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Last update: 2013-06-09

Episode 53: For the Sake of the Trust

2013-06-09 :: comment@ihearofsherlock.com (Scott Monty & Burt Wolder)



The Baker Street Irregulars are widely known as a literary society dedicated to the study of Sherlock Holmes. Since 1934 the group has been gathering in New York City for its annual dinner and weekend festivities and has embarked on a significant publishing effort centered around its own history, international Sherlockian societies' scholarship, and analysis of extant manuscripts of the Canon.

But more than that, the BSI wants to ensure that its own history and that of its members are recorded for posterity and the researchers who may be interested in it sometime in the future. Enter the Baker Street Irregulars Trust.

In this episode, Burt and Scott interview Tom Francis, BSI ("The Imperial Opera at Warsaw), who is the Chair of the Trust. Tom helps us understand how and why the Trust was established, what its aims are, and how you can help this august institution. We discuss some of the holdings of the Houghton Library at Harvard University, where the Trust is housed, including the H.W. Bell collection - Bell having been an early Sherlockian scholar and member of The Speckled Band of Boston.

The BSI Trust is a nonprofit organization as a subset of the Baker Street Irregulars. Donations are welcome, but original materials are more desirable. Correspondence of Irregulars and their other papers are welcome - but the Trust does is not interested in everything Sherlockian or related to all Sherlockian societies. Books and other items that are not a core part of the Trust typically go up for sale or auction.

Tom breaks ground as he utters a phrase never before heard on this program - tune in to find out exactly what that is - and even begins to delve into what the future of the Trust looks like in our digital/electronic times.

Links:

The BSI Trust The finding aid for the Houghton Library collections How individuals can make monetary donations or materials donations to the BSIT   "For the Sake of the Trust" - the BSI Trust newsletter


 Download this episode by right-clicking the icon and selecting "Save As..." or simply click on the file to listen, or on the player above. (File size: 55.8 MB, 1:00:48)
Please subscribe to us on iTunes and be kind enough to leave a rating or review for the show.

Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email, call us at (774) 221-READ (7323). Connect with us on The Sherlock Holmes Community on Google+, FacebookTwitter and Tumblr.

And above all, please let our sponsors know that you heard us rant and rave about their excellence during the programme: Wessex Press and The Baker Street Journal.

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Episode 52: Sherlockian Mythbusters

2013-05-11 :: comment@ihearofsherlock.com (Scott Monty & Burt Wolder)


When a figure like Sherlock Holmes has been around for over a century, there are bound to be misconceptions that creep into public thinking. We blame this not on carelessness or laziness but rather on the overwhelming popularity of the great detective.

The image of Holmes clad in deerstalker and Inverness cape, clenching a Meerschaum pipe in his teeth is the universal, if cliched, image of a detective. But was it true?

We were recently reminded of a number of classic myths about Sherlock Holmes, thanks to a contest being sponsored by The Baker Street Journal (also a sponsor of our program): it has long been rumored that men wore black armbands throughout the city of London after reading "The Final Problem" in the Strand Magazine. And only anecdotal evidence has been referenced whenever this supposed fact is brought up. The BSJ is offering a free year's subscription to anyone who can definitively prove that such mourning attire was worn in response to the death of Sherlock Holmes.


That got us to thinking: what other Sherlockian myths are there? And are we guilty of propagating any of them ourselves? Join us for a quick game show-style question and answer session on the topic, as well as a reading of your comments from our last show and some recent news from the world of Sherlock Holmes.


The Editor's Gas-Lamp: Rather than the traditional gas-lamp, which began under Edgar Smith's editorship of the Baker Street Journal, we thought we would mark May 5 as the 123rd anniversary of Christopher Morley's birth by reading two of his poems: the very short "The Secret" and the quite remarkable "Toulemonde."

Links:
BSI Archival History Series available for sale The Baker Street Journal contest Sherlock Holmes-related 2013 Edgar Award winners and nominees "Stand with me here upon the terrace" for Irving Kamil The Deal Table from the BSJ The Christopher Morley Literary Estate on Facebook Sherlockian Mythbusters: "Thor Bridge" and "The Engineer's Thumb"




 Download this episode by right-clicking the icon and selecting "Save As..." or simply click on the file to listen, or on the player above. (File size: 60.2 MB, 1:05:42)
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Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email, call us at (774) 221-READ (7323). Connect with us on The Sherlock Holmes Community on Google+, FacebookTwitter and Tumblr.

And above all, please let our sponsors know that you heard us mumble their hallowed names on the show: Wessex Press and The Baker Street Journal.

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Episode 51: Who Is a Sherlockian?

2013-04-16 :: comment@ihearofsherlock.com (Scott Monty & Burt Wolder)


We thought we'd stir up the discussions a bit and try to get to the bottom of a couple of controversies that have been roiling the world of Sherlock Holmes enthusiasts (we're careful to say neither "fans" nor "devotees" at this juncture).

The first item of interest that grabbed our attention in early 2013 was the so-called "Free Sherlock" movement. Summed up, this is basically an issue that is being brought to court via a case titled Klinger vs. Conan Doyle Estate, in which Leslie Klinger, BSI ("The Abbey Grange") is contesting the Conan Doyle Estate's claim that any new content that contains Sherlock Holmes must pay a royalty or license fee to the Estate. Burt and Scott parse through some of the non-technical/legal aspects of the case and discuss what's at stake.

Speaking of being at stake, the other item on the docket is the debate as to what in fact constitutes a Sherlockian of good standing? That is, can one have arrived at the doorstep of 221B Baker Street via the BBC series (or Granada, or Universal, etc.) or must one have been schooled only in the printed literature and dress the part of a 1940s joiner? It's quite a debate - one that was taken up vehemently by The Baker Street Babes earlier this year, after the "Elite Devotee Redux" was published in recently resurrected  Saturday Review of Literature. We offer our own humble observations on the matter.

For those who wish to subscribe to the publication and read all of the very interesting articles therein, you may procure a copy by sending $5 postpaid to Donald K. Pollock, 521 College Avenue, Niagara Falls, NY 14305. An image of the cover and inside cover can be seen below.


The Editor's Gas-Lamp: We purposefully revisited the same Gas-Lamp (Vol. 3, No. 2, OS) that we shared on Episode 15, because Edgar Smith's "Who is a Baker Street Irregular?" seemed to strike the same chord some 65 years later.

Links:
Les Klinger's Free Sherlock site The New York Times takes note of the lawsuit Sherlock Holmes Estate challenged with 'copyfraud' The Baker Street Babes take umbrage with being dismissed by Philip Shreffler The BSI's statement: A World of Sherlockians


 Download this episode by right-clicking the icon and selecting "Save As..." or simply click on the file to listen, or on the nice box above. (File size: 50.71 MB, 55:13)
You do subscribe to us on iTunes, don't you?

Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email, call us at (774) 221-READ (7323). Connect with us on The Sherlock Holmes Community on Google+, Facebook, Twitter and Tumblr.

And above all, please let our sponsors know that you heard us mumble their hallowed names on the show: Wessex Press and The Baker Street Journal.

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Episode 50: A Golden Passage

2013-01-24 :: comment@ihearofsherlock.com (Scott Monty & Burt Wolder)

Our 50th episode is a fitting one. As you know, a 50th anniversary is typically celebrated with gold. Because we appreciate our listeners so much, we would settle for nothing less than the same.

But our gold comes in the form of a scintillating conversation with the two editors of the Baker Street Irregulars' eighth entry in their Manuscript Series, The Wrong Passage, which is a look at the manuscript of "The Adventure of the Golden Pince-Nez." Co-editors Andrew Solberg, BSI ("Professor Coram") and Robert Katz, MD, BSI ("Dr. Ainstree") joined us to discuss just what it is that goes into creating a significant piece of scholarship such as we've come to expect from BSI publications of late.

From the history of the manuscript itself, to artifacts from Paul Churchill's famed "evidence boxes," to an in-depth look at the historical background alluded to in the tale, the breadth of topics within the book is impressive. Also included are a number of other analyses on topics ranging from the historical and geographical to the linguistic, religious and medical, by noted Sherlockians Peggy Perdue, BSI ("Violet Westbury"), Denny Dobry, Donald Pollock, MD, BSI ("The Anthropological Journal") former member of the BSI, Albert Silverstein, BSI ("Professor Presbury"), C. Paul Martin, MD, BSI ("Dr. Leslie Armstrong"), Jacquelynn Morris, Richard J. Sveum, MD, BSI ("Dr. Hill Barton"), John Baesch, BSI ("The State and Merton County Railroad"), and William Hyder, BSI ("A Most Valuable Institution").

