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Last update: 2013-06-28

The Week in News: SCOTUS, Snowden, Immigration and Beyond

2013-06-28 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

After the big Supreme Court decisions this week, what's next for same-sex marriage, affirmative action, and voting rights? Can an immigration reform bill pass the House of Representatives? And where in the world is NSA leaker Edward Snowden? We talk to a panel of experts about the week's news developments.…

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Preserving the Bounty: Canning, Pickling and Fermenting

2013-06-28 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Are too many plums falling from a local tree? Beans gone wild in the garden? Or maybe you just crave the perfect pickle or can't stand the idea of only tasting cherries a few weeks a year. It may be time to dive into canning, fermenting, pickling and preserving. Urban hipsters may be fueling the trend the past few years, setting sauerkraut bubbling in vats all over San Francisco kitchen counters, but preserving food goes way back. You may even want to try Nostrodamus' recipe for quince jelly. We talk with experts about preserving food, share recipes and techniques, and take your questions.…

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Supreme Court Clears the Way for Same-Sex Marriage in California

2013-06-28 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

The U.S. Supreme Court issued two long-awaited decisions today, striking down the Defense of Marriage Act as unconstitutional, and ruling that Proposition 8 supporters did not have standing to bring the case, thus clearing the way for same-sex marriage in California. We talk about how the Justices ruled, and what these watershed decisions mean for the state.…

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The Secrets to a Successful Marriage

2013-06-27 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

This week's U.S. Supreme Court decisions on same-sex unions have thrust the institution of marriage into the spotlight. We talk about the latest research on the keys to wedded bliss. Whether you're straight or gay, what does marriage mean to you? What are the secrets to a happy and fulfilling union? Or if you're divorced or getting over a failed relationship, what did you learn about what makes a great partnership?…

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License Plate Readers Gather Millions of Records on Drivers

2013-06-27 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

In the wake of revelations about the NSA's secret surveillance programs, more information is coming forth about how police departments store the data they collect from license plate readers. Mounted on police cars, the devices can log photos of thousands of license plates in a single day's shift. The Center for Investigative Reporting found that millions of these records are being stored in local intelligence fusion centers, one of which is funded by a Silicon Valley firm with ties to the Pentagon and the CIA. Supporters say the license plate data help law enforcement catch criminals -- but others say the photos are a violation of privacy and make it easy to track law-abiding citizens.…

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BART Workers Authorize Strike

2013-06-27 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Unions representing over 2,000 BART employees voted overwhelmingly Wednesday to authorize a strike, which could begin as early as Monday, potentially affecting hundreds of thousands of daily commuters. The employees are demanding wage and cost-of-living increases. BART, meanwhile, wants workers to contribute to pensions, pay more for health insurance and reduce overtime expenses. Unions also filed a lawsuit earlier this week alleging unfair labor practices, accusing BART of refusing to bargain in good faith over worker safety.…

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What's Next for the Immigration Bill?

2013-06-26 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

U.S. Senators this week approved a deal that heightens security along the U.S.-Mexico border, which is expected to smooth the way for bipartisan Senate passage of an immigration bill backed by the White House. We'll discuss what's in the bill and how it might impact undocumented immigrants with a panel of expert immigration lawyers. They're in San Francisco for a meeting of the American Immigration Lawyers Association.…

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'Rape in the Fields': An Investigation into the Sexual Assault of Female Agricultural Workers

2013-06-25 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

A new Frontline investigative documentary uncovers the stories of migrant women who say they have been sexually assaulted in America's fields and packing plants. The women reportedly endure harassment and sexual assault in silence, for fear of risking their jobs or being deported. Frontline spent a year investigating this story in collaboration with the Center for Investigative Reporting, UC Berkeley's Investigative Reporting Program, and Univision. We discuss the investigation.…

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Is Obesity A Disease?

2013-06-25 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

The American Medical Association decided recently to classify obesity as a disease. Their decision has drawn controversy: Supporters say the label could spur health insurers and the government to fund anti-obesity services. But opponents say obesity is a risk factor, and calling it a "disease" further stigmatizes overweight people. We discuss the controversy.…

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Khaled Hosseini: And the Mountains Echoed

2013-06-24 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Khaled Hosseini transported readers to his native Afghanistan with his best-selling novels "The Kite Runner" and "A Thousand Splendid Suns." He returns with a new novel, "And the Mountains Echoed." Spanning over 50 years, the book portrays Afghanistan through the lens of a family coping with separation and tragedy. Hosseini joins us to discuss the book, as well as the ongoing conflict in Afghanistan.…

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Robert Kaiser: Act of Congress

2013-06-24 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Why is Congress so helpless and so hopeless? That's the question Robert Kaiser investigates in his new book, "Act of Congress: How America's Essential Institution Works, and How It Doesn't." The longtime Washington Post correspondent tells the story of the financial reform bill, known as the Dodd-Frank Act, and its journey through Congress, and what the passage -- or failure to pass -- a bill says about our larger democracy today.…

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What Are You Reading This Summer?

2013-06-21 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

It's Forum's annual summer book show. We'd like to hear your recommendations for a good book to throw in a beach bag, prop next to your fishing pole, or relax with in the shade of a tree. Whether your idea of a great summer read is "Gone Girl" or "War and Peace," call or write with your picks.…

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Growing up in '70s San Francisco, With an Openly Gay Dad

2013-06-21 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

When Alysia Abbott was two years old, her mother died in a car crash and her father, a poet and gay rights activist, moved her to San Francisco. Abbot's book "Fairyland: A Memoir of My Father" explores her experiences growing up with an openly gay parent during the tumultuous 1970s in San Francisco. It's a world of artists, activists, drag queens, drugs and eventually, AIDS.…

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San Jose Sues Major League Baseball Over A's Move

2013-06-21 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

On Tuesday, the city of San Jose sued Major League Baseball in an effort to jump-start the Oakland Athletics' proposed move to San Jose. After nearly four years, the MLB has yet to vote on the relocation plan. San Jose city officials accuse the San Francisco Giants and MLB of blocking the move to avoid competition for the Giants. We discuss the lawsuit, and the politics of Bay Area baseball.…

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Richmond Gang Rape Trial Underway

2013-06-21 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Early this month, the trial began for two men charged with raping a teenage girl in Richmond. The 2009 gang rape left the girl beaten and unconscious after a homecoming dance, where a crowd of men reportedly participated or watched the rape, and none called the police. Two other men accepted plea deals for time in prison. We get an update on the trial.…

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Michael Levi on America's Energy Future

2013-06-20 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Michael Levi heads the Program on Energy Security and Climate Change at the Council on Foreign Relations. He joins us to talk about his new book, "The Power Surge: Energy, Opportunity, and the Battle for America's Future," which investigates the growing energy revolution in the U.S.…

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Is the Economy Really Recovering?

2013-06-20 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke on Wednesday said the Fed will start winding down monetary stimulus later this year if employment numbers continue to improve. Bernanke said the economy is expanding at a moderate rate, and risks to the recovery have "diminished since last fall." But experts disagree about how optimistic we should be about the economy. UCLA's June forecast says that despite improvement, the U.S. economy is not in recovery. We take stock of the national and state economies.…

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Thomas Friedman on 'The Next New World'

2013-06-19 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman joins us in the studio. He's just back from visiting Yemen, Syria and Turkey. We'll talk to the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist about his thoughts on the turmoil in Syria, U.S. jobs and NSA surveillance, among other topics. Friedman is in San Francisco to host "The Next New World," a New York Times forum on technology and the global economy.…

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Exposing America's Worst Charities

2013-06-19 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Each year, charities such as Florida-based Kids Wish Network raise millions of dollars. But according to a joint investigation by The Center for Investigative Reporting, the Tampa Bay Times and CNN, Kids Wish Network gave less than three cents on the dollar to the cause. The investigation identifies the nation's 50 worst charities, all of which devoted less than 4 percent of donations to direct cash aid. We discuss the investigation, what should be done to crack down on bad charities, and how to make good decisions about where to send your charitable dollars.…

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'A Principled Stand': Hirabayashi v. the United States

2013-06-18 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

In 1942, President Franklin Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, authorizing the wartime incarceration of Japanese-Americans in what he called "concentration camps." A few Japanese Americans defied that order. One of them, Gordon Hirabayashi, broke curfew and refused to go to camp. He became the face of one of the defining Supreme Court cases of that period, Hirabayashi v. United States. Approaching the 70th anniversary of the case, we talk with Gordon's nephew Lane Hirabayashi about his uncle's life and legacy.…

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Syria Dominates G-8 Talks

2013-06-18 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

After the first day of the G-8 summit meeting in Northern Ireland, topics like tax evasion, transparency and a U.S.-European Union bilateral trade agreement seemed largely overshadowed by talks of the Syrian conflict. Russian President Vladimir Putin's dismissal of President Obama's call to support Syrian rebels has created a rift between Russia and the seven other members of the summit.…

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Inside the Lives of Humboldt's Pot Growers

2013-06-17 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

In Humboldt County, marijuana supports everything from fire departments to schools. Some residents welcome the prospect of legalization. Others want to stick with the inflated profits of the black market. In 2010, journalist Emily Brady decided she would move to Humboldt and live among pot growers. She joins us to talk about her new book, "Humboldt: Life on America's Marijuana Frontier."…

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Jeffrey Toobin Previews Historic Supreme Court Rulings

2013-06-17 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Within the next few weeks, the U.S. Supreme Court is set to release several major decisions on a range of hot-button issues including same-sex marriage and the use of race in undergraduate admissions. New Yorker staff writer Jeffrey Toobin joins us to discuss the big cases facing the court, and his new book "The Oath: The Obama White House and The Supreme Court."…

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The Majesty and Mystery of California's Redwoods

2013-06-14 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

"The redwoods, once seen, leave a mark or create a vision that stays with you always," wrote John Steinbeck. Today, 96 percent of the original old-growth coast redwoods have been logged. But the magic of the big trees lives on in Northern California's parks and preserves. We discuss the history of the redwoods, current preservation efforts and the best places to experience them. We'll also examine the latest research on redwoods, including new studies on the potential impacts of climate change.…

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Preserving San Francisco's 'Living History'

2013-06-14 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

San Francisco's Marcus Books, billed as the oldest black bookstore in the United States, may be on the brink of closure. Supporters are rallying to save it. But can the city retain its historic and diverse businesses and institutions in the face of gentrification and rising real estate prices? That's one of the questions that organizers of this weekend's "Sustaining San Francisco's Living History" summit are hoping to answer. The event will bring together community, business and civic leaders for a discussion of what can be done to prevent the loss of the city's cultural identity.…

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Supreme Court: Human Genes Cannot Be Patented

2013-06-14 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

In a unanimous decision, the U.S. Supreme Court decided this week that human genes cannot be patented. A biotech company, Myriad Genetics, held patents on two genes linked to breast and ovarian cancer. But the Court ruled that because the company had simply isolated the genes and had not synthetically created something new, the patents were not valid. The company argued that allowing patents on human genes incentivizes research. But critics said it would hamper science by raising the cost of testing. What does the decision mean for medical and scientific research?…

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San Francisco Opera's New Take on Mary Magdalene

2013-06-13 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

San Francisco Opera's latest production "The Gospel of Mary Magdalene" premieres next week. The opera takes on the controversial relationship between Jesus and Mary Magdalene, using biblical texts and ancient Gnostic texts found in Egypt in 1948 that challenge the view of Mary as a woman of ill repute. We talk with the composer and librettist as well as the opera's director about the new production and the mythology of Mary Magdalene.…

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Bill Lockyer on 46 Years in California Politics

2013-06-13 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

California State Treasurer Bill Lockyer recently announced his retirement after 46 years in politics. He joins us from Sacramento to discuss his decision to retire and his lengthy career in public service, which has included terms as California's attorney general and head of the State Senate.…

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Middle East Turmoil: Turkey's Riots, Iran Elections, Syria's Attacks

2013-06-13 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Iran is preparing to elect a new leader to replace Mahmoud Ahmadinejad on Friday. Turkey's violent protests show a growing rift between secular and Islamic influences. Meanwhile, a Syrian helicopter has attacked a Lebanese town, and Syrian rebels have reportedly killed 60 Shiites. We discuss the latest news from the Middle East and what role the U.S. might play with a panel of experts.…

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SF District Attorney Backs Smartphone 'Kill Switch'

2013-06-12 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

San Francisco District Attorney George Gascon says around 50 percent of all robberies in the city last year were stolen smartphones. He wants phone companies to install a "kill switch" that renders a phone inoperable after it has been stolen - and Apple announced on Monday that it would be the first smartphone manufacturer to do so. Gascon, a former San Francisco police chief, joins us to talk about cell phone theft as well as his views on immigration reform, crime in the Bay Area and other issues.…

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New Budget Boosts Education, Restores Some Social Services

2013-06-12 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Governor Jerry Brown and legislative leaders have reached an agreement on a $96 billion spending plan, five days ahead of the deadline to pass a state budget. Many Democrats had hoped this year's budget surplus would mean major restorations in services for the poor -- but they ultimately agreed to the governor's more conservative budget projections. The budget uses a controversial new formula to allocate education funding, steering more money to districts where over half of students are poor or learning English. The budget plan also partially restores mental health services and adult dental care for the poor.…

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Carlos Alzugaray on Improving U.S.-Cuba Relations

2013-06-11 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

President Obama called for a "new beginning" between the United States and Cuba after he was elected in 2008. But former Cuban diplomat Carlos Alzugaray says that was just rhetoric, and the U.S. is still locked in a Cold War mentality that hinders any progress towards reconciliation. Treto join us to discuss what he thinks it will take to improve cooperation between the two nations.…

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The NSA Leak and the Ethics of Whistleblowing

2013-06-11 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Edward Snowden has stepped forward as the leaker who exposed the NSA's secret surveillance program known as PRISM. The 29-year-old former NSA contractor is reportedly hiding in Hong Kong, hoping to seek asylum. Supporters call him a heroic whistleblower, while others say he is a criminal whose actions endangered national secrecy. Does Snowden qualify as a whistleblower? Will the U.S. try to extradite him?…

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Journalist Alfredo Corchado on Mexico's Drug Cartels

2013-06-10 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Alfredo Corchado, the Mexico bureau chief for the Dallas Morning News, has been reporting on Mexico's drug war since 1994. The cartels have murdered journalists, and in 2007, Corchado was told he was their next target. Corchado joins us to talk about his new book, "Midnight in Mexico," and to share his thoughts on immigration reform and Mexico's future.…

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Eric Swalwell on Being California's Youngest Congressman

2013-06-10 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

At 32, U.S. Democratic Representative Eric Swalwell is currently the youngest Congressman representing California, having defeated longtime incumbent Pete Stark last year. Congressman Swalwell represents the 15th district, which includes Hayward, Union City, and Livermore. He joins us in-studio to take your questions.…

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In My Experience: Emergency Responders

2013-06-07 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Emergency responders: When a building collapses or a fire breaks out, they're often first on the scene. As part of Forum's "In My Experience" series, we talk with first responders about delivering babies, saving stabbing victims, losing colleagues, and dealing with the stress of a job that puts them at the center of trauma and chaos.…

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Farm Subsidies and Food Stamps at Stake in Farm Bill Vote

2013-06-07 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

The U.S. Senate plans to vote Monday on the reauthorization of the farm bill, which is already causing a stir among farmers, environmentalists, and anti-hunger advocates. The bill would cut $24 billion over the next decade, including $4 billion from food stamp programs. The House drafted a rival bill, with nearly $40 billion in cuts. We discuss the likelihood of the bills' passage, and what they mean for different stake holders.…

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PRISM Scandal: NSA Program Searches Internet Servers

2013-06-07 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Late yesterday, The Washington Post and The Guardian reported on the existence of a secret program where the National Security Agency (NSA) and the FBI were mining data from top U.S. tech companies. The program, known as PRISM, allows the government to access information from the servers of internet and social media companies like Google, Facebook, and Apple. Silicon Valley executives claim they did not know the NSA was granted direct access to their servers.…

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The New Yorker's George Packer on America's Unwinding Equality

2013-06-06 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

New Yorker staff writer George Packer joins us in studio to talk about his latest book, "The Unwinding: An Inner History of the New America." Packer, a Palo Alto Native, also shares his view on the changes occurring in Silicon Valley.…

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2013 California Fire Season Brings Stronger Fires

2013-06-06 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

After two years of sparse rains, California fire officials say this year's wildfire season has started a month earlier than usual and that the fires are stronger. We'll discuss fire danger in Northern California and what residents can do to help prevent it. What can the state can do in the long term to adapt to the possibility of increasingly long fire seasons and more deadly fires due to climate change?…

