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Last update: 2013-06-29

The naked economy

2013-06-29 :: ABC Radio National

A look at the state of the economy.…

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Speak the speech I pray you

2013-06-22 :: ABC Radio National

Why does language change?…

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Bridging the gap

2013-06-15 :: ABC Radio National

There is a big gap between discovery and application.…

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Coconut oil in our diet

2013-06-08 :: ABC Radio National

Can coconut oil be part of a healthy diet?…

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Misinformation on the internet

2013-06-01 :: ABC Radio National

Many interest groups publish misinformation on the internet, sometimes dangerous lies.…

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The other Ian Fleming

2013-05-25 :: ABC Radio National

In the small history of the science world there were two Ian Flemings.…

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From Oxford to Monash: friendship rekindled

2013-05-18 :: ABC Radio National

Professor John Crossley and Professor John Bradshaw, a regular contributor to this program, first met 50 years ago when they were both students at Oxford University.…

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Stroke revisited

2013-05-11 :: ABC Radio National

Professor John Bradshaw talks about how a catastrophic stroke suffered by his wife changed their lives forever.…

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Wind farms and bird strike

2013-05-04 :: ABC Radio National

A large number of birds are killed by wind turbines in Australia and overseas.…

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Cutting for the stone

2013-04-27 :: ABC Radio National

Medical historian Dr Jim Leavesley from Halls Head in Western Australia takes us through the history of surgery to remove bladder stones. The 355th anniversary of the cure for this condition is 1st May this year.…

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The junk DNA controversy

2013-04-20 :: ABC Radio National

A series of new papers has just been published, confirming that most of our DNA has no known function. The Dean of Science at the University of New South Wales, Merlin Crossley, believes that up to 90 per cent of our DNA really is junk.…

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The logistics of 50 per cent

2013-04-13 :: ABC Radio National

Frank Szanto is a mechanical engineer who is involved in the design of rail vehicles. Today he talks about the way freight is transported in Australia; that is, either by rail or in trucks. He argues that transporting freight by rail is the way to go—it would be better for the environment and would cut down on road accidents. However, a lot of work needs to be done on the railway infrastructure before freight trains can become the major way of transporting goods in Australia.…

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Social Dancing

2013-04-06 :: ABC Radio National

Arthur Marcel teaches at the Queensland University of Technology and he loves dancing. Dancing is part of our human culture and goes back many, many years. Arthur Marcel talks about what dancing was like in the past and he argues that there is a decline in social dancing.…

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Why digital money is one of the most important innovations ever

2013-03-30 :: ABC Radio National

Professor Mark Dodgson from the University of Queensland's School of Business talks about digital money, a technology that has changed the way we are able to conduct business transactions.…

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Lambing in the global financial crisis - part two

2013-03-23 :: ABC Radio National

In part two of his talk Dr Peter Underwood from Western Australia talks about the time when his sheep gave birth during extremely harsh weather conditions, which some newborn lambs did not survive. He also tells us how his dog helped in saving a rejected newborn lamb to survive.…

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Lambing in the global financial crisis - part one

2013-03-16 :: ABC Radio National

A few years ago Dr Peter Underwood from Western Australia tried his hand at arranging artificial conception for his flock of Merino sheep. He talks about his experiences and difficulties during that time, which was also the time of the world-wide global financial crisis.…

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Nuclear waste disposal in Australia

2013-03-09 :: ABC Radio National

Terry Krieg from Port Lincoln in South Australia is a retired geology and geography teacher and a member of the Australian Nuclear Forum. He suggests that there are enormous environmental and economic opportunities for Australia in burying and removing the world's nuclear waste from the environment forever and argues that this can be done safely.…

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Botanic gardens in modern society

2013-03-02 :: ABC Radio National

Botanic gardens are beautiful and peaceful places. But they are far more than simply places to relax.…

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A foresight saga

2013-02-23 :: ABC Radio National

Futurist Oliver Freeman reflects on the importance of foresight in our intellectual, social, political and emotional lives as we engage with the growing uncertainties of the 21st century.…

