taken one step further, includes a portfolio of newer, mostly on-demand technologies designed for the enterprise. These technologies could include open source, on demand software as a service applications, or other types of on-demand cloud-based applications and services. Papermaster says that the key question is how do these new technologies impact and power capabilities in the enterprise? He says, “You need to understand the business benefit and the economic benefit before you seriously start to deploy them.”…

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What It Takes To Enable The Next Generation Enterprise:Steve Papermaster, Chairman And Ceo Of Ngenera

2009-01-09
Length: 17s

The first generation Web focused on pushing out content in a one-way mode. In contrast, Web 2.0 provides a very dynamic, highly interactive user experience, similar to consumer Web sites, such as amazon.com or ebay.com. Steve Papermaster, chairman and CEO of nGenera, a company that offers a platform for transforming next generation enterprises, says, “You don’t notice the technology. Instead, you’re completely tied in with your environment. It’s like you become one with it.” Enterprise 2.0, Web 2.0 technologies taken one step further, includes a portfolio of newer, mostly on-demand technologies designed for the enterprise. These technologies could include open source, on demand software as a service applications, or other types of on-demand cloud-based applications and services. Papermaster says that the key question is how do these new technologies impact and power capabilities in the enterprise? He says, “You need to understand the business benefit and the economic benefit before you seriously start to deploy them.”…

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The process of greening an existing data center:Brad Kenney, Vice President of IT Infrastructure at Avnet Inc.

2008-12-11
Length: 19s

Seventy-six per cent of executives surveyed at the MIT Sloan CIO Symposium in May 2008 said they didn't have a committed budget for a greening policy, even though 90 percent said that greening their data centers is crucial to meeting their companies' business objectives. This wasn't the case for Avnet Inc., $14 billion worldwide distributor of electronic components, computer products, and technology services. In fact, Avnet received Computerworld's Best Practices in Green IT Award for a three-year project to create a more energy-efficient data center. Avnet's 13,000 square foot data center houses 1,200 logical servers, more than 200 terabytes of disk storage, a central tape backup system, and redundant UPSs, generators, and switch gear. For Brad Kenney, vice president of infrastructure at Avnet, the greening of the company's data center wasn't another IT project, but an on-going process that has saved the company thousands of dollars in unnecessary power consumption, under-utilized servers, and inefficient UPSs. He says, "Most of all it's saved us the millions of dollars it would cost to build out our data center to house more servers we didn't need." Kenney begin the process by looking at every piece of equipment on the data center floor. Two important factors included the age of the device and its energy efficiency. Because manufacturers have become more concerned about energy consumption, Kenney found it more cost-effective to replace older air conditioners and older UPSs with new devices that were at least 20 percent more energy efficient. He even looked at replacing floor tiles, lighting, and making adjustments in air handling. He says that little things like these can save up to 30 percent in energy consumption. Server virtualization enabled Kenney to liquidate about 300 severs. Twenty-four physical ESX hosts now represent 378 virtual servers, and 39 AIX servers have more than 200 servers on them. Other consolidated efforts include moving to a centralized tape backup system and a storage area network.…

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The process of greening an existing data center:Brad Kenney, Vice President of IT Infrastructure at Avnet Inc.

2008-12-11
Length: 19s

Seventy-six per cent of executives surveyed at the MIT Sloan CIO Symposium in May 2008 said they didn't have a committed budget for a greening policy, even though 90 percent said that greening their data centers is crucial to meeting their companies' business objectives. This wasn't the case for Avnet Inc., $14 billion worldwide distributor of electronic components, computer products, and technology services. In fact, Avnet received Computerworld's Best Practices in Green IT Award for a three-year project to create a more energy-efficient data center. Avnet's 13,000 square foot data center houses 1,200 logical servers, more than 200 terabytes of disk storage, a central tape backup system, and redundant UPSs, generators, and switch gear. For Brad Kenney, vice president of infrastructure at Avnet, the greening of the company's data center wasn't another IT project, but an on-going process that has saved the company thousands of dollars in unnecessary power consumption, under-utilized servers, and inefficient UPSs. He says, "Most of all it's saved us the millions of dollars it would cost to build out our data center to house more servers we didn't need." Kenney begin the process by looking at every piece of equipment on the data center floor. Two important factors included the age of the device and its energy efficiency. Because manufacturers have become more concerned about energy consumption, Kenney found it more cost-effective to replace older air conditioners and older UPSs with new devices that were at least 20 percent more energy efficient. He even looked at replacing floor tiles, lighting, and making adjustments in air handling. He says that little things like these can save up to 30 percent in energy consumption. Server virtualization enabled Kenney to liquidate about 300 severs. Twenty-four physical ESX hosts now represent 378 virtual servers, and 39 AIX servers have more than 200 servers on them. Other consolidated efforts include moving to a centralized tape backup system and a storage area network.…

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From Business Continuity to IT Cost-Cutting in a Fortune 1000 Company -- Lessons Learned from the IT Trenches:Don Hopkins, CIO of SunGard Availability Services and Former CIO of NCR Corp.

2008-12-04
Length: 31s

When Don Hopkins retired as chief information officer at NCR, he decided to join SunGard Availability Services, a business unit of SunGard, a $5 billion business continuity and disaster recovery company. SunGard Availability Services provides the company's more than 10,000 customers in North American and in Europe with solutions that insure uninterrupted, access to mission critical data and systems. By reporting to SunGard's CEO, Hopkins has insight into the company's strategic initiatives and, as a result, has the opportunity to understand what technologies would be good enablers to those strategic decisions. In 1979, Hopkins joined NCR where he moved up the IT ranks from the director of general purpose products eventually to vice president of technology and infrastructure in NCR's IT services group, and to his last position as chief information officer. In fact, he played a leadership role in NCR's transformation and performance turnaround. In 2007, he successfully completed the very complex IT spin-off of Teradata as a separate company. Although this event happened during a very aggressive timeframe, Hopkins and the management team did it under planned budgets, both before and after the spin-off. In this podcast, Hopkins talks about how he has translated his IT experiences at NCR and applied them as CIO at SunGard Availability Services. He also talks about NCR's strategy to cut its IT infrastructure costs and increase the company's profitability, its process for making investment decisions in technology, and its methodology for measuring the value of those investments.…

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From Business Continuity to IT Cost-Cutting in a Fortune 1000 Company -- Lessons Learned from the IT Trenches:Don Hopkins, CIO of SunGard Availability Services and Former CIO of NCR Corp.

2008-12-04
Length: 31s

When Don Hopkins retired as chief information officer at NCR, he decided to join SunGard Availability Services, a business unit of SunGard, a $5 billion business continuity and disaster recovery company. SunGard Availability Services provides the company's more than 10,000 customers in North American and in Europe with solutions that insure uninterrupted, access to mission critical data and systems. By reporting to SunGard's CEO, Hopkins has insight into the company's strategic initiatives and, as a result, has the opportunity to understand what technologies would be good enablers to those strategic decisions. In 1979, Hopkins joined NCR where he moved up the IT ranks from the director of general purpose products eventually to vice president of technology and infrastructure in NCR's IT services group, and to his last position as chief information officer. In fact, he played a leadership role in NCR's transformation and performance turnaround. In 2007, he successfully completed the very complex IT spin-off of Teradata as a separate company. Although this event happened during a very aggressive timeframe, Hopkins and the management team did it under planned budgets, both before and after the spin-off. In this podcast, Hopkins talks about how he has translated his IT experiences at NCR and applied them as CIO at SunGard Availability Services. He also talks about NCR's strategy to cut its IT infrastructure costs and increase the company's profitability, its process for making investment decisions in technology, and its methodology for measuring the value of those investments.…

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Straight Talk About Key Technologies Today's IT Talent Needs To Master:Christina Hollingsworth, Corporate IT Director Genworth Financial

2008-11-21
Length: 11s

Despite the downturn in the economy, some financial services companies are holding their own and hiring people, especially in areas such as IT. Genworth Financial is one of those companies. With more than $103 billion in assets and 15 million customers worldwide, Genworth Financial is comprised on Genworth Financial, a full service broker-dealer; and Genworth Financial Advisers Corporation, an SEC registered investment advisory firm. Genworth has earned the highest company ratings in its industry. It is a leader in product long-term care insurance and annuities. Christina Hollingsworth will be the first one to tell you that IT resides at the core of Genworth Financial's business operations. As corporate IT director at Genworth Financial, she oversees the strategy, planning, and execution of the company's enterprise finance technology acquisition and integration. Hollingsworth has earned a stellar reputation for leading global teams and initiatives and partnering with multiple suppliers. Like many IT executives, Hollingsworth has to be sure that she has a well-stocked pool of qualified personnel who are, not only technically savvy, but can lead IT projects. She says, "In the past, IT professionals have been very good about executing on initiatives, or basically carrying out what they were told to today. Things have changed. Given the speed at which technology is evolving, we need people who can develop strategy based upon trends in the industry, can translate those trends into action, and then can execute on those initiatives." In fact, Genworth Financial has deployed new technologies such as desktop video, and software as a service, which manages travel expenses and investment portfolio expenses. The company also has a social networking pilot underway that is similar to Facebook. In fact, it's called Facebook. Hollingsworth says, "As a global company, we have both employees and contractors working at a variety of locations. The best way to get good ideas is to have many ideas coming from our global talent pool. Our Facebook will make it very easy for people to tap into these resources."…

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Straight Talk About Key Technologies Today's IT Talent Needs To Master:Christina Hollingsworth, Corporate IT Director Genworth Financial

2008-11-21
Length: 11s

Despite the downturn in the economy, some financial services companies are holding their own and hiring people, especially in areas such as IT. Genworth Financial is one of those companies. With more than $103 billion in assets and 15 million customers worldwide, Genworth Financial is comprised on Genworth Financial, a full service broker-dealer; and Genworth Financial Advisers Corporation, an SEC registered investment advisory firm. Genworth has earned the highest company ratings in its industry. It is a leader in product long-term care insurance and annuities. Christina Hollingsworth will be the first one to tell you that IT resides at the core of Genworth Financial's business operations. As corporate IT director at Genworth Financial, she oversees the strategy, planning, and execution of the company's enterprise finance technology acquisition and integration. Hollingsworth has earned a stellar reputation for leading global teams and initiatives and partnering with multiple suppliers. Like many IT executives, Hollingsworth has to be sure that she has a well-stocked pool of qualified personnel who are, not only technically savvy, but can lead IT projects. She says, "In the past, IT professionals have been very good about executing on initiatives, or basically carrying out what they were told to today. Things have changed. Given the speed at which technology is evolving, we need people who can develop strategy based upon trends in the industry, can translate those trends into action, and then can execute on those initiatives." In fact, Genworth Financial has deployed new technologies such as desktop video, and software as a service, which manages travel expenses and investment portfolio expenses. The company also has a social networking pilot underway that is similar to Facebook. In fact, it's called Facebook. Hollingsworth says, "As a global company, we have both employees and contractors working at a variety of locations. The best way to get good ideas is to have many ideas coming from our global talent pool. Our Facebook will make it very easy for people to tap into these resources."…

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Meeting the Challenge of Stocking the IT Talent Pool:Mark Steinke, Vice President of Global Recruiting at SAP

2008-10-31
Length: 15s

What is the chief concern of chief information officers? According to the a recent annual survey by the Society for Information Management, the number one concern of CIOs is attracting, developing, and retaining good IT professionals. So, if you’re looking to move up the corporate IT ladder or you’re a first time IT job seeker, consider sharpening your enterprise software skills at SAP, or working for a SAP partner, or getting SAP training and then going to work for an SAP customer. With revenues of about $10.5 billion and 50,000 employees, SAP ranks as the world’s second largest business software company and the third largest independent software provider in revenues. SAP ERP deployments can be found in more than 41,000 companies, in more than 25 industries, and in about 120 countries. Unlike Oracle which has grown through 30 acquisitions, SAP has grown organically by hiring people. No one knows more about the SAP hiring picture, as well as the hiring needs of the IT industry, than Mark Steinke, vice president of global recruiting at SAP. He oversees SAP’s recruiting and staffing for professionals, senior executives, university graduates, interns, and contingent staff. According to Steinke, the demand for IT professionals with SAP knowledge has never been greater than today. He says, “The quantity of IT candidates has dropped off because of the demands of skills in our space.” While Steinke strongly suggests that IT candidates at all level consider SAP training, he says that technical skills might get you in the door, but won’t give you staying power. He says that today’s business needs demand that IT employees at all levels know how to manage change, to think strategically, and to communicate effectively. He says, “Universities do a good job of incorporating the IT skills in the curriculum, but fall short in those other areas."…

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Meeting the Challenge of Stocking the IT Talent Pool:Mark Steinke, Vice President of Global Recruiting at SAP

2008-10-31
Length: 15s

What is the chief concern of chief information officers? According to the a recent annual survey by the Society for Information Management, the number one concern of CIOs is attracting, developing, and retaining good IT professionals. So, if you’re looking to move up the corporate IT ladder or you’re a first time IT job seeker, consider sharpening your enterprise software skills at SAP, or working for a SAP partner, or getting SAP training and then going to work for an SAP customer. With revenues of about $10.5 billion and 50,000 employees, SAP ranks as the world’s second largest business software company and the third largest independent software provider in revenues. SAP ERP deployments can be found in more than 41,000 companies, in more than 25 industries, and in about 120 countries. Unlike Oracle which has grown through 30 acquisitions, SAP has grown organically by hiring people. No one knows more about the SAP hiring picture, as well as the hiring needs of the IT industry, than Mark Steinke, vice president of global recruiting at SAP. He oversees SAP’s recruiting and staffing for professionals, senior executives, university graduates, interns, and contingent staff. According to Steinke, the demand for IT professionals with SAP knowledge has never been greater than today. He says, “The quantity of IT candidates has dropped off because of the demands of skills in our space.” While Steinke strongly suggests that IT candidates at all level consider SAP training, he says that technical skills might get you in the door, but won’t give you staying power. He says that today’s business needs demand that IT employees at all levels know how to manage change, to think strategically, and to communicate effectively. He says, “Universities do a good job of incorporating the IT skills in the curriculum, but fall short in those other areas."…

