Home  /  Podcast Directory  /  Science  /  Science Talk


Last update: 2013-06-27

Penis Enlightenment: Bering Straight Talk

2013-06-27 :: Scientific American

Jesse Bering discusses his 2012 book Why Is the Penis Shaped Like That? (And Other Reflections on Being Human)

x

Share: Penis Enlightenment: Bering Straight Talk


Close Shave for Bill Nye the Science Guy

2013-06-18 :: Scientific American

Bill Nye the Science Guy ponders Superman's tonsorial travails, and science education…

x

Share: Close Shave for Bill Nye the Science Guy


Is There a Doctor in the Spaceship?

2013-04-29 :: Scientific American

NASA astronaut and medical doctor Michael Barratt spoke to schoolkids at the Family Science Days event at this year's meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Boston…

x

Share: Is There a Doctor in the Spaceship?


Mary Roach Cruises the Alimentary Canal

2013-04-16 :: Scientific American

Mary Roach talks about her new book Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal, which traces what she calls "the whole food chute"…

x

Share: Mary Roach Cruises the Alimentary Canal


Start Talking: Synthetic Biology and Conservation Biology Meet, Part 1

2013-04-02 :: Scientific American

Conservation biologist Kent Redford talks about the issues facing the intersection of synthetic biology and conservation biology and a conference that starts April 9th called "How will synthetic biology and conservation shape the future of nature?"…

x

Share: Start Talking: Synthetic Biology and Conservation Biology Meet, Part 1


Start Talking: Synthetic Biology and Conservation Biology Meet, Part 2

2013-04-02 :: Scientific American

Conservation biologist Kent Redford talks about the issues facing the intersection of synthetic biology and conservation biology and a conference that starts April 9th called "How will synthetic biology and conservation shape the future of nature?"…

x

Share: Start Talking: Synthetic Biology and Conservation Biology Meet, Part 2


Imagine All the People Turning Blue and Green

2013-03-29 :: Scientific American

Science writer Dennis Meredith talks about his new science fiction book The Rainbow Virus, in which a bioterror plot turns people all the colors of the rainbow…

x

Share: Imagine All the People Turning Blue and Green


Biotech's Brave New Beasts, Part 2

2013-03-27 :: Scientific American

Journalist and author Emily Anthes talks about her new book, Frankenstein's Cat: Cuddling Up to Biotech's Brave New Beasts

x

Share: Biotech's Brave New Beasts, Part 2


Biotech's Brave New Beasts, Part 1

2013-03-26 :: Scientific American

Journalist and author Emily Anthes talks about her new book, Frankenstein's Cat: Cuddling Up to Biotech's Brave New Beasts

x

Share: Biotech's Brave New Beasts, Part 1


CSI: 19th-Century France and the Birth of Forensic Science

2013-03-15 :: Scientific American

Reporter and storyteller Steven Berkowitz talks to science journalist and author Douglas Starr about his book The Killer of Little Shepherds: A True Crime Story and the Birth of Forensic Science

x

Share: CSI: 19th-Century France and the Birth of Forensic Science


John Rennie Hacks the Planet

2013-02-28 :: Scientific American

Former Scientific American editor in chief John Rennie talks about his new six-episode Weather Channel TV Show, Hacking the Planet, which debuts February 28…

x

Share: John Rennie Hacks the Planet


Inside Isaac: A Discussion of Newton, Part 2

2013-02-25 :: Scientific American

A panel of physicists, science historians and playwright Lucas Hnath discuss Newton following a performance of Hnath's play about Newton, called Isaac's Eye, at the Ensemble Studio Theater in New York City on February 20th. The play runs through March 10, 2013…

x

Share: Inside Isaac: A Discussion of Newton, Part 2


Inside Isaac: A Discussion of Newton, Part 1

2013-02-24 :: Scientific American

A panel of physicists, science historians and playwright Lucas Hnath discuss Newton following a performance of Hnath's play about Newton, called Isaac's Eye, at the Ensemble Studio Theater in New York City on February 20th. The play runs through March 10, 2013…

x

Share: Inside Isaac: A Discussion of Newton, Part 1


Extinction : New Sci-Fi from Mark Alpert

2013-02-14 :: Scientific American

Mark Alpert is a former editor at Scientific American who has gone on to become a best-selling science fiction writer. We talk about his latest book, Extinction, an apocalyptic tale hinging on brain-machine interfaces…

x

Share: Extinction : New Sci-Fi from Mark Alpert


Science and Tech in President Obama's SOTU

2013-02-13 :: Scientific American

In his 2013 State of the Union address, Pres. Obama talked about climate change, energy and manufacturing technology innovation, and STEM education--that is, science, technology, engineering and math…

x

Share: Science and Tech in President Obama's SOTU


Crustacean Brain May Process Pain

2013-01-29 :: Scientific American

Crabs' ability to remember a shock and avoid it is consistent with the ability to feel and remember pain, rather than being a simple reflex. Gretchen Cuda Kroen reports.…

x

Share: Crustacean Brain May Process Pain


Syringe Design Change Could Cut HIV Transmission

2013-01-28 :: Scientific American

HIV transmission due to needle sharing could be greatly reduced by changing syringe design to ensure less trapped blood. Gretchen Cuda Kroen reports.…

x

Share: Syringe Design Change Could Cut HIV Transmission


Researchers A-C-T on DNA Storage

2013-01-25 :: Scientific American

Using a technique with multiple accuracy checks, researchers have stored large amounts of digital information on tiny volumes of synthetic DNA. Sophie Bushwick reports…

x

Share: Researchers A-C-T on DNA Storage


Dung Beetles Use Milky Way to Guide Movement (Heh)

2013-01-24 :: Scientific American

On moonless nights, dung beetles apparently use the Milky Way's band of light as a navigation guide. Christopher Intagliata reports…

x

Share: Dung Beetles Use Milky Way to Guide Movement (Heh)


Michael C. Hall Analyzes His Dexter's Mind, Part 2

2013-01-24 :: Scientific American

Actor Michael C. Hall, of TV's Dexter, talks with psychologist Kevin Dutton, author of The Wisdom of Psychopaths, at the Rubin Museum of Art in New York City…

x

Share: Michael C. Hall Analyzes His Dexter's Mind, Part 2


Michael C. Hall Analyzes His Dexter's Mind, Part 1

2013-01-23 :: Scientific American

Actor Michael C. Hall, of TV's Dexter, talks with psychologist Kevin Dutton, author of The Wisdom of Psychopaths, at the Rubin Museum of Art in New York City…

x

Share: Michael C. Hall Analyzes His Dexter's Mind, Part 1


Genome Donators Can Be Sleuthed Out

2013-01-23 :: Scientific American

Using publicly available information, researchers found they could figure out the identities of 50 individuals who had loaned their genes to science. Karen Hopkin reports…

x

Share: Genome Donators Can Be Sleuthed Out


Take 2 and Call Me after 19 Centuries

2013-01-16 :: Scientific American

An analysis of pills recovered from a shipwreck off the coast of Italy reveals them to contain zinc compounds that were probably used as eye medication. Sophie Bushwick reports…

x

Share: Take 2 and Call Me after 19 Centuries


Standard Kilogram Needs Trimming

2013-01-15 :: Scientific American

Contaminants have made the standard kilogram weigh slightly more than it originally did, but a careful cleaning method may slim it down. Sophie Bushwick reports…

x

Share: Standard Kilogram Needs Trimming


App Turns Smart Phone into Key

2013-01-14 :: Scientific American

An app turns your smart phone into a smart key by using Near Field Communication, NFC, to send data wirelessly over short distances. Christopher Intagliata reports…

x

Share: App Turns Smart Phone into Key


Fake Fecal Transplants for Gut RePOOPulation

2013-01-10 :: Scientific American

A laboratory-made slurry of healthy bacteria could replace human fecal matter in stool transplants to treat bacterial infections. Gretchen Cuda Kroen reports…

x

Share: Fake Fecal Transplants for Gut RePOOPulation


Wrinkled Fingers Are Not Slippery When Wet

2013-01-09 :: Scientific American

Volunteers were more adept at handling wet objects when their fingertips had gotten waterlogged to the point of being wrinkled than when their fingers were dry. Karen Hopkin reports…

x

Share: Wrinkled Fingers Are Not Slippery When Wet


Milky Way May Contain 100 Billion Planets

2013-01-08 :: Scientific American

Based on exoplanet observations made using the Kepler space telescope, astronomers estimate that our galaxy's ratio of stars to planets is at least one to one. Karen Hopkin reports…

x

Share: Milky Way May Contain 100 Billion Planets


Cup Color Tricks Taste Buds

2013-01-07 :: Scientific American

The same hot chocolate served in an orange cup was rated more "chocolaty" than when it was served in cups of other colors. Christopher Intagliata reports…

x

Share: Cup Color Tricks Taste Buds


Bigger Brains Come at a Cost

2013-01-04 :: Scientific American

Guppies bred for larger brains also had smaller guts and produced fewer offspring. Sophie Bushwick reports…

x

Share: Bigger Brains Come at a Cost


Bonobos Share with Strangers First

2013-01-03 :: Scientific American

Bonobos will readily share food, but they'll offer it up to a strange bonobo before they give it to a member of their known group. Sophie Bushwick reports…

x

Share: Bonobos Share with Strangers First


Drones Accelerate Archaeological Site Mapping

2012-12-31 :: Scientific American

A drone aircraft can acquire in minutes data for a 3-D map of an archaeological site that would have taken humans years to gather. Cynthia Graber reports…

x

Share: Drones Accelerate Archaeological Site Mapping


Forest Canopy Color Reveals CO2 Uptake

2012-12-28 :: Scientific American

Tree leaf color provides a good proxy for photosynthetic productivity, indicating how much carbon dioxide a tree is sequestering. Karen Hopkin reports…

x

Share: Forest Canopy Color Reveals CO2 Uptake


Psychopathy's Bright Side: Kevin Dutton on the Benefits of Being a Bit Psychopathic, Part 2