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Addiction and gambling and other peccadillos

2013-02-16 :: ABC Radio National

Professor John Bradshaw from Monash University explains some of the vulnerability aspects associated with addiction and gambling from a neuroscience perspective.…

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'Poo transplants' - the Australian story

2013-02-09 :: ABC Radio National

Dyani Lewis from the Melbourne School of Population Health at the University of Melbourne, provides an insight into the Australian scene of 'poo transplants' and how the 100 trillion microbes living in and on our bodies are not all bad for our health.…

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Rethinking food security

2013-02-02 :: ABC Radio National

Food security is a growing concern around the world. Mark Wahlqvist from Monash University suggests a fundamentally different approach is needed, from national governments, international organisations and also at a local or community level. He calls for a greater appreciation for the ways in which the biodiversity and ecology of local areas relate to the functioning of food systems.…

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Decisions, decisions

2013-01-26 :: ABC Radio National

Arthur Marcel teaches at the Queensland University of Technology. In this talk he looks at how decisions can be turning points in history, and making the wrong decision can have disastrous effects. He cites as one example the plane crash at Los Rodeos airport on Teneriffe in March, 1977, which killed 583 people.…

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Coal fired power stations - an alternative

2013-01-19 :: ABC Radio National

Geoff Hudson, an independent computer programmer and inventor from Melbourne, refers to an earlier Ockham's Razor talk by Graham Palmer about coal fired power stations and makes some alternative suggestions about how power can be obtained in a more environmentally friendly way.…

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The curious minds who made our science Australian

2013-01-12 :: ABC Radio National

Peter Macinnis from Sydney is the author of a book titled Curious Minds - The Discoveries of Australian Naturalists. In this book he looks at the long line of naturalists who have traversed Australia in search of new plants and animals.…

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Pigs and poultry

2013-01-05 :: ABC Radio National

People used to know where their food came from. They grew it and harvested it, or raised it and slaughtered it. However, the separation of people from their food sources has resulted in more than ignorance and misconceptions about how food is produced and has also resulted in massive waste. Returning to a more environmentally sustainable farm system would involve more than change the land, according to rural journalist Asa Wahlquist from Sydney.…

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A poet's guide to climate change

2012-12-29 :: ABC Radio National

Writer and poet Mark Tredinnick from the Southern Highlands of New South Wales, gives an artist's response to climate change, how to deal with the grief, the denial and the guilt.…

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Celibacy and the Catholic Church

2012-12-22 :: ABC Radio National

Author and historian Jill, Duchess of Hamilton, discusses the Vatican's law of celibacy for Roman Catholic priests. She talks about the history of this law and the problems confronting celibate priests.…

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Trees of survival: seeds of hope

2012-12-15 :: ABC Radio National

International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War hold an international meeting every second year. Dr Peter Underwood, a physician from Perth, attended their last conference, which took place in the Japanese city of Hiroshima. He talks about his experiences and impressions during his stay in this city, which suffered the blast of an atomic bomb 67 years ago.…

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Testing times for medical science

2012-12-08 :: ABC Radio National

Dr Rob Morrison, a Professorial Fellow from Flinders University in Adelaide, is also the Vice President of Friends of Science in Medicine, an organisation that was formed to discourage universities from offering pseudoscientific health courses under a scientific banner and calling them evidence-based when they are not. The Australian Skeptics have named the Friends of Science in Medicine as 'Skeptic of the Year'. This year's winner of the Australian Skeptics' Bent Spoon award 'for the most preposterous piece of paranormal or pseudoscientific piffle' went to Fran Sheffield from Homeopathy Plus. This organisation has made claims that homeopathy can help with the highly contagious bacterial disease of whooping cough and that vaccine is ineffective against a new strain of that disease.…

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John Gould's Extinct and Endangered Birds of Australia.