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NSA Secretly Surveilling Millions of Verizon Users

2013-06-06 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Wednesday night, The Guardian broke the news that the National Security Administration, under orders from the Obama administration, has been secretly collecting phone records of millions of Verizon customers. We'll speak with the Guardian's Washington D.C. bureau chief and a lawyer from the Center for Democracy & Technology to get the latest on the developing story.…

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Encore Careers

2013-06-05 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Anthropologist Margaret Mead said "It is utterly false and cruelly arbitrary to put all the play and learning into childhood, all the work into middle age, and all regrets into old age." If you're in the second half of your life, you may have considered upending this cruelty by finding a new purpose in life through further education or a new job. Author Marci Alboher joins us to talk about her new book, "The Encore Career Handbook," which offers guidance for midlife career switches.…

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Apple Bites Into Radio

2013-06-05 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Apple took one step further into the Internet radio business, when it inked a deal with Warner Music Group for music rights this past weekend. Apple already has an agreement with Universal Music Group for recorded music rights, and is reportedly trying to get more licenses to unveil its service in time for its developers conference on June 10. What will the service -- dubbed iRadio by the press -- entail? And what will it mean for other music streaming services like Pandora and Spotify?…

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Temple Grandin Explores the Autistic Brain

2013-06-04 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Bestselling author and animal scientist Temple Grandin first made a name for herself with her groundbreaking work designing more humane slaughterhouses. Grandin is autistic, and she says that her autism gives her unique insight into animal behavior. Today, she is also a leading advocate for autistics and was the subject of an Emmy-Award winning HBO film starring Clare Danes. Grandin joins us to discuss her new book "The Autistic Brain."…

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U.S. Supreme Court OKs Police Collecting DNA

2013-06-04 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

On Monday the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that police may take DNA from people arrested in connection with serious crimes. The federal government and 28 states, including California, collect DNA from people who have been arrested instead of waiting for a conviction. The majority opinion argued it's a booking procedure, like modern day fingerprinting. But opponents say it's a major change in police powers that tramples the privacy of suspects who haven't been proven guilty. We discuss what the ruling will mean for pending challenges to California's DNA collection program.…

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U.S. vs Bradley Manning: Wikileaks Source Heads to Trial

2013-06-04 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Three years ago, Bradley Manning made headlines when he was arrested for releasing over 700,000 classified military documents to Wikileaks. He was charged with 22 offenses, including aiding and abetting the enemy. He has since confessed to many of the charges. Supporters laud him a hero while critics say he injured national security. Manning's military court martial begins Monday -- and he faces life in prison without parole.…

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Big Data: Finding Meaning in a Sea of Information

2013-06-03 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Every time we send an email, buy a gift on Amazon or swipe our rewards card at the supermarket, we're adding to the sea of information that exists on our habits. Companies are already using this data to predict behavior -- and even outcomes -- in business, health care and education. Can we now predict the outbreak of viruses before they happen? And how can we protect our privacy, or have a say in what happens to our information? We talk with tech experts on what big data means for our future.…

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The Oakland Museum's New Gallery of Natural Sciences

2013-05-31 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

The Gallery of California Natural Sciences at the Oakland Museum of California opens its doors Friday after several years of renovation. The new gallery spotlights seven areas around the state, featuring recreations of lava tubes from Mt. Shasta and a detailed model of Oakland's Lake Merritt and its wildlife. Douglas Long, the museum's senior curator of natural sciences, joins us to discuss how the gallery shows the ties between people and nature, and what we can do to improve wild habitats.…

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Motherhood Deferred: Freezing Your Eggs

2013-05-31 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Journalist Sarah Elizabeth Richards thought she could step away from the panic of her ticking biological clock and postpone motherhood by freezing her eggs. She spent nearly $50,000, but says it was the best investment she ever made. We talk with Richards and a fertility specialist about the benefits and risks of freezing eggs, the hefty price tag and what it means for women to delay motherhood. Do you have questions about freezing eggs? What would make you consider doing it?…

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Will California Crack Down on E-Cigarettes?

2013-05-31 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Electronic cigarettes would be regulated like other tobacco products under a bill passed by the California State Senate last week. The legislation, which heads to the Assembly Friday, would prohibit public e-cigarette usage wherever the real thing is currently banned. Backers of the bill say the battery-powered disposable devices, which produce a nicotine vapor, still pose health risks to users and those around them. But industry groups say e-cigarettes provide a safer alternative to smokers looking to quit.…

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Obama's Asia-Pacific 'Pivot'

2013-05-30 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

On his trip to Asia this week, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel is expected to reassure allies that the Obama administration's so-called "Pacific Pivot" is still on track. The "pivot" -- a shift in military and economic focus to the Asia-Pacific region -- is a major priority for the administration. But it has been hampered by Pentagon budget cuts and delays in negotiating the controversial "Trans-Pacific Partnership," a multinational free-trade agreement. We'll discuss the pivot, and the state of U.S.-Asian relations in advance of President Obama's meeting with Chinese President Xi Jinping in Southern California next week.…

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Mayor Ed Lee on Tech, MUNI and a New Arena

2013-05-30 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee plans to present his two-year spending plan to the city's Board of Supervisors on Friday, which is expected to top $7 billion annually. The mayor joins us in the studio to talk about the budget, the proposed Golden State Warriors waterfront arena, MUNI's latest poor report card, how the booming tech industry is changing San Francisco and other issues facing the city and county.…

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Mr. Huffman Goes to Washington

2013-05-29 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

What is life like for a freshman congressman in one of the most gridlocked eras in modern political history? Democratic Rep. Jared Huffman, who represents California's North Coast, joins us to discuss his brief tenure in the Beltway and his legislative priorities. We'll also talk to the former environmental lawyer about his work on energy efficiency and water issues.…

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San Francisco, Larry Ellison and the America's Cup

2013-05-29 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

In 2000, Oracle CEO and billionaire Larry Ellison suddenly found himself without a sponsor for his America's Cup team. At the same time, a local yacht club was on the brink of bankruptcy. San Francisco Chronicle journalist Julian Guthrie tells the story of how Ellison teamed up with a car mechanic running the yacht club, and after a decade of trial and error, won the prestigious sailing race. Guthrie joins us to discuss her book "The Billionaire and the Mechanic," as well as the ongoing funding and safety problems facing the America's Cup race, which is being held in San Francisco this summer.…

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The Kitchen Sisters and 'The Making Of...'

2013-05-28 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

The Bay Area is a hotbed of the "maker culture," and in the second hour of our special broadcast from the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, we explore what's being made here -- and why. Public radio production team The Kitchen Sisters, Davia Nelson and Nikki Silva, take us through some of the highlights of their series "The Making Of...," a partnership with KQED Public Radio. The series profiles a variety of local creators: people making jam, creating opera, and even constructing the new Bay Bridge span. "The Making Of..." is also holding live demonstrations as part of the SFMOMA's free four-day celebration before the museum temporarily closes for expansion.…

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The Future of SFMOMA

2013-05-28 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

On June 3, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art will close its doors for nearly three years as part of a massive $610 million expansion project that will add a new wing, nearly doubling the museum's gallery space. We bid farewell to the SFMOMA in its current state with a special broadcast from the museum's Schwab Room. We'll talk about plans for the museum's future, and the off-site programing SFMOMA will present at other museums and around the Bay Area during the temporary closure.…

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Jeremy Affeldt: Life, Justice and Major League Baseball

2013-05-24 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

San Francisco Giants relief pitcher Jeremy Affeldt is being called the most honest athlete in America, after he was overpaid half a million dollars and handed it back. He joins us in the studio to talk about his new book, "To Stir a Movement," his Christian faith, and his work against child slavery and child poverty.…

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From the Archives: Mary Roach's Adventures in Digestion

2013-05-24 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

How does saliva work? Why doesn't your stomach digest itself? And did constipation really kill Elvis? In her new book "Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal," Mary Roach chronicles the surprisingly exciting journey that food undertakes in the human body. Roach joins us to talk about everything you ever wanted to know -- or might be disgusted to know -- about the digestive process.…

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From the Archives: Present Shock: When Everything Happens Now

2013-05-24 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Author and trend-spotter Douglas Rushkoff says humans are living in the present more than ever before. But he isn't talking about a serene Zen-like state of being in the moment. Instead, thanks to mobile devices and other technology, "presentism" is characterized by a constant state of distraction, and a need for immediacy which affects virtually everything: the way we tell stories, invest money, and even evaluate politicians. Rushkoff joins us to talk about his new book, "Present Shock.…

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From the Archives: Max Boot's "Invisible Armies"

2013-05-24 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

War isn't what it used to be -- at least according to the conventional wisdom that modern warfare is now irregular and asymmetric, making traditional forces largely obsolete. But military historian Max Boot argues that guerrilla warfare and insurgency are hardly recent developments. Those tactics were actually common for most human history. In his new book, "Invisible Armies," Boot traces the history of irregular warfare.…

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California's New Health Insurance Exchange Unveils Plans, Premiums

2013-05-24 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)

California's new health insurance exchange took a crucial step this week, setting the rates that consumers will pay when the federal health care law takes effect on Jan. 1, 2014. Most say there isn't the rate shock that some had feared. But as we look ahead to further implementation of the Affordable Care Act, experts worry Californians will see spiking health costs, and that parts of the middle class will be left behind. Guests include: Glenn Melnick, professor and director of the Center for Health Financing, Policy and Management at USC; Jamie Court, president of the Consumer Watchdog in Los Angeles; and Lisa Aliferis, health editor for KQED News.…

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What is Terrorism?

2013-05-24 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Recent news events such as this week's brutal killing of a British soldier in London, the Boston Marathon bombings, and the Congressional hearings on the Benghazi attacks have renewed a debate that has simmered since 9-11: What qualifies as terrorism?…

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California's New Health Insurance Exchange Unveils Plans, Premiums

2013-05-24 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

California's new health insurance exchange took a crucial step this week, setting the rates that consumers will pay when the federal health care law takes effect on January 1, 2014. Most say there isn't the rate shock that some had feared. But as we look ahead to further implementation of the Affordable Care Act, experts worry Californians will see spiking health costs, and that parts of the middle class will be left behind.…

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From the Archives: Daniel Pink: 'To Sell is Human'

2013-05-24 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Are extroverts more persuasive than introverts? Does commission motivate good workplace performance? Daniel Pink examines the science of sales including a variety of everyday tasks that involve what he calls "non-sales selling." The author and former speechwriter for Al Gore joins us to talk about his new book, "To Sell is Human: The Surprising Truth about Moving Others."…

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Airbnb Faces Uncertain Legal Future

2013-05-23 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

A New York judge fined an Airbnb user $2,400 this week for renting out a room in his apartment, arguing the three-night rental violated the city's "illegal hotel" laws. The popular San Francisco-based online site that allows users to offer their homes as temporary rentals has also been accused of disrupting local housing markets and failing to charge city taxes. Forum discusses what the ruling may mean for Airbnb and its users locally, and for other participants in the so-called share economy.…

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Apple Accused of Avoiding More Taxes than It Pays

2013-05-23 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

A U.S. Senate subcommittee this week accused Apple of exploiting loopholes and creating stateless foreign subsidiaries to avoid paying $9 billion in U.S. taxes last year. Yet the panel stopped short of alleging the company did anything illegal. We examine Apple's actions, the ethics of corporate tax dodging and whether the system should be reformed.…

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Doctor Paul Farmer on the Call 'To Repair the World'

2013-05-23 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

In his 2001 graduation speech to medical students at Brown University, doctor and activist Paul Farmer said while science and technology are the heart of modern medicine, "you must add the soul." Farmer, the co-founder of Partners in Health, which brings modern health care to the poor, has focused much of his career on that hands-on approach to medicine, living among and treating locals in Haiti, Peru, Russia and other countries. Farmer joins us to talk about his advice to future doctors and his new book, "To Repair the World," a collection of his speeches on global health and social justice.…

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Bay Area Wins Bid to Host Super Bowl in 2016

2013-05-22 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

NFL team owners voted Tuesday for San Francisco to be the official host of the 2016 Super Bowl. The event will be held at the San Francisco 49ers' soon-to-be constructed $1.2 billion facility in Santa Clara. We look at the economic and social impacts the event will have on the Bay Area.…

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Los Angeles Elects a New Mayor

2013-05-22 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Los Angeles voters headed to the polls Tuesday to elect a new mayor. We talk about the race between L.A. City Councilman Eric Garcetti and City Controller Wendy Greuel, and what the outcome means for Los Angeles and the rest of the state.…

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Photographer Bryant Austin's Close Up With Whales

2013-05-22 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

When photographer Bryant Austin came eye-to-eye with a humpback mother whale swimming with her calf, it changed his life. He decided he wanted to recreate that experience for others by making a life-sized print of a whale -- something that had never been done before. So he quit his job, sold his house, and flew to the South Pacific armed with only a snorkel and a camera. Bryant Austin joins us to talk about his book, "Beautiful Whale," and his secret to getting within three feet of the mammals, without them swimming away. We'll also talk to a marine biologist about the efforts to protect whales.…

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Poverty Rates Soar in Bay Area Suburbs

2013-05-21 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

In the suburbs of East Contra Costa County, the poverty rate has grown by more than 70 percent in the past decade. That's part of a Brookings Institution report chronicling the rise of suburban poverty nationwide. The report found the rate of poverty in suburbs has grown twice as fast as it has in the cities, but anti-poverty programs have been slow to respond and are still mostly focused in urban areas. We discuss the rise of poverty in the suburbs, and what can be done about it.…

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Yahoo Acquires Tumblr

2013-05-21 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

On Monday, troubled internet giant Yahoo announced it will purchase Tumblr, the social media and blogging network. We speak with the Silicon Valley journalist who broke the story about what Yahoo hopes to gain from the $1.1 billion acquisition, whether it can increase its appeal to younger audiences and the implications for Tumblr's loyal user base.…

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Jon Mooallem on the Weird World of People and Animals

2013-05-20 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Journalist Jon Mooallem noticed that his young daughter was always surrounded by wild animals: butterflies on her pajamas, a stuffed toy owl, and beavers in her bedtime stories. But these romantic portrayals, he says, hid a harsh reality. Scientists estimate half of all species could be gone by the turn of the century. So he embarked on his own journey to track down three endangered animals, and discovered the extreme -- even futile -- lengths humans go to save them. Jon Mooallem discusses his book, "Wild Ones," and the complex intersections of man and nature.…

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Revised Manual of Mental Disorders Stirs Controversy

2013-05-20 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

A new edition of the most widely used psychiatric guide to mental disorders -- "The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" -- was released this past weekend in San Francisco at a meeting of the American Psychiatric Association. The manual has a big impact on public health, including what insurance companies will cover, the drugs that regulators will approve, and even which children will receive special education services. But critics say that the manual is outdated and question the validity of several new diagnoses.…

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News in Review: Benghazi Emails, IRS Audits, Secret Surveillance

2013-05-17 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

From the ongoing investigation into a purported Benghazi cover-up, to the IRS targeting right-wing groups, to the Justice Department secretly collecting journalists' phone records, it has been a tough week for the White House. We review the week's news and assess the potential political fallout from the scandals.…

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Paul Theroux: 'The Last Train to Zona Verde'

2013-05-17 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Travel writer Paul Theroux has taken his readers on adventures across Europe, India and the Middle East by railroad. His latest book, "The Last Train to Zona Verde," details his journey to the heart of Africa, the continent he knows and loves the best. He joins us in the studio.…

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A New Path for State Parks?