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How to create new business opportunities on the web: Podcast interview with Amy Shuen, former Wharton School of Business professor and author of Web 2.0

2008-10-27
Length: 31s

The Web 2.0 revolution has moved from the college campus to corporate America. While Web 2.0 makes lots of headlines, can it make lots of money for companies? Amy Shuen, a former professor at the Wharton School of Business, answers this question in her new book, Web 2:0: A Strategy Guide. She explains what's different about Web 2.0 and how those differences can improve the bottom line. Rather than focus on the technology, she looks at the importance of creating a Web 2.0 strategy and integrating those strategies within the existing business. She says, "You have to create places online where people like to come together to share what they think, see, and do. When people come together over the Web, the result can be much more than the sum of the parts. The customers themselves help to build the site, as old-fashioned word of mouth becomes hyper growth.…

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IT's Role in Providing a Service-Based Business Strategy to Offer Customer's More Value:John E. McDermott, CIO of Xerox Corporation

2008-10-14
Length: 23s

When John E. McDermott joined Xerox as chief strategy officer, the $18 billion copier and printing giant was in recovery mode. He worked along side Anne Mulcahey, Xerox's CEO, to crystallize the business strategy and the turnaround strategy. In 2007, with the business in good shape, Mulcahey decided that the company needed to do a faster job of carrying out certain aspects of the business strategy. McDermott says, "To do that, we had to build new business processes, which are dependent of critical relationships between the business and IT." To bridge the gap between the IT organization and the business, McDermott moved into the CIO role when Patricia Cusick, the former CIO, retired. McDermott spent his first few months on the job asking customers' CIOs how much they spend per seat to do printing and copying activities. He says, "Most CIOs can't come up with an answer. They can tell you down to the very nickel how much they spend per seat to provision workplace-computing services. The print and copier world has been treated as a second-class citizen by the IT organization." Xerox's biggest challenge today is to fulfill the needs of its large customers that want services offerings around their Xerox copier and printing devices. McDermott says, "If you start to manage these devices as an infrastructure, then you have the tremendous capacity to use their scanning capabilities as an on-ramp to a company's digital workflow." To this end, Xerox has begun to build significant value-added services on top of the infrastructure management business that helps customers to deal with document-intensive business processes.…

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IT's Role in Providing a Service-Based Business Strategy to Offer Customer's More Value:John E. McDermott, CIO of Xerox Corporation

2008-10-14
Length: 23s

When John E. McDermott joined Xerox as chief strategy officer, the $18 billion copier and printing giant was in recovery mode. He worked along side Anne Mulcahey, Xerox's CEO, to crystallize the business strategy and the turnaround strategy. In 2007, with the business in good shape, Mulcahey decided that the company needed to do a faster job of carrying out certain aspects of the business strategy. McDermott says, "To do that, we had to build new business processes, which are dependent of critical relationships between the business and IT." To bridge the gap between the IT organization and the business, McDermott moved into the CIO role when Patricia Cusick, the former CIO, retired. McDermott spent his first few months on the job asking customers' CIOs how much they spend per seat to do printing and copying activities. He says, "Most CIOs can't come up with an answer. They can tell you down to the very nickel how much they spend per seat to provision workplace-computing services. The print and copier world has been treated as a second-class citizen by the IT organization." Xerox's biggest challenge today is to fulfill the needs of its large customers that want services offerings around their Xerox copier and printing devices. McDermott says, "If you start to manage these devices as an infrastructure, then you have the tremendous capacity to use their scanning capabilities as an on-ramp to a company's digital workflow." To this end, Xerox has begun to build significant value-added services on top of the infrastructure management business that helps customers to deal with document-intensive business processes.…

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Building Trust Between IT and the Internal Customers: Suzanne Gordon, vice president of information technology and CIO at SAS

2008-10-03
Length: 11s

During her climb up the corporate ladder at SAS, the world's largest privately held software company, Suzanne Gordon, SAS's vice president of information technology and CIO, developed an air-tight strategy for how IT could work in lockstep with internal SAS customers to reinforce the company's success. A roadblock stood in the way of selling her idea to management. Meanwhile, she decided to move out of IT and into the sales consulting side of SAS. It was here that she saw IT from the customer's perspective. In 2003 when the CIO position came opened at SAS, a company that provides 44,000 customers with analytics software, Gordon got the job. She now could turn her vision into a reality with her IT staff of more than 300 employees. In fact, that same year, Computerworld recognized Gordon's leadership talents by including her in the list of Premier 100 IT Executives for that year.…

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Building Trust Between IT and the Internal Customers: Suzanne Gordon, vice president of information technology and CIO at SAS

2008-10-03
Length: 11s

During her climb up the corporate ladder at SAS, the world's largest privately held software company, Suzanne Gordon, SAS's vice president of information technology and CIO, developed an air-tight strategy for how IT could work in lockstep with internal SAS customers to reinforce the company's success. A roadblock stood in the way of selling her idea to management. Meanwhile, she decided to move out of IT and into the sales consulting side of SAS. It was here that she saw IT from the customer's perspective. In 2003 when the CIO position came opened at SAS, a company that provides 44,000 customers with analytics software, Gordon got the job. She now could turn her vision into a reality with her IT staff of more than 300 employees. In fact, that same year, Computerworld recognized Gordon's leadership talents by including her in the list of Premier 100 IT Executives for that year.…

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What it Takes to Succeed in Today's Marketplace:Ian Patterson, CIO and Executive Director of IT at Scottrade

2008-09-24
Length: 18s

Since joining Scottrade as CIO in 2005, Ian Patterson has racked up a series of IT accolades for the stock brokerage firm, which manages $55.7 billion in assets. In both 2008 and 2007, Computerworld named him to its Premier 100 IT Leaders, a list of the country top IT executives. In 2007, under Patterson's leadership, Scottrade got named to the CIO magazine's CIO 100, an award that recognizes outstanding strategic IT leadership. Scottrade has also made it on the InformationWeek 500 list of the most innovative users of IT in the U.S. What has made Patterson so successful? As a former consultant with Deloitte, Patterson realized that many companies view the IT organization as an outsider, different from other business units. He says, "This never made any sense to me. Why should IT be treated any differently from marketing or finance?" At Scottrade, Patterson created an environment to converge IT into the overall corporate strategy to promote growth and profitability. He says, "Of course, a strategy without execution is just a dream. Our leadership meets regularly to review our five-year plan and to make any adjustments to it."…

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What it Takes to Succeed in Today's Marketplace:Ian Patterson, CIO and Executive Director of IT at Scottrade

2008-09-24
Length: 18s

Since joining Scottrade as CIO in 2005, Ian Patterson has racked up a series of IT accolades for the stock brokerage firm, which manages $55.7 billion in assets. In both 2008 and 2007, Computerworld named him to its Premier 100 IT Leaders, a list of the country top IT executives. In 2007, under Patterson's leadership, Scottrade got named to the CIO magazine's CIO 100, an award that recognizes outstanding strategic IT leadership. Scottrade has also made it on the InformationWeek 500 list of the most innovative users of IT in the U.S. What has made Patterson so successful? As a former consultant with Deloitte, Patterson realized that many companies view the IT organization as an outsider, different from other business units. He says, "This never made any sense to me. Why should IT be treated any differently from marketing or finance?" At Scottrade, Patterson created an environment to converge IT into the overall corporate strategy to promote growth and profitability. He says, "Of course, a strategy without execution is just a dream. Our leadership meets regularly to review our five-year plan and to make any adjustments to it."…

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HOW CIOs HELP THEIR COMPANIES OUTSMART THEIR COMPETITORS:Jim Champy, best-selling author and chairman of Perot Systems Corporation's consulting practice

2008-09-17
Length: 19s

In the early 1990, Jim Champy saw the writing on boardroom walls -- companies have to change the way they work if they want to be effective and to be profitable. No wonder, Champy's book, Reengineering the Corporation, became an immediate best seller, being translated into 17 languages. Although the Internet didn't exist when Champy wrote this book, he says that the concept of work flowing horizontally inside a corporation and across the boundaries of a corporation hasn't changed. In his book, X-Engineering the Corporation, Champy argues that companies have to go beyond their walls and think about how their processes, their systems, and their technology can connect across organizational boundaries to customers, suppliers, and partners. He says, "We see much inefficiency in those processes. About 40 cents of every healthcare dollar goes to settling healthcare claims. If you want to reduce that cost, you have to look at the processes between hospitals, doctors, and insurance companies." According to Champy, the new version of the corporation will have much built-in transparency. He says, "Of course, companies will always have physical walls and various processes they'll own. The Internet has forced companies to become more transparent because of what their constituents expect and what regulations require for disclosure."…

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HOW CIOs HELP THEIR COMPANIES OUTSMART THEIR COMPETITORS:Jim Champy, best-selling author and chairman of Perot Systems Corporation's consulting practice

2008-09-17
Length: 19s

In the early 1990, Jim Champy saw the writing on boardroom walls -- companies have to change the way they work if they want to be effective and to be profitable. No wonder, Champy's book, Reengineering the Corporation, became an immediate best seller, being translated into 17 languages. Although the Internet didn't exist when Champy wrote this book, he says that the concept of work flowing horizontally inside a corporation and across the boundaries of a corporation hasn't changed. In his book, X-Engineering the Corporation, Champy argues that companies have to go beyond their walls and think about how their processes, their systems, and their technology can connect across organizational boundaries to customers, suppliers, and partners. He says, "We see much inefficiency in those processes. About 40 cents of every healthcare dollar goes to settling healthcare claims. If you want to reduce that cost, you have to look at the processes between hospitals, doctors, and insurance companies." According to Champy, the new version of the corporation will have much built-in transparency. He says, "Of course, companies will always have physical walls and various processes they'll own. The Internet has forced companies to become more transparent because of what their constituents expect and what regulations require for disclosure."…

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TAKING A BOTTOM-LINE APPROACH FOR IT:Toby Redshaw, Global CIO of Aviva Group

2008-09-09
Length: 23s

In 2007, Andrew Moss, the former chief financial officer at Lloyds, became the chief executive officer of Aviva Plc, the world's fifth largest insurance group and the largest insurance company in the U.K. He immediately devised a strategy to drive 20 percent growth across Aviva's three lines of business: long-term savings, fund management, and general insurance. The company manages about $800 billion for about 45 million customers. Moss's strategy includes transforming the business by streamlining costs and making sure that all 57,000 employees work toward the goal of providing better value to customers. Since becoming global CIO of the Aviva Group in January 2008, Toby Redshaw has had no problem incorporating Moss's strategy into how IT operates across the three lines of business. Redshaw says that his role is to make sure IT operates at the right pace, with the right resources, and with the right talent. He also takes a bottom line approach to IT by challenging his front-line IT managers to ask their financial counterparts how specific IT projects relate back to the profit & loss statement. Redshaw says the conenction between IT and the company's bottom line is the biggest gap that IT has with the business. Getting and keeping customers or customer turns shows up on the bottom line. IT managers need to understand what they can be doing to improve this metric, and thus the bottom line."…

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TAKING A BOTTOM-LINE APPROACH FOR IT:Toby Redshaw, Global CIO of Aviva Group

2008-09-09
Length: 23s

In 2007, Andrew Moss, the former chief financial officer at Lloyds, became the chief executive officer of Aviva Plc, the world's fifth largest insurance group and the largest insurance company in the U.K. He immediately devised a strategy to drive 20 percent growth across Aviva's three lines of business: long-term savings, fund management, and general insurance. The company manages about $800 billion for about 45 million customers. Moss's strategy includes transforming the business by streamlining costs and making sure that all 57,000 employees work toward the goal of providing better value to customers. Since becoming global CIO of the Aviva Group in January 2008, Toby Redshaw has had no problem incorporating Moss's strategy into how IT operates across the three lines of business. Redshaw says that his role is to make sure IT operates at the right pace, with the right resources, and with the right talent. He also takes a bottom line approach to IT by challenging his front-line IT managers to ask their financial counterparts how specific IT projects relate back to the profit & loss statement. Redshaw says the conenction between IT and the company's bottom line is the biggest gap that IT has with the business. Getting and keeping customers or customer turns shows up on the bottom line. IT managers need to understand what they can be doing to improve this metric, and thus the bottom line."…

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Social Networking Forces Executives to Weave Transparency Into Their Organizational Fabric: author Warren Bennis, Distinguished Professor of Business Administration, University of Southern California

2008-09-03
Length: 16s

In 2005, when Warren Bennis, the author of several best-selling management books and a professor at the University of Southern California, gave a talk at Harvard Business School, he asked the audience how many knew what the blogosphere was. One third of the audience raised their hands to acknowledge their familiarity with the term. In his latest book, Transparency: How Leaders Create a Culture of Candor, Bennis takes on the world of social networking and the world of transacting business across virtual borders. His premise is simple: if companies are going to succeed today, they must be as transparent as possible. Whether companies like it or not, blogging is here to stay. Bennis says that the CEO of Starbucks tunes into blogs to learn what employees in the company's 15,000 stores are feeling, thinking about, and doing. He says, "If companies can't handle transparency, then someone else will come out with the news ahead of them, or offend them, or surprise them."…