2012-12-28 :: Scientific American

Kevin Dutton is a psychologist at the University of Oxford. He talks about his latest book, The Wisdom of Psychopaths: What Saints, Spies, and Serial Killers Can Teach Us about Success

x

Share: Psychopathy's Bright Side: Kevin Dutton on the Benefits of Being a Bit Psychopathic, Part 2


Psychopathy's Bright Side: Kevin Dutton on the Benefits of Being a Bit Psychopathic, Part 1

2012-12-28 :: Scientific American

Kevin Dutton is a psychologist at the University of Oxford. He talks about his latest book, The Wisdom of Psychopaths: What Saints, Spies, and Serial Killers Can Teach Us about Success

x

Share: Psychopathy's Bright Side: Kevin Dutton on the Benefits of Being a Bit Psychopathic, Part 1


Humidity Levels Explain U.S. Flu Winter Peak

2012-12-27 :: Scientific American

In temperate regions the influenza virus fares best when the weather is dry. Karen Hopkin reports…

x

Share: Humidity Levels Explain U.S. Flu Winter Peak


Telecommuters Work Longer Hours Than Office-Goers

2012-12-26 :: Scientific American

Census stats show that people who work at home at least some of the time put in more hours each week than those who stay at the office. Karen Hopkin reports…

x

Share: Telecommuters Work Longer Hours Than Office-Goers


Creativity's Dark Side: Dan Ariely on Creativity, Rationalization and Dishonesty

2012-12-25 :: Scientific American

Dan Ariely is professor of behavioral economics at Duke University. He talks about the subject of his most recent book, The (Honest) Truth About Dishonesty: How We Lie to Everyone--Especially Ourselves

x

Share: Creativity's Dark Side: Dan Ariely on Creativity, Rationalization and Dishonesty


British Frozen Dinners Beat TV Chefs' Recipes for Nutrition

2012-12-25 :: Scientific American

Recipes in cookbooks written by British television chefs had more calories and less fiber than frozen meals manufactured by British supermarket chains. Sophie Bushwick reports…

x

Share: British Frozen Dinners Beat TV Chefs' Recipes for Nutrition


Slow and Steady Wins the Staircase Workout

2012-12-24 :: Scientific American

People who climb stairs one at a time burn more calories per staircase than do those who bound two stairs at a time. Rose Eveleth reports…

x

Share: Slow and Steady Wins the Staircase Workout


Perennial Flu Vaccine Gets Closer

2012-12-21 :: Scientific American

A vaccine aimed at the stable M2 flu virus protein, rather than the variable H or N proteins, could be useful every year. Christopher Intagliata reports…

x

Share: Perennial Flu Vaccine Gets Closer


Norovirus Survives Restaurant Dishwashing Protocols

2012-12-20 :: Scientific American

Dishwashing protocols designed with food-borne bacteria in mind didn't cut the mustard in a test with noroviruses, which cause nasty gastrointestinal illnesses. Karen Hopkin reports…

x

Share: Norovirus Survives Restaurant Dishwashing Protocols


Whales Sing When and Where They Wanna

2012-12-19 :: Scientific American

Humpback whales sing complex songs even when diving and foraging, when it's neither the time nor place for mating behavior. Sophie Bushwick reports…

x

Share: Whales Sing When and Where They Wanna


Better Bitter Tasters Bust Bacteria

2012-12-18 :: Scientific American

Those who can better detect bitter flavors may also be better equipped to fight off upper respiratory tract bacterial infections. Mary Harris reports…

x

Share: Better Bitter Tasters Bust Bacteria


Darwin in Space: How Multigenerational Missions Could Shape Human Evolution

2012-12-18 :: Scientific American

Portland State University anthropologist Cameron Smith talks with Scientific American's John Matson about how multigenerational space exploration missions and colonization might change the human genome and thus shape human evolution…

x

Share: Darwin in Space: How Multigenerational Missions Could Shape Human Evolution


Low-Tech Wastewater Treatment Recipe Features Onions

2012-12-17 :: Scientific American

Powdered onions sopped up most of the lead, iron and tin in wastewater samples laden with the metals. Christopher Intagliata reports…

x

Share: Low-Tech Wastewater Treatment Recipe Features Onions


Deeper-Voiced Women Have Election Advantage

2012-12-13 :: Scientific American

In mock elections between female candidates the deeper voice carried the vast majority of the votes. Christopher Intagliata reports…

x

Share: Deeper-Voiced Women Have Election Advantage


Humans Said Cheese 7,500 Years Ago

2012-12-12 :: Scientific American

Milk fat residue on pottery shards shows that people were purposefully making cheese at least 7,500 years ago. Sophie Bushwick reports…

x

Share: Humans Said Cheese 7,500 Years Ago


David Quammen: The Spillover of Animal Infections to Humans

2012-11-18 :: Scientific American

David Quammen talks about his latest book, Spillover: Animal Infections and the Next Human Pandemic. From his Web site: "The next big and murderous human pandemic, the one that kills us in millions, will be caused by a new disease--new to humans, anyway. The bug that's responsible will be strange, unfamiliar, but it won't come from outer space. Odds are that the killer pathogen--most likely a virus--will spill over into humans from a nonhuman animal."…

x

Share: David Quammen: The Spillover of Animal Infections to Humans


Wormy Monkeys Had Healthier Intestines

2012-11-15 :: Scientific American

Infecting monkeys with helminth worms lessened the symptoms of their version of inflammatory bowel disease. Christopher Intagliata reports…

x

Share: Wormy Monkeys Had Healthier Intestines


Rats Direct Inhalations for Smell Focus

2012-11-14 :: Scientific American

Rats change the way air flows across the insides of their nostrils to direct the scent to the nasal region where it can be best detected. Gretchen Cuda Kroen reports…

x

Share: Rats Direct Inhalations for Smell Focus


Climate Change Threatens Legacy Coffee

2012-11-09 :: Scientific American

Rising temperatures may cripple Ethiopian wild populations of Arabica coffee, which have more genetic diversity than cultivated crops. Christopher Intagliata reports…

x

Share: Climate Change Threatens Legacy Coffee


Clown Fish Know When to Cry Uncle

2012-11-08 :: Scientific American

Social hierarchy in clown fish is signaled via different types of calls, which obviates the need for physical conflict. Sophie Bushwick reports…

x

Share: Clown Fish Know When to Cry Uncle


Obama Cites Science and Tech in Win Speech

2012-11-07 :: Scientific American

After winning reelection, President Obama noted the importance of science and technology to the country. Steve Mirsky pulled pertinent clips from the speech…

x

Share: Obama Cites Science and Tech in Win Speech


Atom-Thick Layer Keeps Silver Shiny

2012-11-06 :: Scientific American

A technique for depositing atom-thick protective layers on silver could safely keep works of art from tarnishing. Gretchen Cuda Kroen reports…

x

Share: Atom-Thick Layer Keeps Silver Shiny


Elephant Never Forgets to Say "Hi"

2012-11-05 :: Scientific American

An elephant in a Korean zoo has developed a way to vocalize a handful of recognizable words in the Korean language. Sophie Bushwick reports…

x

Share: Elephant Never Forgets to Say "Hi"