2013-05-16 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Last July, the California State Parks department learned that it was sitting on a $20 million surplus. The embarrassing discovery came after the agency had declared that financial woes would force it to close 70 parks. The department got a new director and a two-year moratorium that allowed it to avoid closures. How is the agency faring now? We check the pulse of the parks, and discuss a recent state report which calls for increased outsourcing of some park sites and functions.…

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Upheaval at Oakland Police Department

2013-05-16 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Oakland Police Chief Howard Jordan unexpectedly resigned last week, citing medical reasons. His replacement as interim chief stepped down two days later. The turmoil in the department comes in the midst of two reports critical of Oakland police. One report from a court-ordered overseer finds OPD out of compliance with federally mandated reforms from a decade-old police brutality case. Another report, by law enforcement consultant William Bratton, is critical of the department's ability to reduce crime. Forum takes up these issues with the newly appointed Interim Police Chief Sean Whent and others.…

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Iranian-American Fiction

2013-05-16 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

The editors of the first anthology of Iranian-American fiction say there is a maturing literary voice emerging from the Iranian-American community. Many Iranian immigrants came to the U.S. after the Shah was overthrown in 1979, and roughly half of them live in California. We talk with Bay Area editors and authors of "Tremors: New Fiction by Iranian-American Writers" about their stories, culture and community.…

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Michael Pollan's 'Cooked'

2013-05-16 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

As in his previous books, Michael Pollan argues in "Cooked" that relying on processed food disrupts our link to the natural world and weakens our interpersonal relationships. But this time he takes a more hands-on approach, doing apprenticeships with a variety of culinary masters who teach him the fine points of fermentation, the benefits of bacteria, and other secrets of honest cuisine. He joins us in the studio.…

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Richard Haass: Foreign Policy Begins at Home

2013-05-16 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Between a nuclear Iran, climate change, and a rising China, the challenges to U.S national security are manifold. But in his new book, "Foreign Policy Begins at Home," Council on Foreign Relations president Richard Haass argues that the largest threats to this country come from within. With second-rate schools, a decrepit infrastructure, and growing debt, Haass writes, America should focus on improving itself.…

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More Faulty Rods on Bay Bridge

2013-05-15 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Recent reports state that more than 400 steel rods securing the base of the new Bay Bridge's eastern span may be faulty, adding to concerns about the bridge's seismic safety and structural soundness. The Federal Highway Administration has launched an investigation, and a state senate committee held a hearing Tuesday to find out what went wrong. We discuss the latest developments.…

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Governor Brown Releases Revised Budget Plan

2013-05-15 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

On Tuesday, Governor Brown unveiled his latest revision to the state's 2014 budget. The new proposal accounts for shifting economic conditions and the multibillion-dollar increase in tax revenue seen over the past several months. We discuss the revision's impact on schools, health care coverage, job growth and state debt.…

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Dr. Louise Aronson: Writing About Illness and Aging

2013-05-15 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

UCSF physician and author Louise Aronson joins us in the studio to talk about her new story collection, "A History of the Present Illness." Set in San Francisco, the stories draw on her experience working with the sick and elderly in the city's hospitals and nursing homes.…

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The Classics, Revisited

2013-05-14 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

The great literary classics are more than merely important works of art, says author Kevin Smokler. Books that have stood the test of time should also provide insight into "how to live a great life." In his new book, "Practical Classics," Smokler advocates re-reading those oft-assigned tomes like "Candide," "Huckleberry Finn," and "I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings." We talk with Smokler, and we want to hear from you: what makes a book worthy of revisiting?…

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David Kirp's Strategy for Public Schools

2013-05-13 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

In rebuilding our public schools, education policy expert David Kirp says we should stick to what works, like quality early-childhood education and creating word-rich curriculums. In other words, avoid getting carried away by quick fixes and the latest trends. His new book, "Improbable Scholars," tells the success story of Union City, New Jersey, and argues that all our public schools can benefit from what was learned there.…

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Landmark Elections in Pakistan

2013-05-13 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Pakistan's general election on May 11th marks the first successful transition from one democratically elected parliament to another in the nation's 66-year history. But with more than 100 people killed, the election run-up has been blighted by violence. In another sign of mounting tensions, Pakistan's Interior Ministry has ordered the expulsion of The New York Times bureau chief in Islamabad. We'll discuss the election, and what it signifies for Pakistan.…

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Warriors Release S.F. Arena Redesign

2013-05-10 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

The red-hot Golden State Warriors, who are tied with San Antonio in their playoff series, are also facing some tough opposition off the court this week. At issue is the team's plan to build a new $1 billion arena on San Francisco's Embarcadero. The arena has the blessing of Mayor Ed Lee and other city leaders, but some neighbors and environmental groups oppose the project, saying it is inappropriate for the waterfront location. Supporters maintain that the latest design, unveiled on Sunday, preserves Bay vistas and reduces parking.…

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Mark Bittman on Part-Time Veganism

2013-05-10 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Six years ago, Mark Bittman was a full-time omnivore. But then a doctor told him to turn vegan for health reasons, and suddenly Mark found himself facing a world void of meat, dairy, or processed foods. So the New York Times food writer decided to personalize his vegan diet and allow for some cheating. He called it "Vegan Before 6," or "VB6," and says it helped him improve his health and focus on cooking at home. Mark Bittman talks about his new book, and how a full-time meat lover adapted to part-time veganism.…

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Google's Eric Schmidt on the New Digital Age

2013-05-09 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Google's executive chairman, Eric Schmidt, says that between Facebook and cloud computing, "your digital identity will live forever." Schmidt and his co-author, Jared Cohen, join us in the studio to talk about their book "The New Digital Age," which explores how online connectivity is changing censorship, privacy, and activism in countries like Mexico, China, and North Korea, and elsewhere around the world.…

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Calif. High Court Rules Cities Can Ban Pot Dispensaries

2013-05-08 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

In a unanimous decision, the California high court has ruled that local governments have the power to ban medical marijuana dispensaries. The decision upholds bans in about 200 California cities. But in a state with a robust pot economy, lawmakers still debate if and how to regulate the drug. We'll discuss the ruling and what this means for the marijuana market, its dispensaries and its consumers.…

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Israeli Airstrikes on Syria

2013-05-07 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Syria responded angrily to attacks believed to be from Israeli warplanes on Sunday, and accused Israel of coordinating with Syrian rebel groups. Its neighbor Iran also warned that it would respond to the aggression. We get the latest updates on what the airstrikes mean for the region.…

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$2.25 Billion PG&E Fine Proposed for San Bruno Explosion

2013-05-07 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

California regulators want to penalize PG&E $2.25 billion for the 2010 San Bruno gas line explosion that killed eight people and injured 66. California Public Utility Commission staff recommended the hefty fine, which would be the largest penalty ever brought by a state regulator in the U.S., citing the severity of the damage and PG&E's "reprehensible" failures. Forum discusses the proposed penalty and what has changed since the deadly blast.…

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Fast Fashion, Cheap Clothes and the Bangladesh Disaster

2013-05-07 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

The death toll from the collapse of a Bangladesh clothing factory surpassed 600 on Monday, making it the deadliest disaster in the history of the garment industry. Officials from Walmart, San Francisco-based Gap Inc. and other retailers met in Germany after the collapse to talk about improving safety measures in Bangladesh. We discuss the social costs of cheap clothing. Are you concerned about where and how your clothes are made?…

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Filmmaker William Friedkin

2013-05-07 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Academy Award-winning filmmaker William Friedkin reached the Hollywood stratosphere in the 1970s with such groundbreaking films as "The French Connection" and "The Exorcist." But the success was not to last. As he writes in his new memoir, "I was at the edge of a cliff and my demons were standing by waiting to push me off." Today, Friedkin is still directing films -- including 2011's well-received "Killer Joe" -- and has even developed a second career as an opera director. He joins us in studio to discuss his new memoir, "The Friedkin Connection."…

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Updating the Bible

2013-05-06 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Does the Bible need a makeover? A group of 20 spiritual leaders from around the country thought so, and they convened recently to update the New Testament. The result combines traditional and newly discovered texts, including ancient Christian stories of women leading their own congregations. San Francisco-based Presbyterian minister Bruce Reyes-Chow was a part of this group, and he joins us to discuss the book, "A New New Testament."…

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Suicide on the Rise Among Baby Boomers

2013-05-03 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

More people currently die of suicide than in car accidents, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The suicide rate rose sharply among Americans between 35 and 64, jumping by about 50 percent for men in their 50s and women in their early 60s. Some experts suspect financial woes and abuse of painkillers may be contributing to the increase in suicides among Baby Boomers.…

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Spring Gardening

2013-05-03 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Is the unseasonably warm weather wilting your wisteria? Sapping your strawberries? Taxing your tomatoes? Whether you're a seasoned grower with a huge backyard, or you're taking a first crack at a window box of herbs, our panel of gardening and landscaping experts will advise, share stories and cheer you on.…

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Pastor Jim Wallis: 'On God's Side'

2013-05-02 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Abraham Lincoln is said to have remarked that he wasn't concerned about whether or not God was on his side. Instead, he was more concerned about being on God's side. In his new book, theologian Jim Wallis explores what it means to be aligned with the divine in an age of political dysfunction and bitter hyper-partisanship. Wallis joins us to discuss his book "On God's Side," and his call for a national conversation on the meaning of "the common good" in both our politics and our personal lives.…

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A Conversation With Congresswoman Jackie Speier

2013-05-02 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Last year, U.S. Congresswoman Jackie Speier was named to the top "150 Fearless Women of the World" by Newsweek and The Daily Beast, as an outspoken advocate for women's rights. A member of the House Armed Services Committee, she has also pushed for accountability for rape in the military and is a staunch gun control advocate. Her district includes the southwest corner of San Francisco and most of San Mateo County.…

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'Marketplace' Host Kai Ryssdal

2013-05-01 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Kai Ryssdal has had a number of jobs: Naval aviator, Foreign Service officer in China, bookstore employee and even KQED intern. And since 2005, he has been the host of American Public Media's economic show "Marketplace." Ryssdal joins us in-studio to "do the numbers" with his trademark humor, and talk about covering everything from credit default swaps to Halloween candy.…

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Drivers Not Punished for Pedestrian Deaths

2013-05-01 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

The majority of drivers responsible for the deaths of pedestrians faced no criminal charges during a five-year period from 2007-2011 in the largest Bay Area counties, according to a new review by the Center for Investigative Reporting. One-third of the pedestrians killed were legally in the crosswalk when they were hit. We discuss pedestrian safety and driver accountability.…

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Sarah Polley: 'Stories We Tell'

2013-04-30 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

It was a long-running joke in actress and filmmaker Sarah Polley's family. Why doesn't she look more like her father? In her new documentary "Stories we Tell," Polley tries to get to the bottom of that mystery -- while also attempting to better understand her glamorous and free-spirited mother, who died when Polley was 11. But the greatest revelations in the new film involve the nature of storytelling itself. Polley joins us to discuss the film, which is showing as part of the San Francisco International Film Festival.…

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Coming Out of the NBA's Closet

2013-04-30 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Messages of support have been pouring in for pro basketball player Jason Collins, who wrote in the new issue of Sports Illustrated, "I'm a 34-year-old NBA center. I'm black. And I'm gay." That declaration makes him the first openly gay male athlete playing on an American major league sports team. We talk about what impact Collins' announcement may have on sports at all levels.…

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Health Care Leaders Push for 'Precision Medicine'

2013-04-30 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

In 2011, a National Academy of Sciences report called for the creation of a "knowledge network of disease" to help researchers and doctors share information and patient data more effectively. Such a network would also allow scientists and clinicians to access data on the molecular makeup of diseases, vastly improving diagnosis and treatment. But the concept -- known as "precision medicine" -- is already raising ethical questions and concerns over patient privacy. We talk to the heads of National Institutes of Health, the Food and Drug Administration and UCSF about precision medicine, the subject of a two-day summit in San Francisco this week.…

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Michael Feinstein Opens SF Cabaret

2013-04-29 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Local fans of show tunes, torch singers, and "The Great American Songbook" are in luck: Five time Grammy-nominated singer and pianist Michael Feinstein is opening a new cabaret in San Francisco. Feinstein returns to Forum to talk about the new club, and about his work preserving and promoting America's musical heritage.…

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A New Home for City Arts & Lectures

2013-04-29 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Since 1980, City Arts & Lectures has been bringing leading authors, artists, and other luminaries to the Herbst Theater in San Francisco -- and to public radio listeners across the country. Now, the series has its own very own home: The Nourse Theatre, a 1693-seat former school auditorium closed to the public for over 30 years. We talk with founder and director Sydney Goldstein about the new Civic Center space and about her vision for the future of City Arts.…

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Previewing President Obama's Visit to Mexico

2013-04-29 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Starting Thursday, President Obama will meet with Mexico's leader, Enrique Pena Nieto. Immigration, economic issues and drug cartels are reportedly at the top of the agenda. We discuss U.S.-Mexico relations, and what concerns local Mexicans in the Bay Area have.…

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John Leguizamo's 'Ghetto Klown'

2013-04-26 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Growing up in Queens, John Leguizamo was the class clown. His classroom disruptions were so entertaining that his teacher finally handed him the number for an acting instructor. In his one-man play, "Ghetto Klown," actor John Leguizamo talks about the barriers facing Latinos in Hollywood, his struggles to impress his father, and his rise from extra in a Madonna music video to successful film actor.…

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Assessing the 'Pink Ribbon' Campaign with Peggy Orenstein

2013-04-26 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

In recent years, cancer specialists have warned that aggressive early screening for people at low risk for breast cancer may do more harm than good because it can lead to unnecessary treatment. Yet expensive awareness campaigns -- featuring those ubiquitous pink ribbons -- continue to encourage early screening and mammograms. Forum discusses breast cancer awareness and research, and the role of the high profile "pink ribbon" campaign.…

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Syria and Chemical Weapons

2013-04-25 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

On Tuesday, Israel accused Syria of using chemical weapons against rebels, citing reports of victims foaming at the mouth. President Obama has said chemical weapons would be crossing a "red line" and "game changer," to which the U.S. would respond. The U.S. also just doubled its aid to Syrian rebels, pledging to give $123 million in body armor and other supplies. We hear the latest news and discuss America's options with the Syria situation.…

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30 years of Alonzo King LINES Ballet

2013-04-25 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

San Francisco's internationally lauded LINES ballet is celebrating its 30th anniversary with a collaboration between LINES artistic director and choreographer Alonzo King, and acclaimed double bassist and composer, Edgar Meyer. Forum talks with King and Meyer about modern ballet, the rewards and perils of artistic collaboration and the current season of LINES.…

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Warm Weather Getaways

2013-04-24 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

This week's surprisingly hot weather has a lot of people in the Bay Area daydreaming at their desks about redwood hikes, remote campsites and lakeside lounging. We gather a panel of experts on the best camping and weekend getaways in or near the Bay Area. Where is your favorite weekend getaway destination?…

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The CIA and 'The Way of the Knife'

2013-04-24 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times reporter Mark Mazzetti reveals how the CIA transformed from a spy outfit into a paramilitary organization focused on controversial targeted killings. In his new book "The Way of the Knife," Mazzetti talks about the increased use of drone strikes, and how the U.S. military is taking on more of the CIA's intelligence and information-gathering role.…

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Furloughs, Mergers and the State of Air Travel

2013-04-23 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Flights were delayed across the country on Monday, the first day of furloughs for air-traffic controllers under federal across-the-board budget cuts. Meanwhile, a bankruptcy court recently gave American Airlines approval to merge with US Airways, potentially creating the world's biggest airline. We'll examine what air travelers can expect in the coming busy summer travel season.…

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Will the Koch Brothers Buy the LA Times?

2013-04-23 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Conservative businessmen Charles and David Koch are considering a bid to buy the Tribune Company's eight regional newspapers, including The Los Angeles Times. Liberal website the Daily Kos and progressive advocacy group Courage Campaign have collected thousands of signatures protesting the move. We discuss Koch Industries' bid, and explore how it fits in with the companies' libertarian political agenda.…

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Isabel Allende: 'Maya's Notebook'

2013-04-23 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

In Isabel Allende's new novel "Maya's Notebook," the 19-year-old protagonist journals about her happy childhood in Berkeley -- and her later escapades involving drugs, sex and crime in Las Vegas, as she hides out from her pursuers on an island off the coast of Chile. Allende joins us to talk about the book, and about how she weaves her passion for her home country into her writing. Allende recently won the Carl Sandburg Literary Award, given to authors who have made significant contributions to the written word.…

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Update on the Boston Bombing Investigation

2013-04-22 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

After placing the city of Boston on lockdown, police captured the second suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings late on Friday. Nineteen-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaeva was found hiding in a boat docked in a backyard after a citywide sweep by SWAT teams, military Humvees and police dogs. The other suspect, his older brother, died after a car chase and police shootout. We get the latest news from Boston, and discuss how the brothers' suspected involvement in the bombings and their Chechen roots will affect homeland security and beyond.…

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Hedrick Smith: 'Who Stole the American Dream?'