2012-12-01 :: ABC Radio National

Sue Taylor, author and 'twitcher' from Melbourne, talks about her new book John Gould's Extinct and Endangered Birds of Australia.…

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Endangered languages

2012-11-24 :: ABC Radio National

Associate Professor Claire Bowern is in the Department of Linguistics at Yale University. Today she talks about why some languages become endangered and why we should care about this. Her main area of work are endangered Australian Aboriginal languages.…

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Rescuing an icon in crisis

2012-11-17 :: ABC Radio National

Dr Ron Sandland retired from CSIRO in 2007 as Deputy Chief Executive. He was responsible for the National Flagship Initiative and the Science Investment Process and prior to that he was Chief of CSIRO's Mathematical and Information Sciences Division. Today he talks about why CSIRO, Australia's largest publicly funded research organisation, staked everything on an ambitious program of renewal and what happened when it did.…

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The war to end all wars

2012-11-10 :: ABC Radio National

On 11 November, 1918 the hostilities of World War I ended. Shirley Shackleton from Melbourne talks about the World War I experiences of her grandfather and her great uncle.…

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Biodiversity hotspots in the southwest region of Western Australia

2012-11-03 :: ABC Radio National

Perth based journalist and author Victoria Laurie talks about the flora and fauna of Western Australia's southwest region, a 'biodiversity hotspot' where large numbers of species are concentrated, but that place is under threat.…

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50th Anniversary of Rachel Carson's 'Silent Spring'

2012-10-27 :: ABC Radio National

Jonathon Porritt is the Founder Director of Forum for the Future in London. In this talk he celebrates the 50th anniversary of Rachel Carson's book Silent Spring, which took a hard look at the effects of pesticides on our environment and was instrumental in the banning of DDT.…

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The effect of climate change in Antarctica

2012-10-20 :: ABC Radio National

David Neilson is a photographer from Emerald in Victoria. David has made six trips to Antarctica between 1990 and 2009 and in this program he talks about the effect of climate change in Antarctica.…

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Japanese Disasters

2012-10-13 :: ABC Radio National

Roger Pulvers is the Head of the Center for the Study of World Civilizations at the Tokyo Institute of Technology and talks about the history of disasters in Japan and about the big earthquake and tsunami that struck that country last year. He also looks at what can be done to prevent or at least minimise the effect of these types of disasters.…

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Parkinson's Disease and Deep Brain Stimulation

2012-10-06 :: ABC Radio National

Sally Hunter is an author from Adelaide and she has written a book called You Can't Keep A Good Man Down - From Parkinson's To A New Life With Deep Brain Stimulation. It's the story of one person's journey through Parkinson's disease and deep brain stimulation.…

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John Graunt and the birth of medical statistics

2012-09-29 :: ABC Radio National

In London, in 1662, 350 years ago, John Graunt published a booklet which was the beginning of medical statistics, of epidemiology and of medical demography. Dr John Carmody of the Department of Physiology at the University of Sydney, looks at the history of medical statistics.…

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Building London’s sewerage system: an engineering wonder with lessons for today

2012-09-22 :: ABC Radio National

London's sewerage system is seen as wonder of the engineering world. The challenges in getting it built are mirrored in the big infrastructure projects of today.…

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Diet and ADHD

2012-09-15 :: ABC Radio National

Joan Breakey, a dietitian from Brisbane, asks the question why, after 35 years, the controversy about diet and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is still relevant today.…

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Was Australia intended as a hemp colony?

2012-09-08 :: ABC Radio National

Two hundred years ago hemp, cannabis sativa, was used as the basis for sail and rope. In the Age of Sail hemp was as important as oil is in the modern era. Historian Dr John Jiggens wrote a book called Sir Joseph Banks and the Question of Hemp, in which he used previously unpublished documents by Sir Joseph Banks on the hemp question.…

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Ockham's Magic Razor

2012-09-01 :: ABC Radio National

Emeritus Professor of Neuropsychology at Monash University, John Bradshaw, talks about how the media may open doors to research. He mentions his experiences after he talked about two topics of his own research interests on the Ockham's Razor program: Phantom limb pains and synaesthesia.…