Nonstick Surface on Med Devices Could Keep Bacteria at Bay

2012-11-02 :: Scientific American

In lab tests, catheters coated with a nonstick surface harbored far fewer staph bacteria than conventional devices. Gretchen Cuda Kroen reports…

x

Share: Nonstick Surface on Med Devices Could Keep Bacteria at Bay


Old Skeletons Hold DNA Clues to TB

2012-11-01 :: Scientific American

Scientists hope to learn tuberculosis's genetic secrets by examining TB genes in old bones and comparing them with other strains from the past and present. Katherine Harmon reports…

x

Share: Old Skeletons Hold DNA Clues to TB


Scientific American after Sandy

2012-10-31 :: Scientific American

Scientific American Editor in Chief Mariette DiChristina brings us up to date on the state of our New York City-based operation after Sandy. Recorded October 31 at 2:30 P.M. Eastern time…

x

Share: Scientific American after Sandy


Scientific American after Sandy

2012-10-31 :: Scientific American

Scientific American Editor in Chief Mariette DiChristina brings us up to date on the state of our New York City-based operation after Sandy. Recorded October 31 at 2:30 P.M Eastern time…

x

Share: Scientific American after Sandy


Shock Absorber Dampens Baseball Bat Stings

2012-10-27 :: Scientific American

A shock absorber in a baseball bat's knob tuned to cancel out certain vibration frequencies can reduce the painful sting that comes when the ball makes contact away from the "sweet spot." Gretchen Cuda Kroen reports…

x

Share: Shock Absorber Dampens Baseball Bat Stings


Whale Mimics Human Speech

2012-10-26 :: Scientific American

A captive beluga whale has altered his normal songs to more closely approximate human pitch and rhythms. Christopher Intagliata reports…

x

Share: Whale Mimics Human Speech


Short Interval Training Burns Big Calories

2012-10-23 :: Scientific American

Active young men burned 200 more calories on days when they did five 30-second sprints on an exercise bike. Christopher Intagliata reports…

x

Share: Short Interval Training Burns Big Calories


Royal Society Runs Science Women Wiki Marathon

2012-10-18 :: Scientific American

The Royal Society is looking for volunteers create or enhance entries on female scientists, mathematicians and engineers. Karen Hopkin reports…

x

Share: Royal Society Runs Science Women Wiki Marathon


Mice Can Vocally Mimic One Another

2012-10-17 :: Scientific American

When two male mice of different lineages were kept together, the animals gradually learned to match the pitch of their songs. Gretchen Cuda Kroen reports…

x

Share: Mice Can Vocally Mimic One Another


Urea! Turtle Finds Unusual Excretion Method

2012-10-16 :: Scientific American

Kidneys are only part of the equation for a turtle that dumps most of its urea out through its kisser. Katherine Harmon reports…

x

Share: Urea! Turtle Finds Unusual Excretion Method


Food Pairings Rely on Mouth-Feel

2012-10-15 :: Scientific American

Red wine goes with steak and soda with a burger in part because the astringent feel and the fatty feel balance out in our mouths. Gretchen Cuda Kroen reports…

x

Share: Food Pairings Rely on Mouth-Feel


Why Did the Elephant Have Thin Hair?

2012-10-12 :: Scientific American

Not because he left his toupee in his trunk. Thin hair can help an animal stay cool whereas thicker hair can keep it warm. Christopher Intagliata reports…

x

Share: Why Did the Elephant Have Thin Hair?


The 2012 Nobel Prize in Chemistry

2012-10-10 :: Scientific American

The 2012 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded jointly to Robert J. Lefkowitz and Brian Kobilka for studies of G-protein-coupled receptors, which are the portals by which information about the environment reaches the interior of cells and leads to their responses. About half of all drugs work by interacting with G-protein-coupled receptors…

x

Share: The 2012 Nobel Prize in Chemistry


Food Chemists Celebrate Tasty Centennial

2012-10-10 :: Scientific American

It's the 100th anniversary of the Maillard reaction, perhaps the most important chemical reaction that takes place to enhance food's taste when we cook. Karen Hopkin reports…

x

Share: Food Chemists Celebrate Tasty Centennial


The 2012 Nobel Prize in Physics

2012-10-09 :: Scientific American

The 2012 Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded jointly to Serge Haroche and David J. Wineland for experimental methods that enable measuring and manipulation of individual quantum systems…

x

Share: The 2012 Nobel Prize in Physics


Sauropod Neck Bones Were Really Tendons

2012-10-09 :: Scientific American

Microscopic analysis of what were thought to be thin riblike bones that ran the length of sauropods' necks show them to be ossified tendons. Christopher Intagliata reports…

x

Share: Sauropod Neck Bones Were Really Tendons


The 2012 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

2012-10-08 :: Scientific American

The 2012 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded jointly to John B. Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka for the discovery that mature cells can be reprogrammed to become pluripotent…

x

Share: The 2012 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine


Finch Scopes Out Mates with Right Eye Only

2012-10-06 :: Scientific American

When male Gouldian finches had their right eyes covered, they lost their previous discrimination in favor of the coloration of specific females. Karen Hopkin reports…

x

Share: Finch Scopes Out Mates with Right Eye Only


Marine Plant Flees Predators

2012-10-05 :: Scientific American

The phytoplankton Heterosigma akashiwo swims away from zooplankton, its natural predator, but stays put in the presence of other predators without a specific taste for it. Gretchen Cuda Kroen reports…

x

Share: Marine Plant Flees Predators


Snake Venom Contains Potent Painkiller

2012-10-04 :: Scientific American

The black mamba's venom has a special ingredient: a painkiller as potent as morphine. Christopher Intagliata reports…

x

Share: Snake Venom Contains Potent Painkiller


Rechargeable Batteries Could Get New Life

2012-10-03 :: Scientific American

Now that researchers know that nickel blocks lithium ions and keeps older batteries from recharging, they can try to modify manufacturing processes to avoid the problem. Gretchen Cuda Kroen reports…

x

Share: Rechargeable Batteries Could Get New Life


The Climate of Climate Science

2012-09-28 :: Scientific American

James McCarthy, Alexander Agassiz professor of biological oceanography at Harvard, talks about climate science and testifying before Congress, and the collaborations between climate scientists and the national security community as well as with evangelicals. And the Union of Concerned Scientists releases a report about the misleading coverage of climate science at Fox News and The Wall Street Journal

x

Share: The Climate of Climate Science


Coyote Love Is Forever

2012-09-28 :: Scientific American

Researchers tracked urban coyotes over six years and found that they never stray from their mates. Amy Kraft reports…

x

Share: Coyote Love Is Forever


Degradable Electronics Come Closer to Reality

2012-09-27 :: Scientific American

Researchers have created degradable prototype electronics that function for a set time--and then dissolve. Sophie Bushwick reports…

x

Share: Degradable Electronics Come Closer to Reality


It Takes 275 Water Molecules to Make Ice

2012-09-26 :: Scientific American

By tracking the light absorption properties of clusters of water molecules, researchers determined that the change to ice occurs at 275 H20s. Gretchen Cuda Kroen reports…

x

Share: It Takes 275 Water Molecules to Make Ice


Virus Treatment Could Target Acne

2012-09-25 :: Scientific American

Viruses that kill acne-causing bacteria show promise in the lab as a potential acne treatment. Sophie Bushwick reports…

x

Share: Virus Treatment Could Target Acne


Bird Malaria Moves North

2012-09-24 :: Scientific American

Seven percent of 700 birds tested in Anchorage and Fairbanks were infected with avian malaria. Christopher Intagliata reports…

x

Share: Bird Malaria Moves North


Was This Summer a Climate Change Event?

2012-09-21 :: Scientific American

James McCarthy, professor of biological oceanography at Harvard, says this summer's record heat and dryness could have occurred with lower atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations--but it would have been highly unlikely. Steve Mirsky reports…

x

Share: Was This Summer a Climate Change Event?


Farmed Fish Need to Keep Fit

2012-09-20 :: Scientific American

Farmed fish don't get the exercise of their wild counterparts, which can make them unfit, prone to illness and less profitable for farmers. Gretchen Cuda Kroen reports…

x

Share: Farmed Fish Need to Keep Fit


Human First Impulse Is Generosity

2012-09-19 :: Scientific American

When people have to make a choice instantly of being more or less generous, their first impulse is toward cooperation. Sophie Bushwick reports…

x

Share: Human First Impulse Is Generosity


Fun Veggie Names Ups Kid Intake

2012-09-18 :: Scientific American

Renaming vegetables with fun titles in school cafeterias increased how much healthful food kids ate. Christopher Intagliata reports…

x

Share: Fun Veggie Names Ups Kid Intake


Sexually Aroused Women Are Harder to Gross Out

2012-09-17 :: Scientific American

Sexual arousal dampens the disgust response in women, both in the bedroom and outside of it. Ian Chant reports…

x

Share: Sexually Aroused Women Are Harder to Gross Out


Sea Otters Fight Global Warming

2012-09-14 :: Scientific American

By controlling kelp-eating sea urchins, otters help the seaweed thrive and absorb more carbon dioxide, in a case study of the role of animals in the carbon cycle. Sophie Bushwick reports…

x

Share: Sea Otters Fight Global Warming


Newer Cookware Shatters More Easily

2012-09-12 :: Scientific American

Newer cookware, made from soda lime silicate glass instead of borosilicate glass, has a smaller shatterproof temperature range. Christopher Intagliata reports…

x

Share: Newer Cookware Shatters More Easily


Jilted Rock Sparrows Sing Loudest

2012-09-11 :: Scientific American

A rock sparrow's song broadcasts his luck with the ladies--whether good or bad. Daisy Yuhas reports…

x

Share: Jilted Rock Sparrows Sing Loudest


Tattoo Infections Traced to Ink Supply

2012-09-10 :: Scientific American

An outbreak of bacterial infections among patrons of a clean tattoo parlor was traced to a premixed bottle of gray ink carrying the bacteria. Karen Hopkin reports…

x

Share: Tattoo Infections Traced to Ink Supply


Marine Bacterium Creates Cooperative Populations

2012-09-07 :: Scientific American

Vibrionaceae bacteria form populations with a few antibiotic producers and many resistant individuals--the group can thus defend against other groups without their arrangement. Sophie Bushwick reports…