2013-04-22 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative journalist Hedrick Smith argues that over the past 40 years, aggressive deregulation, pro-business tax policy and the demise of corporate responsibility have undermined the American dream. Smith discusses what he sees as the growing concentration of wealth in the hands of a few, its implications for the middle class and what it would take to restore shared prosperity in the U.S.…

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Kids and Food Allergies

2013-04-22 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)

If it seems like childhood food allergies are more common than they used to be, it is because they are: nearly one in 10 preschoolers have allergies to food, and the rate of such allergies has more than doubled in the past decade. For kids with severe allergies, the condition can restrict normal everyday activities like eating out, and often results in frequent trips to the emergency room. But public awareness is growing, and there are promising developments in research and treatment. We rebroadcast a program from March 25, 2013 featuring Melanie Thernstrom, contributing writer for the New York Times magazine, and Kari Nadeau M.D., associate professor of allergies and immunology at Stanford University.…

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Spring Gardening

2013-04-22 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)

Spring has sprung and it's time to get planting. Whether you're a seasoned grower with a huge backyard or you want to take your first crack at a window box of herbs, our panel of experts will advise, share stories and cheer you on. Guests include Ahmed Hassan, landscape contractor and technician, owner of Ahmed Hassan Landscape Services LLC, host of "Yard Crashers" and co-host of "Turf War," both on the DIY Network; Kathleen Brenzel, garden editor for Sunset Magazine; and Stefani Bittner, co-owner of Star Apple Edible Gardens in Berkeley and co-author of "The Beautiful Edible Gardens."…

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News Week in Review

2013-04-22 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)

[Note: Today's Forum has been preempted in favor of live NPR News coverage of developing events in Boston] On Thursday, the FBI released photos and video of two suspects in the Boston Marathon bombings, the same day that rescuers continued their search for survivors after explosions ripped through a Texas fertilizer plant. We review the week's news events and look at how the nation is reacting.…

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Senate Blocks Gun Control Measures

2013-04-18 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

In a setback to gun control advocates, the U.S. Senate rejected several measures on Wednesday, including a bipartisan compromise to expand background checks for firearm purchases. At a news conference, surrounded by relatives of those killed in the Newtown, Connecticut massacre, an angry President Obama said lawmakers had caved to special interests, calling it "a pretty shameful day for Washington." We'll discuss the vote, and look at the prospects for future federal gun control legislation.…

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Bill McDonough: 'Upcycling' and Sustainable Design

2013-04-18 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

A decade ago, William McDonough co-wrote "Cradle to Cradle," a manifesto advocating the design of products with many lifecycles, such as bottles made solely from biodegradable materials. His new book "The Upcycle" expands on these ideas by applying design solutions to global environmental challenges like food scarcity, clean water and climate change. McDonough urges us to think beyond simply minimizing our impact and to envision a world in which everything we do actually improves the environment.…

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The Forensics of Finding a Bomber

2013-04-18 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Two days after twin bombs ripped through crowds at the Boston Marathon, media outlets were reporting that police had identified a possible suspect thanks to nearby cameras and facial recognition software. What goes into tracking down a bomber? With the remnants of a pressure cooker and hundreds of videos to go by, what will investigators be looking for?…

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The 'Gang of 8' Immigration Reform Bill

2013-04-17 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

On Tuesday, the bipartisan group of U.S. senators dubbed the "Gang of Eight" unveiled an immigration reform bill that would include a pathway to citizenship for the 11 million people who stay in the U.S. illegally. We talk about the legislation and its controversial proposal that would allow immigrants to become citizens after a 13-year process.…

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Mary Roach's Adventures in Digestion

2013-04-17 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

How does saliva work? Why doesn't your stomach digest itself? And did constipation really kill Elvis? In her new book "Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal," Mary Roach chronicles the surprisingly exciting journey that food undertakes in the human body. Roach joins us to talk about everything you ever wanted to know -- or might be disgusted to know -- about the digestive process.…

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Exploratorium Reopens

2013-04-16 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

San Francisco's Exploratorium science museum opens the doors at its new location at Pier 15 on the Embarcadero on Wednesday. With three times more space, the Exploratorium will expand its exhibits outdoors into the city and bay. We get a preview of the revamped museum with executive director Dennis Bartels and some of the experts responsible for the museum's renowned interactive exhibits.…

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Explosions at the Boston Marathon

2013-04-16 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

We check in on developments in Boston as the city reels from explosions near the finish line of Monday's Boston marathon. How prepared is California for a similar emergency? We'll also assess the nation's efforts to prevent acts of terror.…

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How to Get to Zero Waste

2013-04-16 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Is the curbside garbage can headed for the dustbin of history? The city of Palo Alto has launched a pilot project that eliminates curbside garbage bins, using only compost and recycling bins. The aim of the project is to achieve zero landfill waste, a goal San Francisco and other Bay Area cities also hope to reach. We talk about what consumers can do to reduce waste and keep their compostable and recyclable trash out of the landfill.…

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The 2013 Goldman Environmental Prize Winners

2013-04-15 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

The Goldman Environmental Prize is known as the "Green Nobel," one of the most prestigious awards given for environmental activism. Many winners have challenged big corporations or corrupt government officials who are harming their environments, sometimes risking prison or even death. The six winners receive $150,000 each and international attention for their work. We talk with a few of this year's Goldman Prize winners about how they're changing the world.…

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Palo Alto High Students Talk About 'Rape Culture'

2013-04-15 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Student journalists at Palo Alto High School found themselves in the national spotlight when they decided to take an insider's look at stories of rape within their own school. The article in "Verde," Palo Alto's student magazine, tells the story of two students who say they were raped while drunk. We'll talk with the student journalists about what they call the "rape culture" in high school and beyond, which they say blames and silences victims.…

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Wine Demystified

2013-04-12 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Are you easily intimidated by snobby sommeliers? Flummoxed by phone-book-thick restaurant wine lists? Help is on the way. We convene a panel of Bay Area wine connoisseurs to talk about how to pour and taste wine, and how to select the perfect bottle at a store or restaurant.…

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Who Owns Your Genes?

2013-04-12 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

On Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court is set to hear a case that could decide whether genes can be patented. The ACLU, cancer patients, scientists and others sued Myriad Genetics -- which owns the exclusive rights for two genes tied to breast and ovarian cancers -- arguing the company limits patients' access to affordable and accurate testing. But supporters say gene patents are necessary to incentivize research. What could the Court's decision mean for scientists, patients and corporations?…

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SF Housing Authority in Crisis

2013-04-11 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

On Tuesday, the San Francisco Housing Authority Commission voted unanimously to fire its embattled chief, Henry Alvarez. Alvarez faces three employee lawsuits and complaints of bullying, as well as a federal investigation into allegations of illegal contracting. We look at the financial emergency confronting the Housing Authority, and the future and state of public housing in California and across the nation.…

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David Stockman's 'Doomsday' Scenario

2013-04-11 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

In his new book, "The Great Deformation," former Reagan budget director David Stockman says the federal budget has turned into a fiscal "doomsday machine." If the government doesn't stop "cooking the books" and get its debt under control, Stockman predicts a collapse of the U.S. economy. We'll talk to Stockman about his book and get his take on President Obama's proposed 2014 budget, introduced on Wednesday.…

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Lost Cat

2013-04-10 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Ever wondered what your cat does when you're not around? Author Caroline Paul was gripped by the question after her anxious and timid cat Tibby disappeared for several weeks, only to return fat, happy and confident. So Paul and her partner, illustrator Wendy MacNaughton, took the logical next step: they strapped a GPS and camera on Tibby to sniff out his secret second life. Paul and MacNaughton join Forum to discuss their intrepid investigation, the elusive lives of cats and their book, "Lost Cat: A True Story of Love, Desperation and GPS Technology."…

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Gun Control Showdown

2013-04-10 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

On Monday, President Obama stood alongside family members of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting victims and called for Congress to vote on gun control legislation. While some senators are working on a bipartisan compromise, more than a dozen Republicans have threatened to filibuster a vote on any such bill. We talk about the policies being proposed, and the likely fate of gun control legislation in this Capitol Hill showdown.…

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A History of Public Art in San Francisco

2013-04-09 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Today, it is nearly impossible to imagine San Francisco's Telegraph Hill without its landmark Coit Tower. But when the San Francisco Arts Commission approved the tower project in the early 1930s, public opinion was sharply divided. For 80 years, the city's arts commission has been at the center of a lively and often stormy debate over taxpayer-funded art. This commission's pivotal role in shaping public art and design is the subject of a new book, "San Francisco: Arts for the City." We'll talk to the author and to the current director of the commission.…

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Remembering Margaret Thatcher

2013-04-09 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Leaders from around the globe are paying tribute to former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, who died of a stroke this week at age 87. Britain's "Iron Lady" was the country's first female prime minister and one of the 20th Century's most important political figures. But the conservative Thatcher also had many critics, who say her policies hurt workers and the country's economy. We'll discuss Thatcher's life and legacy, including her relationship with the U.S. and President Ronald Reagan.…

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'Totally Biased' with W. Kamau Bell

2013-04-08 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

W. Kamau Bell was a stand-up comedian in San Francisco before Chris Rock discovered him. Now Bell is the host of the FX television series "Totally Biased," a show he calls "liberal, politically-charged comedy from a 6'4", 250-pound black man." W. Kamau Bell returns to Forum to talk about politics, interracial love, making fun of Tyler Perry, and why the Bay Area made him the comedian he is today.…

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Obama's 2014 Budget Proposal

2013-04-08 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

This week President Obama is set to release his 2014 budget, proposing sweeping cuts to Social Security and Medicare, and fewer tax hikes. The new budget will reportedly include parts of the compromise offer that Obama made to House Speaker John Boehner in December. We talk about what's in the proposed budget, which is already getting a negative reception from Congressional Republicans, as well as from some liberals. We'll also discuss how the budget relates to the across-the-board cuts known as "the sequester."…

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Syria Behind the Lines

2013-04-08 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

British filmmaker Olly Lambert spent five weeks in Syria last fall, documenting the country's civil war. He spent time with rebels, refugees, and soldiers loyal to the regime. His new film, "Syria Behind the Lines," provides a rare glimpse inside the war ravaged county. Lambert joins us to discuss the film, which airs as part of the PBS series "Frontline" this April.…

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Ben Sidran: How Jews Influenced American Music

2013-04-05 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

What do "White Christmas," "Blowin' in the Wind," and "Somewhere Over the Rainbow" all have in common? They were all written by Jews. According to musician Ben Sidran, Jews helped shape the iconic American songbook, from George Gershwin and Irving Berlin, to Bob Dylan (aka Bob Zimmerman). The longtime jazz keyboard player and former NPR music host talks about his book, "There Was a Fire," and the roots of American music.…

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Douglas Rushkoff on 'Present Shock'

2013-04-04 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Author and trend-spotter Douglas Rushkoff says humans are living in the present more than ever before. But he isn't talking about a serene Zen-like state of being in the moment. Instead, thanks to mobile devices and other technology, "presentism" is characterized by a constant state of distraction, and a need for immediacy which affects virtually everything: the way we tell stories, invest money, and even evaluate politicians. Rushkoff joins us to talk about his new book, "Present Shock."…

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North Korea's Missile Threats

2013-04-04 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

In response to nuclear threats from North Korea, the U.S. government announced Wednesday that it was deploying an advanced missile defense system to Guam. We'll discuss the latest developments.…

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Anti-Tax Activist Grover Norquist

2013-04-04 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Americans for Tax Reform President Grover Norquist has made no secret of his ultimate goal. He has famously said he wants to shrink government "to the size where we can drown it in the bathtub." Norquist's "taxpayer protection pledge," which asks candidates to commit to opposing all tax increases, has been signed by 219 House members and 39 senators, as well as more than 1,000 state officeholders. We'll talk to Norquist about the current budget battles in Washington and the future of the Republican Party.…

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Robert Alter's 'Ancient Israel'

2013-04-03 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Biblical scholar Robert Alter considers himself a "literary archaeologist." In his award-winning translations of the Hebrew Bible, he aims to reconstruct and restore the poetry and prose style of the original ancient text. Alter joins us to discuss his latest installment, "Ancient Israel," a translation of "The Former Prophets," the Biblical books Joshua, Judges, Samuel and Kings.…

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Obama Invests in Brain-Mapping Project

2013-04-03 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

On Tuesday, President Obama unveiled a new initiative to map the human brain. The plan is to invest $100 million starting in 2014, so scientists can create a "road map" of the brain's circuits, similar to the documentation done for the Human Genome Project. The initiative could develop tools to help treat diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, and it's being co-led by a Stanford scientist. But critics say there are no clear end goals and no set deadline, and that the money could be better used elsewhere.…

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Daniel Kahneman on Behavioral Economics

2013-04-02 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

According to Steven Pinker, Daniel Kahneman is "the most important psychologist alive today." His work on decision making and irrational economic choices has made him one of a very small group of non-economists who have earned a Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences. Kahneman joins us to discuss how and why we make the decisions we do, and how that can help us understand politics, the economy and even the way we grocery shop.…

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Stockton Cleared to Enter Bankruptcy

2013-04-02 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

A federal judge has ruled that Stockton is eligible for bankruptcy protection, making it the largest city in the United States to enter bankruptcy. The judge rejected claims by the city's creditors that Stockton isn't really broke and that it should have cut its pension payments instead of reneging on other debts. The judge said the question of how bankruptcy will affect Stockton's large pension obligations will be a central issue in the case going forward, and it will be closely watched by other struggling California cities. We will discuss the bankruptcy case and what it will mean for Stockton.…

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Teens, Texting and Online Behavior

2013-04-01 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

More U.S. teens than ever are using smartphones as their main access to the Internet, according to a recent report from the Pew Internet and American Life Project. But teens' constant texting and Internet access can create headaches for parents worried about monitoring sexting, cyber-bullying and other inappropriate online activities. What are teens up to on the web these days, and how much should parents control teens' online behavior?…

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NPR Cancels 'Talk of the Nation'

2013-04-01 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

After a 21-year run, NPR's "Talk of the Nation" call-in show will end this summer. We'll hear from NPR about its decision and get listener reactions and recommendations for what should replace the program. And we'll talk about recent reports on the health of news media in general.…

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Controversy Over Newest Delta Plan Proposal

2013-03-29 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

This week, Governor Jerry Brown's office released further details of its plan to build twin tunnels to pump water from Northern California to cities and farms in other parts of the state. Brown says the $23 billion plan will help restore ecosystems, but critics say the proposal would further threaten the Delta's endangered fish and hurt smaller farmers. We talk about the latest plan and its potential impact on the region…

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That Taxing Time of Year

2013-03-29 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

It's tax time -- but fear not. We won't let you drown in your pile of tax forms. With April 15 just a few weeks away, our panel of tax experts answers your questions on topics ranging from out-of-state income to the effects of the sequester.…

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Memory Triage and Other Secrets of Sleep

2013-03-28 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

When you go to sleep, your brain doesn't take a nap. According to a recent study, it keeps working: organizing memories by what's important and what isn't, in a form of "memory triage." One of the researchers, UC Berkeley professor of psychology Matthew Walker, joins us to discuss his findings, and to answer questions on sleep and memory.…

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Bolts Found Broken on New Bay Bridge Span

2013-03-28 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

More than 30 large bolts on a section of the new eastern span of the Bay Bridge broke after workers tightened them. Bridge officials said on Wednesday that the bolts, ranging from nine to 25 feet in length, are located on the eastern foundation of the new self-anchored suspension bridge. We talk with Steve Heminger, head of the Metropolitan Transportation Commission, about what the discovery means for the safety of the new $6.4 billion span -- and for its scheduled opening Labor Day weekend.…

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Massive Cyberattack Slows Internet Worldwide

2013-03-28 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

On Wednesday, parts of the Internet slowed down when a group of spammers working in an abandoned bunker in the Netherlands decided to launch a cyberattack. The attack was aimed at the anti-spam watchdog, Spamhaus, which blocks fake Viagra and weight-loss ads. When Spamhaus added Cyberbunker to its blacklist, the Dutch group retaliated with a massive distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack, one of the largest reported cyberattacks ever. Experts join us to talk about the incident and the future of online security.…

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Game Over for Consoles?

2013-03-27 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Video game consoles like the Xbox and PlayStation have long ruled the gaming world. But the increasing popularity of smartphones, tablets and other mobile devices is shaking up the industry. As game developers from around the world gather this week in San Francisco for their annual conference, we look at the future of video games.…

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Same-Sex Marriage and the Supreme Court: An Update

2013-03-27 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

On Wednesday, the second of two days of landmark arguments over same-sex marriage, the U.S. Supreme Court takes up the 1996 Federal Defense of Marriage Act which denies federal tax, pension, and other benefits to married same-sex couples. Defenders of the law say it appropriately defines marriage as a union between a man and a woman for purposes of federal benefits. Opponents say it violates equal protection. We analyze the arguments presented and the justices' reactions.…

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Are Robots Taking a Toll on Jobs?