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Social Networking Forces Executives to Weave Transparency Into Their Organizational Fabric: author Warren Bennis, Distinguished Professor of Business Administration, University of Southern California

2008-09-03
Length: 16s

In 2005, when Warren Bennis, the author of several best-selling management books and a professor at the University of Southern California, gave a talk at Harvard Business School, he asked the audience how many knew what the blogosphere was. One third of the audience raised their hands to acknowledge their familiarity with the term. In his latest book, Transparency: How Leaders Create a Culture of Candor, Bennis takes on the world of social networking and the world of transacting business across virtual borders. His premise is simple: if companies are going to succeed today, they must be as transparent as possible. Whether companies like it or not, blogging is here to stay. Bennis says that the CEO of Starbucks tunes into blogs to learn what employees in the company's 15,000 stores are feeling, thinking about, and doing. He says, "If companies can't handle transparency, then someone else will come out with the news ahead of them, or offend them, or surprise them."…

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Why It's Important for CIOs to Be On the Corporate Leadership Team: Paul Ingevaldson, Retired CIO of Ace Hardware:

2008-08-27
Length: 20s

Ace is the place, especially if you're looking for home hardware in the U.S. or in Saudi Arabia. And no one knows this better than Paul Ingevaldson. After a 25-year with Ace Hardware, Ingevaldson retired as CIO and senior vice president of international and technology for the $3 billion dollar global hardware wholesale. Its more than 5,000 retail hardware stores do $12 billion in annual sales. Ingevaldson was responsible for Ace's IT needs for the entire corporation, including the retail stores in more than 70 countries. Of his many accomplishments, Ingevaldson is most proud of having become an officer of the company, heavily automating all aspects of the retail operation, and having the full corporation of executive management to align IT with the business. He attributes much of his success in these areas to a stint where he moved out of IT and handled distribution for Ace Hardware. He says, "The experience enabled me to see IT from the user's perspective. I realized that we had to spend more time training people how to interact with IT." Since his retirement, Ingevaldson has written a variety of tutorial IT management articles for both CIO and Computerworld. His topics have covered everything from improving governance to delegating authority. He also has cranked out many articles about how CIOs should report to CEOs. In fact, his article, IT Cheat Sheet for CEOs, helps a CIO to explain the mechanics of IT to a new CEO. Ingevaldson says that there are many reasons why it's important for CIOs to report directly to CEOs, than CFOs, and to be on the executive leadership team as a peer with CFOs. He says, "When it comes to corporate funds, CFOs take a risk adverse position. If you want to move the company forward through automation, then IT has to assume certain risks. If IT isn't willing to take a chance, then it will be a follower. If you work for a CFO, you have to go into much detail about every aspect of IT. Most of all, you aren't a peer with the rest of the leadership team. I'd never take a CIO position reporting to a CFO." In this podcast, Ingevaldson talks more about why it's important for CIOs to sit at the corporate leadership table, and how they can maintain their place at this table.…

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Why It's Important for CIOs to Be On the Corporate Leadership Team: Paul Ingevaldson, Retired CIO of Ace Hardware:

2008-08-27
Length: 20s

Ace is the place, especially if you're looking for home hardware in the U.S. or in Saudi Arabia. And no one knows this better than Paul Ingevaldson. After a 25-year with Ace Hardware, Ingevaldson retired as CIO and senior vice president of international and technology for the $3 billion dollar global hardware wholesale. Its more than 5,000 retail hardware stores do $12 billion in annual sales. Ingevaldson was responsible for Ace's IT needs for the entire corporation, including the retail stores in more than 70 countries. Of his many accomplishments, Ingevaldson is most proud of having become an officer of the company, heavily automating all aspects of the retail operation, and having the full corporation of executive management to align IT with the business. He attributes much of his success in these areas to a stint where he moved out of IT and handled distribution for Ace Hardware. He says, "The experience enabled me to see IT from the user's perspective. I realized that we had to spend more time training people how to interact with IT." Since his retirement, Ingevaldson has written a variety of tutorial IT management articles for both CIO and Computerworld. His topics have covered everything from improving governance to delegating authority. He also has cranked out many articles about how CIOs should report to CEOs. In fact, his article, IT Cheat Sheet for CEOs, helps a CIO to explain the mechanics of IT to a new CEO. Ingevaldson says that there are many reasons why it's important for CIOs to report directly to CEOs, than CFOs, and to be on the executive leadership team as a peer with CFOs. He says, "When it comes to corporate funds, CFOs take a risk adverse position. If you want to move the company forward through automation, then IT has to assume certain risks. If IT isn't willing to take a chance, then it will be a follower. If you work for a CFO, you have to go into much detail about every aspect of IT. Most of all, you aren't a peer with the rest of the leadership team. I'd never take a CIO position reporting to a CFO." In this podcast, Ingevaldson talks more about why it's important for CIOs to sit at the corporate leadership table, and how they can maintain their place at this table.…

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Robert Abbott, General Partner, Norwest Venture Partners: VC Firm Specializing in IT Welcomes Relationship with CIOs

2008-08-19
Length: 16s

PeopleSoft. Brocade. and Forte. All of these IT companies got their start with funding from Norwest Venture Partners. Since its inception more than 45 years ago, Norwest has funded more than 400 IT companies in areas ranging from infrastructure to security. Today, the $2.5 billion fund concentrates on early-stage IT companies in areas such as semiconductors and components. enterprise software and service, communications systems and Internet infrastructure. So what technologies does a VC firm like Norwest find particularly attractive these days? Robert Abbott, general partner at Norwest, says, "CIOs want to buy things that are easy to deploy and to manage over time. To this end, we like managed infrastructure services, such as outsourced security, and enterprise applications based on software as a service. We also like enterprise applications based on an appliance model. With so much emphasis on virtualization, we're looking for things that will take the challenge out of managing all those virtual machines. We still continue to fund things that make it easier to manage all the systems in a data center.…

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Robert Abbott, General Partner, Norwest Venture Partners: VC Firm Specializing in IT Welcomes Relationship with CIOs

2008-08-19
Length: 16s

PeopleSoft. Brocade. and Forte. All of these IT companies got their start with funding from Norwest Venture Partners. Since its inception more than 45 years ago, Norwest has funded more than 400 IT companies in areas ranging from infrastructure to security. Today, the $2.5 billion fund concentrates on early-stage IT companies in areas such as semiconductors and components. enterprise software and service, communications systems and Internet infrastructure. So what technologies does a VC firm like Norwest find particularly attractive these days? Robert Abbott, general partner at Norwest, says, "CIOs want to buy things that are easy to deploy and to manage over time. To this end, we like managed infrastructure services, such as outsourced security, and enterprise applications based on software as a service. We also like enterprise applications based on an appliance model. With so much emphasis on virtualization, we're looking for things that will take the challenge out of managing all those virtual machines. We still continue to fund things that make it easier to manage all the systems in a data center.…

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Ken Theis, director of Michigan Department of Information Technology: How IT Makes Government Work Better and More Economically Viable for People of Michigan

2008-08-08
Length: 19s

The State of Michigan has become a pioneer in how to make IT work better and more economically viable for the State's citizens. The answer focused on consolidating IT into one state agency, and then developing a strategic plan and a enterprise architecture to support the plan. In 2001, the entire IT organization across the State of Michigan merged into the Michigan Department of Information Technology (MDIT), under the direction of Ken Thesis. MDIT's 1,700 employees support 19 other state agencies. These agencies have a combined annual budget of $434 million, 800 business critical applications, 55,000 desktops, and 1,300 telecom locations. The consolidation has helped to reduce the overall IT expenditures in Michigan by 34 percent, almost taking more than $100 million off the state budget. Some of these strategic moves included closing 23 data centers and creating three main data centers, reducing the number of email servers from 700 to 70, and centralizing one petabyte of data storage. Meanwhile, MDIT also addressed errors in programs, such as Food Stamps. In this podcast, Ken Theis, director of MDIT, talks about the agency's overall IT strategy, the components that comprise the enterprise architecture, the initiatives that are bringing smaller and more efficient government to the people of Michigan, and the challenge of managing IT investments.…

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Ken Theis, director of Michigan Department of Information Technology: How IT Makes Government Work Better and More Economically Viable for People of Michigan

2008-08-08
Length: 19s

The State of Michigan has become a pioneer in how to make IT work better and more economically viable for the State's citizens. The answer focused on consolidating IT into one state agency, and then developing a strategic plan and a enterprise architecture to support the plan. In 2001, the entire IT organization across the State of Michigan merged into the Michigan Department of Information Technology (MDIT), under the direction of Ken Thesis. MDIT's 1,700 employees support 19 other state agencies. These agencies have a combined annual budget of $434 million, 800 business critical applications, 55,000 desktops, and 1,300 telecom locations. The consolidation has helped to reduce the overall IT expenditures in Michigan by 34 percent, almost taking more than $100 million off the state budget. Some of these strategic moves included closing 23 data centers and creating three main data centers, reducing the number of email servers from 700 to 70, and centralizing one petabyte of data storage. Meanwhile, MDIT also addressed errors in programs, such as Food Stamps. In this podcast, Ken Theis, director of MDIT, talks about the agency's overall IT strategy, the components that comprise the enterprise architecture, the initiatives that are bringing smaller and more efficient government to the people of Michigan, and the challenge of managing IT investments.…

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Molly ONeill - CIO of the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency:How IT Drives a Federal Agency's Information Exchange and Collaboration Efforts With Global and Local Constituents

2008-08-06
Length: 14s

Molly O'Neill has both a technology role and a policy role at the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency. As an assistant administrator for the EPA's Office of Environmental Information, she oversees the life cycle of information to support the agency's mission of protecting health and the environment. O'Neill's role as CIO includes overseeing the agency's strategic information planning, investment and information policies, enterprise architecture, and information security program. In both of her roles, O'Neill is working toward the same goal -- helping the EPA to use technology to collaborate and exchange information with the widest possible network of bright minds around the world. The EPA employs about five percent of the U.S. environmental workforce. The majority of this workforce consists of people who work in state government, in consulting firms, in private industry, and in academic institutions. She says, "Environmental issues are huge. People work at the EPA because they believe in its mission. We want to reach everyone who has a thirst for knowledge about environmental issues."…

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Molly ONeill - CIO of the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency:How IT Drives a Federal Agency's Information Exchange and Collaboration Efforts With Global and Local Constituents

2008-08-06
Length: 14s

Molly O'Neill has both a technology role and a policy role at the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency. As an assistant administrator for the EPA's Office of Environmental Information, she oversees the life cycle of information to support the agency's mission of protecting health and the environment. O'Neill's role as CIO includes overseeing the agency's strategic information planning, investment and information policies, enterprise architecture, and information security program. In both of her roles, O'Neill is working toward the same goal -- helping the EPA to use technology to collaborate and exchange information with the widest possible network of bright minds around the world. The EPA employs about five percent of the U.S. environmental workforce. The majority of this workforce consists of people who work in state government, in consulting firms, in private industry, and in academic institutions. She says, "Environmental issues are huge. People work at the EPA because they believe in its mission. We want to reach everyone who has a thirst for knowledge about environmental issues."…

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Barry Libert, author and chairman of the board of Mzinga:Why We Are Smarter Than Me and What Businesses Need to Do to Harness the Power of the Crowd

2008-07-24
Length: 20s

Barry Libert, a social media visionary and the founder of Shared Insights (now Mzinga), knows how to use technology to harness the power of what he calls the crowd. Mzinga provides software as a service solutions for online communities. It currently manages about 14,000 communities, and services more than one billion monthly page requests from 27 million users in 160 countries worldwide. Libert is currently chairman of the board of Mzinga. He and his co-authors set up a community and enlisted members to contribute to a book called, We are Smarter Than Me: How to Unleash the Power of Crowds in Your Business. In fact, this is the first book on the subject that actually used an online community, based on a Web 2.0 technology from Mzinga, to help create the book. About 4,000 qualified members joined the online community and helped shape the final product. By using the same social networking tools and techniques that their book covers, Libert and his co-authors could provide practical and unique look at online community building.…

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Barry Libert, author and chairman of the board of Mzinga:Why We Are Smarter Than Me and What Businesses Need to Do to Harness the Power of the Crowd

2008-07-24
Length: 20s

Barry Libert, a social media visionary and the founder of Shared Insights (now Mzinga), knows how to use technology to harness the power of what he calls the crowd. Mzinga provides software as a service solutions for online communities. It currently manages about 14,000 communities, and services more than one billion monthly page requests from 27 million users in 160 countries worldwide. Libert is currently chairman of the board of Mzinga. He and his co-authors set up a community and enlisted members to contribute to a book called, We are Smarter Than Me: How to Unleash the Power of Crowds in Your Business. In fact, this is the first book on the subject that actually used an online community, based on a Web 2.0 technology from Mzinga, to help create the book. About 4,000 qualified members joined the online community and helped shape the final product. By using the same social networking tools and techniques that their book covers, Libert and his co-authors could provide practical and unique look at online community building.…

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Part 2 William Hurley, Chief Architect of Open Source Strategy at BMC Software, Inc.,:Microsoft's Foray into Open Source

2008-07-19
Length: 14s

In the second of two podcasts, whurley, without mincing words, talks about a meeting that he and 30 other open source illuminaries had at Microsoft to discuss that company's position on openness. Whurley talks about what he observed at that meeting. He also discusses his challenge of mantaining the balance between BMC's marketing efforts and the involvement of BMC customers in helping to develop products that will leverage open source. To hear Part 1 please visit http://www.enterpriseleadership.org…