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Six products I want to see

2012-08-25 :: ABC Radio National

Independent computer programmer and inventor Geoff Hudson from Melbourne talks about some possible inventions which could be useful in the future.…

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Australia's population debate

2012-08-18 :: ABC Radio National

Emeritus Professor Ian Lowe from Griffith University in Brisbane has recently published a book called Bigger or Better, in which he explains the politics of population growth and what it will mean for Australia.…

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Cattle and methane

2012-08-11 :: ABC Radio National

A lot of people, amongst them Britain's Lord Stern and Sir Paul McCartney, argue that eating less meat could help save the planet. But there is a growing body of evidence that it is not simply a case of less meat means less heat. Rural journalist Asa Wahlquist takes a closer look at this issue.…

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What's your beef?

2012-08-04 :: ABC Radio National

When Mark Whittaker, a cow farmer and journalist, moved to the country for a simpler life, he did not expect to discover that his cows would be blamed for their contribution to the greenhouse effect.…

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QWERTY - here to stay

2012-07-28 :: ABC Radio National

There is no sense to its layout. Touch typists have wired their brains for the qwerty keyboard. Despite some attempts to introduce other layouts, qwerty has become part of almost every digital device which requires human input. The qwerty keyboard seems embedded and immovable.  Robin Robertson discusses the history of qwerty and the power of touch typists.…

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A grandmother confronts creationist beliefs in her family

2012-07-21 :: ABC Radio National

Mildred Studders, a grandmother from Brisbane, hoping to encourage her grandchildren to think for themselves, posed several questions to them by email. The replies she got were extremely surprising and worrying.…

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Computers and Literacy

2012-07-14 :: ABC Radio National

Michael Callanan, a high school teacher from Brisbane, discusses whether computers in schools have a beneficial effect on academic achievement.…

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Are global cataclysms cyclic?

2012-07-07 :: ABC Radio National

Geologist Peter James from Tasmania discusses what has happened over the centuries when Jupiter and Saturn line up with us and the sun.…

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Disease and civilization

2012-06-30 :: ABC Radio National

Medical historian, Dr James Leavesley from Margaret River in Western Australia, talks about the times when diseases like typhoid, measles, cholera and others decimated large areas of Europe and North and South America.…

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Indigenous Literacy

2012-06-23 :: ABC Radio National

Jeanie Adams of Black Ink Press in Townsville, Northern Queensland, talks about some of the reasons for low literacy among many indigenous Australians.…

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Summer in the Antarctic

2012-06-16 :: ABC Radio National

Professor Herbert Huppert, an Australian Geophysicist at Cambridge University, King's College, talks about his experiences while taking part in an oceanographic expedition in Antarctic waters.…

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The history of bell-ringing

2012-06-09 :: ABC Radio National

Dr Heather Phillips from Adelaide talks about the history of the ringing of church bells in England.…

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Innovations that can change our lives

2012-06-02 :: ABC Radio National

Dr Andrew Leigh MP is the Federal Member for Fraser in the ACT and today he talks about five ideas that can change our lives.…

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GrowthBusters: Hooked on Growth

2012-05-26 :: ABC Radio National

Dave Gardner is a US filmmaker who recently directed the documentary GrowthBusters: Hooked on Growth. He asks one of the most critical questions of our time: How do we become a sustainable civilization?…

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The weather of who we are

2012-05-19 :: ABC Radio National

Mark Tredddinick is a poet who lives in the Southern Highlands of New South Wales and has written a book called Australia's Wild Weather. He talks about what weather means to us and how it affects our daily lives.…

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From Battlefields to Bushfires: The Mental Health Effects of Traumatic Experience

2012-05-12 :: ABC Radio National

Professor Mark Creamer from the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Melbourne discusses the effect of trauma and how awareness of it and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has changed considerably over recent years.…

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Music and the mind

2012-05-05 :: ABC Radio National

Emeritus Professor Roger Rees from Flinders University in Adelaide, talks about the benefits of music therapy for people who recover from trauma, brain injury and who suffer from mental illness.…