2013-03-27 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

The Golden Gate Bridge switches this week from toll booths to electronic tolling. The pre-payment system is supposed to make commuting faster, but it also puts human toll booth operators out of a job. With robots playing increasingly key roles in manufacturing, surgery, and everyday operations, where does that leave the flesh-and blood worker? Are there downsides to the rise of robots? Or does this reliance on technology simply make humans more efficient, creating new job opportunities?…

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Funding Cuts Hurt Community College Access

2013-03-26 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

A new report shows student enrollment rates in California's community colleges have dropped to a 20-year low. According to the findings of the Public Policy Institute of California (PPIC), state funding cuts have severely affected whether students can access state education, and have hit returning students especially hard. We talk to the report's co-author about the other ways the funding cuts have impacted students.…

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The Golden Gate Bridge Switches to Electronic Payments

2013-03-26 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

On Wednesday, the Golden Gate Bridge will become the first in California to accept only electronic payment for bridge tolls, either with FasTrak, a license plate account or through pre-payments. We discuss what the changes mean for commuters and tourists, and we talk with a soon-to-be-unemployed toll taker about the end of the era of personal service on the iconic bridge.…

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Student Loan Interest Rate Set to Rise

2013-03-26 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

The current student loan debt totals $1 trillion. It's the biggest worry among college-bound high school students, according to a recent Princeton Review Survey. They may have even more to worry about starting July 1, when the interest rate for subsidized student loans jumps to nearly 7 percent, unless Congress acts. Is there a better plan for students to manage, or even lower, their overall debt? We talk to experts about options for dealing with student loans.…

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Amnesty International Head Salil Shetty

2013-03-25 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Salil Shetty grew up with activist parents in India in the 1970s, and he has followed in his family's footsteps. He now heads Amnesty International, the human rights organization that calls attention to the plight of war refugees, political prisoners and others at risk around the world. Salil Shetty joins us to talk about how the group is dealing with rape in India, massacres in Syria and other international issues, as well as its continued call to release prisoners from Guantanamo Bay.…

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Supreme Court Hears Same-Sex Marriage Cases

2013-03-25 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

On Tuesday, the U.S. Supreme Court is set to hear arguments on Proposition 8, California's voter-approved 2008 ban on same-sex marriage. The following day, the high court will take up the Defense of Marriage Act, which denies federal benefits to legally married same-sex couples. We'll preview the historic hearings.…

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Kids and Food Allergies

2013-03-25 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

If it seems like childhood food allergies are more common than they used to be, it is because they are: nearly one in 10 preschoolers have allergies to food, and the rate of such allergies has more than doubled in the past decade. For kids with severe allergies, the condition can restrict normal everyday activities like eating out, and often results in frequent trips to the emergency room. But public awareness is growing, and there are promising developments in research and treatment.…

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The Iraq Invasion, 10 Years Later

2013-03-22 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Tuesday marks the 10th anniversary of the United States' invasion of Iraq. Former president George W. Bush justified the 2003 invasion on the grounds that then-Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein possessed weapons of mass destruction. That assertion proved to be incorrect, as did the administration's initial prediction of a brief conflict. The third-longest war in U.S. history has claimed the lives of at least 190,000 people -- including 4,488 U.S. service members and 134,000 Iraqi civilians -- and has cost more than $2 trillion, according to a new Brown University study. We look back at the Iraq invasion and discuss the legacy of the war.…

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NCAA Tournament Tips Off in San Jose

2013-03-22 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

San Jose is hosting several NCAA Tournament games this week at HP Pavilion -- and local officials hope the tournament will provide an economic boost to the South Bay. Bay Area basketball fans have a lot to cheer about on the court, with Cal's men's and women's teams both participating, along with the top-seeded Stanford women. In a special broadcast from KQED Silicon Valley, we talk about the tournament and discuss the state of college hoops.…

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First Person: Susan Wojcicki

2013-03-22 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Susan Wojcicki is a central player in the origin story of Google. In 1998 she rented her Menlo Park garage to Sergey Brin and Larry Page to start the company. She became Google's 16th employee and now, as the head of the company's advertising products, she brought in $43.7 billion last year - 95 percent of Google's revenue. As part of our First Person series profiling notable leaders in the Bay Area, we talk with Susan Wojcicki about the changing world of digital advertising, and about raising four children and a flock of chickens while holding one of the most powerful business positions in the world.…

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Devil's Slide Tunnels Set to Open

2013-03-21 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

After nearly five decades and $439 million, the new Highway 1 bypass at Devil's Slide is set to open March 25. The bypass avoids a section of highway between Pacifica and Montara known for multiple landslides and deadly car accidents. The twin tunnels, which extend through San Pedro Mountain, will be the first new highway tunnels to open in California in nearly 50 years. They feature state-of-the-art technology with huge exhaust fans and carbon monoxide sensors. We discuss the tunnels' construction and the environmental and political roadblocks its proponents met along the way.…

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First Person: Rose Pak

2013-03-21 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Rose Pak has been called the most powerful woman in San Francisco. Many credit the Chinatown political activist with being the kingmaker behind Mayor Ed Lee's election, and the person most responsible for the increasing political power of Asian-Americans in the city. Pak joins us as part of our First Person series, profiling the leaders, innovators and others that make the Bay Area unique.…

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Tom Steyer: Billionaire Investor Turned Climate Activist

2013-03-20 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

San Francisco billionaire, investor, philanthropist and environmentalist Tom Steyer has emerged as a political force in California in recent years, backing two successful environmental ballot measures. Now the former hedge fund manager is taking a greater role on the national stage, particularly in the fight against climate change. He was even in the running to become President Obama's next energy secretary.…

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Trouble at Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco?

2013-03-20 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco are facing serious management and morale problems, according to recent news reports. The institutions -- which include the de Young Museum in Golden Gate Park and the Legion of Honor in Lincoln Park -- have been without a director since John Buchanan died over a year ago. Several longtime staff members have been fired. Some critics have blamed Board President Diane B. Wilsey for the museums' troubles and have accused her of nepotism and other misuses of power.…

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SF Supervisor Proposes Planned Parenthood 'Buffer Zone'

2013-03-20 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

A San Francisco supervisor is looking to expand the zone that separates reproductive health clinics like Planned Parenthood from anti-abortion protesters. Supervisor David Campos wants to replace the current eight-foot "bubble zone" with a 25-foot buffer around the entrances, exits and driveways of clinics that offer reproductive services. Supporters say it will protect the patients who visit these clinics from being harassed -- but protesters say it infringes on their free speech rights.…

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Sarah Ogilvie's 'Words of the World'

2013-03-19 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Oxford English Dictionary editor emeritus Sarah Ogilvie caused a literary stir for alleging in her new book that a former editor of the OED had deleted words with foreign origins. Ogilvie joins us to discuss the book "Words of the World: The Global History of the Oxford English Dictionary." We'll also explore the role and usefulness of dictionaries in an online age.…

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In My Experience: The Iraq War

2013-03-19 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Today marks the 10th anniversary of the United States' invasion of Iraq. As part of our "In My Experience" series spotlighting the personal stories of local residents, we'll talk with four people whose lives have been profoundly affected by the Iraq War.…

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China's Terracotta Warriors Come to SF

2013-03-18 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

When the Chinese Emperor Qin Shihuang died in 210 BC, he took his royal court and over 7,000 of his soldiers with him to the grave. But they were all made of clay. Dubbed the "ghost army," over 7,000 terracotta warriors were built by craftsmen and lined up underground alongside clay horses and weapons. A portion of those soldiers are now on display at the Asian Art Museum in San Francisco. We talk to experts about the exhibit.…

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In My Experience: Working With the Dead

2013-03-18 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

As part of our "In My Experience" series, we talk with people who work with the dead for a living. A crematorium director, a woman who specializes in at-home funerals and a student who dissects cadavers all join us to share their stories. How has working with the dead changed their own views on life?…

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San Francisco Symphony on Strike

2013-03-15 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

On Wednesday, the 100-plus musicians of the San Francisco Symphony officially went on strike, just days before they were set to perform at Carnegie Hall and kick off an East Coast tour. The musicians say they want salaries comparable to the Chicago and Los Angeles symphonies, and they question the bonuses and spending of symphony management. Symphony officials say musicians are already well compensated, with average salaries exceeding $165,000. We hear from both sides on the discord.…

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A Later Last-Call for California Bars?

2013-03-15 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

California cities and towns could allow bars and restaurants to serve liquor until 4:00 a.m. under a proposal by State Senator Mark Leno. Currently, the state permits booze service from 6:00 a.m. until 2:00 a.m. The San Francisco Democrat says the extended hours would boost employment and promote tourism. But critics contend that the change could lead to more crime and encourage drinking and driving.…

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What Grandmothers Do

2013-03-15 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

As fond as we may be of our grandmothers, evolutionary biologists have long questioned why women live for so long after they can procreate. The so-called "grandmother hypothesis" posits that grandmothers help the species survive by taking care of grandchildren and helping support families. In the U.S., grandparents are the primary source of child care for a third of families with a working mother and young children. We discuss the role of grandmothers in the U.S. and globally. What role did your grandmother play in your life? If you're a grandmother, does your family rely on your labor? How do you feel about it?…

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A New Pope

2013-03-14 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

White smoke rose from the Vatican chimney on Wednesday: a signal to the world that the Roman Catholic Church had elected a new pope. Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio of Argentina, hereafter known as Pope Francis I, was elected the 266th pontiff, the first South American and the first Jesuit to lead the Church. We'll discuss the new pope, his background and what his selection means for Catholics in Latin America and around the world. We'll also examine the challenges he faces, including priest shortages and sexual abuse scandals.…

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The Science of Winning and Losing

2013-03-14 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

What makes some people thrive in the heat of competition, and others drop the ball? How important are genes in predicting success? Those are among the questions explored by Po Bronson and Ashley Merryman in their new book "Top Dog: The Science of Winning and Losing." Bronson joins us to discuss the book, which challenges many commonly held assumptions about success and failure.…

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Anti-Jihad Ads Return to SF Muni Buses

2013-03-13 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

For the second time in a year, San Francisco Muni buses are featuring ads critical of Islam. The latest ones feature pictures of and quotes from Osama bin Laden and the Times Square car bomber. Local officials and Muslim groups have denounced the ads -- but the city has refused to pull them on free speech grounds. We talk to critics of the ads, and the woman behind the campaign.…

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Bill Would Ban Smoking in Apartments, Condos

2013-03-13 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

California would ban smoking indoors for people living in townhouses, condos, apartments and other attached units under a bill introduced by state Assembly member Marc Levine. The San Rafael Democrat says he wants to protect the one-third of Californians who live in multi-unit complexes, and who may be forced to breathe secondhand smoke from their neighbors. If approved, it would be the strictest anti-smoking law in the country. We'll talk to Levine and an opponent of the idea.…

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J-Street Founder Jeremy Ben-Ami

2013-03-13 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

When Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel was confirmed last month despite opposition from conservative Jewish groups, some observers declared it a victory for the more moderate Israel lobby group J-Street, which supported Hagel. J-Street founder and president Jeremy Ben-Ami joins us to talk about his group's work and about President Obama's trip to Israel next week.…

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The Death and Legacy of Hugo Ch�vez

2013-03-12 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Venezuelan President Hugo Ch�vez died Tuesday at the age of 58, after a battle with cancer. We'll discuss the controversial leader's career and look at what lies ahead for Venezuela, the fourth-largest oil supplier to the United States and, under Ch�vez, a U.S. adversary. We will also consider the likely successor to Ch�vez and discuss whether his socialist and revolutionary agendas will continue after his death.…

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America's Cup Funding Shortfall?

2013-03-12 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

America's Cup organizers are falling short in their efforts to raise private donations to help pay for the cost of bringing the America's Cup sailing competition to San Francisco -- and that could leave the city on the hook for about $20 million. The Board of Supervisors holds hearings Wednesday to discuss the shortfall. Supporters say even without all of the promised private funds, the city still benefits financially from hosting the America's Cup.…

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'A Fierce Green Fire'

2013-03-12 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

The new documentary "A Fierce Green Fire" traces the history of the modern environmental movement, chronicling dramatic battles like the Sierra Club's fight against dams in the Grand Canyon, Greenpeace's campaign to save whales and recent efforts to combat climate change. San Francisco-based director Mark Kitchell, who also made the Academy Award-nominated "Berkeley in the Sixties," joins us in the studio. Who are your environmental heroes?…

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First Person: Aileen Hernandez

2013-03-11 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

For more than six decades, San Franciscan Aileen Hernandez has been working to make American society more equal. A native New Yorker born of Jamaican parents, she moved to California to work for the International Ladies Garment Workers Union. She went on to become the only woman appointed by President Johnson to the federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and, soon after, helped found the National Organization for Women (NOW). She became NOW's second president, where she worked for more inclusion of women of color in the women's rights movement.…

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International News Roundup

2013-03-11 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Tensions in North Korea over new United Nations sanctions, elections in Kenya with candidates accused of war crimes, and ongoing efforts to free peacekeepers seized by Syrian rebels are just some of the latest stories from around the world. We discuss the top international headlines with a panel of experts.…

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Civil Rights Leaders Remember the March on Washington

2013-03-08 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

In August 1963, Martin Luther King, Jr. stood before thousands of people in front of the Lincoln Memorial and delivered those historic words, "I Have a Dream." Almost 50 years later, that iconic speech still resonates. We remember the March on Washington and talk to those who worked alongside Dr. King -- including one who helped pen that famous "I Have a Dream" speech -- about Dr. King's legacy and where the civil rights movement stands today.…

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How Would Funding Changes Affect Calif. Schools?

2013-03-08 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Governor Jerry Brown wants to dramatically restructure the way California allocates funding to schools by providing extra funds to districts with large numbers of needy students. But critics say the formula benefits mostly urban areas to the detriment of more affluent suburban districts. We'll discuss the plan and check in with some Bay Area school districts to get their response.…

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The Dow Skyrockets: Sign of Recovery?

2013-03-07 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

The Dow Jones industrial average rocketed to a record high this week, the highest since the recession. Is this a sign our economy is recovering? Or is it just a short-term spike? We talk about what this means for the economy, market growth, jobs, housing and the road ahead.…

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How to Eat for a Longer Life

2013-03-07 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

The connection between diet and health has been well established -- but can eating your broccoli really help you live longer? We'll discuss the latest research on nutrition and longevity with researchers from Marin's Buck Institute on Research in Aging. We also check in with Rebecca Katz, author of the new cookbook "The Longevity Kitchen."…

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The Bay Lights

2013-03-06 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

On Tuesday night, the Bay Bridge's western span shone with 25,000 white lights, in what has been billed as the world's largest LED light sculpture. We'll talk about the ambitious installation, designed by artist Leo Villareal. What do you think of the Bay Lights? How does it stack up against other large-scale public art projects?…

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What's at Stake in the Kenyan Election?