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Part 2 William Hurley, Chief Architect of Open Source Strategy at BMC Software, Inc.,:Microsoft's Foray into Open Source

2008-07-19
Length: 14s

In the second of two podcasts, whurley, without mincing words, talks about a meeting that he and 30 other open source illuminaries had at Microsoft to discuss that company's position on openness. Whurley talks about what he observed at that meeting. He also discusses his challenge of mantaining the balance between BMC's marketing efforts and the involvement of BMC customers in helping to develop products that will leverage open source. To hear Part 1 please visit http://www.enterpriseleadership.org…

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Part 1 -Conversation with William Hurley, chief architect of open source strategy at BMC Software, Inc.,

2008-07-11
Length: 18s

In an effort to bring a consistent message about open source to customers and to partners, and to participate more actively in the open source community, BMC in 2007 hired William Hurley (aka whurley), an open source activist, inventor, and chairman of the Open Management Consortium, a non-profit organization advancing the adoption, development, and integration of open source systems management. Whurley's role as chief architect of open source strategy has many facets to it. BMC's executives depend on guidance for anything that has to do with open source. Whurley contributes to the company's open source strategy, as well as carries it out. As an evangelist, he is the BMC open source voice at IT venues. He manages BMC's presence in the open source community by getting customers involved with it. In fact, management has encouraged whurley to maintain all of his open source community connections. In the second of two podcasts, whurley, without mincing words, talks about a meeting that he and 30 other open source illuminaries had at Microsoft to discuss that company's position on openness. Whurley talks about what he observed at that meeting. He also discusses his challenge of mantaining the balance between BMC's marketing efforts and the involvement of BMC customers in helping to develop products that will leverage open source.…

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Part 1 -Conversation with William Hurley, chief architect of open source strategy at BMC Software, Inc.,

2008-07-11
Length: 18s

In an effort to bring a consistent message about open source to customers and to partners, and to participate more actively in the open source community, BMC in 2007 hired William Hurley (aka whurley), an open source activist, inventor, and chairman of the Open Management Consortium, a non-profit organization advancing the adoption, development, and integration of open source systems management. Whurley's role as chief architect of open source strategy has many facets to it. BMC's executives depend on guidance for anything that has to do with open source. Whurley contributes to the company's open source strategy, as well as carries it out. As an evangelist, he is the BMC open source voice at IT venues. He manages BMC's presence in the open source community by getting customers involved with it. In fact, management has encouraged whurley to maintain all of his open source community connections. In the second of two podcasts, whurley, without mincing words, talks about a meeting that he and 30 other open source illuminaries had at Microsoft to discuss that company's position on openness. Whurley talks about what he observed at that meeting. He also discusses his challenge of mantaining the balance between BMC's marketing efforts and the involvement of BMC customers in helping to develop products that will leverage open source.…

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How Learning From Crucibles Can Help You Become a Great Leader:Podcast interview with Robert Thomas, author and executive director of Accenture's Institute for High Performance Business Leadership

2008-07-01
Length: 24s

Almost everyone agrees that anyone who seeks to lead must get firsthand experience. Experience, however, by itself doesn't guarantee learning. What matters most is what one makes of experience, particularly traumatic and often unplanned crucible events that challenge one as a leader. This conclusion comes from research done by Robert Thomas, who is executive director at Accenture's Institute of High Performance Business Leadership and as an associate professor at Tuft University's Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. The empirical research down by the Institute provides Accenture's consultants and clients with insight on topics ranging from new business global to talent management. Most of the information analyzed in Thomas's new book, Crucibles of Leadership: How to Learn from Experience to Become a Great Leader, comes from interviews with leaders selected on the basis of their proven ability to grow and to sustain an organization during times of trial. In this podcast, Thomas talks about what some CEOs have learned from their crucibles, how even CIOs can leverage their crucibles to move up the ranks, and how C-level executives can help emerging leaders learn from their experiences.…

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How Learning From Crucibles Can Help You Become a Great Leader:Podcast interview with Robert Thomas, author and executive director of Accenture's Institute for High Performance Business Leadership

2008-07-01
Length: 24s

Almost everyone agrees that anyone who seeks to lead must get firsthand experience. Experience, however, by itself doesn't guarantee learning. What matters most is what one makes of experience, particularly traumatic and often unplanned crucible events that challenge one as a leader. This conclusion comes from research done by Robert Thomas, who is executive director at Accenture's Institute of High Performance Business Leadership and as an associate professor at Tuft University's Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. The empirical research down by the Institute provides Accenture's consultants and clients with insight on topics ranging from new business global to talent management. Most of the information analyzed in Thomas's new book, Crucibles of Leadership: How to Learn from Experience to Become a Great Leader, comes from interviews with leaders selected on the basis of their proven ability to grow and to sustain an organization during times of trial. In this podcast, Thomas talks about what some CEOs have learned from their crucibles, how even CIOs can leverage their crucibles to move up the ranks, and how C-level executives can help emerging leaders learn from their experiences.…

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Taking A Holistic Approach to Innovation: Podcast interview with Cheryl Perkins, founder and president of Innovationedge and former chief innovation officer of Kimberly-Clark

2008-06-25
Length: 13s

Innovation can deliver a desirable experience for your customers, and sustainable growth for your company. Many companies, however, struggle with how to deliver top-line growth and deliver true business innovation. Meanwhile, come companies have become astounded by the curve balls being thrown at them because of rising energy costs in the global economy. Getting corporate innovation right goes beyond delivering the next generation product. If you want to deliver something that creates value Innovation can deliver a desirable experience for customers, you need to take a holistic look at innovation. This approach requires a total solution based on the right business model, the ability to leverage partnership relationships, and the desire to reach customers through different channels. Cheryl Perkins practiced this holistic innovation model while she was chief innovation officer for Kimberly-Clark. This model has become the underpinning of her strategic innovation consulting practice called Innovationedge. She says, "We started the practice to deliver a roadmap so companies can get their leadership teams focused on key priorities and capabilities so they can start to innovate." Because so many products have a tie in some way to IT, CIOs plays a critical role in driving innovation more than they did a few years ago. Perkins says that CIO and their teams can harness the important discrete pieces of information that sit in various departments across the company. She adds that even regulated products have discrete information residing in different departments. She says, "The IT team puts critical support systems and information systems in place so you can capture the knowledge and transfer it. This process is critical to speed to market. If you don't have this flow of information and data throughout the corporation, your time to market will be delayed. Without the IT team, the data and knowledge can't be transformed into new solutions."…

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Taking A Holistic Approach to Innovation: Podcast interview with Cheryl Perkins, founder and president of Innovationedge and former chief innovation officer of Kimberly-Clark

2008-06-25
Length: 13s

Innovation can deliver a desirable experience for your customers, and sustainable growth for your company. Many companies, however, struggle with how to deliver top-line growth and deliver true business innovation. Meanwhile, come companies have become astounded by the curve balls being thrown at them because of rising energy costs in the global economy. Getting corporate innovation right goes beyond delivering the next generation product. If you want to deliver something that creates value Innovation can deliver a desirable experience for customers, you need to take a holistic look at innovation. This approach requires a total solution based on the right business model, the ability to leverage partnership relationships, and the desire to reach customers through different channels. Cheryl Perkins practiced this holistic innovation model while she was chief innovation officer for Kimberly-Clark. This model has become the underpinning of her strategic innovation consulting practice called Innovationedge. She says, "We started the practice to deliver a roadmap so companies can get their leadership teams focused on key priorities and capabilities so they can start to innovate." Because so many products have a tie in some way to IT, CIOs plays a critical role in driving innovation more than they did a few years ago. Perkins says that CIO and their teams can harness the important discrete pieces of information that sit in various departments across the company. She adds that even regulated products have discrete information residing in different departments. She says, "The IT team puts critical support systems and information systems in place so you can capture the knowledge and transfer it. This process is critical to speed to market. If you don't have this flow of information and data throughout the corporation, your time to market will be delayed. Without the IT team, the data and knowledge can't be transformed into new solutions."…

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Podcast with Faisal Hoque, author and CEO of BTM Corporation: Thought Leader Faisal Hoque Talks about how the Move from Alignment to Convergence Benefits to the Bottom Line

2008-06-12
Length: 19s

Many CIOs grapple with how to align IT with the needs of their businesses. By de facto, they have to demonstrate the value their role serves and to make sure technology works well within their businesses. However, these CIOs aren't alone. Businesses, in general, have a hard time measuring and quantifying the value of IT and how it affects the entire business. Meanwhile, forces such as a mobile global workforce, the growing dependency on social media, and the push for more utility computing based on service-oriented architecture are driving businesses to converge their IT strategy with their business strategy. This move will fuel growth and will sustain profitability. In a converged company, information, not the technology behind it, is what matters to all constituents the company serves. As a result, CIOs take on the new role of information officer not chief IT officer. They become more involve in strategy planning and in the governance process. Moreover, they look at how technology enables the business architecture and how the business manages the overall investment portfolio. No one knows more about getting out of the alignment trap and moving toward convergence than Faisal Hoque, founder and CEO of BTM Corporation; founder of the BTM Institute, a not-for-profit IT think tank; and author of five books on business technology management. In fact, a decade ago, Hoque conceived and developed a unique holistic business model which looks at the relationship between business and technology in the following areas: governance, strategy and platform, enterprise architecture, investment management, and the maturity of the overall management structure. The result is a converged organization where business and technology come together to drive innovation, which, in turn, fuels growth and profitability. In this podcast, Hoque provides a good overview of the organizational changes and the philosophy changes CIOs need to consider if they want to transition from alignment to convergence. He also talks about the BTM Institute's Business Technology Convergence Index, a five-year study that quantifies the relationship between the way global companies value their technology investments and the companies' revenues and profitability. He says, "Companies with mature converged business technology management practices, such as FedEx, UPS, and Procter & Gamble, have better financial performance than their competitors. Think about it. Today, both FedEx and UPS are information services companies, not just movers or packages and trucks."…

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Podcast with Faisal Hoque, author and CEO of BTM Corporation: Thought Leader Faisal Hoque Talks about how the Move from Alignment to Convergence Benefits to the Bottom Line

2008-06-12
Length: 19s

Many CIOs grapple with how to align IT with the needs of their businesses. By de facto, they have to demonstrate the value their role serves and to make sure technology works well within their businesses. However, these CIOs aren't alone. Businesses, in general, have a hard time measuring and quantifying the value of IT and how it affects the entire business. Meanwhile, forces such as a mobile global workforce, the growing dependency on social media, and the push for more utility computing based on service-oriented architecture are driving businesses to converge their IT strategy with their business strategy. This move will fuel growth and will sustain profitability. In a converged company, information, not the technology behind it, is what matters to all constituents the company serves. As a result, CIOs take on the new role of information officer not chief IT officer. They become more involve in strategy planning and in the governance process. Moreover, they look at how technology enables the business architecture and how the business manages the overall investment portfolio. No one knows more about getting out of the alignment trap and moving toward convergence than Faisal Hoque, founder and CEO of BTM Corporation; founder of the BTM Institute, a not-for-profit IT think tank; and author of five books on business technology management. In fact, a decade ago, Hoque conceived and developed a unique holistic business model which looks at the relationship between business and technology in the following areas: governance, strategy and platform, enterprise architecture, investment management, and the maturity of the overall management structure. The result is a converged organization where business and technology come together to drive innovation, which, in turn, fuels growth and profitability. In this podcast, Hoque provides a good overview of the organizational changes and the philosophy changes CIOs need to consider if they want to transition from alignment to convergence. He also talks about the BTM Institute's Business Technology Convergence Index, a five-year study that quantifies the relationship between the way global companies value their technology investments and the companies' revenues and profitability. He says, "Companies with mature converged business technology management practices, such as FedEx, UPS, and Procter & Gamble, have better financial performance than their competitors. Think about it. Today, both FedEx and UPS are information services companies, not just movers or packages and trucks."…

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HOW IT MASTERS A GROWING GLOBAL BUSINESS FOR A MAJOR CREDIT CARD COMPANY; Podcast Interview with Robert Reeg, Interim President of Global Technology and Operations at MasterCard Worldwide.

2008-06-06
Length: 15s

Each year, MasterCard processes more than a trillion dollars worth of credit card transactions between its 25 million acceptance locations in 210 countries worldwide. Net revenues for 2007 year were $4.1 billion, a 22 percent increase versus the same period in 2006. Information technology drives all MasterCard's three card business services: franchiser of acceptance locations that are guaranteed through MasterCard's network; processor of all payment transactions through the network and the final settlement of dollars with the financial institutions; and consultant offering a data warehouse of intelligence to help customers, such as merchants and banks, to make the best use of payments. Robert Reeg, interim president of global technology and operations at MasterCard Worldwide, says that he doesn't worry about aligning IT with the business. He says, "We're one and the same. IT and the business are completely connected." In fact, Reeg leverages IT talent around the world to build and to manage MasterCard's massive network. He has even created the role of the business technologist as a way to develop future IT leaders. In this podcast, Reeg talks about how his organization has adapted to the current economy to maintain its position in the marketplace, what processes, best practices, and new technologies are in place to manage a global organization, what role outsourcing plays in the IT operations, and how leveraging diversity can improve the innovation process.…

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HOW IT MASTERS A GROWING GLOBAL BUSINESS FOR A MAJOR CREDIT CARD COMPANY; Podcast Interview with Robert Reeg, Interim President of Global Technology and Operations at MasterCard Worldwide.