Our discussions range as far and wide as the book itself, and we also cover just a bit of the BSI Weekend festivities from 2013. But more on that in a future episode. This one clocked in at over an hour and 20 minutes, but we think you'll enjoy the conviviality between four Sherlockians as you spend a long evening with Holmes.


The Editor's Gas-Lamp: We thought it was fitting to focus on 50th anniversaries, so we took a page from the 50th anniversary year of the Baker Street Journal and read the Editor's Gas-Lamp of Vol. 46, No. 4 from December 1996, with Donald ("I'm not a member of the BSI") Pollock as editor.

Links:
The Wrong Passage, available for sale for $35  The BSI Manuscript Series Randall Stock's The Best of Sherlock Holmes The Sherlock Holmes Community on Google+ The eBSJ, now available for purchase Listen now:


 Download this episode by right-clicking the icon and selecting "Save As..." or simply click on the file to listen, or on the nice box above. (File size: 46.28 MB, 1:20:54)
You do subscribe to us on iTunes, don't you?

Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email, call us at (774) 221-READ (7323) or drop by our Facebook page. You can also find us on Twitter, Tumblr and Instagram. Be sure to visit the Sherlock Holmes Community on Google+.
And as always, please give some love to our sponsors Wessex Press and The Baker Street Journal.

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Editor's note: this entry has been updated to reflect Donald Pollock's non-association with the BSI. 

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Episode 49: I'll Have a Blue Christmas

2012-12-20 :: comment@ihearofsherlock.com (Scott Monty & Burt Wolder)


"Compliments of the season" is how Watson described his activities regarding a visit he paid to Holmes during the Christmas season.

And we know "The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle" as the sole Christmas story in the Canon of Sherlock Holmes stories. And rather than focus on the nostalgic and its place in the lineup of winter classics, we discuss how this classic fits in the pantheon of Holmes stories in its own right as a tale of friendship, crime, discovery and what we've come to realize as some of the typical Baker Street scenes.

In an effort to pay homage to this Christmas classic, the Baker Street Irregulars in 1948 crafted a special edition of "The Blue Carbuncle" that included a wonderful essay by Christopher Morley titled "A Christmas Story Without Slush." About BLUE, Morley said, "it was superb art. It hasn't a word too many or two few." That essay itself has become something of a classic as well, and we're delighted to share it with our listeners here.

After Burt inhabits the person of Morley for our reading, we come to a rather alarming and satisfying conclusion. We would be interested to hear if you share our assessment.

We go on to express admiration for the dramatized versions of the story - particularly by Jeremy Brett and David Burke for Granada and Peter Cushing and Nigel Stock for the BBC. We even invent our own version of Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon with one of the actors who appeared in each.

As part of the holiday season, we also offered up our own - rather eclectic - list of gift ideas and sites where you might find the same. Herewith, the gift giving guide for Sherlockians (or perhaps those from the Steampunk crowd as well) during the holiday season:
Gentleman's Emporium (Inverness capes for only $99!) Construct your own Inveness Cape The Scottish Inverness Cape Company - a Harris tweet version ($$$) Mr. Antony - Inverness-style rain capes Recollections Clothing Sherlock Holmes gifts at BuzzSugar Detachable collars from Amazon Dry Goods Polyvore's "Keep Calm" poster Two Sherlock Holmes chess sets: one from The Robert Opie Collection, and one from Amazon Sherlock Holmes quote wall art from Style It Out Magnoli Clothiers has vintage and custom clothing Randall Stock's list of the 10 Best Sherlock Holmes Gifts
The Editor's Gas-Lamp: We round out the show with a reading of "Two Days After Christmas," a version of "The Blue Carbuncle" that takes the form of Clement Moore's classic "A Visit From St. Nick." If you would like to read this poem for your own Sherlockian society meeting, please feel free to download or print it out - with attribution, of course.

Links:
Listener James O'Leary's contribution identifying Canonical sources for "Elementary" Episode 17: an interview with Otto Penzler The Jeremy Brett version of "The Blue Carbuncle" (Amazon US | Amazon UK) The Peter Cushing BBC version of "The Blue Carbuncle"(Amazon US | Amazon UK) Patrick Gowers' original soundtrack to the Granada Sherlock Holmes series (Amazon US | Amazon UK) BSI Weekend events
Listen now:


 Download this episode by right-clicking the icon and selecting "Save As..." or simply click on the file to listen, or on the nice box above. (File size: 33.25 MB, 1:12:34)
Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email, call us at (774) 221-READ (7323) or drop by our Facebook page. You can also find us on Twitter, Tumblr and Instagram. And check out the new Sherlock Holmes Community on Google+.
And as always, please visit our sponsors Wessex Press and The Baker Street Journal and subscribe to us on iTunes.

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Episode 48: Dangerous Work

2012-12-06 :: comment@ihearofsherlock.com (Scott Monty & Burt Wolder)


When Conan Doyle embarked on his whaling adventure at the age of 20, little could he have guessed what awaited him.

And little did the world know how profoundly his experiences would influence his later life, including the creation for which we know him most intimately - that of Sherlock Holmes.

We're joined in this episode by the editors of Dangerous Work: Diary of an Arctic Adventure, Jon Lellenberg, BSI and Daniel Stashower, BSI. Jon and Dan have been with us on previous episodes of I Hear of Sherlock Everywhere: when we discussed Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters on Episode 13, and again on Episode 37 when we covered The Narrative of John Smith, a lost Conan Doyle manuscript.

What we learn about Conan Doyle's six and a half month voyage on the Hope is absolutely fascinating - from the provenance of the manuscript itself and how Dame Jean Conan Doyle worked tirelessly to ensure this publication could be seen, to the harrowing adventures that Arthur himself saw as part of this arctic voyage and more - and what we consider the world would have been like had this journey not taken place, or worse: if events had taken a more grisly turn.

From the raw and harsh realities that required the ministrations of a third year medical student, to the unexpected swims and from the daily thoughts to the watercolor illustrations, we gain a view of Conan Doyle that truly helps the reader understand the seeds that were planted for a later career. What would his mother, (the "Ma'am") have thought of his accepting the adventure? What would his work been like absent such adventures? We speculate with the two men who have come to know Conan Doyle intimately through their previous work.

One item of note that the editors shared with us is that Dr. William Henry Neale, the surgeon on board the Eira (a ship that the Hope encountered), posed in a photograph with Conan Doyle at the time. A later photo (in 1892 and pictured below) shows Dr. Neale, who could very easily pass for Dr. Watson.

There is another item of note related to Dr. Watson that was mentioned by Conan Doyle at the conclusion of his voyage, but rather than spoil it here, we'll let you discover it yourself in the audio.

Finally, rather than the traditional Editor’s Gas-Lamp, we thought that while we had the editors with us, they could read to us from Doyle's diary. We asked Dan to read a poem that Doyle wrote in the July 26 entry, titled "Meerschaum Pipe."

We then turn to your comments on previous episodes and review your response to some of our questions/surveys on Facebook. Of course we do our housekeeping and mention all of our social network presence: on Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr and Instagram - including the Top 10 Suggestive Lines from the Sherlock Holmes Canon.

Links:
Dangerous Work: Diary of an Arctic Adventure [Amazon link] Details on the Manuscript of Arthur Conan Doyle's Whaling Diary on the SS Hope [Best of Sherlock] A database of Sherlock Holmes pastiches
Listen now:


Download this episode by right-clicking the icon and selecting "Save As..." or simply click on the file to listen, or on the nice box above. (File size: 27.85 MB, 1:00:46)
Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email, call us at (774) 221-READ (7323) or drop by our Facebook page. You can also find us on Twitter, Tumblr and Instagram.
And as always, please visit our sponsors Wessex Press and The Baker Street Journal and subscribe to us on iTunes.

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Episode 47: Re: Vampires

2012-10-27 :: comment@ihearofsherlock.com (Scott Monty & Burt Wolder)

It's our Halloween show!