2013-03-06 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Kenyans waited in lines stretching up to one mile Monday to vote in that country's first presidential election since 2007. Gangs with machetes have reportedly killed at least 15 people, stirring memories of the bloody violence that left over 1,200 dead during the 2007 elections. We talk about what these current elections mean for Kenya, Africa and the world -- and why the leading candidate may also face a war crime trial at The Hague.…

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Child Cured of HIV

2013-03-05 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Scientists say a two-year-old Mississippi girl who was born with HIV has been cured of the infection. If the findings are confirmed, AIDS specialists say the case is a game changer in the search for a cure. She is the first child and only the second person to have been cured of HIV. While the adult was cured with a bone marrow transplant, the baby was treated with drugs early and aggressively -- and researchers say the case may change the way they treat HIV-infected people.…

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Joyce Carol Oates on 'The Accursed'

2013-03-05 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Shortly after moving to Princeton, New Jersey in 1984, Joyce Carol Oates began drafting a story based on the Victorian-era history of the area. After setting the manuscript aside for 30 years, Oates has finished what became a gothic thriller, "The Accursed." The novel combines portrayals of historical figures like Upton Sinclair and Woodrow Wilson with surreal elements -- including vampires, demons and ghosts. We talk to the celebrated author about her new novel and prolific career.…

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Harmeet Dhillon Elected Vice Chair of Calif. GOP

2013-03-05 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

San Francisco Republican Party Chair Harmeet Dhillon made history over the weekend. She became the first woman to be elected vice chair of the state GOP. A practicing Sikh of Indian descent, she endured several racial slurs during the course of her campaign. We talk to Dhillon about her unusual career -- including a stint as a board member with the ACLU -- her vision for the party, and her experiences as a Republican in San Francisco.…

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Washington Roundup: This Week in Politics

2013-03-04 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

The deadline to come up with a deal to avoid sequestration has come and gone. President Obama made some dire predictions about the March 1 deadline, so what political and economic fallout are we actually dealing with? Now that Chuck Hagel's rocky confirmation as defense secretary is over, will John Brennan, Obama's pick for CIA director, get the same treatment? We'll take a look at the big political stories of the week with a team of Washington experts.…

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Lawrence Wright on His New Play and Scientology

2013-03-04 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

We talk with Pulitzer Prize-winning author, journalist and playwright Lawrence Wright. His new play on the life of Italian journalist Oriana Fallaci premieres at the Berkeley Repertory Theatre this week. Fallaci, who died in 2006, was well-known for her controversial interviewing style. She once threw her chador off in protest while speaking with Iran's Ayatollah Khomeini. Wright himself is no stranger to controversy. His latest book "Going Clear" is an in-depth investigation into Scientology and its ties to Hollywood. We'll talk about the fallout from the book and discuss how Fallaci influenced Wright's own journalistic work.…

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Study Reveals Genetic Ties to Mental Disorders

2013-03-01 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

A new study reveals previously unknown genetic links between five psychiatric illnesses, including schizophrenia and ADHD. Scientists say the discovery could lead to new treatments, and affect how the diseases are classified.…

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Obama Administration Urges Court to Strike Down Prop. 8

2013-03-01 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

The Obama Administration has filed a brief with the U.S. Supreme Court arguing that California's voter-approved ban on same-sex marriage is unconstitutional. We discuss the administration's legal stance on the issue and its potential impact on the court, as well as efforts nationwide to legalize same-sex marriage.…

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A National Day of Unplugging

2013-03-01 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

On Friday evening, people across the country will turn off their cell phones and laptops to observe the fourth annual National Day of Unplugging. The event is part of the growing "slow tech" movement, which promotes mindful and balanced use of technology. We'll discuss why you might need a break from your electronics, and the best ways to unplug.…

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Should SFO be Renamed for Harvey Milk?

2013-02-28 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

John Wayne, JFK, Reagan and Bob Hope aren't just celebrities and politicians - they're also airports. Supporters are hoping Harvey Milk will join that roster. One city supervisor is proposing renaming San Francisco International Airport after the former supervisor and gay rights pioneer. But a recent poll suggests 61 percent of likely San Francisco voters oppose that idea. Do you think SFO should be named for Harvey Milk? What would you rename the airport?…

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Max Boot: Tracing the History of Guerrilla Warfare

2013-02-28 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

War isn't what it used to be, at least according to the conventional wisdom that modern warfare is now irregular and asymmetric, making traditional forces largely obsolete. But military historian Max Boot argues that guerrilla warfare and insurgency are hardly recent developments. Those tactics were actually common for most of human history. In his new book "Invisible Armies," Boot traces the history of irregular warfare.…

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Mike Tyson on His 'Undisputed Truth'

2013-02-28 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Retired boxer Mike Tyson promises to talk about everything in his one-man show, from biting Evander Holyfield's ear to his prison time for rape charges. "Nothing is off limits," Tyson says. The play, "Mike Tyson: Undisputed Truth," is directed by Spike Lee and runs for three nights at San Francisco's Orpheum Theatre. The show chronicles the former heavyweight champion's life, from his days being bullied as a kid in Brooklyn to his struggle with drugs and the death of his young daughter.…

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Tavis Smiley on Obama and the Fight Against Poverty

2013-02-27 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

When President Obama used Martin Luther King Jr.'s Bible at his second inaugural swearing-in, talk show host Tavis Smiley said he hoped the president would continue Dr. King's legacy by tackling poverty. Smiley is running a national anti-poverty campaign, along with professor and activist Cornel West. Smiley joins us to talk about his hopes for Obama's second term, why he is focusing on poverty in America and the backlash he's gotten for his campaign.…

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Study Confirms Benefits of a Mediterranean Diet

2013-02-27 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

The Mediterranean diet -- which emphasizes things like fruits, vegetables, olive oil and fish -- has long been promoted as a healthy approach to eating. A major new study, published Monday in the New England Journal of Medicine, provides even more reasons to eat like an Italian, Spaniard or Greek. Among the findings: people on a Mediterranean diet had a 30 percent lower risk of major cardiovascular problems compared to people who followed a low-fat diet.…

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'Birds of Paradise Lost': Fleeing Vietnam for San Francisco

2013-02-27 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Author Andrew Lam says he robbed his Vietnamese parents of their American Dream the day he told them he wanted to be a writer and not a doctor. But years later, Lam's writing still centers on his Vietnamese roots. Lam joins us to talk about his new book "Birds of Paradise Lost," which focuses on Vietnamese immigrants and their struggles to integrate in the Bay Area. Lam is editor of New America Media, the country's first and largest national collaboration and advocate of ethnic news organizations.…

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Yahoo Bans Working From Home

2013-02-26 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Yahoo Inc. told employees last week that they may no longer work from home or other remote locations. The announcement came as a surprise in an industry known for non-traditional work arrangements and generous employee perks. According to the U.S. Census, the number of people working from home has increased steadily, with almost 10 percent of the workforce working from home at least one day a week. We'll discuss flexible work programs: Do they increase or hurt productivity?…

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Kim Gordon on Life After Sonic Youth

2013-02-26 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Former Sonic Youth singer and guitarist Kim Gordon says that since she was five years old, all she ever wanted to be was an artist. Music, she says, was just an escape from the art world. Maybe so, but Sonic Youth's groundbreaking sound has influenced everyone from Nirvana to Russian-dissident band Pussy Riot. Sonic Youth disbanded in 2011, after Gordon's marriage to bandmate Thurston Moore ended. But she continues to perform, as well as to create and exhibit her visual art.…

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Roman Mars is '99% Invisible'

2013-02-26 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Roman Mars produces a radio show and podcast called "99% Invisible" that focuses on design and architecture. But that doesn't just mean buildings: Roman investigates the history of everything from cul-de-sacs and subway escalators to monks who make beer. Roman Mars joins Forum to talk about how "99% Invisible" went from an underground pet project to a Kickstarter success story, and why fans call him "the Ira Glass of design."…

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Michael Sandel: Public Philosopher

2013-02-25 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Harvard University political philosopher Michael Sandel teaches Harvard's most popular course. It's called "Justice," and explores the often thorny moral and ethical issues underlying the news. Is torture ever justified? Should we bribe people to be healthy? Should a nation be allowed to buy the right to pollute? Sandel returns to Forum to talk about justice.…

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How Will the Sequester Affect California?

2013-02-25 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

The sequester -- the $85 billion in spending cuts that Congress and President Obama delayed at the start of the year -- is set to take effect on March 1. The cuts are split between defense and domestic programs, and will slice into Medicare, work assistance, police departments and many other government programs. We talk to experts about the sequester's effects -- both nationally and here in California.…

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'Why Priests? A Failed Tradition'

2013-02-22 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Garry Wills says he has nothing against priests. He respects priests, and he once tried to be one. But in his new book, he questions whether there is any precedent for the priesthood based in the early church and the New Testament. Wills argues that a church system that exalts priests runs counter to Jesus' teachings on community, and that the it can lead to corruption and sin. Author and historian Garry Wills joins us to talk about his book, "Why Priests? A Failed Tradition."…

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Former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright

2013-02-22 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright was raised Catholic, but in her 50s she learned her parents were Jewish and that many of her relatives died in the Holocaust. Her family fled to England and narrowly escaped Nazi tanks when she was a toddler. In her new memoir, "Prague Winter," Albright explores her family history and the story of the birth of Czechoslovakia.…

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And the Oscar Goes to...

2013-02-21 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Movie critics were surprised when Ben Affleck wasn't nominated for a Best Director Oscar. Will his film "Argo" be vindicated with other awards on Sunday? Will the story of the killing of bin Laden or the tale of the president who saved the U.S. from being split in two take home Best Picture? We talk with a panel of film critics in advance of this weekend's Academy Awards about their favorite (and least favorite) of the nominees.…

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'Overheated: The Human Cost of Climate Change'

2013-02-21 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Andrew Guzman realizes that his warnings about the human costs of climate change might come across as alarmist. "But that's because we should be alarmed," he writes in his new book "Overheated." The UC Berkeley law professor believes that there has been too much discussion about the science of climate change, and not enough about the likely consequences -- things like famine, war and mass migration. Guzman joins us in the studio.…

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1,000 Places To See Before You Die

2013-02-20 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Have you ever cruised through the palm-fringed canals of Kerala? Or taken a sunrise balloon safari over Masai Mara? Those are just some of the 1,000 places that travel writer Patricia Schultz thinks you should see before you die. We talk with Schultz about some of her top travel picks, and we'll hear from our listeners. What is your must-see destination?…

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New Report Accuses Chinese Government of Cyber-Espionage

2013-02-20 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

An American cyber-security firm released a report yesterday that sent shockwaves through tech and national security circles. According to the company Mandiant, government-backed Chinese hackers have stolen data and intellectual property from 115 U.S. targets since 2006. Some of the companies targeted are involved in infrastructure that's critical to the U.S., like the power grid and water works. We'll examine the report's findings, the possible threat to U.S. national security and what companies can do to protect themselves.…

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Has Bragging Become an Epidemic?

2013-02-19 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Are we witnessing a bragging epidemic, or does it only sometimes feel that way? Facebook gives us a constant stream of parents boasting about their kids' academics, musical talent and sports prowess while others flaunt their exotic travels and exploits. And there is the so-called "humblebrag," where the braggart decries some small difficulty while really reminding everyone of why his or her life is so good. Why do we boast? Does it benefit us, and when, if ever, is it OK?…

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Study Links Alcohol to Cancer Deaths

2013-02-19 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

A new study finds that even moderate alcohol consumption can increase the risk of cancer-related death. We'll hear from one of the study's authors, who says alcohol is responsible for 20,000 cancer deaths every year. But the study is not without controversy. Some researchers say alcohol may have certain health benefits, and that it's risky to advocate total abstinence. We'll look at the mechanism by which alcohol may increase cancer death. Should you give up booze altogether?…

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What Does Silicon Valley Want From Obama's Second Term?

2013-02-18 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Silicon Valley donated over $14 million to President Obama's re-election campaign, and the president made quite a few promises on his many visits to the region, including steps toward immigration reform. We'll discuss what Silicon Valley leaders want from Congress and Obama's second term administration when it comes to upgrading visa laws, tax shelters and online privacy.…

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Newlyweds Search for a Bone Marrow Donor

2013-02-18 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Last year, Kevin Weston was riding high. He had just won a journalism fellowship at Stanford, and was raising two daughters with his partner Lateefah Simon, a civil rights activist and MacArthur Genius fellow. Then doctors told him he had leukemia, and needed to find a bone marrow donor by the end of the month. But Kevin is African-American -- and African-Americans comprise only 7 percent of registered donors. Kevin and Lateefah join us to share their story. We'll also discuss the low rate of minority donor participation and the long road to a successful transplant.…

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Michael Krasny Marks 20 Years as Forum Host

2013-02-15 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Michael Krasny hosted his first Forum program on February 15, 1993 -- 20 years ago today. During that first show, he promised to continue the program's commitment to in-depth news and political programming while opening up "new vistas in the arts...and the life of the mind." We mark Michael's milestone by turning the tables on him: he joins Dave Iverson to talk about his two decades behind the Forum microphone.…

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Is It Time to Raise the Minimum Wage?

2013-02-15 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

In Tuesday's State of the Union address, President Obama urged Congress to increase the federal minimum wage from $7.25 to $9 an hour by 2015 and to provide for annual cost of living adjustments. The California Assembly will also consider a bill which would raise state hourly rates to $9.25 by 2016. We discuss the politics and economics of the proposed minimum wage increases, and the impacts on workers and businesses alike.…

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Meteor Hits Russia, Causes Injuries

2013-02-15 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

A meteor exploded in the sky above Russia's Ural Mountains today, causing a shock wave that damaged buildings across a vast territory and injured hundreds of people with flying glass.…

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Univision and the Importance of Ethnic Media

2013-02-14 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Univision is the dominant Spanish-language TV channel in the United States, and it's looking to further expand its base. It recently teamed up with Disney to launch Fusion, the first 24-hour cable channel aimed at Latinos who speak English. Univision's Isaac Lee joins us to discuss outreach to the booming Latino population, how it tackles immigration coverage and the importance of ethnic media.…

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What Makes a Good Preschool?

2013-02-14 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

President Obama said in his State of the Union speech on Tuesday that every child in the U.S. should get a high-quality preschool education. So, what makes a good preschool? We'll discuss play-based versus more academic preschools, and what the latest research says is the best way to prepare a toddler for the world.…

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Has the Military Abandoned Osama bin Laden's Shooter?

2013-02-13 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

The Navy SEAL who says he killed Osama bin Laden has left the service and, according to a new profile in Esquire magazine, now feels abandoned by the military, with inadequate health coverage, no pension and no security detail. We talk with Phil Bronstein, the author of the piece, about the details of bin Laden's shooting and the hardships faced by even the most elite military personnel when they return to civilian life. And we discuss the controversy surrounding the article. Critics say the piece mischaracterizes the services the government provides to veterans. Among other charges, they say the article failed to acknowledge the health benefits to which bin Laden's shooter is entitled.…

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Bay Area Traffic Congestion Ties L.A.'s

2013-02-13 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Bay Area residents might find it hard to mock Los Angeles for its traffic congestion anymore. A recent report ranks the San Francisco-Oakland area right alongside L.A. for traffic delays, second only to Washington, D.C. Bay Area commuters waste 61 hours per year sitting in their cars because of congestion. Where is the worst traffic in the Bay? And what does so much idling mean for drivers and the environment?…

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Al Gore: Past, Present and 'Future'

2013-02-12 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

"There is no prior period of change that remotely resembles what humanity is about to experience," writes Al Gore in his new book "The Future." And he's not just talking about climate change. Gore explores the six forces he says will reshape our world in the years to come. The former vice president, Nobel Peace Prize-winning environmentalist and entrepreneur joins us in the studio. We'll talk about the book as well as the controversial recent sale of his cable network Current TV to Al Jazeera, for which he reportedly earned $100 million.…

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Pope Benedict Resigns

2013-02-12 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

In a surprise announcement Monday, Pope Benedict XVI said he would resign this month after less than eight years in office. He's the first pope to resign in nearly 600 years, when Pope Gregory XII stepped down, and the first to have done so voluntarily since Celestine V in 1294. We'll get news from Rome, and check in with Bay Area Catholics about who might be a successor and about the future of the Catholic Church in the U.S. and worldwide.…

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Gavin Newsom

2013-02-11 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Gavin Newsom thinks hackers may be the key to good government. California's lieutenant governor and San Francisco's former mayor says officials are often hampered by old equipment and policies. But he thinks the tech community can step in and create apps for better bus schedules, carpooling systems and tracking your tax dollars, among other things. Lt. Gov. Newsom joins us to talk about his new book, "Citizenville: How to Take the Town Square Digital and Reinvent Government." We'll also talk to him about his push to keep jobs in California, and his reportedly rocky relationship with Governor Jerry Brown.…

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Obama's Second Term and the State of the Union

2013-02-11 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

On Thursday, President Obama told House Democrats that his top priority is job creation. But what else will he focus on in his second term? We'll preview Obama's State of the Union Address. What do you wish the president would say on issues such as national security, unemployment and education?…

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First Person: Rhodessa Jones

2013-02-11 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Performer, teacher and theater director Rhodessa Jones has spent her rich and varied career merging social activism and theater. In the late 1980s she founded the widely acclaimed Medea Project: Theater for Incarcerated Women, which in recent years has been exploring the stories of women living with HIV. Jones was recently presented with the San Francisco Mayor's Art Award. We talk with Rhodessa Jones as part of our First Person series on the leaders, innovators and others who make the Bay Area unique.…

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Calif. High Court Considers Pot Club Bans

2013-02-11 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Should local governments in California have the power to ban medical marijuana outlets? That's the question the state Supreme Court will take up on Tuesday in a closely watched case. Meanwhile, things are heating up in Oakland, where the Harborside Health Center marijuana dispensary faces possible closure by the U.S. Justice Department. We get the latest on the state's pot wars.…

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The Future of the U.S. Postal Service

2013-02-08 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

The United States Postal Service this week announced it will no longer deliver mail on Saturdays, starting this summer. The USPS is deep in the red, and taking Saturdays off is expected to save about $2 billion per year. But will that money be enough to save the postal service? Should it dip into its pension fund, or even privatize? We talk about what options remain for the USPS, and about a local push to save the historic Downtown Berkeley Post Office from being sold.…

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Lyrics Born: 'Yes, Bay Area'

2013-02-08 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

When rapper and producer Tom Shimura (aka Lyrics Born) was at UC Davis, he and his friends at the campus radio station found they shared a taste for innovative, underground hip-hop. The group, which also included artists like DJ Shadow and Blackalicious, went on to create the influential SoleSides record label. Today, Berkeley-based Lyrics Born performs around the world, and his music is heard frequently in movies, video games and TV shows like HBO's "Entourage." He joins us to talk about his latest album, and his new ebook "Yes, Bay Area," a selection of his locally flavored tweets from the past few years.…

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Rob Corddry on Comedy, Clowns and Zombie Love

2013-02-08 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Actor and writer Rob Corddry is perhaps best-known for his stint as a popular correspondent on "The Daily Show with Jon Stewart." Corddry went on to appear in hit movies like "Hot Tub Time Machine," and he won a 2012 Emmy for his medical drama-spoof "Children's Hospital." We'll check in with Corddry about his career, his new horror film "Warm Bodies" and how his wife taught him how to speak like a zombie. Corddry performs at SF Sketchfest this Saturday.…

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George Saunders' 'Tenth of December'

2013-02-07 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Back when George Saunders was a geophysics graduate with dreams of being a writer, the faculty at Syracuse University's creative writing program decided to take a risk on him. They called him their "grand experiment." Today, George Saunders has multiple awards and a MacArthur "Genius" grant to his name, along with a new collection of short stories called "Tenth of December," which the New York Times called "the best book you'll read this year." We talk with George Saunders about crafting a short story and his unique characters.…

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Is Online Dating Changing Our Relationships?