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Beyond vox pop democracy: Deepening democracy in the internet age

2012-04-28 :: ABC Radio National

Nicholas Gruen is CEO of Lateral Economics and Chairman of the Australian Centre for Social Innovation and today he discusses how the internet can play a role in involving people in government..…

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Reframe

2012-04-21 :: ABC Radio National

Sydney author Eric Knight wrote a book called Reframe: How to solve the world's trickiest problems, in which he explains ways of finding a solution to problems.…

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Educational technologies and the changing role of universities

2012-04-14 :: ABC Radio National

Professor Jim Barber, Vice Chancellor of the University of New England in Armidale, New South Wales, talks about how teaching at universities is changing, using the internet.…

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Christian animal sacrifice in the Holy Land

2012-04-07 :: ABC Radio National

Jill, Duchess of Hamilton was shocked when she discovered that the practice of ritualized animal sacrifice by Christians in the Holy Land still occurs.…

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Humour in science

2012-03-31 :: ABC Radio National

Ig Nobel laureate Len Fisher from the physics department of the University of Bristol in the UK tells us that scientists do have a sense of humour, and humour can be a stimulus as well as the result in scientific research.…

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Is the carbon Landcare's missing link?

2012-03-24 :: ABC Radio National

Landcare just had its 25th anniversary and today one of its founders, Phillip Toyne, talks about the history and the future of that movement.…

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Mateship with nature

2012-03-17 :: ABC Radio National

Author Carrie Tiffany from Melbourne has been working with the Landcare movement, which just had its 25th anniversary, for most of that time. Today she talks about her experiences with the Australian landscape and the people she has met during her work.…

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The effect of caffeine on performance

2012-03-10 :: ABC Radio National

In his second talk about caffeine Chris Forbes-Ewan, a defence nutritionist with the Defence and Technology Organisation in Scottsdale, Tasmania, talks about the way caffeine affects the performance of athletes.…

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The effect of caffeine on human health

2012-03-03 :: ABC Radio National

Chris Forbes-Ewan, a defence nutritionist with the Defence Science and Technology Organisation in Scottsdale, Tasmania, talks about the health effects of caffeine. He explains what caffeine is and describes its physiological effects on the body.…

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2011-11-27 A question of collaboration

2011-11-26
Length: 13m 38s

Sydney author Peter Macinnis is fascinated by the 19th century. Today he discusses the science and technology predictions of that era and tells us his vision of the future. TRANSCRIPT: Robyn Williams: We have a new liquidiser in the office. It doesn´t m…

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2011-11-20 Lathered up about CO2

2011-11-19
Length: 11m 30s

Howard Morrison is an energy consultant, a hands on adviser to architects and engineers and today he joins the debate about how we can reduce our CO2 emissions. He also questions the efficiency of our energy system. TRANSCRIPT: Robyn Williams: Do you rec…

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2011-11-13 Epileptic seizures - turmoil hidden from view

2011-11-12
Length: 13m 19s

Melbourne author Suzanne Yanko has written a self-published book called Epilepsy in the Family. She talks about different types of epilepsy, in particular, complex-partial seizures and how they often go unrecognised, despite the strange sensations experie…

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2011-11-06 Mulling up Cannabis and psychosis

2011-11-05
Length: 13m 58s

Psychiatrist Dr Matthew Large, Clinical Senior Lecturer in the School of Psychiatry at the University of New South Wales, responds to an earlier Ockham's Razor talk by author Dr John Jiggens, which was broadcast on 28 August, 2011. TRANSCRIPT: Robyn Will…

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2011-10-30 Ignoring gen Y while the world sleepwalks to catastrophe

2011-10-29
Length: 13m 38s

Fiona Heinrichs, who studies business administration at Macquarie University in Sydney, feels that her generation is largely ignored and not given a voice in the media. TRANSCRIPT: Robyn Williams: So it´s happened, 35 minutes ago in Bendigo, the 7 billi…

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2011-10-23 A scientific view of non-scientific beliefs