With Victorian and Gothic influence in a number of the Sherlock Holmes stories, the Canon can be great fodder for the mysterious, occult and spooky elements of Halloween. Certainly The Hound of the Baskervilles, "The Adventure of the Devil's Foot," "The Adventure of the Blanched Soldier," or "The Adventure of Shoscombe Old Place" have elements that can make a reader's hair stand on end.

But the most direct link with Halloween as we know it today (other than Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's "Lot No. 249" - the original mummy story) has to be "The Adventure of the Sussex Vampire." Sherlock Holmes himself was a bit dismissive of the supernatural in this case, saying "Rubbish, Watson, rubbish! What have we to do with walking corpses who can only be held in their grave by stakes driven through their hearts? It's pure lunacy."

But our guest on this episode, Les Klinger (a guest on Episodes 31 and 32, when he spoke about the Guy Ritchie / Robert Downey, Jr. movies and his role as Warner Brothers' consultant on the set) is no stranger to Dracula. He has written The New Annotated Dracula and has been an influential in the Dracularian movement. As we discuss the intersection of Holmes and Dracula, Les helps us understand the evolution of vampire literature and Dracula-influenced media.

In the discussion, Les alludes to other influential fictional works in the movement such as I Am Legend, In the Shadow of Dracula, and Anno Dracula by Kim Newman, who is the Distinguished Speaker at the 2013 Baker Street Irregulars Weekend. In addition to the popular work, Les noted that there is a scholarly vein of work (pardon the pun) in the field that brings more seriousness to the practice, albeit less fluid and constant than Sherlockian scholarship. But we kept coming back to the intersections of Holmes and Dracula, in all forms: written, film and stage, and how each have their cycles of popularity that are typically driven by a single piece of work each time.

We had a number of listener comments from you regarding Episode 46 ("Elementary, My Dear CBS) that included very visceral opinions about the Jonny Lee Miller / Lucy Liu show, as well as some traditional and fanciful ideas for Canonically-inspired Halloween costumes.

For our Gas-Lamp this episode, we welcome a very special guest for a chilling reading of Edgar Allan Poe's "The Raven." We won't spoil it by telling you who it is; you'll have to tune in yourself to hear it.

Links:
Len Wolf's original The Annotated Dracula Les Klinger's The New Annotated Dracula The Dracula Society The Journal of Dracula Studies H.P. Lovecraft Companion by Philip A. Shreffler Les Klinger's website
Listen Now:

Download this episode by right-clicking the icon and selecting "Save As..." or simply click on the file to listen, or on the nice box above. (File size: 31.8 MB, 1:08:39)
Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email, submit a review on iTunes, call us at (774) 221-READ (7323) or drop by our Facebook page, Twitter account, Tumblr or Google+ page.
And please sure to check out our sponsors and let them know that we sent you: Wessex Press and The Baker Street Journal

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Episode 46: Elementary, My Dear CBS

2012-10-13 :: comment@ihearofsherlock.com (Scott Monty & Burt Wolder)


Joining the BBC's Sherlock on television this fall is another high-powered outing by the network CBS in the United States. If you haven't yet heard, the new show is Elementary and it stars Jonny Lee Miller as a modern-day Sherlock Holmes who is in New York after rehab, and Lucy Liu at Dr. Joan Watson, Holmes's "sober companion," whose responsibility it is to look after him an ensure he readjusts to society and doesn't relapse.

The creators were under pressure almost from the moment the project was announced, what with the success of another modern-day Sherlock Holmes enjoying popular acclaim. Rest assured, Elementary does not encroach on the territory of Sherlock.

But exactly how much of the Canon does it include or reference? And how faithful are the characters to what we know? Or does that even matter? And how closely tread is the fine line that exists between an established character and updating it to a modern setting? Join us as we debate and discuss the relative merits and attributes of the latest addition of Holmes to the small screen.

During the episode, we share some listener comments of late, read the Editor's Gas-Lamp from Vol. 6, No. 1 (March 1956) from the Baker Street Journal, and prepare for our Halloween Show. As part of that, we'd like to know what Canonical or Sherlockian Halloween costume you might wear. Tell us in a comment below.

Links:
Interview with Rob Doherty: "Interesting, Though Elementary" [HOUN] WSJ.com: Sherlock Got Sex Appeal Hollywood Reporter: Elementary: How Does CBS's Sherlock Holmes Measure Up? The Atlantic: Sherlock Holmes's Disappointing New Update Tor.com: Elementary's Biggest Crime Is Being Lame Oppa Grimpen Style and Oppan Gangnam Style The Elementary opening credits and theme on YouTube Listen Now:


Download this episode by right-clicking the icon and selecting "Save As..." or simply click on the file to listen, or on the nice box above. (File size: 22.76 MB, 49:27)
Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email, call us at (774) 221-READ (7323) or drop by our Facebook page.

Poll: Would you be interested in purchasing a poster based on the Stuart Fairey-inspired IHOSE image above?
Be sure to check out our sponsors: Wessex Press and The Baker Street Journal

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Episode 45: Sherlock Holmes and Politics

2012-09-15 :: comment@ihearofsherlock.com (Scott Monty & Burt Wolder)

The political season is upon us. At least in America, that is.

In case you've been hiding under a rock for the last 18 months, the presidential election is closing in, with Barack Obama vs. Mitt Romney. This site certainly does not stand for any type of political dogma; indeed, Sherlock Holmes is for every political persuasion.

So why would we want to touch the third rail of polite conversation and delve into politics on our podcast about Sherlock Holmes? As it turns out, there are a number of political figures in the Canon and politics, both domestic and international, play a role in the plots of a few of the stories.

We take a look at the influence of politics inside the Sherlock Holmes stories as well as what was happening externally at the time. In addition, we even look at one member of the Baker Street Irregulars who had something of a government post and his Sherlockian scholarship - amazingly enough, written at a very crucial juncture of our country's history.

Try as we might, we were unable to find a Gas-Lamp from the archives of The Baker Street Journal that were political in nature. However, we were able to find some letters from that government servant mentioned above, which make for a very special reading.

Links:
Franklin Delano Roosevelt's five letters to the Baker Street Irregulars Sherlock Holmes for the 21st Century: Essays on New Adaptations by Lynnette Porter  Amazon UK  |  Amazon USA Sherlock and Transmedia Fandom: Essays on the BBC Series  Amazon UK  |  Amazon USA I Hear of Sherlock Everywhere Facebook page: http://facebook.com/ihearofsherlock 
Listen now:


Download this episode by right-clicking the icon and selecting "Save As..." or simply click on the file to listen, or on the nice box above. (File size: 26.19 MB, 57:12)
Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email, call us at (774) 221-READ (7323) or drop by our Facebook page.

Be sure to check out our sponsors: Wessex Press and The Baker Street Journal




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Episode 44: Watson and Holmes

2012-08-20 :: comment@ihearofsherlock.com (Scott Monty & Burt Wolder)

A new modern urban re-interpretation of Sherlock Holmes. That's how the digital comic Watson and Holmes is being referred to.

The recent revival in Sherlock Holmes material across a variety of media has truly increased the buzz around our favorite topic. From the reimagining on the big screen, courtesy of the Robert Downey, Jr. / Jude Law films, to the small screen updating of the characters in Sherlock, through Benedict Cumberbatch and Martin Freeman and soon the Jonny Lee Miller / Lucy Liu version in Elementary, there is plenty of interest in the perennial character.

Now, we're prepared to be treated to yet another version of the iconic detective and his faithful friend and colleague, thanks to New Paradigm Studios. In this episode, we're joined by three of the principals who are behind the updating of Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson the a modern urban setting of New York and as African American characters. Brandon Perlow, Publisher and co-creator of Watson and Holmes, Justin Gabrie, Senior Editor, and Karl Bollers, Writer joined us to tell the story behind their work with Paul J Mendoza, Co-creator and color artist and Rick Leonardi, Penciler - who has worked on a number of Marvel and DC Comics projects.


We also discuss the issue of race and the Canon, landing on an interesting work from Vol. 27, No. 3  (September 1977) of the Baker Street Journal - not a Gas-Lamp, but an article by William P. Collins titled "Norbury and Steve Dixie: Holmes and Victorian Racial Attitudes."