2013-02-06 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

One-third of all single Americans now use dating websites to find potential mates. Has this shift in the way we meet changed the way we think about relationships? In his book "Love in the Time of Algorithms," Dan Slater argues that an efficient, easily accessible pool of singles has made people less likely to stay in unsatisfying relationships out of fear of being alone. But does it also make it hard to commit when a better option may just be a mouse-click away?…

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Using Drones to Target Americans

2013-02-06 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Until this week, little was known about the legal framework the U.S. government operates under when ordering the killing of its citizens. But now a leaked Justice Department memo outlines the legal case for some of these attacks. Civil liberties groups decry the policy as an overreach of executive authority. The leak comes as the Obama administration's nominee for CIA director, John Brennan, a drone program supporter, is due to appear before the Senate for a confirmation hearing.…

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President Obama Speaks on the Nation's Finances

2013-02-05 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

President Obama made a statement this morning about the nation's finances, just a day after he signed a debt ceiling bill suspending the nation's borrowing limit until May 18. We discuss the president's speech.…

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SF Weighs Requiring Soft-Story Earthquake Retrofits

2013-02-05 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Thousands of San Francisco's so-called soft-story homes -- three-story or higher wood-frame buildings built before 1978 -- are vulnerable to earthquakes. On Tuesday, the city's Board of Supervisors will look at a proposal to mandate earthquake retrofitting of these structures by 2020.…

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King Richard III's Remains Found

2013-02-05 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Five-hundred years after he died in battle, scientists have discovered the skeleton of King Richard III under a British parking lot. The short-reigned monarch is known as a Machiavellian hunchback who purportedly committed atrocious murders on his journey to the throne. But the king has modern day supporters who say he was unfairly maligned both by the Tudor monarchs who succeeded him and in William Shakespeare's portrayal. We discuss the finding and the legacy of King Richard III.…

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'The Little Book of Heartbreak'

2013-02-04 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Author Meghan Laslocky thought she had it bad when it came to love: she's been dumped 12 times. But then she discovered that Ernest Hemingway stole his wife's job when their marriage was collapsing. And that Lord Byron sent a breakup letter to his girlfriend, and had his new lover sign it. Laslocky joins us to talk about her new work "The Little Book of Heartbreak," and the history of lost love in movies, art and literature. What was your worst breakup? And how did you cope?…

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Super Bowl XLVII: Post Game Show

2013-02-04 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Our panel of Monday morning quarterbacks analyzes Sunday's Super Bowl matchup in New Orleans between the San Francisco 49ers and the Baltimore Ravens.…

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California's New Prison Chief

2013-02-01 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Four years ago, as head of Pennsylvania's Department of Corrections, Jeffrey Beard testified in federal court that California's prisons were dangerously overcrowded. Now, as the new head of California's corrections system, Beard says the crisis is over and the courts should release state prisons from a federal population cap. We talk with Secretary Beard about conditions in state lockups and his plans for improvement.…

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Filmmaker Sari Gilman

2013-02-01 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

We talk with San Francisco filmmaker Sari Gilman, director of the Oscar-nominated documentary short "Kings Point." The film, which spotlights the lives of residents at a Florida retirement community, raises complex questions about aging in America.…

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Hillary Clinton's Legacy

2013-02-01 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Today is Hillary Clinton's last day as U.S. secretary of state. During her tenure, she worked to boost global economic development, health and women's rights. But she also faced a heated review of her handling of the Benghazi attack that killed four Americans, including the U.S. ambassador to Libya. Will Benghazi be her legacy? Where else has she made an impact? Clinton told NPR, "I don't see myself getting back into politics." But is a 2016 presidential run still in the cards?…

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Should SF Tear Down Part of I-280?

2013-01-31 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

San Francisco has a history of tearing down freeways. In the 1990s, both the Embarcadero Freeway and the Central Freeway were torn down after being damaged in the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. Now, Mayor Ed Lee's office is floating a new plan to raze the tail end of Interstate 280 as a way to make the surrounding neighborhood more walkable and livable, and to spur development. But the plan would mean moving an important Caltrain railyard, and critics worry about how surface streets will handle the increased traffic.…

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First Person: Street Outreach With Kevin Grant

2013-01-31 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Kevin Grant knows about life on the streets. He used to be an Oakland gang member, and did time in and out of prison for robberies and selling drugs. Now he's back on the streets at night, but in a different role. He's breaking up fights before they escalate into violence or murder in Oakland -- and he's talking young people into putting down their guns. Grant won the California Peace Prize for his work in November. He joins us to talk about breaking the cycle of violence and retaliation in one of California's deadliest cities.…

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Homophobia in Sports

2013-01-31 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Just days before the San Francisco 49ers' first Super Bowl appearance in 18 years, cornerback Chris Culliver said he wouldn't welcome a gay teammate in the locker room. The team quickly responded with an official statement supporting the LGBT community. Do Culliver's comments reflect a pervasive anti-gay sentiment in sports, or is he an individual outlier?…

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Crisis in Mali

2013-01-30 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

French-led troops in Mali now control the ancient city of Timbuktu, which was occupied for 10 months by Islamists. France now plans to turn over long-term security operations to an African force. Have the militants been defeated or have they just retreated to the desert? We'll get the latest on the conflict, and discuss the U.S. role in the region.…

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Undocumented Students, 'In and Out of Shadows'

2013-01-30 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Poet and playwright Gary Soto has spent a good part of his life writing about the migrant laborers he grew up with in the San Joaquin Valley. In a new play set to run at San Francisco's Marsh Theater, Soto decided to tackle the newest generation of immigrants: the undocumented students struggling to stay in school and keep their parents from being deported. We talk to the poet and the theater's co-founder about this new work, as well as some young immigrants trying to stay in the United States.…

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Immigration Reform Takes Center Stage

2013-01-29 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

President Obama is set to make a major speech on immigration reform Tuesday, one day after a bipartisan group of senators released a plan to overhaul the nation's immigration policy. President Obama has called immigration the top legislative priority for his second term, and he's not the only one. Republicans are also focusing on reform after losing the Latino vote by a large margin in the last election. We speak with a panel of immigration experts about this week's events. What does the future hold for immigration policy?…

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Justice Sonia Sotomayor

2013-01-29 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Sonia Sotomayor made history in 2009 when she became the first Hispanic U.S. Supreme Court justice. In her memoir, "My Beloved World," Justice Sotomayor shares candid memories about growing up in a Puerto Rican household, and how a girl from the Bronx went on to top honors at Princeton University and Yale Law School.…

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Blind Soprano Laurie Rubin: Seeing Through Music

2013-01-29 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

When opera singer Laurie Rubin takes the stage, she stares straight into the audience -- even though she can't see a single person. Rubin has been blind since birth, and spent years being told she'd never live on her own or hold a real job. Today, the internationally acclaimed mezzo-soprano performs around the world. She also founded her own jewelry line and camp for young musicians. Rubin joins us to talk about her book, "Do You Dream in Color?" and about navigating the opera world as a blind, openly gay woman.…

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Dr. Robert Lustig's War on Sugar

2013-01-28 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Dr. Robert Lustig is waging a war on sugar. He calls sugar the culprit behind obesity, and wants the government to regulate sugar the way it does alcohol. But his ideas have stirred up controversy among his medical colleagues who say he has insufficient evidence linking sugar to obesity. Dr. Lustig joins us to talk about his new book, "Fat Chance: Beating the Odds Against Sugar, Processed Food, Obesity, and Disease."…

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Update: City College of San Francisco

2013-01-25 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

City College of San Francisco could be forced to close later this year unless it can correct problems threatening its accreditation. We'll get an update on the school's progress as it works towards addressing deficiencies and operating problems. We'll also discuss a recently released draft "closure report" outlining a contingency plan in case the worst happens, and the school must close.…

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Amy Wilentz's Love Letter to Haiti

2013-01-25 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Journalist Amy Wilentz has written about Haiti for 25 years -- but when she visited just weeks after the 2010 earthquake, she hardly recognized the country. Yet amid the devastation and signs of corruption, she says she also felt Haiti's determined resilience and vibrant culture shine through. Her latest book, "Farewell, Fred Voodoo," is a love letter to Haiti and its people, who she says are still undiminished by Haiti's many challenges.…

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Rethinking Nuclear Weapons

2013-01-24 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Former secretaries of state Henry Kissinger and George Shultz called for an end to nuclear weapons a few years ago, but the movement failed to gain a foothold. So why do countries continue to spend billions of dollars to modernize and expand their nuclear arsenals? What would make nuclear disarmament possible? Ward Wilson joins us to talk about his book, "Five Myths About Nuclear Weapons."…

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Oakland Hires Controversial Consultant

2013-01-23 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

The Oakland City Council voted early Wednesday morning to hire William Bratton as a crime consultant. Bratton used to head the Los Angeles and New York police departments, where he saw double-digit reductions in crime during his tenure. While his "stop-and-frisk" and "zero tolerance" polices have been controversial, some officials hope his expertise could reverse Oakland's rise in violence. Are consultants the solution to Oakland's problems? How should the Oakland Police Department move forward?…

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Tracy Kidder on 'The Art of Nonfiction'

2013-01-23 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Pulitzer Prize-winning author Tracy Kidder has long been acknowledged as a master of literary journalism. In previous books, he's written about the development of an early microcomputer, profiled a doctor on a mission to cure disease in developing nations and depicted the day-to-day drama of a family building its first new house. Now, with longtime editor Richard Todd, Kidder reveals the secrets of great storytelling in his new book, "Good Prose: The Art of Nonfiction."…

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Niners Head to Super Bowl

2013-01-22 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Despite a rough first quarter in Sunday's NFC championship game, the San Francisco 49ers are headed for the Super Bowl for the first time in 18 years. They'll face off against the Baltimore Ravens in New Orleans early next month in a Super Bowl game that will be significant for another reason. It will be the first time two brothers -- Jim and John Harbaugh -- will lead opposing teams in football's biggest game. Commentators are calling it the "Har-bowl." We preview Superbowl XLVII.…

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Whole Foods' John Mackey

2013-01-22 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

In his new book, "Conscious Capitalism," Whole Foods co-founder and co-CEO John Mackey says that a responsible business can benefit both society and the bottom line. We talk to Mackey about ethical capitalism and the recent controversy surrounding his comparison of President Obama's health care reform to fascism.…

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Teaching Social and Emotional Learning

2013-01-18 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Oakland schools have launched programs to help students manage their emotions, establish positive relationships and resolve conflicts. One of the programs, Roots of Empathy, brings infants and their mothers into school to help students recognize emotions and experience empathy. We discuss the social and emotional learning movement, which aims to teach fundamental life skills in schools, and how it's being used in Oakland.…

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SFJAZZ Center Opens

2013-01-18 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

San Francisco's new $63 million SFJAZZ center opens its doors on Monday. We take stock of the jazz scene in the Bay Area, and preview some of the upcoming acts at the new jazz center.…

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'Radio Ambulante'

2012-10-09 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Bay Area author Daniel Alarcon's acclaimed 2007 novel, "Lost City Radio," features a radio show that plays a powerful role in an unnamed South American country by reuniting people missing or displaced by war. Now, Alarcon has launched a radio program in Spanish in the style of "This American Life." The program features personal stories that reflect the wide range of experiences of Latinos in the U.S., and of Spanish speakers across the globe.…

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Steven Pinker

2012-10-09 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

We are probably living in the most peaceful era in the history of our species, author Steven Pinker says. That may be hard to believe for regular viewers of the evening news. But the Harvard psychologist's research finds that when it comes to war, genocide, capital punishment, rape, hate crimes and slavery, things are definitely looking up. Pinker joins us to discuss his latest book "The Better Angels of Our Nature." Do you think global violence is on the decline?…

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Point Reyes' 50 Year Anniversary

2012-10-08 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Point Reyes National Seashore celebrates its 50th anniversary this year. From its trademark lighthouse to 150 miles of trails, the seashore attracts over 2 million visitors a year and is home to ranchers, oyster farmers and abundant wildlife. But the story of how environmentalists and politicians joined forces to save the area from development is less well known. We talk about the seashore's storied history and plans for the future.…

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Jobs, the Economy and the Presidential Race

2012-10-08 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

President Obama had one welcome bright spot in a week when challenger Mitt Romney was widely considered to have won their first debate: the jobs report. The nation's unemployment rate is at the lowest level since the month Obama took office, according to the latest Labor Department report. We'll talk about the state of the economy and the two candidates' economic plans.…

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Pain at the Pump in California

2012-10-08 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

California drivers faced a second day of record gasoline prices on Sunday. In response, Gov. Jerry Brown directed the Air Resources Board to take emergency steps to increase the state's gas supply. What's causing California's price spike, and how are drivers coping?…

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Oakland A's and SF Giants in the Playoffs

2012-10-05 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Following a remarkable streak of wins surprising nearly everyone, the Oakland A's this week clinched the American League West division title after spending most of the season far in the back of the pack. Meanwhile, an exuberant San Francisco Giants team has secured the National League West title. Both of the Bay Area teams begin playoff games this weekend. We preview the post-season and discuss the Bay Area's stunning season of baseball.…

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Measure S: Berkeley's Proposed Sit-Lie Ban

2012-10-05 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Berkeley has a controversial new ordinance on the ballot this November. If enacted, Measure S will ban sitting on sidewalks in the city's commercial districts during the day. Proponents say people camping out on sidewalks are driving customers away from local stores and restaurants and hurting Berkeley's business community. Opponents say it will divert police resources and that it doesn't solve the problem of homelessness.…

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Don Lattin's 'Distilled Spirits'

2012-10-04 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Veteran journalist Don Lattin writes in his new memoir that he spent years "worshiping at the altar of drugs and alcohol" -- not the type of devotion you might expect from a religion writer. The book "Distilled Spirits" intertwines Lattin's own story with biographical sketches of three others who mixed spiritual seeking with mind-altering substances: "Brave New World" author Aldous Huxley, Alcoholics Anonymous co-founder Bill Wilson, and philosopher Gerald Heard. Lattin joins us in the studio.…

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The First Presidential Debate 2012

2012-10-04 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

President Barack Obama and GOP challenger Mitt Romney stepped into the ring Wednesday night for the first presidential debate. A recent poll showed most Americans think Romney is the underdog. How did he and Obama fare? What were the night's highlights? And did we learn any new details about where each candidate stands on taxes, budget cuts, health care, or how to make Social Security sustainable? Join us for in-depth analysis of Wednesday night's debate in Denver.…

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Sherman Alexie

2012-10-03 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Author Sherman Alexie broke into the literary scene in the mid-'90s with "The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven" and other stories about growing up on a reservation. Since then, he hasn't shied away from sensitive topics like alcoholism and abuse among Native Americans. His book "The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian" was on the list of Top 10 most frequently challenged books in America. Alexie joins Forum to talk about his book "Blasphemy," a collection of 15 new stories and 15 old favorites covering topics from donkey basketball to wind turbines.…

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Election Law and 'The Voting Wars'

2012-10-03 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

In the 12 years since armies of lawyers argued over hanging chads in Florida, election-related lawsuits have more than doubled. Law professor and election law expert Richard Hasen says we should expect even more bitter, partisan disputes over election law in coming years. We'll discuss voter ID laws, claims of voter fraud and voter suppression, plus Hasen's new book, "The Voting Wars: From Florida 2000 to the Next Election Meltdown."…

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Prop. 35: Ban on Human Trafficking and Sex Slavery

2012-10-02 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Proposition 35, a new tough-on-trafficking measure, expands the definition of human trafficking and dramatically increases prison terms and fines for offenders. While everyone seems united against human trafficking, opponents of Prop. 35 argue that it's a politically motivated initiative that will penalize sex workers and their families, rather than criminals who trade in human beings. Defenders of the proposition assert the need for increased penalties in order to deter traffickers and protect those most vulnerable from the threat of sex slavery.…

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Prop. 32: Campaign Finance Reform or an Attack on Unions?