2008-06-06
Length: 15s

Each year, MasterCard processes more than a trillion dollars worth of credit card transactions between its 25 million acceptance locations in 210 countries worldwide. Net revenues for 2007 year were $4.1 billion, a 22 percent increase versus the same period in 2006. Information technology drives all MasterCard's three card business services: franchiser of acceptance locations that are guaranteed through MasterCard's network; processor of all payment transactions through the network and the final settlement of dollars with the financial institutions; and consultant offering a data warehouse of intelligence to help customers, such as merchants and banks, to make the best use of payments. Robert Reeg, interim president of global technology and operations at MasterCard Worldwide, says that he doesn't worry about aligning IT with the business. He says, "We're one and the same. IT and the business are completely connected." In fact, Reeg leverages IT talent around the world to build and to manage MasterCard's massive network. He has even created the role of the business technologist as a way to develop future IT leaders. In this podcast, Reeg talks about how his organization has adapted to the current economy to maintain its position in the marketplace, what processes, best practices, and new technologies are in place to manage a global organization, what role outsourcing plays in the IT operations, and how leveraging diversity can improve the innovation process.…

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HOW C-LEVEL EXECUTIVES BUILD THEIR REPUTATIONS -- FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE: Podcast interview with Dr. Leslie Gaines-Ross, chief reputation strategist Weber Shandwick

2008-05-27
Length: 18s

In 2007, a major company issued a statement saying that it had dismissed its CIO for violating an important corporate policy. The nature of the corporate policy wasn't revealed. Just about every IT publication carried news of the event. For weeks IT bloggers posted comments about what the CIO could have done to be let go. Eventually, the noise level around this executive's dismissal died down, and the executive took a new job in an area outside of IT. In this podcast, enterpriseleadership.org asked one of the world's most sought-after authorities on executive reputation, to talk about how C-level executives, especially CEOs, build their reputations based on their corporate strategies, what they need to do to maintain them, and what challenges they face in developing and executing their corporate strategies. In her role as chief reputation strategist, Dr. Leslie Gaines-Ross leads Weber Shandwick’s global reputation consulting services and proprietary thought-leadership development. She has done groundbreaking, award-winning research into CEO and corporate reputation, executive team reputation, leadership transitions, and reputation sustainability and recovery. She spearheaded the first comprehensive research on CEO reputation and its impact on corporate reputation and performance. She developed Weber Shandwick’s first global corporate reputation study – “Safeguarding Reputation,” which identifies strategies for sustaining and recovering corporate reputation. Dr. Gaines-Ross also created Fortune’s “On the Minds of CEOs” research. Her book, CEO Capital: A Guide to Building CEO Reputation and Company Success, was published in 2003 by John Wiley & Sons and her book on reputation recovery is scheduled to be published in 2008, also by John Wiley & Sons. Dr. Gaines-Ross created www.reputationRx.com, the Web site devoted exclusively to reputation news and information, and her blog can be found at http://reputationxchange.com/.…

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HOW C-LEVEL EXECUTIVES BUILD THEIR REPUTATIONS -- FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE: Podcast interview with Dr. Leslie Gaines-Ross, chief reputation strategist Weber Shandwick

2008-05-27
Length: 18s

In 2007, a major company issued a statement saying that it had dismissed its CIO for violating an important corporate policy. The nature of the corporate policy wasn't revealed. Just about every IT publication carried news of the event. For weeks IT bloggers posted comments about what the CIO could have done to be let go. Eventually, the noise level around this executive's dismissal died down, and the executive took a new job in an area outside of IT. In this podcast, enterpriseleadership.org asked one of the world's most sought-after authorities on executive reputation, to talk about how C-level executives, especially CEOs, build their reputations based on their corporate strategies, what they need to do to maintain them, and what challenges they face in developing and executing their corporate strategies. In her role as chief reputation strategist, Dr. Leslie Gaines-Ross leads Weber Shandwick’s global reputation consulting services and proprietary thought-leadership development. She has done groundbreaking, award-winning research into CEO and corporate reputation, executive team reputation, leadership transitions, and reputation sustainability and recovery. She spearheaded the first comprehensive research on CEO reputation and its impact on corporate reputation and performance. She developed Weber Shandwick’s first global corporate reputation study – “Safeguarding Reputation,” which identifies strategies for sustaining and recovering corporate reputation. Dr. Gaines-Ross also created Fortune’s “On the Minds of CEOs” research. Her book, CEO Capital: A Guide to Building CEO Reputation and Company Success, was published in 2003 by John Wiley & Sons and her book on reputation recovery is scheduled to be published in 2008, also by John Wiley & Sons. Dr. Gaines-Ross created www.reputationRx.com, the Web site devoted exclusively to reputation news and information, and her blog can be found at http://reputationxchange.com/.…

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ENTREPRENEURIAL LEADERSHIP AND INNOVATION DRIVE GROWTH REGARDLESS OF COMPANY SIZE: Podcast interview with Dr. Art Boni, professor at the Tepper School of Business at Carnegie Mellon University.

2008-05-21
Length: 19s

Because of the rapidly accelerating pace of change in global business today, C-level executives in all size companies need to respond quickly to changes in their business climate. Thus, executives have to be aware, not only of their own external environment, but also they have to immerse themselves in their industries, and to look at society -- both nationally and globally. By understanding where changes come from or what changes to make, executives can take advantage of new opportunities. Meanwhile, executives must also focus on innovation and entrepreneurship in order to be successful. In fact, the Carnegie Mellon MBA programs looks at innovation in organizations, ranging from startups to the Fortune 500 companies. In this podcast, Dr. Art Boni, the director of the Donald H. Jones Center for Entrepreneurship at the Tepper School of Business at Carnegie Mellon University, talks about how entrepreneurial leadership and innovative drive corporate growth. (Boni also holds the John R. Thorne Chair of Entrepreneurship at the Tepper School of Business.) He says that to achieve this, executives need to understand their market, and their customer needs, and then to develop strategies for going forward. He says, "Companies also need to have good leadership because a strategy without a good team to execute it won't go very far." Boni views corporate strategy as an integral part of innovation and success for any organization. He adds that good integration of information across the enterprise can help executives better execute their strategies and move the company forward. Dr. Boni has solid experience to back up what he teaches and preaches. Before getting his doctorate and becoming a full-time professor, Boni pursued an entrepreneurial career in the private sector. He joined Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) after its startup period and become part of the senior management team that built the company to $700 million in revenues. Today, SAIC is an $8 billion technology conglomerate. He also founded and served as CEO of a technology incubator, and four companies in technology and life sciences.…

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ENTREPRENEURIAL LEADERSHIP AND INNOVATION DRIVE GROWTH REGARDLESS OF COMPANY SIZE: Podcast interview with Dr. Art Boni, professor at the Tepper School of Business at Carnegie Mellon University.

2008-05-21
Length: 19s

Because of the rapidly accelerating pace of change in global business today, C-level executives in all size companies need to respond quickly to changes in their business climate. Thus, executives have to be aware, not only of their own external environment, but also they have to immerse themselves in their industries, and to look at society -- both nationally and globally. By understanding where changes come from or what changes to make, executives can take advantage of new opportunities. Meanwhile, executives must also focus on innovation and entrepreneurship in order to be successful. In fact, the Carnegie Mellon MBA programs looks at innovation in organizations, ranging from startups to the Fortune 500 companies. In this podcast, Dr. Art Boni, the director of the Donald H. Jones Center for Entrepreneurship at the Tepper School of Business at Carnegie Mellon University, talks about how entrepreneurial leadership and innovative drive corporate growth. (Boni also holds the John R. Thorne Chair of Entrepreneurship at the Tepper School of Business.) He says that to achieve this, executives need to understand their market, and their customer needs, and then to develop strategies for going forward. He says, "Companies also need to have good leadership because a strategy without a good team to execute it won't go very far." Boni views corporate strategy as an integral part of innovation and success for any organization. He adds that good integration of information across the enterprise can help executives better execute their strategies and move the company forward. Dr. Boni has solid experience to back up what he teaches and preaches. Before getting his doctorate and becoming a full-time professor, Boni pursued an entrepreneurial career in the private sector. He joined Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) after its startup period and become part of the senior management team that built the company to $700 million in revenues. Today, SAIC is an $8 billion technology conglomerate. He also founded and served as CEO of a technology incubator, and four companies in technology and life sciences.…

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WHY CIOs SHOULD BECOME CERTIFIED IN SECURITY: Podcast Interview with Hord Tipton, former CIO. U.S. Dept. of the Interior

2008-05-19
Length: 21s

When Hord Tipton became CIO of the U.S. Dept. of Interior, he knew he would be wrestling with some daunting IT issues, especially in security. In fact, the Dept. was reeling from a December 2001 court order that disconnected all Interior systems from the Internet. That order resulted in a multi-million lawsuit brought by beneficiaries of Individual Indian Trust accounts held by the Interior's Bureau of Indian Affairs, based in part on hackers burrowing into the Trust's accounts. By making a good case for business systems security, Tipton managed to convince the Interior's officials to increase the $4 million annual IT network and security budget to $100 million. Tipton and his staff spent the next four years upgrading systems security and getting all of the Interior's systems reconnected to the Internet. Tipton even gave his IT staff one year to become certified in security. When he received a lot of staff resistance to his challenge, the 60-year old Tipton did something unusual for a CIO. He became a Certified Information Systems Security Professional. This certification matched the job at hand. Under Tipton's leadership, the U.S. Dept. of the Interior established sound IT security policies and guidelines, and initiated testing and IT security training programs throughout the agency. Now retired from government service, Tipton is a board member of ISC2,, the organization that oversees the CISSP exam and maintains the credentialing process.…

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WHY CIOs SHOULD BECOME CERTIFIED IN SECURITY: Podcast Interview with Hord Tipton, former CIO. U.S. Dept. of the Interior

2008-05-19
Length: 21s

When Hord Tipton became CIO of the U.S. Dept. of Interior, he knew he would be wrestling with some daunting IT issues, especially in security. In fact, the Dept. was reeling from a December 2001 court order that disconnected all Interior systems from the Internet. That order resulted in a multi-million lawsuit brought by beneficiaries of Individual Indian Trust accounts held by the Interior's Bureau of Indian Affairs, based in part on hackers burrowing into the Trust's accounts. By making a good case for business systems security, Tipton managed to convince the Interior's officials to increase the $4 million annual IT network and security budget to $100 million. Tipton and his staff spent the next four years upgrading systems security and getting all of the Interior's systems reconnected to the Internet. Tipton even gave his IT staff one year to become certified in security. When he received a lot of staff resistance to his challenge, the 60-year old Tipton did something unusual for a CIO. He became a Certified Information Systems Security Professional. This certification matched the job at hand. Under Tipton's leadership, the U.S. Dept. of the Interior established sound IT security policies and guidelines, and initiated testing and IT security training programs throughout the agency. Now retired from government service, Tipton is a board member of ISC2,, the organization that oversees the CISSP exam and maintains the credentialing process.…

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Patrick Gray, author and president of the Prevoyance Group: How CIOs Can Supercharge Organizational Growth

2008-05-08
Length: 18s

Today's CIOs come from many disciplines outside of IT, but they all face a similar challenge -- how to take their IT organization from being a cost-centric services provider to being perceived as a valuable business partner. That's the question Patrick Gray answers in his new book, Breakthrough IT: Supercharging Organizational Value Through Technology. His book provides a necessary roadmap for shifting IT from an operational entity that simply manages technology, to a powerhouse that combines strategy and technology to deliver measurable business results and long-term value. As principal and president of the Prevoyance Group, a strategic IT consulting firm, Gray has worked on this issue with clients ranging from OfficeMax to SAP. The Prevoyance Group's strategic IT consulting combines applied strategy and process improvement to ensure large IT organizations measurable monetary returns. In this podcast, Patrick Gray talks about why CIOs don't belong to the business strategy circle, how the CIO role has to change to accommodate breakthrough IT, and what CIOs should do to accelerate that change.…

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Patrick Gray, author and president of the Prevoyance Group: How CIOs Can Supercharge Organizational Growth

2008-05-08
Length: 18s

Today's CIOs come from many disciplines outside of IT, but they all face a similar challenge -- how to take their IT organization from being a cost-centric services provider to being perceived as a valuable business partner. That's the question Patrick Gray answers in his new book, Breakthrough IT: Supercharging Organizational Value Through Technology. His book provides a necessary roadmap for shifting IT from an operational entity that simply manages technology, to a powerhouse that combines strategy and technology to deliver measurable business results and long-term value. As principal and president of the Prevoyance Group, a strategic IT consulting firm, Gray has worked on this issue with clients ranging from OfficeMax to SAP. The Prevoyance Group's strategic IT consulting combines applied strategy and process improvement to ensure large IT organizations measurable monetary returns. In this podcast, Patrick Gray talks about why CIOs don't belong to the business strategy circle, how the CIO role has to change to accommodate breakthrough IT, and what CIOs should do to accelerate that change.…

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THE BEST PRACTICES FOR MAKING GOOD ON A CUSTOMER-CENTRIC ENGAGEMENT MODEL: Podcast with Tony Velleca, CIO of UST Global