Links:
Watson and Holmes Facebook page, with previews of the page layouts Bleeding Cool with its preview of the new comic iVerse Media The Societe Sherlock Holmes de France takes a look at the issue of color at the BSI dinner
Listen now:


Download this episode by right-clicking the icon and selecting "Save As..." or simply click on the file to listen, or on the nice box above. (File size: 27.04 MB, 58:59)
Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email, call us at (774) 221-READ (7323) or drop by our Facebook page.

Be sure to check out our sponsors: Wessex Press and The Baker Street Journal



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Episode 43: Fathers in the Canon

2012-08-19 :: comment@ihearofsherlock.com (Scott Monty & Burt Wolder)




Sometimes, when there's a topic that bears a discussion-based episode between the two of us, we like to do a little research to see what's been written previously, so we can have some reference material upon which to base some of our zany theories.

Sunday, June 17 was Father's Day in the United States, which made it a perfect opportunity to tackle the topic of fathers in the Canon. Imagine our chagrin and surprise then, when we discovered that there was no appreciable material (at least to our "small but select" libraries of Sherlockiana) that adequately chronicled fathers and father figures in the Sherlock Holmes stories.

Not to be deterred, we decided to thumb through the stories and pick out not only fathers, but step-fathers, would-be fathers, father figures and others who espoused the characteristics that fathers do or should have. More than a laundry list of individuals, this episode turned into a fun reminiscence and analysis that we hope you enjoy listening to almost as much as we enjoyed creating it.

While we couldn't find an Editor's Gas-Lamp that was directly about fatherhood, we did find one that had paternal overtone in the Vol. 8 No. 4 issue from October 1958 titled "Truth is Better than Fiction."



Links:
The Morley-Montgomery Award Winners, including "Who Wrote the American Chapters of A Study in Scarlet?" by Ben Vizoskie. William Baring-Gould's biography Sherlock Holmes of Baker Street Elementary! The 221B Con in Atlanta in 2013
Listen now:




Download this episode by right-clicking the icon and selecting "Save As..." or simply click on the file to listen, or on the nice box above. (File size: 28.37 MB, 1:0:04)
Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email, call us at (774) 221-READ (7323) or drop by our Facebook page.


Be sure to check out our sponsors: Wessex Press and The Baker Street Journal

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Episode 42: Sherlock @PBS - Cumberbatch Returns

2012-05-08 :: comment@ihearofsherlock.com (Scott Monty & Burt Wolder)




Sherlock mania as at its heights. The second series of the BBC's Sherlock is making its way to the U.S. shores currently, and fandom online and offline is continuing to grow.

On behalf of the show, Burt made his way to New York City on May 2, 2012 for the sneak preview of the new season and question and answer time with some of the cast and crew of Sherlock, including Rebecca Eaton, Steven Moffat, Sue Vertue and of course, Benedict Cumberbatch. About 800 people crowded into a theatre after 10,000 applied for seats, and the reaction - including screams - were reminiscent of the Beatles coming to the Ed Sullivan Show in the 1960s. And this is nothing new; Frank Sinatra garnered a similar reaction at the Paramount in New York City back in the 1940s. Thanks to Burt's courageous reporting, we have some clips from the event and the queue, as well as a question and answer session with the cast, in which we're able to hear and feel the excitement of the crowd.

We've witnessed the #believeinsherlock movement that arose from the BBC airing of the series and how the phenomenon has grown. We discuss a bit of that and we sing our own praises to Sherlock Holmes, in a manner of speaking.

And with such an enthusiastic new group of fans, it's inevitable that we would welcome them to the world of Sherlockians. The Editor's Gas-Lamp from the current issue of the Baker Street Journal. (Vol 62, No. 1), titled "Consider yourself at home," is the perfect way to do so.

Links:
Frank Sinatra causes a riot at the Paramount The Beatles on the Ed Sullivan Show Sherlock on PBS Masterpiece #SherlockPBS Twitter events Pre-order your DVD of Sherlock: Season Two (U.S.) Sherlock Holmes comes to New York:
Watch Sherlock Season 2: A Look at the Sherlock New York Event on PBS. See more from Masterpiece.


Listen now:



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Episode 41: The Woman

2012-04-19 :: comment@ihearofsherlock.com (Scott Monty & Burt Wolder)




To Burt and Scott she is always the guest. While you may have heard her mentioned by the name of Irene Adler, she is actually Lara Pulver and she is our interview subject for this very special episode of I Hear of Sherlock Everywhere.

Sherlock: Season Two originally aired on BBC One in January and now we're poised for it to air on PBS's Masterpiece Mystery in the United States. One of the most intriguing characters of this new series is none other than the adventuress Irene Adler, the antagonist in the first episode "A Scandal in Belgravia."

So in this episode, titled "The Woman," we're joined by the woman who played the woman in "A Scandal in Belgravia," Lara Pulver. An actress, singer and dancer, Lara has the enviable distinction of playing Irene Adler as perceived in the 21st century. She joined us from Chichester after a theatre performance and chatted with us on her experience with Mark Gatiss, Steven Moffat, Benedict Cumberbatch and Martin Freeman on the set of the BBC "Sherlock," and what it was like to inhabit the character of the only woman who beat Sherlock Holmes.

We close the show with an appropriately titled and themed Editor's Gas-Lamp from the Vol. 41, No. 1 issue of the Baker Street Journal.

Links:
The BSJ CD-ROM and other eBooks Great Sherlockian scholarship: The Grand Game, published by the Baker Street Irregulars Sherlock on PBS Masterpiece Pre-order your DVD of Sherlock: Season Two (U.S.) The Adventuresses of Sherlock Holmes, who meet the first Wednesday of each month in New York City
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Download this episode by right-clicking the icon and selecting "Save As..." or simply click on the file to listen, or on the nice box above. (File size: 28.37 MB, 1:01:50)
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And here's a sneak peek at what's coming to PBS:


Watch Sherlock Season 2: A Scene from Ep. 1 on PBS. See more from Masterpiece.
Be sure to check out our sponsors: Wessex Press and The Baker Street Journal

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Episode 40: One Voice of Sherlock Holmes

2012-03-24 :: comment@ihearofsherlock.com (Scott Monty & Burt Wolder)



While our listeners normally have to deal with the voices of Burt Wolder and Scott Monty, this episode is different. We're pleased to be able to bring you the smooth baritone of one Mr. David Ian Davies.

A veteran actor for many decades, having been trained at the London Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts, David traces his heritage to England by way of California. But along the way (you may be surprised to hear just how young), he was bitten by the acting bug. Combine that with David's inherent love of Sherlock Holmes and a desire to be the first individual to record the entire Canon, and you'll find a passionate and talented voice of Sherlock Holmes.

Through his production company One Voice Recordings, David has managed to create a nine-volume series called The Consummate Holmes Canon (see below for links), as well as a few other non-Canonical stories.

We had a delightful chat with Mr. Davies that included hearing a few clips from his interpretation and a live reading. He helps the amateurs understand how he as a professional prepares for the roles - and just how many roles there are!

We close this episode with a surprise archival recording from some radio stars from a bygone era who took on some rather unorthodox roles in a special appearance. And we offer an opportunity for our listeners to win one a very special prize.



Links:
One Voice Recordings Tom Richmond's Sherlock Holmes artwork The Sherlock Holmes pen Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce switch roles Listen now:




Download this episode by right-clicking the icon and selecting "Save As..." or simply click on the file to listen, or on the nice box above. (File size: 35.2 MB, 43:50)
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And as always, please visit our sponsors Wessex Press.
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David Ian Davies' Recordings from Audible.com:

One Voice Chronological: The Consummate Holmes Canon, Collection 1
Here are six classic Sherlock Holmes stories: "A Scandal In Bohemia", "The Red-Headed League", "A Case of Identity", "The Boscombe Valley Mystery", "The Five Orange Pips", and "The Man with the Twisted Lip"....



One Voice Chronological: The Consummate Holmes Canon, Collection 2
Six more classic mysteries solved by Sherlock Holmes....


One Voice Chronological: The Consummate Holmes Canon, Collection 3
Seven more cases solved by Sherlock Holmes....


One Voice Chronological: The Consummate Holmes Canon, Collection 4
Six more cases solved by Sherlock Holmes....