2012-10-02 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Billed as a campaign finance reform initiative by supporters, Proposition 32 seeks to limit political contributions by unions and corporations in California. Detractors claim the proposition is an assault on labor unions and would all but eliminate union influence in politics. We take up the debate over Prop. 32.…

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New California Laws

2012-10-02 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Gov. Jerry Brown has been signing -- and vetoing -- a flurry of bills in recent weeks. In January, new laws will go into effect that will grant licenses to some undocumented immigrants, ban therapies designed to turn gay people straight and give some prisoners with life sentences a chance at a new sentence. The governor vetoed the so-called Trust Act, that would have shielded some immigrants from deportation, and a bill that would have granted rights to domestic workers. We discuss the scores of new laws and the ones the governor has rejected.…

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Protecting Civilians in War Zones

2012-10-01 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

In 2003, 28-year-old Californian Marla Ruzicka was killed by a suicide bomber in Baghdad while working to document the civilian casualties of the Iraq War and to fight for compensation for victims' families. The group she founded -- now called Center for Civilians in Conflict -- has moved away from door-to-door advocacy in war zones, and now works with warring parties around the world to help civilians. We talk with Executive Director Sarah Holewinski about the campaign to reduce civilian casualties and compensate victims in conflict zones like Afghanistan, Libya, Somalia and Pakistan. We'll also discuss the impact on civilians of the increased use of drones by the U.S. military.…

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Proposition 33: Changes to Auto Insurance

2012-10-01 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Our election coverage continues with a debate on Proposition 33, which would change how insurance companies can give discounted rates.…

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Presidential Debate Preview

2012-10-01 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

The Obama and Romney campaigns are busy preparing their candidates -- and trying to lower expectations -- for Wednesday's first presidential debate in Denver, which will focus on domestic policy. We preview the debates.…

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Prop. 36: Should Three Strikes be Changed?

2012-09-28 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

California's Three Strikes Law was enacted in 1994 in response to the kidnapping and murder of Polly Klaas. Since then, crime rates have gone down and defenders of the Three Strikes Law ask; why mess with success? But proponents of Proposition 36 argue their initiative will remedy the unintended consequences of Three Strikes, which they say include unjust incarceration and prison overcrowding.…

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Heat and Harvest: Climate Change and California's Farms

2012-09-28 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

From citrus groves to tomato fields, California is home to a $30 billion agricultural industry. But rising temperatures and lower water levels, which some attribute to climate change, are hitting crops hard. The cherry industry alone lost $22 million last year. How are these changes affecting our farmers? We get an overview of the new documentary "Heat and Harvest," a co-production of KQED and the Center for Investigative Reporting.…

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Prop. 37: The Food Fight Over GMO Labeling

2012-09-27 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Should California require labeling of genetically modified foods? That's the goal of Proposition 37 on the November state ballot. Supporters say GMO labeling will provide California consumers with valuable information, while detractors claim it will simply add unnecessary confusion and cost to the food system.…

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Abraham Sofaer: 'Taking on Iran'

2012-09-27 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Iran's president told the U.N. General Assembly that his country is under threat from "uncivilized Zionists," and urged other leaders to confront the power centers that he said dominated weaker countries. In his speech, President Ahmadinejad demanded the U.N. restructure itself to give equal say to all countries. The U.N. has imposed economic sanctions on Iran for its nuclear program, and President Obama, also addressing the U.N., said the United States will "do what we must" to keep Iran from getting nuclear arms. We talk to Hoover Institution fellow Abraham Sofaer about the recent developments, and his new book "Taking on Iran."…

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Announcing the Tech Awards Winners

2012-09-26 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Imagine if you could turn cow manure into electricity. Or power a makeshift hospital after an earthquake with a hand-carried "solar suitcase." These are some ideas that have won the San Jose Tech museum-sponsored Tech Awards -- monetary prizes given annually to companies, individuals and non-profits for new inventions or technological innovations that benefit humanity. In this special broadcast from KQED Silicon Valley, the San Jose Tech museum announces the 2012 Tech Awards laureates.…

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Should San Jose Raise its Minimum Wage?

2012-09-26 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

From KQED Silicon Valley, we present a debate over Measure D: an effort to raise the minimum wage in San Jose. Inspired by a SJSU sociology class, activist students helped bring this ballot measure to the voters. But fears of job losses and rising costs have many in the business community fighting back against this measure.…

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San Jose Mayor Chuck Reed

2012-09-26 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

San Jose is the wealthiest city in the country, according to data released Thursday by the U.S. Census Bureau. But despite the rosy income data, the Bay Area's largest city and its mayor are facing serious challenges. For one, crime is on the rise and the police chief just unexpectedly announced his resignation. Mayor Chuck Reed joins us in a special broadcast from KQED Silicon Valley to talk about his plan to put more cops on the street, and to shore up the city budget.…

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Salman Rushdie

2012-09-25 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

During his time in hiding, author Salman Rushdie's security detail asked that he provide an alias. He chose "Joseph Anton," in honor of literary heroes Conrad and Chekhov. The name also serves as the title of Rushdie's new memoir. The Booker Prize-winning author joins us to discuss his new book, in which he recounts the nine years he lived under Ayatollah Khomeini's fatwah, imposed in response to Rushdie's 1988 novel "The Satanic Verses."…

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How Much Tech Can San Francisco Take?

2012-09-25 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

There are now 1,700 technology companies based in San Francisco, a 30 percent jump from just two years ago. The tech boom has kept the unemployment rate well under the state average, and it's brought a lot of tax revenue to the city. But has it come at a cost? Critics say the trend, and its accompanying high rents, is shutting out artists and the middle class and threatening the very soul of the city. San Francisco has long been embroiled in gentrification fights. How will it withstand this newest, biggest tech boom?…

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Critical Mass, 20 Years Later

2012-09-24 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

It started with a bike ride in San Francisco on Sept. 25, 1992. About 50 people cycled in a pack along Market Street, hoping to earn some respect from drivers who sometimes ignored them or edged them off the road. They called it the "Commute Clot." Today it's known as Critical Mass, a movement that's spread worldwide. Supporters say it promotes cycling and the rights of bicyclists. But critics say it is illegal, clogs traffic and antagonizes drivers. We talk about Critical Mass' 20th anniversary, and its effects on the city.…

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'What's the Matter With White People?'

2012-09-24 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Joan Walsh grew up in an Irish middle-class family in New York. But she says they went from "Kennedy Democrats to voting for Nixon." So why did so many working class families defect from the Democratic Party? And why does Walsh think their vision of the American dream has kept the country from becoming "a truly multiracial America"? Joan Walsh joins us to discuss her new book, "What's the Matter With White People: Why We Long for a Golden Age That Never Was," and how she thinks white middle class America will impact the elections.…

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'The Spinoza Problem'

2012-03-15 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Retired Stanford psychiatrist Irvin Yalom has written what one reviewer calls a "very cerebral mystery" novel that spans three centuries. It involves the unlikely connections between the excommunicated Jewish philosopher Baruch Spinoza, who lived in pre-Enlightenment Amsterdam, and Alfred Rosenberg, one of Hitler's closest advisers in Nazi Germany.…

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Compromise Reached on Tax Proposals

2012-03-15 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

California Governor Jerry Brown has recently been pushing his own tax plan, and trying to convince backers of other tax increase ballot proposals to back off. Now, the governor has joined forces with these rivals on a new revenue initiative. We discuss the deal and the likelihood of its passage in November.…

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Fan Violence Bill

2012-03-15 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

The brutal beating of San Francisco Giants fan Bryan Stow last year outside of Dodger Stadium and other acts of violence against fans have prompted a proposed California law that would ban violent fans from attending games. But critics say the law penalizes people for acts they haven't yet committed.…

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Brian Copeland

2012-03-14 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Brian Copeland returns to the Bay Area stage with a new one man show "The Waiting Period," an intimate portrayal of the mandatory 10 days Copeland spent waiting to purchase the gun with which he intended to end his life. Without abandoning his signature brand of humor, Copeland explores what it means to live with clinical depression.…

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Rents on the Rise

2012-03-14 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Rents in San Francisco, Marin and the Peninsula are the least affordable in the country, according to a new study by the National Low Income Housing Coalition. Continuing home foreclosures have pushed rental rates up nationwide, even as home prices in some areas continue to decline. We discuss this trend, and what it may mean for both homeowners and renters.…

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Central Valley Drinking Water Contamination

2012-03-14 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Californians living in the state's agricultural regions are at risk of drinking water contaminated with harmful levels of nitrates, according to a new UC Davis report. Linked with thyroid illnesses and some cancers, nitrate contamination largely comes from chemical fertilizer and animal manure. We discuss the extent and cost of the problem, as well as potential solutions.…

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Vegan Cooking

2012-03-13 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Going vegan can offer a range of challenges. Can you really get enough protein without meat and dairy? Can you really make eggless desserts that are anything more than a crumbly mess? Our guests say yes to both questions.…

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Massacre in Afghanistan

2012-03-13 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

U.S. forces in Afghanistan have been warned of possible reprisal attacks following the killings of 16 civilians -- nine of them children -- allegedly by a lone U.S. serviceman. While the Obama administration says its war strategy in Afghanistan will remain intact, lack of trust on both sides complicates the future of this mission.…

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From Adversity to Advocacy

2012-03-12 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

We hear from people struggling with mental and physical issues who are involved with a new organization called Adversity 2 Advocacy. The group focuses on turning personal challenges into service. We talk with people living with disabilities and illnesses who say that speaking out -- and advocating for education and change -- is healing.…

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California Jobs Update

2012-03-12 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

For the first time in almost three years, California's unemployment rate fell below 11 percent in January. We look at what a slow drop in the jobless rate may mean for recovery and employment in the state.…

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Mirkarimi Saga Continues

2012-03-12 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

A three-judge panel ruled Friday that a key piece of video evidence can be submitted in the domestic violence trial of San Francisco Sheriff Ross Mirkarimi. We discuss the latest developments in this legal drama that has already taken several interesting turns.…

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Preventing Youth Smoking

2012-03-09 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

In its first report on youth smoking in almost 20 years, the Surgeon General's Office warns that there is still a need to reduce the number of teens who smoke. Although the number of young smokers has decreased from earlier decades, the report says the rate of decline has slowed. We discuss the report's findings, and what can be done to curb youth smoking.…

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'The Moment'

2012-03-09 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Is there one moment that changed the trajectory of your life? Or illuminated a truth? Or changed the way you think about something important? Larry Smith, founding editor of Smith Magazine, has collected stories of turning points, epiphanies and revelations from 125 writers and artists. We talk to Smith about the collection, and invite you to share the story of a moment that shifted your life.…

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Recalling a Quest to Ban the Bomb

2012-03-08 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

In 1988, former New York Times reporter Philip Taubman watched as top American and Soviet officials came close to a historic deal to eliminate all their nuclear weapons. Now, more than 25 years later with Iran's nuclear program in the news, Taubman's story of the near-abolition of nuclear weaponry still has resonance. He has written a new book about the 1980s push to "ban the bomb," and he joins us in-studio.…

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A 'Public Employees Bill of Rights'?

2012-03-08 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Cash-strapped state and local governments are increasingly looking to privatization as a way to cut costs. But opponents, such as California Assemblyman Roger Dickinson, say state workers are more dedicated and get the job done better than outside contractors. Dickinson has introduced a bill to that effect, called a "Public Employees Bill of Rights." We debate the costs and benefits of privatizing public services.…

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The Art of French Parenting

2012-03-07 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

No need to turn into a Tiger Mother -- writer Pamela Druckerman says it's the French model American parents should be watching. While raising her own children in Paris, Druckerman observed a nation of hands-off, no-nonsense mothers and fathers raising well-tempered children who eat their food and sleep through the night. Should American parents raise their Jacks and Marys more like Jacques and Madelines?…

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Amnesty International Chief Suzanne Nossel

2012-03-07 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

Suzanne Nossel took over as executive director of Amnesty International USA in January, after a stint in the U.S. State Department working on humanitarian issues. She joins us to discuss the latest developments in Iran and Syria, and the organization's efforts to fight injustice and protect human rights around the globe.…

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Rush Limbaugh and the Contraception Controversy

2012-03-06 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

On Saturday, talk show host Rush Limbaugh apologized for calling a Georgetown University law student Sandra Fluke a "slut" and "prostitute." A dozen advertisers have now ditched Limbaugh's show in response to the comments, which came after Fluke testified before Congress in support of health coverage for contraception. We discuss the incident and assess Limbaugh's cultural and political influence.…

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Robert Sapolsky

2012-03-05 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

For over 30 years Stanford neuroscientist Robert Sapolsky has combined field work on primates with neurological research in the laboratory, producing unique insights into primate and human behavior. Sapolsky joins us to talk about his latest research on stress and the brain.…

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One Year On: Fukushima Dai-ichi

2012-03-05 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

As the first anniversary of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant disaster approaches, U.S. nuclear regulators are proposing new rules to improve safety. At the same time, they've just approved construction of two new reactors. We discuss the legacy of Fukushima, and how prepared we are to deal with the consequences of natural disasters at our nuclear power plants.…

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Girls and the Ambition Gap

2012-03-02 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

A recent study commissioned by the Girl Scouts found more than a third of girls surveyed between the ages of eight and 17 said they would not feel comfortable trying to be a leader. We look at the so-called gender ambition gap. What can be done to help raise strong and self-confident girls?…

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Kevin Epps: 'Straight Outta Hunters Point 2'

2012-03-02 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

According to filmmaker Kevin Epps, most San Francisco residents haven't spent much time in his Hunters Point neighborhood. Epps' new documentary, "Straight Outta Hunters Point 2" is a sequel to his award-winning 2003 film. He joins us to discuss the film and his work in the community.…

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Chukchansi Indian Dispute

2012-03-02 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52s

For the last two months, the Chukchansi Indian tribe in California's Madera County has been split over who should be the rightful leader of the tribal council. Like many other tribes, the Chukchansi runs a nearby casino. We explore the role that Indian casinos may be playing in provoking membership struggles within tribes around the country.…

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From the Archives: Jeffrey Eugenides

2011-11-25 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52m 0s

Jeffrey Eugenides joined us in the studio to discuss his highly anticipated latest novel, "The Marriage Plot." The book is Eugenides' first since his 2002 bestseller Middlesex, which won the Pulitzer Prize.…

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From the Archives: Ann Packer

2011-11-25 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52m 0s

Ann Packer, the author of best-selling novels like "The Dive from Clausen's Pier" and "Songs Without Words," joins us to talk about her newest book--a collection of short stories. Critics have applauded her novels for their stirringly emotional characters…

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From the Archives: Maurice Lim Miller

2011-11-25 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52m 0s

Today we continue our First Person series, featuring the leaders, innovators, and other compelling characters that make the Bay Area unique. Social entrepreneur Maurice Lim Miller from the Oakland-based Family Independence Initiative joins the show to dis…

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From the Archives: The Heart and the Fist

2011-11-25 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52m 0s

"The world needs many more humanitarians than it needs warriors," writes Eric Greitens in his new book "The Heart and the Fist," "but there can be none of the former without enough of the latter." Dave Iverson talks with Greitens, a former Rhodes scholar…

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Holiday Books 2011

2011-11-25 :: forum@kqed.org (KQED Public Radio)
Length: 52m 0s

Forum opens up the phone lines to hear from listeners about their favorite books of 2011. Call or write in and let us know about the books you think everyone should read and why.

PLEASE NOTE: WE ARE EXPERIENCING TECHNICAL DIFFICULTIES WITH THE LINKS TO…

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