x

Share: Marine Bacterium Creates Cooperative Populations


Testosterone Dips for Baby-Snoozing Dads

2012-09-06 :: Scientific American

Dads who sleep next to their babies have lower testosterone than other pops--which is probably good for the kid. Christopher Intagliata reports…

x

Share: Testosterone Dips for Baby-Snoozing Dads


Stay Thirsty, My Unfair Friends

2012-09-05 :: Scientific American

Humans will reject an unfair deal even when they really want what's at stake, like water for extreme thirst. Amy Kraft reports…

x

Share: Stay Thirsty, My Unfair Friends


Rifle Hunters Shape Elk Evolution

2012-09-04 :: Scientific American

Hunters with high-powered rifles are giving a survival advantage to elk that stay hidden in forests over fast, bold elk who had the advantage over natural predators. Christopher Intagliata reports…

x

Share: Rifle Hunters Shape Elk Evolution


You Can Survive the State Fair Food

2012-08-31 :: Scientific American

The Mayo Clinic's Donald Hensrud, who specializes in nutrition and preventive medicine, has offered advice on having your fried Twinkies at state fairs and eating them, too. Steve Mirsky reports…

x

Share: You Can Survive the State Fair Food


Lighting and Music Reduce Fast-Food Meal Size

2012-08-30 :: Scientific American

Patrons in part of a fast-food restaurant that had a fine-dining atmosphere consumed almost a fifth fewer calories per meal than those in the regular section. Steve Mirsky reports…

x

Share: Lighting and Music Reduce Fast-Food Meal Size


Studying Instead of Sleeping Bites Students

2012-08-29 :: Scientific American

Students who studied a lot at the expense of sleep had significantly more negative incidents, such as not understanding a lecture, as those who kept a more balanced study schedule. Christie Nicholson reports…

x

Share: Studying Instead of Sleeping Bites Students


Gibbon Call Produced Like Human Soprano Song

2012-08-28 :: Scientific American

A gibbon on helium showed researchers that the two parts of the ape's sound-making apparatus--the larynx and vocal tract--function independently, as in human singing. Sophie Bushwick reports…

x

Share: Gibbon Call Produced Like Human Soprano Song


Elderly with Heart Risk Factors May Be More Dementia-Proof

2012-08-27 :: Scientific American

Older individuals with high cholesterol and C-reactive protein levels probably have protective genes, allowing their brains to stay healthy in spite of their heart risks. Christopher Intagliata reports…

x

Share: Elderly with Heart Risk Factors May Be More Dementia-Proof


A Gel That Extends the Shelf Life of Bananas

2012-08-22 :: Scientific American

Chemists have created a spray-on gel that can slow the ripening of bananas. Christie Nicholson reports…

x

Share: A Gel That Extends the Shelf Life of Bananas


Camouflage Makeup That Protects against Bomb Blasts

2012-08-22 :: Scientific American

Scientists have found a way to make military camouflage makeup heat- and fireproof. Christopher Intagliata reports…

x

Share: Camouflage Makeup That Protects against Bomb Blasts


Nanofibers Extract Uranium from Seawater

2012-08-21 :: Scientific American

Hidden within the oceans, scientists have found a possible way to power nuclear reactors long after uranium mines dry up. Christopher Intagliata reports…

x

Share: Nanofibers Extract Uranium from Seawater


The Flynn Effect: Modernity Made Us Smarter

2012-08-20 :: Scientific American

James Flynn studies intelligence at the University of Otago in New Zealand. And he features prominently in an article called "Can We Keep Getting Smarter?" in the September issue of Scientific American magazine. Back on July 10, Flynn visited the SA offices, where he chatted with a group of editors…

x

Share: The Flynn Effect: Modernity Made Us Smarter


Zap Sweet Potatoes to Boost Antioxidants

2012-08-20 :: Scientific American

Giving a jolt of electricity to sweet potatoes increased the level of antioxidants known as polyphenols by 60 percent. Amy Kraft reports…

x

Share: Zap Sweet Potatoes to Boost Antioxidants


Hourly Car Renters Seek Cost, Not Community

2012-08-17 :: Scientific American

Zipcar users primarily consider their own convenience and cost, rather than being green or part of a user community. Evelyn Lamb reports…

x

Share: Hourly Car Renters Seek Cost, Not Community


Hermit Crabs Remodel Shells with Predators in Mind

2012-08-16 :: Scientific American

A hermit crab removes material from a new shell to make it more spacious, but it stops short of weakening it to a predator's crushing ability. Christopher Intagliata reports…

x

Share: Hermit Crabs Remodel Shells with Predators in Mind


Pregnancy Changes Mom's Gut Bacteria

2012-08-15 :: Scientific American

Pregnant women's microbial makeup changed dramatically between the first and third trimesters. Ian Chant reports…

x

Share: Pregnancy Changes Mom's Gut Bacteria


Mummy Had Lung Infection, Technique Reveals

2012-08-14 :: Scientific American

Shotgun proteomics on a corpse can determine whether someone was actually suffering from a disease rather than just carrying it. Evelyn Lamb reports…

x

Share: Mummy Had Lung Infection, Technique Reveals


Elephants Vocalize Like Us, Not Cats

2012-08-13 :: Scientific American

The larynx of a dead elephant showed researchers that the pachyderms vocalize the way humans do, as opposed to the active larynx control employed by cats. Sophie Bushwick reports…

x

Share: Elephants Vocalize Like Us, Not Cats


Don't Waste Waste

2012-08-10 :: Scientific American

The journal Science concentrates its latest issue on making the most of the vast amounts of waste plastics, metal, water and sludge we produce. Cynthia Graber reports…

x

Share: Don't Waste Waste


Pre-Columbian America Enjoyed "Black Drink"

2012-08-09 :: Scientific American

Black Drink, a caffeinated brew of toasted leaves and twigs of the holly plant, was apparently popular far from any holly. Cynthia Graber reports…

x

Share: Pre-Columbian America Enjoyed "Black Drink"


Big Time Zone Shift Ups Athlete Illness

2012-08-08 :: Scientific American

A study of elite rugby players found a doubling of illness rates when the athletes had to travel five or more time zones. Cynthia Graber reports…

x

Share: Big Time Zone Shift Ups Athlete Illness


What's Next for Curiosity on Mars

2012-08-07 :: Scientific American

Scientific American contributor David Appell talks with Mars Science Lab Project leader John Grotzinger, professor of geology at Caltech, about the plans for the rover on the Martian surface…

x

Share: What's Next for Curiosity on Mars


Poor Sleep Hampers Vaccines

2012-08-07 :: Scientific American

Lack of sleep can compromise the immune system's response to vaccines, in some cases making the shots useless. Christopher Intagliata reports…

x

Share: Poor Sleep Hampers Vaccines


Curiosity Lands on Mars

2012-08-06 :: Scientific American

Less than an hour after NASA received confirmation that the Curiosity rover was safely on the Martian surface, some principal members of the mission briefed the press. This is an edited presentation of that briefing, which started at about 11:20 P.M. Pacific time on August 5…

x

Share: Curiosity Lands on Mars


Curiosity Rover Is Safe on Mars

2012-08-06 :: Scientific American

After successfully completing its complex series of landing maneuvers, the Curiosity rover is on the Martian surface and ready to begin exploration. John Matson reports…

x

Share: Curiosity Rover Is Safe on Mars


Spongeworthiness Defines Dolphin Clique

2012-08-03 :: Scientific American

Dolphins that wear marine sponges to protect their beaks when they hunt prefer to hang out with other so-called spongers. Amy Kraft reports…

x

Share: Spongeworthiness Defines Dolphin Clique


Jays and Youngsters Solve Aesop Problem Similarly

2012-08-02 :: Scientific American

Until kids are eight, they are only about equally good as European Jays at solving a problem outlined by Aesop. Sophie Bushwick reports…

x

Share: Jays and Youngsters Solve Aesop Problem Similarly


Scientific American Math Doc Defends Algebra Ed

2012-08-01 :: Scientific American

Evelyn Lamb, math Ph.D., responds to poli-sci professor Andrew Hacker's argument that most students do not need an algebra class. Steve Mirsky reports…

x

Share: Scientific American Math Doc Defends Algebra Ed


Tick Bite Triggers Meat Allergy

2012-07-31 :: Scientific American

Some folks bitten by the Lone Star tick report subsequent allergic reactions to meat. A compound in tick saliva similar to one found in meat may be to blame. Christopher Intagliata reports…

x

Share: Tick Bite Triggers Meat Allergy


Olympic Records Boosted by Materials Science

2012-07-27 :: Scientific American

New materials in athletic equipment and within athletes' bodies make previously impossible performances commonplace today. Cynthia Graber reports…

x

Share: Olympic Records Boosted by Materials Science


Japanese Cuisine Fungus Domesticated for Metabolic Traits

2012-07-26 :: Scientific American

Tiny differences in the genomes of a wild fungus and its domesticated cousin responsible for miso and sake suggest that selection during breeding affected genes related to metabolism rather than development. Evelyn Lamb reports…