One Voice Chronological: The Consummate Holmes Canon, Collection 5
Six more cases solved by Sherlock Holmes....


One Voice Chronological: The Consummate Holmes Canon, Collection 6
The Adventure of the Three Students....


One Voice Chronological: The Consummate Holmes Canon, Collection 7
Six more cases solved by Sherlock Holmes....


One Voice Chronological: The Consummate Holmes Canon, Collection 8
Seven more cases solved by Sherlock Holmes....


One Voice Chronological: The Consummate Holmes Canon, Collection 9
Five more cases solved by Sherlock Holmes....


Sherlock Holmes and the Apocalypse Murders
This is an excellent, page-turning Sherlock Holmes pastiche by noted author and historian Barry Day....


The Tangled Skein
Skeptic Sherlock Holmes must first confront his disbelief in the supernatural and then the Prince of the Undead himself, Count Dracula....

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Episode 39: #BelieveInSherlock

2012-02-12 :: comment@ihearofsherlock.com (Scott Monty & Burt Wolder)



When a fictional character's impact overflows to reality to affect what people are talking about, where they go and how they act, it's quite an accomplishment. When it happens in a nearly identical, if time-appropriate manner nearly 120 years apart, it must have something to to with Sherlock Holmes.

As this podcast is all about Sherlock Holmes, you can rest assured that is indeed the case. But what of it? This updated and renewed interest in our beloved master is curious, but in the end, quite elementary. Much of the chatter and buzz seen on the Internet in particular, has been generated by the Robert Downey, Jr. outings in two films, and more recently by Benedict Cumberbatch's portrayal in two seasons of the BBC television show "Sherlock."

In this episode, we welcome the ladies from another Sherlock Holmes-related podcast, the Baker Street Babes, namely Kristina, Ardy and Marie, to discuss the machinations behind the movement that has taken hold across the world called "Believe in Sherlock." With the conclusion (in the U.K.) of the BBC's second season of the show with an episode titled "The Reichenbach Fall," you can probably imagine what the outcome was. We won't spoil it by giving away the details, but suffice it to say that there were some upset fans at the conclusion - so upset, in fact, that they took to the streets and the web alike, demonstrating their love of the character and their wish to see his good name cleared.

We discuss the beginnings of this newfound and fervent interest in Holmes, as generated through the Mark Gatiss and Steven Moffat-created series starring Benedict Cumberbatch and Martin Freeman and get the perspective from Londoners who were not only there to witness the activities of this movement, but who contributed to and even instigated some of them. We'll conclude with a reading of the latest Editor's Gas-Lamp from the Winter 2011 (Vol. 61, No. 4) of the Baker Street Journal.


Links:
The Baker Street Babes   The post that started it all (earlfoolish.tumblr.com) Operation: 221B swings into play The World Believes in Sherlock Holmes (BuzzFeed) Signage at 187 Gower Street (aka 221B Baker Street) An analysis of how it started A bit about the Benedict Cumberbatch fascination A map of the movement across the globe The Baker Street Journal




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Download this episode by right-clicking the icon and selecting "Save As..." or simply click on the file to listen, or on the nice box above. (File size: 39.9 MB, 43:30)
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And as always, please visit our sponsors Wessex Press.
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Episode 38: On Conan Doyle

2012-01-27 :: comment@ihearofsherlock.com (Scott Monty & Burt Wolder)




One of the great benefits of being a member of the Baker Street Irregulars is that we get to meet a lot of interesting and famous people. Chief among them are the literati, such as Michael Dirda, the Pulitzer Prize-winning book critic for the Washington Post, who makes his living by writing about the literati.

In this case, Michael himself is the author, having been tapped by the Princeton University Press to contribute to their "Writers on Writers" series with the volume On Conan Doyle: Or, the Whole Art of Storytelling. In it, he takes us through Conan Doyle's life and writings - many of which may not be familiar to the Sherlock Holmes fan - and gives us a perspective on many of them through the Canon.

Burt and Scott had a chance to sit down with Michael at the Players in New York City during the 2012 Baker Street Irregulars Weekend - marking the first time our podcast has been recorded with the two hosts together in the same room.

Rather than give you an Editor's Gas-Lamp in this episode, we asked Michael to read something from his own work.

Links:
On Conan Doyle: Or, the Whole Art of Storytelling  (Amazon) The Baker Street Journal Michael Dirda's content in the Washington Post

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Download this episode by right-clicking the icon and selecting "Save As..." or simply click on the file to listen, or on the nice box above. (File size: 34.7 MB, 37:51)
Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email, call us at (774) 221-READ (7323) or drop by our Facebook page.
And as always, please visit our sponsors Wessex Press.
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Episode 37: The Lost Conan Doyle Manuscript

2011-11-22 :: comment@ihearofsherlock.com (Scott Monty & Burt Wolder)



You may recall that we had Jon Lellenberg and Daniel Stashower on the show when they published Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in Letters in 2007. The pair has returned with another publication, but this time it's one that is even more intriguing.

In 1883, when he was just twenty-three, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle wrote The Narrative of John Smith while he was living in Portsmouth and struggling to establish himself as both a doctor and a writer. He had already succeeded in having a number of short stories published in leading magazines of the day, such as Blackwood’s, All the Year Round, London Society, and the Boy’s Own Paper â€” but as was the accepted practice of literary journals of the time, his stories had been published anonymously. Thus, Conan Doyle knew that in order to truly establish his name as a writer, he would have to write a novel.

The only wrinkle is that once Conan Doyle finished this novel, it went missing in the post, never to be seen again.

Join Burt and Scott as we discover how this lost manuscript has made its way to publication, some 125 years after it was first written, and why it had never before made its way to the public eye.

As to the Editor's Gas-Lamp for this episode...well, we'll make that our little surprise that you can discover within the show.

Links:
The Narrative of John Smith (Amazon) The British Library The Arthur Conan Doyle Collection
Listen now:


Download this episode by right-clicking the icon and selecting "Save As..." or simply click on the file to listen, or on the nice box above. (File size: 51.9 MB, 56:39)
Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email, call us at (774) 221-READ (7323) or drop by our Facebook page.
And as always, please visit our sponsors Wessex Press.
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Episode 36: Michael Hoey and the Fabulous Faces of Universal

2011-10-05 :: comment@ihearofsherlock.com (Scott Monty & Burt Wolder)


It's not very often that one has an opportunity to speak with someone who has a direct connection to a legend. In this case, Burt and Scott spoke with Michael Hoey, the son of Dennis Hoey -Inspector Lestrade to Basil Rathone's Sherlock Holmes.

Michael Hoey is the author of Sherlock Holmes & the Fabulous Faces - The Universal Pictures Repertory Company (affiliate link). In this fascinating book, Mr. Hoey focuses not on Rathbone and Bruce, but rather on the 68 men and women in supporting roles in the 12 Sherlock Holmes films that Universal Pictures produced in the early 1940s.

Join us as a very special guest introduces Mr. Hoey, as Hoey reminisces about his visits to the sets of Universal, recounts many bits of trivia about the Universal series that we all know and love, and reveals some little-known gems.

Mr. Hoey will be appearing at From Gillette to Brett III in Indianapolis in November. There's still time to register - and if you click through to the link above to buy his book, you might be able to get it signed by Mr. Hoey himself.


We wrap up the show with a reading of the Editor’s Gas-Lamp from a 1956 issue of The Baker Street Journal, Vol. 6, No.1 covering "Fictional Characters."

Links:
Roy William Neil (IMDb) Games, Gossip and Greasepaint - Nigel Bruce's autobiography. More excerpts here. The Brits Who Conquered Hollywood: Tales from the Hollywood Raj Terror by Night
Listen now:




Download this episode by right-clicking the icon and selecting "Save As..." or simply click on the file to listen, or on the nice box above. (File size: 57.15 MB, 1:02:16)
Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email, call us at (774) 221-READ (7323) or drop by our Facebook page.
And as always, please visit our sponsors Wessex Press.
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Episode 35: Sherlock Holmes in the News

2011-09-26 :: comment@ihearofsherlock.com (Scott Monty & Burt Wolder)




In this episode, we catch up on some of the interesting tidbits of news that have touched the world of Sherlock Holmes lately. From a new television adaptation to Sherlockians passing, fake literary Twitter handles to banned books and more, we cover some of the more remarkable stories that have been in the public's eye over the last few weeks.