2008-05-01
Length: 13s

To provide end-to-end IT services and business processing outsourcing solutions for Global 2000 companies, UST Global has a customer-centric global engagement model that combines local and off-sites resources with the cost, scale, and quality advantages of off-shore operations. This customer-centric model forms the core of the company's values of how it operates and how it serves customers. Tony Velleca, UST Global's CIO says that the company strives to build a long-lasting strategic relationship with each customer. "We empower our employees to provide value beyond what's outlined in a customer contract." A project portfolio management system provides the technology underpinning for the customer engagement model. Velleca says, "We can have as many as 660 projects going at the same time." The system Velleca deployed enables UST Global's personnel to prioritize company projects, and to improve the performance of those projects, while reducing their costs. He says, "Because we know which projects won't meet customers' objectives, we can take the approprate action." The industry-leading expertise found within UST Global's centers of excellence concept plays another key role in the customer engagement process. The CoEs deliver pragmatic IT solutions that allow UST Global to consistently achieve its most critical business objectives. Complementing the CoEs, the partner programs aim to develop strategic relationships with key technology organizations, which can provide UST developers with access to new technology and educational resources. KPMG has certified UST Global as an SEI-CMMI and PCMM Level 5 company. Velleca says, "We've adopted Six Sigma for developing our customer-facing processes. Our centers in India are ISO 27001 certified. These quality practices provide a foundation for all of our services, and also to provide internal benefits to our customers."…

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THE BEST PRACTICES FOR MAKING GOOD ON A CUSTOMER-CENTRIC ENGAGEMENT MODEL: Podcast with Tony Velleca, CIO of UST Global

2008-05-01
Length: 13s

To provide end-to-end IT services and business processing outsourcing solutions for Global 2000 companies, UST Global has a customer-centric global engagement model that combines local and off-sites resources with the cost, scale, and quality advantages of off-shore operations. This customer-centric model forms the core of the company's values of how it operates and how it serves customers. Tony Velleca, UST Global's CIO says that the company strives to build a long-lasting strategic relationship with each customer. "We empower our employees to provide value beyond what's outlined in a customer contract." A project portfolio management system provides the technology underpinning for the customer engagement model. Velleca says, "We can have as many as 660 projects going at the same time." The system Velleca deployed enables UST Global's personnel to prioritize company projects, and to improve the performance of those projects, while reducing their costs. He says, "Because we know which projects won't meet customers' objectives, we can take the approprate action." The industry-leading expertise found within UST Global's centers of excellence concept plays another key role in the customer engagement process. The CoEs deliver pragmatic IT solutions that allow UST Global to consistently achieve its most critical business objectives. Complementing the CoEs, the partner programs aim to develop strategic relationships with key technology organizations, which can provide UST developers with access to new technology and educational resources. KPMG has certified UST Global as an SEI-CMMI and PCMM Level 5 company. Velleca says, "We've adopted Six Sigma for developing our customer-facing processes. Our centers in India are ISO 27001 certified. These quality practices provide a foundation for all of our services, and also to provide internal benefits to our customers."…

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A SUCCESSFUL BUSINESS TRANSFORMATION INITIATIVE REQUIRES A SOLID FRAMEWORK: Podcast with Dr. Robert Miles, author and president of Corporate Transformation Resources

2008-04-25
Length: 20s

To overcome stagnant revenues, Symantec embarked on a corporate transformation integrating disconnected business subsidiaries into one cohesive business, focused on customer needs. Symantec couldn't have done this initiative without the help of Dr. Robert H. Miles, who developed the accelerate corporate transformation or ACT framework to enable change. He has written many books on the subject and heads up a corporate transformation consulting practice and serves as chairman of two other consulting firms that use his ACT framework. Dr. Miles developed the ACT framework for business transformation while he was carrying out executive leadership programs for CEOs at Harvard Business School. The first version of ACT emphasized focus and execution. After spending time in Silicon Valley, Dr. Miles expanded the ACT framework to include speed and engagement. He says, "These four competencies become the bedrock of an organization's management process." In this podcast, Dr. Miles talks how the ACT framework can help C-level executives to plan, to launch, and to refocus corporate transformation efforts, how companies have benefited from this framework, and why speed, not necessarily agility, is the new management discipline.…

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A SUCCESSFUL BUSINESS TRANSFORMATION INITIATIVE REQUIRES A SOLID FRAMEWORK: Podcast with Dr. Robert Miles, author and president of Corporate Transformation Resources

2008-04-25
Length: 20s

To overcome stagnant revenues, Symantec embarked on a corporate transformation integrating disconnected business subsidiaries into one cohesive business, focused on customer needs. Symantec couldn't have done this initiative without the help of Dr. Robert H. Miles, who developed the accelerate corporate transformation or ACT framework to enable change. He has written many books on the subject and heads up a corporate transformation consulting practice and serves as chairman of two other consulting firms that use his ACT framework. Dr. Miles developed the ACT framework for business transformation while he was carrying out executive leadership programs for CEOs at Harvard Business School. The first version of ACT emphasized focus and execution. After spending time in Silicon Valley, Dr. Miles expanded the ACT framework to include speed and engagement. He says, "These four competencies become the bedrock of an organization's management process." In this podcast, Dr. Miles talks how the ACT framework can help C-level executives to plan, to launch, and to refocus corporate transformation efforts, how companies have benefited from this framework, and why speed, not necessarily agility, is the new management discipline.…

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THE LURE OF CRAIGSLIST - Open Source Technology, A Simple Business Model, AND Lots of Customer Feedback: Podcast with Jim Buckmaster, CEO of Craigslist

2008-04-18
Length: 19s

When it comes to looking for a job, an apartment, or even a good garage sale, more than 26 million unique visitors each month turn to a Craigslist.com site in one of 450 cities in 50 countries. No one can dispute the cult-like reputation Craigslist, founded by Craig Newmark, has earned. As a company, Craigslist runs frugal with 25 employees working out of an old Victorian building in San Francisco. However, Craigslist has proven that even a well meaning, grassroots bunch of nerds can put a big dent in the advertising profits earmarked for 1,000 of newspapers. Let's not forget how Craigslist, which is 25 percent owned by eBay, has changed the way many of us live and work. So how did Craigslist, which started as Newsmark's idea for a San Francisco events list 12 years, come this far? Why would a company that could be making hundreds of millions of dollars each year continue to offer a primarily free service? What drives Craigslist's quirky form of innovation and culture? These are some of the things enterpriseleadership.org asked Jim Buckmaster, craigslist CEO. Since 2000, Buckmaster has led craigslist to be the most used classifieds in any medium, and one of the world's most popular Web site.…

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THE LURE OF CRAIGSLIST - Open Source Technology, A Simple Business Model, AND Lots of Customer Feedback: Podcast with Jim Buckmaster, CEO of Craigslist

2008-04-18
Length: 19s

When it comes to looking for a job, an apartment, or even a good garage sale, more than 26 million unique visitors each month turn to a Craigslist.com site in one of 450 cities in 50 countries. No one can dispute the cult-like reputation Craigslist, founded by Craig Newmark, has earned. As a company, Craigslist runs frugal with 25 employees working out of an old Victorian building in San Francisco. However, Craigslist has proven that even a well meaning, grassroots bunch of nerds can put a big dent in the advertising profits earmarked for 1,000 of newspapers. Let's not forget how Craigslist, which is 25 percent owned by eBay, has changed the way many of us live and work. So how did Craigslist, which started as Newsmark's idea for a San Francisco events list 12 years, come this far? Why would a company that could be making hundreds of millions of dollars each year continue to offer a primarily free service? What drives Craigslist's quirky form of innovation and culture? These are some of the things enterpriseleadership.org asked Jim Buckmaster, craigslist CEO. Since 2000, Buckmaster has led craigslist to be the most used classifieds in any medium, and one of the world's most popular Web site.…

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GREENING THE ENTERPRISE AT SYBASE: Podcast interview with Jim Swartz, CIO and vice president of Sybase

2008-04-03
Length: 20s

Server virtualization. Retiring and redeploying servers. Improved cooling. Virtualized desktops. Even temporary storage of the OS. These initiatives comprise Sybase's enterprise green strategy. Like many large companies, this $1 billion data base vendor has cut unnecessary IT costs by consolidating data centers. Now Sybase plans to keep unnecessary IT costs from growing by going green. In fact, Jim Swartz, CIO of Sybase, says that these initiatives could postpone the building of a new data center until 2017. How let's hear more about Sybase's going green from Jim Swartz, CIO and vice president of Sybase.…

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GREENING THE ENTERPRISE AT SYBASE: Podcast interview with Jim Swartz, CIO and vice president of Sybase

2008-04-03
Length: 20s

Server virtualization. Retiring and redeploying servers. Improved cooling. Virtualized desktops. Even temporary storage of the OS. These initiatives comprise Sybase's enterprise green strategy. Like many large companies, this $1 billion data base vendor has cut unnecessary IT costs by consolidating data centers. Now Sybase plans to keep unnecessary IT costs from growing by going green. In fact, Jim Swartz, CIO of Sybase, says that these initiatives could postpone the building of a new data center until 2017. How let's hear more about Sybase's going green from Jim Swartz, CIO and vice president of Sybase.…

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IN SEARCH OF IT AGILITY: Podcast interview with Dr. Nicholas (Nick) Horney, founder and principal of Agility Training and Consulting

2008-03-28
Length: 24s

What does agility have to do with information technology? If IT organizations want to lower their operating costs, to improve the business's overall customer service, and to find new revenues opportunities, they must improve their agility to anticipate changes in the marketplace, and to act accordingly. Agility, along with appropriate alignment with the business units, can help IT organizations create more business value. In this podcast, Dr. Nick Horney, founder and principal of Agility Consulting and Training, talks about the agile IT organization. He was one of the expert panelists who participated in the selection of CIO magazine's Agile 100. Now let's meet Dr. Nick Horney. http://www.enterpriseleadership.org…

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IN SEARCH OF IT AGILITY: Podcast interview with Dr. Nicholas (Nick) Horney, founder and principal of Agility Training and Consulting

2008-03-28
Length: 24s

What does agility have to do with information technology? If IT organizations want to lower their operating costs, to improve the business's overall customer service, and to find new revenues opportunities, they must improve their agility to anticipate changes in the marketplace, and to act accordingly. Agility, along with appropriate alignment with the business units, can help IT organizations create more business value. In this podcast, Dr. Nick Horney, founder and principal of Agility Consulting and Training, talks about the agile IT organization. He was one of the expert panelists who participated in the selection of CIO magazine's Agile 100. Now let's meet Dr. Nick Horney. http://www.enterpriseleadership.org…

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Perfecting Instant Office Space for Virtual Workers: Podcast with Mark Dixon, Founder and CEO of Regus

2008-03-17
Length: 13s

Today, can you fly to any major city and find high quality, fully staff office space for a day or a month. You can open an office in New York without buying one piece of furniture or signing on with an Internet provider. Enter the instant office by Regus. This global company provides fully staffed, contractual office space, virtual offices, and meeting space in 400 cities in 70 countries. In this podcast, Mark Dixon, the founder and CEO of The Regus Group, talks about how he has combined innovative thinking, strong leadership, and cutting-edge technology to grow his business. Let's welcome Mark Dixon to the enterpriseleadership.org show.…

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Perfecting Instant Office Space for Virtual Workers: Podcast with Mark Dixon, Founder and CEO of Regus

2008-03-17
Length: 13s

Today, can you fly to any major city and find high quality, fully staff office space for a day or a month. You can open an office in New York without buying one piece of furniture or signing on with an Internet provider. Enter the instant office by Regus. This global company provides fully staffed, contractual office space, virtual offices, and meeting space in 400 cities in 70 countries. In this podcast, Mark Dixon, the founder and CEO of The Regus Group, talks about how he has combined innovative thinking, strong leadership, and cutting-edge technology to grow his business. Let's welcome Mark Dixon to the enterpriseleadership.org show.…

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Outsourcing Model Offers the Best of Emerging Technology from China with Bernard (Bud) Mathaisel, CIO of Achievo

2008-03-07
Length: 26s

When it came to outsourcing requirements based on emerging technologies, such as Web services, Achievo decided to base its IT services delivery model on talent from China, instead of India. In this podcast, Bud Mathaisel, chief information officer and senior vice president of Achievo, talks about what differentiates his company's business model from other outsourcers and what has propelled the growth of IT outsourcing in China. Now let's listen to what Bud Mathaisel, CIO of Achievo, has to say. http://www.enterpriseleadership.orgChina, outsourcing, CMMI…

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Outsourcing Model Offers the Best of Emerging Technology from China with Bernard (Bud) Mathaisel, CIO of Achievo

2008-03-07
Length: 26s

When it came to outsourcing requirements based on emerging technologies, such as Web services, Achievo decided to base its IT services delivery model on talent from China, instead of India. In this podcast, Bud Mathaisel, chief information officer and senior vice president of Achievo, talks about what differentiates his company's business model from other outsourcers and what has propelled the growth of IT outsourcing in China. Now let's listen to what Bud Mathaisel, CIO of Achievo, has to say. http://www.enterpriseleadership.orgChina, outsourcing, CMMI…

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BUILDING THE NEXT GENERATION ENTERPRISE: Podcast with Vaughan Merlyn, executive vice president of BSG Concours

2008-02-28
Length: 30s

There's an old saying in IT. Business executives get the IT they deserve. Perhaps, this happens because a gap exists between how CIOs communicate the value of IT to business executives. Before they can bridge this gap, CIOs need to first understand where they rank on the Business IT Maturity model, and how they can create a construct they describes the next generation enterprise. It's one with an appetite for innovation and growth, and a desire to help the entire organization become more agile and collaborative. In this podcast, Vaughan Merlyn, executive vice president of BSG Concours, provides a colorful explanation of this model. Now let's meet Vaughan Merlyn. HOST Tom Parish. Produced at Tom Parish Inc. in Austin TX.…