x

Share: Japanese Cuisine Fungus Domesticated for Metabolic Traits


Protein Refolds to Perform Second Job

2012-07-25 :: Scientific American

The transcription factor RfaH unfolds and then refolds into a new conformation to become a translation factor. Ian Chant reports…

x

Share: Protein Refolds to Perform Second Job


Noisy Nookie Makes Flies Bat Food

2012-07-24 :: Scientific American

Frisky male flies flutter their wings, producing sounds that bats use to locate the distracted prey. Amy Kraft reports…

x

Share: Noisy Nookie Makes Flies Bat Food


Banana Genome Could Help Bunches

2012-07-23 :: Scientific American

Researchers sequenced the genome of a type of banana, which may help the most popular banana variety ward off diseases that threaten its existence. Sophie Bushwick reports…

x

Share: Banana Genome Could Help Bunches


Neandertals May Have Self-Medicated

2012-07-20 :: Scientific American

Fifty-thousand-year-old dental plaque reveals that Neandertals may have used certain plants for their medicinal qualities. Christopher Intagliata reports…

x

Share: Neandertals May Have Self-Medicated


Chemistry Nobelist Attacks Macular Degeneration

2012-07-19 :: Scientific American

A team led by chemistry Nobel laureate Walter Kohn has developed a tool for the diagnosis of the specific visual distortions perceived by any individual suffering from macular degeneration. Mariette DiChristina reports…

x

Share: Chemistry Nobelist Attacks Macular Degeneration


Give Time to Feel Less Time-Squeeze

2012-07-18 :: Scientific American

Giving time to others can have the paradoxical effect of making you feel like you have more time yourself. Katherine Harmon reports…

x

Share: Give Time to Feel Less Time-Squeeze


Fungus Makes Manganese Manage Mine Mess

2012-07-16 :: Scientific American

Fungi and bacteria produce superoxide that makes manganese into an environmental cleanup star. Cynthia Graber reports…

x

Share: Fungus Makes Manganese Manage Mine Mess


Silk Protein Lets Vaccines Stand the Heat

2012-07-13 :: Scientific American

Encased in silk protein, vaccines and antibiotics survived tropical temperatures without refrigeration. Cynthia Graber reports…

x

Share: Silk Protein Lets Vaccines Stand the Heat


Eye Movements Do Not Reveal Lying

2012-07-12 :: Scientific American

Multiple tests of eye-movement direction and honesty found no correlation between lying and eye direction. Steve Mirsky reports…

x

Share: Eye Movements Do Not Reveal Lying


Northern Lights Make Noise, Too

2012-07-11 :: Scientific American

Researchers have recorded sound evidence to support the idea that noises long reputed to accompany the aurora borealis do exist. Steve Mirsky reports…

x

Share: Northern Lights Make Noise, Too


Stand Up Now to Stick Around Later

2012-07-10 :: Scientific American

Sitting for less than three hours a day could increase average life expectancy by two years. Katherine Harmon reports…

x

Share: Stand Up Now to Stick Around Later


Gravitionally Lensed Light Caused by Ancient Massive Galaxy Cluster

2012-07-06 :: Scientific American

Astronomers observed light warped by the lensing effect of a massive galaxy cluster more than 10 billion light-years away, the most distant cluster ever responsible for perceived lensing. Evelyn Lamb reports…

x

Share: Gravitionally Lensed Light Caused by Ancient Massive Galaxy Cluster


Brain Bluffs Humans Differently Than Machines

2012-07-05 :: Scientific American

The temporal parietal junctions of poker players behaved differently when they were bluffing another human versus bluffing a computer. Cynthia Graber reports…

x

Share: Brain Bluffs Humans Differently Than Machines


Andy Teaches Opie Math

2012-07-04 :: Scientific American

Andy Griffith died on July 3. As Mayberry sheriff Andy Taylor, he attempts to teach son Opie (Ron Howard) some basic math…

x

Share: Andy Teaches Opie Math


Teeny Fly Likely Cuts Off Tiny Heads

2012-07-03 :: Scientific American

A newly discovered phorid fly is less than half a millimeter long and, if its like its relatives, parasitizes and decapitates tiny ants. Sophie Bushwick reports…

x

Share: Teeny Fly Likely Cuts Off Tiny Heads


Predator-Prey Equations Govern Gang Territories

2012-07-02 :: Scientific American

The Lotka-Volterra equations describe population dynamics between competing species. Criminologists have now shown they also describe gang turf boundary formation and violence hot spots. Evelyn Lamb reports…

x

Share: Predator-Prey Equations Govern Gang Territories


Plants Know Stuff

2012-06-29 :: Scientific American

Daniel Chamovitz, director of the Manna Center for Plant Biosciences at Tel Aviv University, talks about his new book What a Plant Knows.…

x

Share: Plants Know Stuff


Super-Earths: Bigger, and Maybe Better

2012-06-21 :: Scientific American

Dimitar Sasselov, professor of astronomy at Harvard University and the founder and director of the Harvard Origins of Life Initiative, talks about his new book The Life of Super-Earths: How the Hunt for Alien Worlds and Artificial Cells Will Revolutionize Life on Our Planet

x

Share: Super-Earths: Bigger, and Maybe Better


The Transit of Venus, Part 2

2012-05-31 :: Scientific American

Mark Anderson, author of the book The Day The World Discovered the Sun, talks about the transit of Venus coming up on June 5th or 6th in different parts of the world and how it will be of use to astronomers searching for exoplanets…

x

Share: The Transit of Venus, Part 2


The Transit of Venus, Part 1

2012-05-30 :: Scientific American

With a transit of Venus coming up on June 5th or 6th in different parts of the world, Mark Anderson, author of the book The Day The World Discovered the Sun, talks about the great efforts to track the transits of Venus in the 1760s and the science they would produce…

x

Share: The Transit of Venus, Part 1


Virus Victors: People Who Control HIV

2012-05-29 :: Scientific American

Bruce Walker, professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and director of the Ragon Institute of Massachusetts General Hospital, M.I.T. and Harvard, talks about his article in the July issue of Scientific American magazine called "Controlling HIV," about rare individuals who never develop AIDS after being infected by the virus…

x

Share: Virus Victors: People Who Control HIV


The Football Concussion Crisis

2012-05-15 :: Scientific American

NFL Hall of Famer Harry Carson joins former NBC anchor Stone Phillips and pathologist Bennet Omalu for a discussion of chronic traumatic encephalopathy among football players. Recorded May 12th at the Ensemblestudiotheatre.org, site of the new play Headstrong about the brain injury issue…

x

Share: The Football Concussion Crisis


Killer Chimps and Funny Feet: Report from the AAPA Conference

2012-04-27 :: Scientific American

Scientific American editor Kate Wong talks about the recent conference of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists in Portland, Ore., where subjects included killer chimps, unprecedented fossil sharing among researchers and divergent hominid foot forms…

x

Share: Killer Chimps and Funny Feet: Report from the AAPA Conference


Getting Guinea Worm Gone: Report from the AHCJ Conference

2012-04-26 :: Scientific American

Scientific American editor Christine Gorman talks about the recent conference of the Association of Health Care Journalists, including Jimmy Carter's efforts against guinea worm and trachoma, and Rosalynn Carter's mental health initiatives…

x

Share: Getting Guinea Worm Gone: Report from the AHCJ Conference


Food Poisoning's Lasting Legacy

2012-04-04 :: Scientific American

Scientific American Science of Health columnist Maryn McKenna talks about the new understanding that food poisoning can have long-lasting negative health effects…

x

Share: Food Poisoning's Lasting Legacy


Your Mileage Price May Vary

2012-03-13 :: Scientific American

Adjusted for inflation and for the better mileage you probably now get, the cost to go a mile may be cheaper than it was three decades ago. Steve Mirsky reports…

x

Share: Your Mileage Price May Vary


Produce Consumption Ups Eater's Looks

2012-03-12 :: Scientific American

Consuming more produce increases red and yellow colors in the skin of Caucasians, whom observers then rate as more attractive. Sophie Bushwick reports…

x

Share: Produce Consumption Ups Eater's Looks


Fukushima Anniversary: We Listen Back

2012-03-11 :: Scientific American

Scientific American editor David Biello takes us through newly released audio from the first week of the nuclear meltdown crisis at Fukushima Daiichi…

x

Share: Fukushima Anniversary: We Listen Back


QWERTY Keyboard Leads to Feelings about Words

2012-03-09 :: Scientific American

Words with more letters on the right side of a QWERTY keyboard are thought of more positively than are words primarily typed on the left side. Sophie Bushwick reports…

x

Share: QWERTY Keyboard Leads to Feelings about Words


Chimp Cops Arbitrate Disputes

2012-03-08 :: Scientific American

High-ranking chimps in a group break up scuffles and keep the peace. Karen Hopkin reports…

x

Share: Chimp Cops Arbitrate Disputes


AAAS Report: Fracking, Whale Rights, Higgs Evidence and Twitter Truthiness

2012-03-07 :: Scientific American

Scientific American editors Mark Fischetti and Michael Moyer discuss some of the sessions they attended at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Subjects covered include fracking, cetacean rights, the Higgs boson and Twitter's truthiness…

x

Share: AAAS Report: Fracking, Whale Rights, Higgs Evidence and Twitter Truthiness