In addition, we also take a look at events in the weeks ahead. While there are many events at Sherlockian societies in the North America, the United Kingdom and beyond, we focused on those in London, Toronto, Indianapolis and Providence in this case.

We wrap up the show with a reading of the Editor’s Gas-Lamp from the Summer 2011 issue of The Baker Street Journal, Vol. 61, No.2.

Links:
The news of CBS's pending modern "Sherlock Holmes" adaptation The avclub.com reaction William Lipscomb, from the Annals of Improbable Research Some canonically-connected fake literary profiles on Twitter That entire list for you to follow Burt's @A_Conan_Doyle account The state of Undershaw and how you can help A Study in Scarlet banned from school reading lists in Ablemarle County, Virginia

Upcoming Events
The Sherlock Holmes Society of London’s Richard Lancelyn Green Lecture - Sir Christopher Frayling Arthur Conan Doyle: A Study in Scandal (Toronto, Oct. 13-16)  From Gillette to Brett III (Indianapolis, Nov. 11-13)

Listen now:





Download this episode by right-clicking the icon and selecting "Save As..." or simply click on the file to listen, or on the nice box above. (File size: 55.62 MB, 1:0:41)
Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email, call us at (774) 221-READ (7323) or drop by our Facebook page.
And as always, please visit our sponsors Wessex Press.
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Episode 34: William Gillette, America's Sherlock Holmes

2011-08-26 :: comment@ihearofsherlock.com (Scott Monty & Burt Wolder)

Every generation has its Sherlock Holmes. Currently, it's a pitched battle between Robert Downey, Jr. on the big screen and Benedict Cumberbatch on the small screen. A generation ago, it was Jeremy Brett; prior to that it was Douglas Wilmer and Peter Cushing. Certainly one of the monuments of all time was Basil Rathbone.

But before Rathbone - even before Wontner and Norwood - stood a giant of the stage: William Gillette. Gillette was a respectable gentleman who made a respectable living from the stage, not least of which were his 1,300 appearances as Sherlock Holmes, after close contact with Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in the late 1890s.

In this episode, we have an opportunity to speak with Henry Zecher, author of the first definitive biography of Gillette, titled William Gillette, America's Sherlock Holmes. Mr. Zecher is a former award-winning sports journalist and editor who has written on a wide variety of topics. He has had a lifelong love of Sherlock Holmes and has followed his passion in writing about William Gillette over the last 14 years. You can read his full bio on his website.

We go inside the book and trace the early beginnings of Gillette as an aspiring actor, a stage manager and a playwright, learning how he took what was a questionable profession and turned it into one that would not only be palatable for his family but also for his fellow thespians, who ultimately conferred upon Will the title "Dean of the American Theatre." We'll also hear about his association with Helen Hayes.

Rather than a traditional reading of the Editor's Gas-Lamp, we're treated to a reading of Frederic Dorr Steele's tribute to Gillette upon Gillette's death, as well as a poem by Richard Burton, originally recounted in a special supplement to Vol. 3, No.3 (New Series) of the Baker Street Journal.

Links:William Gillette, America's Sherlock Holmes on Amazon.com William Gillette, America's Sherlock Holmes (order direct from the author) Henry Zecher's site Gillette Castle Listen now:


Download this episode by right-clicking the icon and selecting "Save As..." or simply click on the file to listen, or on the nice box above. (File size: 61.24 MB, 1:06:48)
Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email, call us at (774) 221-READ (7323) or drop by our Facebook page.
And as always, please visit our sponsors Wessex Press.

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Episode 33: Remembering Edward Hardwicke

2011-06-14 :: comment@ihearofsherlock.com (Scott Monty & Burt Wolder)



As you probably already know, Edward Hardwicke passed away in May 2011. To an entire generation of Sherlock Holmes enthusiasts, he was Dr. Watson, the faithful friend, biographer and colleague of Jeremy Brett's Sherlock Holmes.

In this episode, we gather with two eminent Sherlockians who knew Mr. Hardwicke and explore his life and commitment to the craft a little deeper. We're joined by David Stuart Davies, BSI ("Sir Ralph Musgrave"), author of The Tangled SkeinBending the Willow: Jeremy Brett As Sherlock Holmes and Starring Sherlock Holmes: A Century of the Master Detective on Screen, among many other titles. We were also fortunate to have Steven Doyle, BSI ("The Western Morning News"), author of Sherlock Holmes For Dummies, proprietor of the Wessex Press (sponsor), and organizer of the quadrennial conference From Gillette to Brett, which covers Holmes on the stage and screen.

Each of these gentlemen share with us their personal memories of Mr. Hardwicke, Jeremy Brett's impression of his colleague, Sir Cedric's advice to his young son, and much, much more. By the conclusion of this episode, you'll understand why one commenter on the Baker Street Blog wrote, "While the world could use several Sherlock Holmeses, everyone needs a Watson."

We're also pleased to bring you some listener mail we received via email. And the Editor's Gas-Lamp, appropriately enough, is focused on Dr. Watson, from the Spring 2011 issue (Vol. 61 No. 1) of the Baker Street Journal.

Links:Starring Sherlock Holmes: A Century of the Master Detective on Screen by David Stuart Davies
Part 1 and Part 2 of an interview with Edward Hardwicke

Listen now:

Download this episode by right-clicking the icon and selecting "Save As..." or simply click on the file to listen, or on the nice box above. (File size: 46.55 MB, 50:48)
Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email, call us at (774) 221-READ (7323) or drop by our Facebook page.
And as always, please visit our sponsors Wessex Press.

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Episode 32: Untitled Les Klinger Sequel

2011-04-24 :: comment@ihearofsherlock.com (Scott Monty & Burt Wolder)

In our previous episode, we spent time with author Les Klinger discussing his evolution as a Sherlockian, author and editor, covering a wide variety of topics and publications.

In this episode, we continue the conversation, but we turn towards Hollywood instead. Les was an official consultant for the initial Robert Downey, Jr. "Sherlock Holmes," and he now returns to Warner Bros. to consult on the second installment, which until just prior to the recording of this episode was called "Untitled Sherlock Holmes Sequel." Of course, now we know it's called "Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows."

Les gives a great background on what it takes to become an advisor to a major Hollywood franchise, as well as what an advisor of this sort actually does. It's a fascinating look behind the scenes of the making of "Sherlock Holmes" that only I Hear of Sherlock Everywhere brings you.

This edition of the Editor's Gas-Lamp comes to you from the Autumn 2010 issue (Vol. 60 No. 3)  of the Baker Street Journal.

Links:
Episode 31: A Chat with Les Klinger
Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows (IMDb)
Sherlock Holmes: Year 1 (Dynamite Publishing)
Ian Edgington's The Valley of Fear


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Download this episode by right-clicking the icon and selecting "Save As..." or simply click on the file to listen, or on the nice box above. (File size: 33.9 MB, 37:01)

Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email, call us at (774) 221-READ (7323) or drop by our Facebook page.

And as always, please visit our sponsors Wessex Press.

Image credit: Scott Monty (Flickr)
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Episode 31: A Chat with Les Klinger

2011-03-09 :: comment@ihearofsherlock.com (Scott Monty & Burt Wolder)

We are delighted to bring you one of the greats of the Sherlockian world in this episode - none other than the Edgar-winning editor Leslie Klinger, BSI, 2s ("The Abbey Grange"). And while it's tempting to craft these show notes entirely out of endnotes and footnotes, we'll give you some meaty content.

Les Klinger is one of the foremost living experts on Sherlock Holmes, having edited a number of books related to the great detective. He also has a vast knowledge of Dracula and has contributed to the literature of that subject as well. We have a representative listing of his works in the links section below.

Les is the editor of the three-volume set The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes and the ten-volume Sherlock Holmes Reference Library. He has written numerous books and articles on Sherlockiana and co-edited with Andrew Jay Peck, BSI ("Inspector Baynes, Surrey Constabulary") the revised edition of The Date Being--?: A Compendium of Sherlockian Chronologies and Sherlock Holmes, Conan Doyle & The Bookman: An Anthology of Literary Treasures (1895-1933) with S.E. Dahlinger. He has taught several UCLA Extension courses on "Sherlock Holmes and His World" and has consulted with Warner Bros. on the Sherlock Holmes film series with Robert Downey, Jr. He is co-editing an anthology of Victorian detective stories for IDW Publishing. Les has written The New Annotated Dracula and is also editing an anthology of Victorian vampire stories for IDW Publishing. He served as the Series Editor for the BSI Manuscript Series and is currently the editor of the BSI's History Series. With Laurie R. King, he co-editing The Grand Game and the duo is currently co-editing a collection of original Sherlock Holmes-inspired short stories called A Study in Sherlock, due out from Random House in December 2011.