2011-10-22
Length: 13m 54s

Science communicator Dr Craig Cormick from Canberra discusses the fact that a large number of people believe in psychic powers, UFOs, magic and similar things. Apparently about 80% of Australians and Americans hold at least one paranormal belief. TRANSCR…

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2011-10-16 Heat

2011-10-15
Length: 13m 57s

Dr Jennifer Coopersmith is an honorary research associate at La Trobe University in Bendigo, Victoria. She discusses the various theories that surrounded the mysteries of heat. TRANSCRIPT: Robyn Williams: Let me ask you a couple of physics questions. Wha…

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2011-09-25 Coal dependence and the renewables paradox

2011-09-24
Length: 13m 42s

Graham Palmer, who is an industrial engineer from Melbourne, discusses our dependence on coal. TRANSCRIPT: Robyn Williams: One of my favourite quotations goes like this: `Practically everything we do, from eating ice to crossing the Atlantic, and from ba…

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2011-09-18 Not so high speed rail

2011-09-17
Length: 12m 51s

Frank Szanto is a mechanical engineer based in Sydney and has spent a lifetime working on the railways. Today he discusses the history and future of the Australian rail system. TRANSCRIPT: Robyn Williams: Isn´t it odd, now that we´re all poor and the cou…

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2011-09-11 Mobile phones and cordless technology - are they safe?

2011-09-10
Length: 12m 53s

Lyn McLean is the Director of EMR Australia and former director of EMR Association of Australia. She is a community representative on several government and industry committees and has lobbied for precautions to protect the community against the harmful e…

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2011-09-04 Climate change and Australia's energy future

2011-09-03
Length: 13m 19s

Terry Krieg is a retired geography and geology teacher from Port Lincoln, in South Australia. He suggests that Australia should embrace nuclear power. TRANSCRIPT: Robyn Williams: Port Lincoln in South Australia is about to celebrate 200 years since Mat…

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2011-08-28 New drug that maddens victims (Reefer Madness version 2.0)

2011-08-27
Length: 14m 0s

Dr John Jiggens is an author living in Brisbane. He is outraged by the type of media coverage linking marijuana and cannabis to mental illness. TRANSCRIPT: Robyn Williams: A few months ago on Life Matters I was startled to hear someone claim that about …

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2011-08-21 All is not quite right in the hallowed halls of academe

2011-08-20
Length: 13m 54s

Former Pro Vice Chancellor at the University of New South Wales, Adrian Lee, believes that universities are too focussed on research rather than teaching. Whilst research productivity increases the prestige of a university, it is critical that teaching ex…

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2011-08-14 Stroke - the hour that struck

2011-08-13
Length: 14m 0s

Emeritus Professor John Bradshaw from Monash University in Melbourne has been a regular contributor to this program for many years. Today he tells us how his life (and that of his wife Judy) has changed forever after his wife suffered a major stroke durin…

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2011-08-07 Heart pacemakers

2011-08-06
Length: 12m 10s

Cardiologist Dr John England, who lives and works in the Blue Mountains in New South Wales, has been living with a pacemaker for the last 35 years. He has also written a book which tells you everything you need to know about living with a pacemaker. It's …

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2011-07-31 Compulsory imagination

2011-07-30
Length: 12m 4s

David Astle from Melbourne is a crossword maker and today he talks about the art of designing and solving crossword puzzles. TRANSCRIPT: Robyn Williams: I´m about to say something rude. According to ABC guidelines I have to warn you about that, otherwise…

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2011-07-24 Fire and humans

2011-07-23
Length: 14m 0s

Professor of Forest Ecology David Bowman from the University of Tasmania in Hobart, talks about human involvement with fire and its consequences. TRANSCRIPT: Robyn Williams: Well, this may not be the best time of year to talk about fire - or is it? Yes…

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2011-07-17 Adonis and Jesus Christ

2011-07-16
Length: 11m 40s

Today historian Jill, Duchess of Hamilton talks about the connection between Adonis and Jesus Christ and what Adonis has to do with Bethlehem. TRANSCRIPT: Robyn Williams: Did you know that when I was somewhat younger they used to call me Adonis? (Or may…

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2011-07-10 What's in a name?