New Gels Heal Themselves--and Maybe You

2012-03-07 :: Scientific American

Self-healing hydrogels may find uses in industry, including better plastics, as well as in medicine, such as the treatment of stomach perforations and ulcers. Sophie Bushwick reports…

x

Share: New Gels Heal Themselves--and Maybe You


Earthshine Sets Example for Life-Light Search

2012-03-06 :: Scientific American

Researchers looking for life on exoplanets tried a proof-of-concept experiment by examining the light bouncing off Earth, via the moon. Cynthia Graber reports…

x

Share: Earthshine Sets Example for Life-Light Search


Psoriasis Linked to Protection from HIV-1

2012-03-05 :: Scientific American

Many psoriasis patients have the same gene variants as people who are not significantly affected by an HIV-1 infection. Charles Q. Choi reports…

x

Share: Psoriasis Linked to Protection from HIV-1


Mars Swings into Opposition March 3

2012-03-02 :: Scientific American

Every two years and two months Earth and Mars line up with the sun, giving us a relatively close view of the Red Planet. Cynthia Graber reports…

x

Share: Mars Swings into Opposition March 3


Fish Finning Fails Financially

2012-03-01 :: Scientific American

An economic analysis of the value of sharks for ecotourism alone finds that each individual is worth far more alive than dead for its fins. Steve Mirsky reports…

x

Share: Fish Finning Fails Financially


Do Whale Research without Getting Seasick

2012-02-29 :: Scientific American

Join the more than 5,000 citizen scientists who are helping researchers identify the songs of individual whales. Mariette DiChristina reports…

x

Share: Do Whale Research without Getting Seasick


Oldest New World Cave Art Discovered

2012-02-27 :: Scientific American

A figure engraved in the bedrock of a Brazilian cave dates back at least 10,000 years. Cynthia Graber reports…

x

Share: Oldest New World Cave Art Discovered


New Driver Style Predicts Crash Risk

2012-02-24 :: Scientific American

New drivers with more "g-force events," like quick turns and sudden braking, had more crashes and near hits. Amy Kraft reports…

x

Share: New Driver Style Predicts Crash Risk


New Male Terminates Monkey Pregnancies

2012-02-23 :: Scientific American

Female gelada monkeys spontaneously abort 80 percent of pregnancies by a displaced male when a new male succeeds him. Sophie Bushwick reports…

x

Share: New Male Terminates Monkey Pregnancies


Our Birth Control Undermines Amphibians

2012-02-22 :: Scientific American

Human oral contraceptives that find their way back into the environment might be having an effect on frog mating. Christopher Intagliata reports…

x

Share: Our Birth Control Undermines Amphibians


If You're Happy, How You Know It

2012-02-22 :: Scientific American

Social scientist Roly Russell, of the Sandhill Institute in British Columbia, talked with Scientific American's Mark Fischetti at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science about potentially better measures than GDP of a nation's well-being…

x

Share: If You're Happy, How You Know It


Smoking Messes Mouth Bacterial Community

2012-02-21 :: Scientific American

Nonsmokers have stable oral bacterial communities, but smokers' oral bacteria is transient, which opens up real estate for bad bugs. Christopher Intagliata reports…

x

Share: Smoking Messes Mouth Bacterial Community


Journal Article Tweets May Predict Citations

2012-02-17 :: Scientific American

The number of times a paper gets tweeted in the first three days after it's published may predict how often it will be officially cited. Steve Mirsky reports…

x

Share: Journal Article Tweets May Predict Citations


Fruit Flies Take Medicinal Nips

2012-02-16 :: Scientific American

Fruit flies will purposely ingest alcohol to ward off parasitic wasps. Cynthia Graber reports…

x

Share: Fruit Flies Take Medicinal Nips


The Coming Entanglement: Bill Joy and Danny Hillis

2012-02-15 :: Scientific American

Digital innovators Bill Joy, co-founder of Sun Microsystems, and Danny Hillis, co-founder of the Long Now Foundation, talk with Scientific American Executive Editor Fred Guterl about the technological "Entanglement" and the attempts to build the other, hardier Internet…

x

Share: The Coming Entanglement: Bill Joy and Danny Hillis


Upbleat Finding: Kids Start to Sound Alike over Time

2012-02-15 :: Scientific American

Baby goats learn to bleat just like the kids they hang out with. Christopher Intagliata reports…

x

Share: Upbleat Finding: Kids Start to Sound Alike over Time


Self-Rated Health Predicts Mortality

2012-02-14 :: Scientific American

Those who rated their health negatively were more likely to have died 30 years later. Sophie Bushwick reports…

x

Share: Self-Rated Health Predicts Mortality


Cricket Fossil Reveals Ancient Song

2012-02-13 :: Scientific American

Based on the remains of a long-extinct bushcricket, researchers have reconstructed its call. Sophie Bushwick reports…

x

Share: Cricket Fossil Reveals Ancient Song


Deep Sea Is Alive with Sound

2012-02-10 :: Scientific American

Scientists share the first-ever recordings of deep-sea species. Sarah Fecht reports…

x

Share: Deep Sea Is Alive with Sound


Zebra Stripes Clash with Insect Interest

2012-02-09 :: Scientific American

Biting insects prefer a plain brown hide to the zebra's stripes, implying that the stripes are an anti-insect adaptation. Cynthia Graber reports…

x

Share: Zebra Stripes Clash with Insect Interest


Champagne Glass Shape Affects Gas Level

2012-02-08 :: Scientific American

When gas bubbles out of champagne, a higher concentration of carbon dioxide collects in a slim flute versus a wide coupe. Sophie Bushwick reports…

x

Share: Champagne Glass Shape Affects Gas Level


Visual Cues Encourage Vegetable Consumption

2012-02-07 :: Scientific American

Pictures of green beans and carrots on cafeteria trays resulted in more kids eating more veggies. Cynthia Graber reports…

x

Share: Visual Cues Encourage Vegetable Consumption


Close Super Bowl Boosts Ad at End

2012-02-03 :: Scientific American

An ad right after a suspenseful game made a bigger impression on viewers than ads during the game. Christopher Intagliata reports…

x

Share: Close Super Bowl Boosts Ad at End


More with Maryn: McKenna on Antibiotic Resistance

2012-02-02 :: Scientific American

In part 2 of our conversation with journalist and author Maryn McKenna, she talks about antibiotic resistance in agriculture and human health, MRSA, and offers a brief coda on the subject of fecal transplants…

x

Share: More with Maryn: McKenna on Antibiotic Resistance


Signs Boost Stair Climbing

2012-02-02 :: Scientific American

Putting up signs can increase stair use versus elevator riding by more than 40 percent. Cynthia Graber reports…

x

Share: Signs Boost Stair Climbing


Scorpion Armor Inspires Sand-Resistant Surfaces

2012-02-01 :: Scientific American

Textured surfaces based on the patterns found on scorpion exoskeletons could help equipment avoid erosion damage. Sophie Bushwick reports…

x

Share: Scorpion Armor Inspires Sand-Resistant Surfaces


Fecal Transplants: The Straight Poop

2012-01-31 :: Scientific American

Journalist and author Maryn McKenna talks about fecal transplants, which have proved to be exceptionally effective at restoring a healthy intestinal microbiome and curing C. diff infections, yet remain in regulatory limbo…

x

Share: Fecal Transplants: The Straight Poop


Spider Parting Gift Makes Him Sterile Father

2012-01-31 :: Scientific American

Male orb web spiders will detach their sex organs and leave them in the female to become a father without becoming dinner. Katherine Harmon reports…

x

Share: Spider Parting Gift Makes Him Sterile Father


Have Your Cake and Eat Its Package

2012-01-30 :: Scientific American

Materials scientists are developing edible packaging for processed foods. Cynthia Graber reports…

x

Share: Have Your Cake and Eat Its Package


Micro-Bubbles Cut Cost of Algae-Derived Biofuel

2012-01-27 :: Scientific American

Tiny bubbles float algae to the water's surface for harvest and processing. Sophie Bushwick reports…

x

Share: Micro-Bubbles Cut Cost of Algae-Derived Biofuel


Bosses Who Work Out Are Nicer

2012-01-26 :: Scientific American

Employees rated supervisors who worked out as less abusive than their sedentary counterparts. Christopher Intagliata reports…

x

Share: Bosses Who Work Out Are Nicer


State of the Union: Research, Technology and Energy

2012-01-25 :: Scientific American

About six minutes of President Obama's State of the Union address dealt with research, technology and energy…

x

Share: State of the Union: Research, Technology and Energy


People in Power Feel Taller

2012-01-25 :: Scientific American

A person in a position of power will overestimate their height. Cynthia Graber reports…

x

Share: People in Power Feel Taller


Dark-Dwelling Fish Converge on Blindness

2012-01-24 :: Scientific American

DNA analysis revealed that 11 populations of blind cave fish did not all descend from a single blind ancestor, but had five separate evolutionary origins. Sophie Bushwick reports…