Les joins us for a very robust discussion of his passion - mostly editing, writing and lecturing about Sherlock Holmes and Dracula - passions that have seemingly been fueled by a lack of weekend activities of this practicing attorney. He shares with us the beginnings of his interest, the growth of his writing and editing responsibilities and eventual academic post involving Sherlock Holmes, and has recommendations as to where new Sherlockians can get started.

We also have a wonderful audio comment from a listener.

Links:
Leslie S. Klinger on Amazon The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes Sherlock Holmes Reference Library Sherlock Holmes, Conan Doyle & The Bookman: An Anthology of Literary Treasures (1895-1933) The New Annotated Dracula The Grand Game: A Celebration of Sherlockian Scholarship Volume 1: 1902-1959 The BSI Manuscript Series The BSI History Series
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Download this episode by right-clicking the icon and selecting "Save As..." or simply click on the file to listen, or on the nice box above. (File size: 53.8 MB, 58:42)

Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email, call us at (774) 221-READ (7323) or drop by our Facebook page.

Please visit our sponsor, Wessex Press.

Image credit: Scott Monty (Flickr)
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Episode 30: The Sherlockian

2011-01-31 :: comment@ihearofsherlock.com (Scott Monty & Burt Wolder)

It's always fun to have an author on our show, and even more so when the author has written a book that has gotten many popular reviews lately. Graham Moore was inspired to write The Sherlockian after discovering the character in his childhood and discovering that the people who admire him are an interesting lot.

Burt and Scott go inside the mind of the author to discern his intent, determine the origin of the fascination with Doyle, Holmes and Sherlockians, discuss inaccuracies (were they intentional or not?), and find out just what it's like - in his own words - for a 28 year-old to write a novel for the first time - a daunting task, regardless of one's age.

We take a bit of a departure with our tradition of reading the Editor's Gas-Lamp this time - tune in to hear where we took our inspiration from and how we share it with you.

Links:
The Sherlockian on Amazon.com
Reviews of The Sherlockian from the Los Angeles Times, A.V. Club, the New York Times.
Episode 08: To Keep the Memory Green
Episode 13: Sir Arthur Conan Doyle - A Life in Letters
The Copper Beeches by Arthur Lewis
The Case of the Baker Street Irregulars by Antony Boucher

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Download this episode by right-clicking the icon and selecting "Save As..." or simply click on the file to listen, or on the nice box above. (File size: 51 MB, 55:39)

Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email, call us at (774) 221-READ (7323) or drop by our Facebook page.
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Episode 29: Baker Street Irregular

2010-12-14 :: comment@ihearofsherlock.com (Scott Monty & Burt Wolder)


We enjoy the episodes in which we have an opportunity to interview interesting people in the world of Sherlock Holmes. Even more so when we can welcome back a previous guest. In this case, we're happy to have Jon Lellenberg join us to talk about his new novel Baker Street Irregular. Jon previously joined us on Episode 13: A Life in Letters with Dan Stashower. If you haven't had a chance to listen to that yet, please do.

In this chat, Jon fills us in on his first novel - one that combines his professional experience and Sherlockian interest very nicely - featuring Woody Hazelbaker, a young lawyer whom we meet in New York City during Prohibition. Through associations with a crime boss, the early members of the Baker Street Irregulars, and eventually some high-ranking members of the U.S. and British government, Woody's personal and professional journey up to and beyond World War II is a fascinating one. And for those uninitiated in both BSI history and pre-WWII history, you'll get a glimpse as you've never gotten. Listen in to hear what inspired Jon to write this and some of the inside secrets behind the pages of the book.

Listen now:



Download this episode by right-clicking the icon and selecting "Save As..." or simply click on the file to listen (File size: 51 MB, 55:43)


Links
Review from The Big Thrill Some background on Elmer Davis BSI Archival History Explore Woody's world Jon's blog, The Editor's Gas-Bag Purchase the latest entries in the BSI History Series
Please visit our sponsor: Wessex Press, publishers of the new titles Murder in the Vatican and Sherlockian Heresies. Click the link above to read more about the titles on their site. …

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Episode 28: Friendship

2010-11-09 :: comment@ihearofsherlock.com (Scott Monty & Burt Wolder)

Christopher Morley once said that the Sherlock Holmes stories were a textbook of friendship. We've heard this platitude before, but what does it mean? How did the relationship between Holmes and Watson manifest itself in the Canon and how does that impact us as Sherlock Holmes enthusiasts today, in the digital age?

We discuss the elements of Holmes and Watson and how they were influenced most notably by the personality of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle; the difficulty in portraying the depth of the characters and their relationship on stage and screen; and how Sherlockians make each other's acquaintance.

We get to your comments - which you can submit below, on our Facebook Page, via email (comment AT ihearofsherlock DOT com) or by calling 774-221-READ (7323). We read the Gas-Lamp from Vol 2. No. 1, 1952 that celebrates Dr. Watson.

Note: there may be some dated mentions, as this episode had been "in the can" for a while.


Links
Sherlock Holmes And Dr. Watson: A Textbook Of Friendship Dr. Thorndyke mysteries The Criterion Bar "You squashed my pea." (from Murder By Decree) The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes John Gielgud & Ralph Richardon (1950s radio series) Clive Merrison & Michael Williams (BBC radio series - complete Canon on audio) Google search results for "Sherlock Holmes" (now over 15 million results) I Hear of  Sherlock on Twitter: @ihearofsherlock

Download this episode by right-clicking the icon and selecting "Save As..." (File size: 50.5 MB, 55:06)
Please visit our sponsor: Wessex Press, publishers of the new titles Murder in the Vatican and Sherlockian Heresies. Click the link above to read more about the titles on their site. …

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Episode 27: A Sherlockian Potpourri

2010-08-07 :: comment@ihearofsherlock.com (Scott Monty & Burt Wolder)

This week we cover a few sundry items, which we're calling a potpourri of Sherlockian material - tidbits of information about a number of topics that themselves may not require en entire show. Topics include:
News coverage of the conference Sherlock Holmes and His Worlds in Bennington, VT The Spirits of Sherlock Holmes conference at the University of Minnesota August 6-8, 2010 A Scintillation of Scions III in Clarksville, MD A new book from Jon Lellenberg, Baker Street Irregular Books about the BSI: The Case of the Baker Street Irregulars by Anthony Boucher, Murder Most Irregular by H. Paul Jeffers, Copper Beeches
by Arthur H. Lewis This episode's reading comes from Profile By Gaslight: "Ballad of Watson in the Morning" by Belden Wigglesworth.

Download this episode by right-clicking the icon and selecting "Save As..." (File size: 24.1 MB, 26:21)

Please visit our sponsor: Wessex Press, publishers of the new titles Murder in the Vatican and Sherlockian Heresies. Click the link above to read more about the titles on their site. …

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Episode 26: A Musical Stroll Down Baker Street

2010-05-23 :: comment@ihearofsherlock.com (Scott Monty & Burt Wolder)

It isn't often that one gets an opportunity to chat with an accomplished actor, either from the big screen, small screen, or the stage. Burt and Scott were joined by one that has crossed all three, but whom is certainly known for his musical turn as Sherlock Holmes in the 1965 musical "Baker Street: A Musical Adventure of Sherlock Holmes:": none other than Tony Award-winning actor Fritz Weaver. 
Fritz Weaver is a veteran of the stage and an accomplished voice over artist, so you'll no doubt enjoy his booming baritone throughout this interview. Over the course of this 30-minute chat with Fritz, we cover a range of material, including some commentary on William Shatner's singing style; some behind-the-scenes information - and funny at that - about Martin Gabel, who played Moriarty in the musical; references to My Fair Lady; lovely reminiscences of Inga Swenson; and even a Twilight Zone reference. 
But we mostly focus on "Baker Street," the memories of the production, and even include some of the musical tracks from "Baker Street," bringing Mr. Weaver "down memory lane," as he fondly states.Cold Clear World (Holmes & Adler) I Shall Miss You (Moriarty) Pursuit (Holmes) After the interview, Burt shares with us how he was able to land an interview with our very special and remarkable guest. Tune in to hear how he managed it!