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BUILDING THE NEXT GENERATION ENTERPRISE: Podcast with Vaughan Merlyn, executive vice president of BSG Concours

2008-02-28
Length: 30s

There's an old saying in IT. Business executives get the IT they deserve. Perhaps, this happens because a gap exists between how CIOs communicate the value of IT to business executives. Before they can bridge this gap, CIOs need to first understand where they rank on the Business IT Maturity model, and how they can create a construct they describes the next generation enterprise. It's one with an appetite for innovation and growth, and a desire to help the entire organization become more agile and collaborative. In this podcast, Vaughan Merlyn, executive vice president of BSG Concours, provides a colorful explanation of this model. Now let's meet Vaughan Merlyn. HOST Tom Parish. Produced at Tom Parish Inc. in Austin TX.…

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HOW TO WEATHER AN IT TRANSFORMATION: Podcast interview with Tom Trainer, executive chairman, BTM Global 2000

2008-02-21
Length: 20s

PepsiCo. Seagram. Reebok. Eli Lilly. During his 40-year career in IT, Tom Trainer has been provided IT leadership for some of the world's most recognizable companies. He's seen IT evolve from the back office, to the cornerstone of the modern global corporation. In this podcast, Tom Trainer gives his observations about governance, IT alignment, innovation, and quality practices. So, join us for a conversation with Tom Trainer, the former CIO and senior vice president at PepsiCo.…

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HOW TO GET SERVER VIRTUALIZATION RIGHT THE FIRST TIME: Podcast interview with Simon Crosby, CTO at Citrix XenSource

2008-02-13
Length: 22s

Are you one of those organizations with just too many powerful X86 servers? Then server virtualization might be just what you need. It enables you to consolidate these servers into fewer devices, as well as to reduce power consumption, and to eliminate the need to build a new data center. In this podcast, Simon Crosby, the chief technology officer at Citrix XenSource, provides some helpful guidelines for deploying server virtualization. Now let's join Simon Crosby, CTO of Citrix's Virtualization and Management Division.…

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BECOMING THE NEW CIO LEADER: Podcast interview with Dr. Ellen Kitzis, group vice president at Gartner, Inc.

2008-02-04
Length: 30s

These are the best or times and the worst of times for CIOs. On the one hand, the CIO role has gone from keeping the lights on and the data flowing, to aligning IT with their company's business strategy. For those all those CIOs who aren't "born leaders," Dr. Ellen Kitzis, a group vice president for Gartner's CIO Executive Programs has done extensive research about how the CIO is changing and how the CIO should perform in their organization. New CIOs and seasoned CIOs who are reexamining their role will want to check out her Book, The New CIO Leader -- Setting the Agenda and Delivering Results, published by Harvard Business School Press, and thos podcast, as she talks about what it takes to become the new CIO leader.…

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The Alignment Trap: Podcast Interview with Rudy Puryear leader of Bain & Co.'s Global IT Practice

2008-01-23
Length: 19s

Those companies that get IT alignment right experience significantly larger business growth than their peers. They also see their IT costs go down. On the hand, many companies fall prey to the IT alignment trap by over aligning and, in turn, introducing more complexity into the organization. These are the findings of a study done by C.R. (Rudy) Puryear and his colleagues at Bain & Co.…

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The Alignment Trap: Podcast Interview with Rudy Puryear leader of Bain & Co.'s Global IT Practice

2008-01-23
Length: 19s

Those companies that get IT alignment right experience significantly larger business growth than their peers. They also see their IT costs go down. On the hand, many companies fall prey to the IT alignment trap by over aligning and, in turn, introducing more complexity into the organization. These are the findings of a study done by C.R. (Rudy) Puryear and his colleagues at Bain & Co.…

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GETTING SIX SIGMA RIGHT, THE FIRST TIME: Podcast interview with Joe De Feo, CEO and executive coach, the Juran Institute

2008-01-10
Length: 27s

When it comes to deploying Six Sigma initiatives, IT organizations and IT service companies face a lot of challenges. The Juran Institute, a quality managing consulting firm founded by J.M. Juran, has been helping Fortune 1000 organizations to carry out Six Sigma successfully, especially in IT. In this podcast, Joe De Feo, CEO and executive coach for the Juran Institute, will talk about how Six Sigma applies to IT, and how organizations can correct the common mistakes they make in carrying out Six Sigma. He'll also dispel the myth that Six Sigma stops innovation.…

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Podcast interview with Drew Clark, director of strategy, the IBM Venture Group

2008-01-04
Length: 24s

China. India, Brazil. Because the U.S. is no longer the sole player in IT innovation, companies such as IBM have had to devise new models for reaching start-up ventures around the world. Formed in 2000, the IBM Venture Group doesn't offer an investment pool of funds. Instead, the group works with more than 150 venture capital firms around the world to identify start-ups that might be candidates for non-equity relationships with IBM. Drew Clark, the co-founder, and director of strategy for the group, says, "We leverage the investments VCs make in these companies by working as a partner throughout their lifecycle." In this podcast, Clark tells how any CIO can replicate the group's model for innovation. It can start with what Clark calls the "open innovation jam," or "jamming," a process that encourages people outside of research and development and the corporate staff to contribute ideas for new processes. But regardless of their business, says Clark, "CIOs ... shouldn't limit themselves to one model for innovation."…

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Podcast interview with Drew Clark, director of strategy, the IBM Venture Group

2008-01-04
Length: 24s

China. India, Brazil. Because the U.S. is no longer the sole player in IT innovation, companies such as IBM have had to devise new models for reaching start-up ventures around the world. Formed in 2000, the IBM Venture Group doesn't offer an investment pool of funds. Instead, the group works with more than 150 venture capital firms around the world to identify start-ups that might be candidates for non-equity relationships with IBM. Drew Clark, the co-founder, and director of strategy for the group, says, "We leverage the investments VCs make in these companies by working as a partner throughout their lifecycle." In this podcast, Clark tells how any CIO can replicate the group's model for innovation. It can start with what Clark calls the "open innovation jam," or "jamming," a process that encourages people outside of research and development and the corporate staff to contribute ideas for new processes. But regardless of their business, says Clark, "CIOs ... shouldn't limit themselves to one model for innovation."…

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IT and the Total Customer Experience at Jenny Craig: Podcast Interview with Shourky Tiab, CIO

2007-11-30
Length: 17s

For the past 25 years, Jenny Craig, Inc., has become more of the U.S.'s leading health-conscious weight management program. Each week, more than 120,000 people follow the Jenny Craig program through the company's more than 500 Jenny Craig's center. Jenny Craig, Inc., which was purchased in July 2006 by Nestle for $600 million, is on a mission to do what it takes to keep its competitive edge. This move has included updating technology that enables Jenny Craig to offer a responsive relationship management program throughout customers' weight loss lifecycle. For example, features like click-to-call on the Jenny Craig Web site allow customers to enter their zip code and automatically receive a telephone call from the nearest Jenny Craig weight management center. Shourky Tiab, Jenny Craig's CIO, says, "Features like this help us to get close to our customers." Tiab, who joined the company in early 2007, is currently working on a back-office application that would sit on top of the new wide area network, which will connect all of more than 500 Jenny Craig weight management centers. Tiab says, "This application will give us a complete view of each customer, regardless of what channel he/she uses to communicate with us. It will help us to make our supply chain more efficient." In this podcast, Shoukry Tiab, chief information officer at Jenny Craig, talks about how the company perceives it customers and how technology is applied to serve their unique needs.…

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IT and the Total Customer Experience at Jenny Craig: Podcast Interview with Shourky Tiab, CIO

2007-11-30
Length: 17s

For the past 25 years, Jenny Craig, Inc., has become more of the U.S.'s leading health-conscious weight management program. Each week, more than 120,000 people follow the Jenny Craig program through the company's more than 500 Jenny Craig's center. Jenny Craig, Inc., which was purchased in July 2006 by Nestle for $600 million, is on a mission to do what it takes to keep its competitive edge. This move has included updating technology that enables Jenny Craig to offer a responsive relationship management program throughout customers' weight loss lifecycle. For example, features like click-to-call on the Jenny Craig Web site allow customers to enter their zip code and automatically receive a telephone call from the nearest Jenny Craig weight management center. Shourky Tiab, Jenny Craig's CIO, says, "Features like this help us to get close to our customers." Tiab, who joined the company in early 2007, is currently working on a back-office application that would sit on top of the new wide area network, which will connect all of more than 500 Jenny Craig weight management centers. Tiab says, "This application will give us a complete view of each customer, regardless of what channel he/she uses to communicate with us. It will help us to make our supply chain more efficient." In this podcast, Shoukry Tiab, chief information officer at Jenny Craig, talks about how the company perceives it customers and how technology is applied to serve their unique needs.…

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IT SWEETENS WRIGLEY'S GLOBAL BRAND: Interview with Donagh Herlihy, CIO and vice president of supply chain strategy and planning, The Wm. Wrigley Jr. Company

2007-11-15
Length: 20s

Has anyone offered you an Altoid lately? Ever chew Wrigley's Doublemint gum when you were a kid? These are just two of the Wm. Wrigley Jr. Company's enduring brands. In 2001, the 116-year old company decided to expand and update the global image and reputation of the Wrigley brand. This move included replacing an aging, disparate IT infrastructure with a single supply chain platform using SAP. Donagh Herlihy, Wrigley's CIO, spearheaded the three-year, international implementation, and helped shape the governance process needed to carry out the initiative. Now, IT’s helping to increase brand awareness for Wrigley in innovative ways, even helping Wrigley to reach out to young customers with a presence in Second Life and a safe, family-fun Web site where kids can indulge in multi-player games. http://www.enterpriseleadership.org…

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Michael Paravicini: Lessons Learned from Outsourcing a Global Infrastructure

2007-11-09
Length: 24s

In 2003, Michael Paravicini became the new chief technology information officer at Zurich Financial Services, one of the world's largest insurance companies. Right away, he knew he had his work cut out for him. First order of business: how to transform a highly decentralized, locally based staff of 7,700 IT professionals, including 30 CIOs, and several data centers. Paravicini says that although it was a tough road, he met the challenge, reducing costs by 30 percent through careful oursourcing choices and best practices including IT Infrastructure Library.…

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HOLISTIC IT: Podcast interview with Faisal Hoque, BTM Corporation

2007-11-02
Length: 21s

Why do half of all IT projects fail? Why do most companies create major IT plans that have no linkages to corporate strategy? Can IT really be run as a business? Faisal Hoque, author of IT management books inclucing The Alignment Effect, and Sustained Innovation, and founder of BTM Corporation, has spent years researching questions like this. In this podcast, he talks about some of the conclusions he's drawn, and about the "holistic business model" for managing technology and business together that have helped global companies like Marriott and JPMorgan achieve a competitive edge.…

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The Challenge of Delivering IT Commitments on Technology's Bleeding Edge: Podcast interview with Patricia Morrison, CIO, Motorola Corp.

2007-10-26
Length: 24s

Patricia Morrison has a stellar track record delivering the value major corporations expect from the IT organization. In less than two years, she’s taken the $42 billion Motorola Corp. from #42 to #12 on InformationWeek's ranking of Top 500 IT innovators in 2006, and #1 in the manufacturing industry segment. She has one consistent message for her team of 2,200 Motorola IT professionals: "Make sure we deliver what we commit to." In his podcast, Patricia Morrison, executive vice president and chief information officer at Motorola, talks about everything from corporate governance to business process improvements to IT career development through rotational programs.…

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MANAGING BRAND BY THE (ANALYTICS) NUMBERS: Podcast interview with Unmesh Jain, chief information officer and chief technology officer of PRC

2007-10-19
Length: 20s

Ever received a courtesy call from DirecTV or have subscribed to an AARP service over the telephone? Then you've probably spoken with one of the 14,000 customer care representatives from PRC LLC, formerly called Precision Response Corp. PRC is the country's third largest contact center outsourcer, which manages customer relationship for some of the world's leading corporations. PRC aims to deliver value for both its B to B and B to C customers. And, IT provides the crucial underpinning for driving the contact center services. In this podcast, CIO and CTO Umesh Jain talks about how a large enterprise can gain a deeper understanding of its customers' behavior by harnessing the contact center's vast amounts of customer and market data.…

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MANAGING BRAND BY THE (ANALYTICS) NUMBERS: Podcast interview with Unmesh Jain, chief information officer and chief technology officer of PRC

2007-10-19
Length: 20s

Ever received a courtesy call from DirecTV or have subscribed to an AARP service over the telephone? Then you've probably spoken with one of the 14,000 customer care representatives from PRC LLC, formerly called Precision Response Corp. PRC is the country's third largest contact center outsourcer, which manages customer relationship for some of the world's leading corporations. PRC aims to deliver value for both its B to B and B to C customers. And, IT provides the crucial underpinning for driving the contact center services. In this podcast, CIO and CTO Umesh Jain talks about how a large enterprise can gain a deeper understanding of its customers' behavior by harnessing the contact center's vast amounts of customer and market data.…

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BRAVE, NEW NETCENTRIC WORLD: Podcast interview with Lt. General Harry Raduege, chairman of the new Deloitte Center for Network Innovation

2007-09-27
Length: 40s

Lt. General Harry Raduege had spent a professional lifetime working in technology for the military -- the last spent as director of the Defense Information Systems Agency. Then came 9/11. The lessons he learned about the importance of "netcentricity" got up-close and personal on that day and after, as he led efforts to prioritize and restore telecommunications throughout New York City and the Pentagon. Now, as chairman of the new Deloitte Center for Network Innovation, Raduege brings deep understanding of today's increasing need for interdependent information networks that are secure and interoperable, whether in the public or private sectors.…