x

Share: Dark-Dwelling Fish Converge on Blindness


Worm Turns Alcohol into Longevity

2012-01-23 :: Scientific American

A very dilute alcohol solution doubles the life span of the ubiquitous lab organism C. elegans. Christopher Intagliata reports…

x

Share: Worm Turns Alcohol into Longevity


Schoolkids Name Moon Orbiters

2012-01-20 :: Scientific American

GRAIL A and B, the Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory lunar moon satellites, are now Ebb and Flow, courtesy of Montana students. Cynthia Graber reports…

x

Share: Schoolkids Name Moon Orbiters


Where You Vote May Affect How You Vote

2012-01-19 :: Scientific American

Subjects randomly surveyed within view of a church gave more conservative responses than those surveyed within view of a secular school. Katherine Harmon reports…

x

Share: Where You Vote May Affect How You Vote


Boa Constrictors Listen to Loosen

2012-01-18 :: Scientific American

Boa constrictors kept tightening their grips on dead rats with faked heartbeats for 20 minutes, but let go when the pulse stopped. Christopher Intagliata reports…

x

Share: Boa Constrictors Listen to Loosen


1,300-Year-Old Flask Holds Mayan Tobacco Remains

2012-01-17 :: Scientific American

A chemical analysis found evidence of nicotine in a Mayan flask dating back to A.D. 700. Sophie Bushwick reports…

x

Share: 1,300-Year-Old Flask Holds Mayan Tobacco Remains


A Second Science Front: Evolution Champions Rise to Climate Science Defense

2012-01-16 :: Scientific American

Eugenie Scott, executive director of the National Center for Science Education, long the nation's leading defender of evolution education, discusses the NCSE's new initiative to help climate science education…

x

Share: A Second Science Front: Evolution Champions Rise to Climate Science Defense


Anna Deavere Smith: Let Me Down Easy

2012-01-14 :: Scientific American

Actor, playwright and journalist Anna Deavere Smith talks about the health care crisis and her play about people dealing with illness, health and the health care system, Let Me Down Easy

x

Share: Anna Deavere Smith: Let Me Down Easy


Tiny Frog Makes Big Claim

2012-01-13 :: Scientific American

Researchers say a newly discovered species is the world's smallest frog--and more. Cynthia Graber reports…

x

Share: Tiny Frog Makes Big Claim


Underground Nukes Leave Traceable Uplift

2012-01-12 :: Scientific American

Surface rock above a nuclear test will expand enough to be trackable by radar satellites. Christopher Intagliata reports…

x

Share: Underground Nukes Leave Traceable Uplift


Salt Boosts Blood Pressure, but via Adrenalin

2012-01-11 :: Scientific American

Rather than increase fluid volume, salt's real role in high blood pressure may be to induce the nervous system to produce excess adrenalin. Steve Mirsky reports…

x

Share: Salt Boosts Blood Pressure, but via Adrenalin


Female Trailblazer Inspires New Species Name

2012-01-10 :: Scientific American

Jeanne Baret disguised herself as a man to do botanical fieldwork in the 18th century. She has has been honored with a namesake species. Cynthia Graber reports…

x

Share: Female Trailblazer Inspires New Species Name


Social Media Tracks Disease Spread

2012-01-09 :: Scientific American

Analysis of social media and Internet news reports can enable researchers to track a disease outbreak faster than conventional medical notifications. Cynthia Graber reports…

x

Share: Social Media Tracks Disease Spread


Man from Mars: Health and Nutrition Research at Mars, Inc., and Beyond

2012-01-05 :: Scientific American

Hagen Schroeter, the director of fundamental health and nutrition research at Mars, Inc., talks about research on bio-active food compounds and the search for why a healthful diet is good for you…

x

Share: Man from Mars: Health and Nutrition Research at Mars, Inc., and Beyond


Dogs Gauge Intention by Human Communication Style

2012-01-05 :: Scientific American

Dogs are similar to babies in their ability to discern an intent by a human to communicate meaningful information. Rose Eveleth reports…

x

Share: Dogs Gauge Intention by Human Communication Style


Stradivarius Fails Sound Test versus Newbie Violins

2012-01-04 :: Scientific American

Experienced violinists were unable to tell the difference between rare, old instruments and new ones. Sophie Bushwick reports…

x

Share: Stradivarius Fails Sound Test versus Newbie Violins


Microbes Make Some People Smell Delicious to Mosquitoes

2012-01-03 :: Scientific American

Mosquitoes prefer the smell of skin with more abundant--but less diverse--bacterial communities. Sophie Bushwick reports…

x

Share: Microbes Make Some People Smell Delicious to Mosquitoes


Another Ellipse around the Sun

2012-01-02 :: Scientific American

The last year took you far--hundreds of millions of miles, in fact. Steve Mirsky reports…

x

Share: Another Ellipse around the Sun


Solar Paint Converts Light to Electricity

2011-12-30 :: Scientific American

A paint containing titanium dioxide and semiconducting cadmium nanocrystals can convert sunlight to electricity. Christopher Intagliata reports…

x

Share: Solar Paint Converts Light to Electricity


Silky Micro-Needles Could Make Shots Pain-Free

2011-12-29 :: Scientific American

Researchers have created a potentially pain-free drug delivery system that uses an array of micro-needles made of silk protein to get under the skin. Sophie Bushwick reports…

x

Share: Silky Micro-Needles Could Make Shots Pain-Free


Is the Shift-Worker Diet an Occupational Hazard?

2011-12-28 :: Scientific American

An editorial in PLoS Medicine makes the case for considering the poor eating habits of shift workers, and the associated health risk, as a legally defined occupational hazard. Sophie Bushwick reports…

x

Share: Is the Shift-Worker Diet an Occupational Hazard?


Deep Frog Voice Signals His Chromosome Number

2011-12-27 :: Scientific American

Two related frog species differ by chromosome number, which deepened one species's calls and tells the females who's who. Steve Mirsky reports…

x

Share: Deep Frog Voice Signals His Chromosome Number


Perceived Gift Values Get Averaged, Not Added

2011-12-23 :: Scientific American

Adding a small, additional gift can, counterintuitively, detract from, rather than add to, the perceived value of a first, big gift. Cynthia Graber reports…

x

Share: Perceived Gift Values Get Averaged, Not Added


Pigeons Can Follow Abstract Number-Counting Rules

2011-12-22 :: Scientific American

Trained pigeons demonstrate an ability to use abstract number-counting rules on par with primates and to recognize which groups of items contain more of those items. Sophie Bushwick reports…

x

Share: Pigeons Can Follow Abstract Number-Counting Rules


It's Plain the Rain Ups Chili Peppers' Pain

2011-12-21 :: Scientific American

Chili peppers in wet areas are spicier than their dry counterparts, due to higher capsaicin levels needed to fight seed-attacking fungi. Christopher Intagliata reports…

x

Share: It's Plain the Rain Ups Chili Peppers' Pain


Insect Cuticle Inspires New Material

2011-12-20 :: Scientific American

Researchers created a tough, light, flexible material, called shrilk, based on the proteins and structure of the surface covering of insects. Cynthia Graber reports…

x

Share: Insect Cuticle Inspires New Material


Insect Cuticle Inspires New Material

2011-12-20 :: Scientific American

Researchers created a tough, light, flexible material, called shrilk, based on the proteins and structure of the surface covering of insects. Cynthia Graber reports…

x

Share: Insect Cuticle Inspires New Material


DNA in a Cup of Water Reveals Lake Denizens

2011-12-18 :: Scientific American

Freshwater habitat dwellers can be detected and quantified based on DNA obtained directly from small water samples. Sophie Bushwick reports…

x

Share: DNA in a Cup of Water Reveals Lake Denizens


Mosquitos Use Drop of Blood to Keep Cool

2011-12-15 :: Scientific American

When sucking down hot blood, a mosquito exudes a small bead of the meal for evaporative cooling. Karen Hopkin reports…

x

Share: Mosquitos Use Drop of Blood to Keep Cool


Some Terrestrial Exoplanets May Be Half Diamond

2011-12-14 :: Scientific American

When rocky planets form that have more carbon than does Earth, vast quantities of diamond may be a natural result. Karen Hopkin reports…

x

Share: Some Terrestrial Exoplanets May Be Half Diamond


Body Hair Senses Parasites While Slowing Their Blood Quest

2011-12-13 :: Scientific American

Volunteers detected bedbugs more quickly on unshaven versus shaved arms. And the bugs took longer to find a feeding spot in the forest of hair. Christopher Intagliata reports…

x

Share: Body Hair Senses Parasites While Slowing Their Blood Quest


U.S. Teen Births Hit Record Low

2011-12-12 :: Scientific American

2010 saw the lowest birth rate among teen girls since records started being kept 70 years ago. Cynthia Graber reports…

x

Share: U.S. Teen Births Hit Record Low


The YouTube SpaceLab Competition

2011-12-11 :: Scientific American

If you're 14 to 18 years old, you still have until December 14th to prepare a two-minute video of a suggestion for an experiment to be performed at the International Space Station and upload it to youtube.com/spacelab. Winners will see their experiment performed in space…