We close with a reading from The Baker Street Journal, Vol. 15, No. 2 (June 1965) titled "How a Baker Street Irregular Looks at Baker Street."
Listen now:
LinksPurchase Baker Street: A Musical Adventure of Sherlock Holmes from Amazon.com. The Baker Street Journal online
Download this episode by right-clicking the icon and selecting "Save As..." (File size: 38.7 MB, 42:15) …

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Episode 13: Arthur Conan Doyle - A Life in Letters

2009-09-06 :: comment@ihearofsherlock.com (Scott Monty & Burt Wolder)

We're pleased to welcome two noted authors to the show this week: Jon Lellenberg and Daniel Stashower. The recently edited a biography about Sir Arthur Conan Doyle along with Doyle's great-nephew Charles Foley. Comprised of hundreds and hundreds of letter…

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Episode 12: Bob Thomalen (Part 2)

2009-09-06 :: comment@ihearofsherlock.com (Scott Monty & Burt Wolder)

We pick up where we left off in Episode 11, talking with Bob Thomalen, BSI ("The Three Garridebs") about how he was able to make his events so successful so early on, how he went about selecting speakers, what it was like to work with Tom Stix, and a wond…

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Episode 11: Bob Thomalen (Part 1)

2009-09-06 :: comment@ihearofsherlock.com (Scott Monty & Burt Wolder)

Scott and Burt interview Bob Thomalen, BSI to learn more about his involvement with the Sherlockian world, including his claim to fame, Autumn in Baker Street (aka “The Great Sherlockian Sleepover”). Join us as we learn more about this veteran drummer, gu…

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Episode 09: Our Favorite Books

2009-09-06 :: comment@ihearofsherlock.com (Scott Monty & Burt Wolder)

This week, we take a break from our interview schedule to get back to the basics. We discuss the man who determined the foundations of a good Sherlockian collection and heap lavish praise on our favorite tomes related to the great detective. Show topics:…

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Episode 08: To Keep the Memory Green

2009-09-06 :: comment@ihearofsherlock.com (Scott Monty & Burt Wolder)

Editors Steven Rothman and Nicholas Utechin join us for a chat about a book they have co-edited: To Keep the Memory Green, some recollections from the life of Sherlockian/Doylean scholar and collector Richard Lancelyn Green. We also hear about their respe…

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Episode 07: Peter Blau (Part 2)

2009-09-06 :: comment@ihearofsherlock.com (Scott Monty & Burt Wolder)

The chatfest with Peter Blau continues as we enjoy more conversation in an even more interesting vein, if you can imagine. From the early days of the BSI to radio connections, professional societies, collecting and traditions, and even Sherlock Holmes in…

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Episode 06: Peter Blau (Part 1)

2009-09-06 :: comment@ihearofsherlock.com (Scott Monty & Burt Wolder)

We do another interview show, this time when we have a conversation with longtime Baker Street Irregular Peter Blau ("Black Peter"). Peter is one of the center points of the Sherlockian hub and has plenty of great stories to tell. Add to that an audio com…

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Episode 25: Sherlock Holmes for Dummies

0000-00-00 :: comment@ihearofsherlock.com (Scott Monty & Burt Wolder)

As you probably know, any blockbuster film - in addition to the revenue it brings to the studio - will result in an associated cottage industry. Toys, music, books, video games - you name it. In this case, Sherlockians new and old have been given a gift i…

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Episode 24: Sherlock Holmes and His Worlds

0000-00-00 :: comment@ihearofsherlock.com (Scott Monty & Burt Wolder)

Occasionally, you'll come across individuals within the Holmesian community who are doers. Or in Sally Sugarman's case, dynamos.

Sally Sugarman, BSI ("The Three Gables"), founder of the Baker Street Breakfast Club, joins Burt and Scott in thi…

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Episode 23: Weekend in Review

0000-00-00 :: comment@ihearofsherlock.com (Scott Monty & Burt Wolder)

Burt and Scott have returned from the Baker Street Irregulars Weekend to take us on an audio journey of what it was like in New York in January. We bravely go from club to club, meal to meal, and Sherlockian to Sherlockian, to bring you a recap of a …

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Episode 22: Sherlock Holmes at the Movies (Part 2)

0000-00-00 :: comment@ihearofsherlock.com (Scott Monty & Burt Wolder)


You'll recall that on the last episode, we were joined by David Morrill, BSI ("Count von Kramm"), who offered an informed opinion about the new Sherlock Holmes film.


And as they do in the film business, we're offering you the se…

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Episode 21: Sherlock Holmes at the Movies (Part 1)

0000-00-00 :: comment@ihearofsherlock.com (Scott Monty & Burt Wolder)


Well, it's been in the news quite frequently lately. The new Sherlock Holmes movie has brought new life to the literary franchise we all know and love.

But Holmesians have a number of questions: how is it? Does Robert Downey, Jr. make …

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Episode 20: Cleaning (The Empty) House

0000-00-00 :: comment@ihearofsherlock.com (Scott Monty & Burt Wolder)

As we finished the last episode, we realized that we never got around to talking more about "The Adventure of the Empty House," as we had promised. We've filled that gap nicely this time out, with a discussion ranging from the multitude of commentary on "…

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Episode 19: The Return of I Hear of Sherlock

0000-00-00 :: comment@ihearofsherlock.com (Scott Monty & Burt Wolder)

In the Sherlockian world, the "Great Hiatus" is known as the period from 1891 to 1894 when Holmes was presumably dead after his showdown with Professor Moriarty at the Reichenbach Falls. In the real world, it meant that publication of new Sherlock Holmes …

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Episode 18: The Sons of the Copper Beeches

0000-00-00 :: comment@ihearofsherlock.com (Scott Monty & Burt Wolder)

A visit to a venerable scion society, the Sons of the Copper Beeches, in October 2007. Headmastiff Gideon Hill describes the group's history, assisted by Scott Bond, who then offers remarks about his 25 years as the Baker Street Journal's cartoonist. We…

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Episode 17: Collectors' Corner - Otto Penzler

0000-00-00 :: comment@ihearofsherlock.com (Scott Monty & Burt Wolder)

Here we pick up where we left off last time. You'll recall that previously, we interviewed Jerry Margolin about giving up part of his collection; in this episode, we speak with the man who bought that collection. Otto Penzler, BSI ("The King of Bohemia") …

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Special Episode: Compliments of the Season 2007

0000-00-00 :: comment@ihearofsherlock.com (Scott Monty & Burt Wolder)

This time of year always draws our minds to "The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle," the only Sherlock Holmes story that takes place at Christmas. It's the source of our greeting cards to each other, with the universally applicable "Compliments of the Seaso…

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Episode 16: Collectors' Corner - Jerry Margolin

0000-00-00 :: comment@ihearofsherlock.com (Scott Monty & Burt Wolder)

We're pleased to welcome Jerry Margolin, BSI ("Hilton Cubitt") to this show this week. Jerry has been a collector of something or other nearly his whole life, but his Sherlockian collection was the thing that occupied most of his adult life. Recently, Jer…

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Episode 15: Michael Whelan, Wiggins of the Baker Street Irregulars (Part 2)

0000-00-00 :: comment@ihearofsherlock.com (Scott Monty & Burt Wolder)

In the previous episode of the show, you heard us get into some pretty interesting topics with Mike Whelan, head of the Baker Street Irregulars. We continue in this vein in Part 2, talking about the BSI Trust, the BSI Weekend in much greater detail, the D…

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Episode 14: Michael Whelan, Wiggins of the Baker Street Irregulars (Part 1)

0000-00-00 :: comment@ihearofsherlock.com (Scott Monty & Burt Wolder)

In this episode of the only Sherlockian podcast, we begin our interview the head of the Baker Street Irregulars - the internationally renowned literary society that remains at the forefront of the study of Sherlock Holmes. Michael Whelan has been "Wiggins…

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I Hear of Sherlock Everywhere


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