2011-07-09
Length: 13m 22s

Dr Kevin Thiele is Curator at the Western Australian Herbarium in Perth and talks about the the naming of plants and flowers. TRANSCRIPT: Robyn Williams: What´s in a name? Would you prefer to be called Beelzebub or Venus and would it affect in any way …

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2011-07-03 Early French influences in Australia

2011-07-02
Length: 13m 17s

Edward Duyker is Adjunct Professor in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at the Australian Catholic University and Honorary Senior Lecturer in the Department of French Studies at Sydney University. Today he tells us about the French influence in Australia i…

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2011-06-26 There's more to it than meets the eye: Unconscious perception

2011-06-25
Length: 13m 38s

Emeritus Professor John Bradshaw from Monash University in Melbourne discusses how we are open to suggestion and gives many examples of how our thinking can be influenced without us knowing it. TRANSCRIPT: Robyn Williams: Are you open to suggestion? Have…

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2011-06-19 Why Australian students should be travellers

2011-06-18
Length: 13m 48s

Dr John Aaskov from the Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation at the Queensland University of Technology, researches tropical medicine. During his work he spends a large amount of his time in South East Asia and today he tells us the story of Dr A…

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2010-12-12 The occupational health of academics

2010-12-11
Length: 14m 0s

Professor Yasmin Haskell from the University of Western Australia discusses some of the ailments associated with the sedentary scholarly lifestyle. TRANSCRIPT: Robyn Williams: Australians are suspicious of intellectuals. Rightly so! They are a little s…

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2010-12-05 Not your ordinary doctor

2010-12-04
Length: 14m 14s

Medical historian and author Dr Jim Leavesley from Western Australia looks at some of the famous and infamous men who trained as doctors and then went on to do other things. TRANSCRIPT: Robyn Williams: Dr George Miller preferred Mad Max, Dr John Colle…

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2010-11-28 Small can be beautiful when it comes to minerals

2010-11-27
Length: 12m 10s

Victorian veterinarian Dr Peter Carter discusses the importance of minerals, not only in animals and plants, but also in humans. TRANSCRIPT: Robyn Williams: One of the great challenges to farming in the early days in Australia was trying to work out why …

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2010-11-21 Darwin's shame and other strong emotions

2010-11-20
Length: 13m 59s

Senior Lecturer Tony Webb from the University of Western Sydney discusses Darwin's other less well known book on the expression of emotions in man and animals. This talk focuses on shame and its implications. TRANSCRIPT: Robyn Williams: Next Wednesday of…

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2010-11-14 Earthquakes and their prediction

2010-11-13
Length: 13m 33s

Earth scientist and author Peter James from Dunalley in Tasmania discusses the nature of earthquakes and the ability to predict them. TRANSCRIPT: Robyn Williams: Let you into a secret: One of the first interviews I recorded for the Science Show, back in…

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2010-11-07 Innovative cities

2010-11-06
Length: 13m 57s

Professor Mark Dodgson, Director of the Technology and Innovation Management Centre at the University of Queensland, has been exploring how innovation might deal with the problems of city living. TRANSCRIPT: Robyn Williams: The current edition of the jou…

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2010-10-31 Jatta

2010-10-30
Length: 13m 45s

Sydney author and illustrator Jenny Hale has written a fantasy novel in which its heroine, 14-year-old Jatta, discovers that she is a werewolf. TRANSCRIPT: Robyn Williams: I always look forward to this day when one can have blood on one´s muesli instead …

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Ockham's Razor - Program podcast

William of Ockham was an English monk, philosopher, theologian, who provided the scientific method with its key principle 700 years ago. 'What can be done with fewer assumptions is done in vain with more,' he said. That is, in explaining any phenomenon, we should use no more explanatory concepts than are absolutely necessary. Simplicity should never be despised. Thoughtful people have their say, without interruption, on important science-related topics.

Ockham's Razor - Program podcast


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