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TYING TOGETHER THE DATA SILOS: Podcast interview with Jill Dyché and Evan Levy of Baseline Consulting

2007-09-26
Length: 30s

In managing today's ever-more-complex data environment, the common complaint is about data silos that are out of control. Enter Master Data Management (MDM), a way to integrate all those disparate silos of data without having to replatform your system. MDM could help your enterprise with issues that arise from compliance requirements, M&A support, and CRM support. It might also be a great way to move incrementally toward a service oriented architecture. Jill Dyché and Evan Levy are the authors of the new book, Customer Data Integration: Reaching a Single Version of the Truth; they're also consultants with Basline Consulting, which specializes in MDM. In this interview, they'll talk about how MDM can be a segue for SOA, when to know if an MDM initiative makes sense for your business, some of the do's and don'ts you should know about implementing such an initiative, and more. http://www.EnterpriseLeadership.org…

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TYING TOGETHER THE DATA SILOS: Podcast interview with Jill Dyché and Evan Levy of Baseline Consulting

2007-09-26
Length: 30s

In managing today's ever-more-complex data environment, the common complaint is about data silos that are out of control. Enter Master Data Management (MDM), a way to integrate all those disparate silos of data without having to replatform your system. MDM could help your enterprise with issues that arise from compliance requirements, M&A support, and CRM support. It might also be a great way to move incrementally toward a service oriented architecture. Jill Dyché and Evan Levy are the authors of the new book, Customer Data Integration: Reaching a Single Version of the Truth; they're also consultants with Basline Consulting, which specializes in MDM. In this interview, they'll talk about how MDM can be a segue for SOA, when to know if an MDM initiative makes sense for your business, some of the do's and don'ts you should know about implementing such an initiative, and more. http://www.EnterpriseLeadership.org…

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Podcast interview with Vin Melvin, CIO of Arrow Electronics

2007-09-21
Length: 21s

Being a new CIO in a new company has it challenges, and its rewards. Just ask Vin Melvin, who become vice president and CIO of Arrow Electronics in 2006. The $14 billion provider of electronic components and computer products had grown rapidly through global acquisitions. But as a result, Arrow's supply chain became highly fragmented, and other key issues emerged, like the need to improve IT governance, and to adopt formal best practices to comply with Sarbanes-Oxley. Functions like driving innovation and IT governance remain works in progress, but compliance with Sarbanes-Oxley propelled Arrow to adopt formal best practices like the IT Infrastructure Library, or ITIL. Says Melvin, "ITIL has brought a process discipline to the IT community which has made compliance less burdensome to both the auditors and IT."…

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Keeping Ahead of the Crowd: Podcast interview with Kevin Zaffaroni, IT organization leader of Acxiom

2007-09-14
Length: 20s

Acxiom Corp. has quietly built a $1.5 billion business aggregating and managing more than 20 billion customer and prospect records for more than 1,000 global companies. An innovative culture has garnered numerous awards for this 38-year-old company; for example, it brought grid technology into the mainstream by developing the Customer Information Infrastructure (CII), and it did away with formal titles (like CIO) in 1992. Kevin Zaffaroni, Acxiom's IT organization leader, says, "We continued to enhance this culture of innovation. That's one of the reasons why the world's largest companies come to Conway, Arkansas, to have us do their work."…

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TRAVELLING THE GLOBE AT THE SPEED OF MONEY: Podcast interview with Daniel Atlman, journalist and author of the new book, Connected: 24 Hours in the Global Economy

2007-09-06
Length: 20s

Remember the Jules Vern classic, Around the World in Eighty Days? Now, get ready for "around the global economy in one day" ... any random day. That's the structure through which author and journalist Daniel Altman has woven a series of insightful and thought-provoking snapshots of the global economy in his new book, Connected: 24 Hours in the Global Economy. Reading Altman's book will put to rest any doubts you've ever had that the sovreign destiny of nations is increasingly like an incredibly complex web comprising wealth, politics, and culture. Join us for a wide-ranging conversation with this respected global writer that may leave you with a much better appreciation for the old phrase, "it's a small world," and its significant implications. http://www.enterpriseleadership.org…

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TRAVELLING THE GLOBE AT THE SPEED OF MONEY: Podcast interview with Daniel Atlman, journalist and author of the new book, Connected: 24 Hours in the Global Economy

2007-09-06
Length: 20s

Remember the Jules Vern classic, Around the World in Eighty Days? Now, get ready for "around the global economy in one day" ... any random day. That's the structure through which author and journalist Daniel Altman has woven a series of insightful and thought-provoking snapshots of the global economy in his new book, Connected: 24 Hours in the Global Economy. Reading Altman's book will put to rest any doubts you've ever had that the sovreign destiny of nations is increasingly like an incredibly complex web comprising wealth, politics, and culture. Join us for a wide-ranging conversation with this respected global writer that may leave you with a much better appreciation for the old phrase, "it's a small world," and its significant implications. http://www.enterpriseleadership.org…

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NO INNOVATOR'S DILEMMA AT TATA CONSULTANCY SERVICES: Podcast interview with K. Ananth Krishnan, CTO, Tata Consultancy Services

2007-08-24
Length: 38s

As CTO of Indian behemoth Tata Consultancy Services, K. Ananth Krishnan has relied heavily on the work of Dr. Clayton Christensen, a Harvard Business School professor and author of The Innovator's Dilemma and The Innovator's Solution to help drive innovation. In May 2007, Krishnan received an InfoWorld Top 25 CTO award for two far-reaching initiatives: One was Ultimatrix, an intranet and transaction platform that digitized and integrated all of the company's end-to-end information, ranging from human resources to sales. The other was Project Infinity, a multiprotocol label switching backbone to tie together all of the companies Internet-based communications, such as telephony and network access, and video collaboration applications. In this podcast, Krishnan talks about the wisdom he's gotten from Dr. Christensen, the role of a corporate think tank, an overview of TCS's service computing framework, and the best practices the company uses to carry out technology initiatives.…

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CHARLIE CATLETT: STRETCHING THE BOUNDARIES, FROM TERAGRID TO SECOND LIFE: Podcast interview with Charlie Catlett, CIO of the Argonne National Laboratory

2007-08-22
Length: 29s

Charlie Catlett is the CIO and division director of the Energy Dept.'s Argonne National Laboratory's Computing and Information Systems Division. Since 1990, Argonne has worked with more than 600 companies, many federal agencies, and other organizations, in areas ranging from climatology to biotechnology. Because of Catlett's unique scientific and technical background, his duties push the boundaries of the traditional CIO role, from managing an IT group, to serving on the scientific computing leadership team, which is turning out plans and strategy for the Digital Laboratory. He also works with the TeraGrid Project, a $90 million project funded by the National Science Foundation that is deploying a 25-teraflops computational grid system integrating resources at Argonne, California Institute of Technology, National Center for Supercomputing Applications, and other institutions. And, an upcoming project is to establish a Second Life presence for Argonne, where scientific collaboration can be virtual and in real time. http://www.enterpriseleadership.org…

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BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE FOR EVERYONE: Podcast interview with Don Campbell, vice president, platform strategy and technology at Cognos

2007-08-17
Length: 26s

During the past decade, business intelligence and performance management have moved from being applications used by specific departments to being vehicles for strategic decision-making across the enterprise. In this interview, Don Campbell, vice president, platform strategy and technology at Cognos, will discuss the challenge of delivering the value of business intelligence to everyone in an organization, not just knowledge workers and executives. He will explain how technology trends such as enterprise search and wireless applications are changing the playing field by making business intelligence information more accessible by its current users, and for the first time, easily accessible by anyone in the extended organization.…

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TOWARD A CULTURE OF RESPECT: Podcast interview with Tom Mendoza, president, Network Appliance

2007-08-08
Length: 25s

From the day when Tom Mendoza became president of Network Appliance (NetApp), he set out to create a culture based on candid communications among management and employees, emphasis on employee creativity and innovation, and respect for all employees, regardless of their position using technologies like CDs and podcasts as well as brown-bag lunch sessions with employees and executives. This culture helped the company to weather an $800 million loss following the dot.com debacle to better days as the fastest growing provider of turnkey network-attached or fabric-attached storage devices. Mendoza says, "When we interview prospective employees, we talk a lot about innovation. We want employees who can adapt to change and who provide us with good ideas for process and product improvements."…

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ITIL AND THE GLOBAL CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE: Podcast interview with Roel Louwhoff, president of customer service and network operations, BT Global Services

2007-08-03
Length: 19s

BT Global Services is one of four business units that make up the BT Group, a $28 billion international provider of IT services and solutions. The award-winning group provides BT Group's customers with services like desktop and network equipment and software, transport and connectivity, and more. Yet, when Roel Louwhoff, president, customer service and network operations for BT Global Services, joined BT Global Services, it consisted of disparate entities from joint ventures, regional organizations, acquired companies, and services. His new business model included standardized operational processes for service delivery and service support, with the IT Infrastructure Library, or ITIL, providing the framework. Join us for a conversation with Roel Louwhoff, on developing seamless customer service across continents and cultures, and how ITIL helped him build his organization into an award winner.…

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ITIL AND THE GLOBAL CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE: Podcast interview with Roel Louwhoff, president of customer service and network operations, BT Global Services

2007-08-03
Length: 19s

BT Global Services is one of four business units that make up the BT Group, a $28 billion international provider of IT services and solutions. The award-winning group provides BT Group's customers with services like desktop and network equipment and software, transport and connectivity, and more. Yet, when Roel Louwhoff, president, customer service and network operations for BT Global Services, joined BT Global Services, it consisted of disparate entities from joint ventures, regional organizations, acquired companies, and services. His new business model included standardized operational processes for service delivery and service support, with the IT Infrastructure Library, or ITIL, providing the framework. Join us for a conversation with Roel Louwhoff, on developing seamless customer service across continents and cultures, and how ITIL helped him build his organization into an award winner.…

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ITIL COMES OF AGE: Podcast interview with ITIL program manager at PA Consulting

2007-07-25
Length: 32s

What do Procter & Gamble, Austin Energy, and the Commonwealth of Virginia have in common? They’ve reaped the benefits of ITIL -- an IT service support/service delivery framework based on the IT Infrastructure Library. Selecting specific ITIL initiatives, like the service desk or change management, has become a norm with organizations using ITIL Version 1 or Version 2. Yet, few companies have embraced all of the ITIL initiatives. But that could all change with the lifecycle approach to IT service management built into ITIL Version 3, which provides a beginning and end to the entire service management process. In this podcast, Derek Lonsdale, an ITIL program manager at PA Consulting, provides a look at where organizations are with ITIL Version 1 and 2, what enhancements have been made to ITIL 3, and what are some of PA Consulting' lesson learned about carrying out ITIL successfully.…

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TECH TAKES FLIGHT: Podcast interview with Monte Ford, CIO of American Airline

2007-07-20
Length: 35s

Each day, American Airlines' 80,000 employees make sure more than 5,000 flights leave on time and arrive safely, on time, at their destinations. Monte Ford, vice president and CIO of American Airlines, doesn't mince word when he says his IT organization is a front runner, keeping pace with the highly competitive and dynamic airline industry. Ford sums up his common-sense approach to IT leadership as follows: "You constantly need to take your customers' pulse to know if you're doing a good job or not." Join us for a conversation with Monte Ford, vice president and CIO of American Airlines, who talks about how he oversees an IT organization in an industry that soars. http://www.EnterpriseLeadership.org host: Tom Parish…

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TECH TAKES FLIGHT: Podcast interview with Monte Ford, CIO of American Airline

2007-07-20
Length: 35s

Each day, American Airlines' 80,000 employees make sure more than 5,000 flights leave on time and arrive safely, on time, at their destinations. Monte Ford, vice president and CIO of American Airlines, doesn't mince word when he says his IT organization is a front runner, keeping pace with the highly competitive and dynamic airline industry. Ford sums up his common-sense approach to IT leadership as follows: "You constantly need to take your customers' pulse to know if you're doing a good job or not." Join us for a conversation with Monte Ford, vice president and CIO of American Airlines, who talks about how he oversees an IT organization in an industry that soars. http://www.EnterpriseLeadership.org host: Tom Parish…

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BRINGING IT TO THE FOREFRONT: Podcast interview with Rebecca Blalock, senior vice president and chief information officer of Southern Company

2007-07-13
Length: 27s

When Rebecca Blalock became CIO of the Southern Company, a Fortune 500, $14 billion regional electrical utility in the Southeast, she made it her goals to (1) deliver the cost efficiencies to keep the company competitive and provide customers with low rates, and (2) educate business unit leaders about the benefits of working closely with IT. To accomplish those goals, Blalock took steps like implementing money-saving process improvements, and devising a Technology Showcase and a governance model that took the IT organization from obscurity to front-line innovation driver. Join us for an interview with Rebecca Blalock, senior vice president and CIO of the Southern Company, as she talks about being a force for positive change in her IT organization.…

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WHEN ALL THINGS (DATA) CONVERGE: Podcast with Tim Jennings, Research Director of the Butler Group

2007-07-02
Length: 28s

Information management convergence is a very big and important subject for today's enterprise. There are more and more tools emerging in the marketplace to help manage boatloads of data, but Tim Jennings, research director for the Butler Group, thinks these tools are all part of a solution to a common set of business challenges. In this interview, he talks about the three types of business challenges for information management, how the rise of SOA figures in to the broad landscape of data management, and more.…

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AT THE VANGUARD: Podcast with Paul Heller, CIO of The Vanguard Group

2007-06-28
Length: 22s