x

Share: The YouTube SpaceLab Competition


Large Hadron Collider Backgrounder

2011-12-11 :: Scientific American

Thomas LeCompte of Argonne National Lab was the physics coordinator for the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. He talks about the instrument and its future, as we await the December 13th announcement as to whether the LHC has found the Higgs particle…

x

Share: Large Hadron Collider Backgrounder


Out of Our Depth: Sea Level on the Rise

2011-12-08 :: Scientific American

Ocean and climate scientist Eelco Rohling talks with Scientific American senior editor Mark Fischetti about updated calculations of sea-level rise as a function of climate change…

x

Share: Out of Our Depth: Sea Level on the Rise


Brian Greene Talks Faster-Than-Light Neutrinos

2011-11-23 :: Scientific American

Physicist Brian Greene, host of the NOVA series The Fabric of the Cosmos, addresses the question of faster-than-light neutrinos at a Q&A session after the debut of the PBS series…

x

Share: Brian Greene Talks Faster-Than-Light Neutrinos


The Mind's Hidden Switches

2011-11-22 :: Scientific American

Eric J. Nestler, director of the Friedman Brain Institute at the Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City, talks about his article in the December issue of Scientific American magazine on epigenetics and human behavior, called "Hidden Switches in the Mind"…

x

Share: The Mind's Hidden Switches


The Discovery of Quasicrystals: The 2011 Nobel Prize in Chemistry

2011-10-05 :: Scientific American

Listen to the announcement of the 2011 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, to Daniel Shechtman of the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology. Then hear comments from the president of the American Chemical Society, Nancy Jackson, of Sandia National Laboratories…

x

Share: The Discovery of Quasicrystals: The 2011 Nobel Prize in Chemistry


An Accelerating Universe: The 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics

2011-10-04 :: Scientific American

Listen to the announcement of the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics, to Saul Perlmutter, Brian Schmidt and Adam Riess, from the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. Following the formal announcement comes an explanation of the research, which tracked type Ia supernovae to discover that the expansion of the universe was accelerating, and a phone conversation with new Nobel laureate Brian Schmidt…

x

Share: An Accelerating Universe: The 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics


Cancer Vaccines

2011-09-30 :: Scientific American

Eric von Hofe, cancer researcher and president of the biotech company Antigen Express talks about his article in the October issue of Scientific American called "A New Ally against Cancer," about cancer vaccines…

x

Share: Cancer Vaccines


Science Legend Christian de Duve

2011-09-09 :: Scientific American

Christian de Duve, 1974 Nobel laureate for physiology or medicine, talks about going from a cell biologist to a theorist on evolution and the origin of life…

x

Share: Science Legend Christian de Duve


Carl Zimmer on Rats, Cats, Viruses and Tattoos

2011-08-26 :: Scientific American

In part 2 of our interview, award-winning author Carl Zimmer talks about his latest books, and a new study that shows how Toxoplasma influences the behavior of rats--and maybe of us…

x

Share: Carl Zimmer on Rats, Cats, Viruses and Tattoos


Carl Zimmer on Evolution in the Big City

2011-08-24 :: Scientific American

The annual Scientific American September single-topic issue is all about cities. And award-winning author Carl Zimmer recently penned a piece on evolution research in the urban environment for The New York Times. In part 1 of this interview, he talks about urban evolution…

x

Share: Carl Zimmer on Evolution in the Big City


The City That Became Safe: What New York Teaches about Urban Crime and Its Control

2011-08-09 :: Scientific American

U.C. Berkeley School of Law professor Franklin Zimring talks about his article, "How New York Beat Crime," in the August issue of Scientific American

x

Share: The City That Became Safe: What New York Teaches about Urban Crime and Its Control


Nobel Laureate Avram Hershko: The Orchestra in the Cell

2011-07-27 :: Scientific American

Nobel laureate Avram Hershko, who determined cellular mechanisms for breaking down proteins, talks about his research in a conversation recorded at the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting in Lindau, Germany. And Scientific American Editor in Chief Mariette DiChristina discusses the recent inaugural Google Science Fair…

x

Share: Nobel Laureate Avram Hershko: The Orchestra in the Cell


Nobel Laureate Peter Agre: From Aquaporins to Lutefisk

2011-07-20 :: Scientific American

Peter Agre, 2003 Chemistry Nobel laureate for his work on aquaporins, the proteins that allow water into and out of cells, talks about his research, his upbringing and why he almost ran for the Senate, in a conversation recorded at the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting in Lindau, Germany…

x

Share: Nobel Laureate Peter Agre: From Aquaporins to Lutefisk


Let's Make a Probabilistic Deal: A Fresh Look at the Monty Hall Problem

2011-06-25 :: Scientific American

Scientific American math and physics editor Davide Castelvecchi revisits the Monty Hall problem, so you can know whether you're better off holding on to your original pick or switching when new information presents itself…

x

Share: Let's Make a Probabilistic Deal: A Fresh Look at the Monty Hall Problem


How Physics Limits Intelligence

2011-06-17 :: Scientific American

Award-winning author Douglas Fox talks about his cover story in the July issue of Scientific American on The Limits of Intelligence, placed there by the laws of physics…

x

Share: How Physics Limits Intelligence


Dying for Science: The 100th Anniversary of the Doomed Scott Antarctic Expedition

2011-05-26 :: Scientific American

Pulitzer Prize-winning author Edward Larson talks about his article "Greater Glory" in the June issue of Scientific American on the forgotten science of the doomed Scott expedition a hundred years ago…

x

Share: Dying for Science: The 100th Anniversary of the Doomed Scott Antarctic Expedition


Skirting Steak: The Case for Artificial Meat

2011-05-17 :: Scientific American

Journalist Jeffrey Bartholet talks about his June Scientific American magazine article on the attempts to grow meat in the lab, and Editor in Chief Mariette DiChristina talks about the cover piece in the May issue on radical energy solutions…

x

Share: Skirting Steak: The Case for Artificial Meat


Astronaut Love: An Interview with Spacewalker Stanley Love

2011-04-28 :: Scientific American

On the eve of the launch of the penultimate space shuttle mission, STS-134, Scientific American astronomy editor George Musser talks to veteran astronaut Stanley Love about being in space and the future of spaceflight…

x

Share: Astronaut Love: An Interview with Spacewalker Stanley Love


Editors' Roundtable: Science Conference Reports

2011-04-21 :: Scientific American

Scientific American editors Christine Gorman, Robin Lloyd, Michael Moyer and Kate Wong talk about their recent trips to different science conferences: the meetings of the Association for Health Care Journalists, the Paleoanthropology Society, the American Association of Physical Anthropologists and an M.I.T. 150th-anniversary conference called Computation and the Transformation of Practically Everything…

x

Share: Editors' Roundtable: Science Conference Reports


Can It Be Bad to Be Too Clean?: The Hygiene Hypothesis

2011-04-06 :: Scientific American

Johns Hopkins School of Medicine researcher Kathleen Barnes talks about the hygiene hypothesis, which raises the possibility that our modern sterile environment may contribute to conditions such as asthma and eczema…

x

Share: Can It Be Bad to Be Too Clean?: The Hygiene Hypothesis


Self-Aware Robots?

2011-03-02 :: Scientific American

Journalist Charles Choi talks about work being done to make robots self-aware. Plus, we test your knowledge about some recent science in the news…

x

Share: Self-Aware Robots?


The Cornucopia Conference: Roundtable on the AAAS Meeting

2011-02-24 :: Scientific American

Podcast host Steve Mirsky talks with Scientific American magazine Editor in Chief Mariette DiChristina, news editor Anna Kuchment, feature editor Mark Fischetti and online news editor Robin Lloyd about various sessions at the recently completed annual conference of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Washington, DC.…

x

Share: The Cornucopia Conference: Roundtable on the AAAS Meeting


The Spirit of Innovation: From High School to the Moon

2011-02-17 :: Scientific American

Nancy Conrad, chair of the Conrad Foundation, talks about the Spirit of Innovation competition for high school students, and about her late husband, Pete Conrad, the third man to walk on the moon…

x

Share: The Spirit of Innovation: From High School to the Moon


What's New with Science News

2011-02-16 :: Scientific American

Former Scientific American editor in chief and current Gleaming Retort blogger John Rennie, blogger and Scientific American blogs network director Bora Zivkovic, and Scientific American online news editor Robin Lloyd talk about the future of science news…

x

Share: What's New with Science News


Jefferson's Moose: Thomas's Fauna Fight against European Naturalists

2011-01-26 :: Scientific American

Biologist and author Lee Dugatkin talks about his article "Jefferson's Moose" in the February issue of Scientific American, the story of Jefferson's battle against the European theory of American biological degeneracy. Plus, we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news…

x

Share: Jefferson's Moose: Thomas's Fauna Fight against European Naturalists


What Is the Watson Jeopardy-Playing Supercomputer, Alex?

2011-01-13 :: Scientific American

Scientific American editor Michael Moyer talks about the sneak preview he caught of IBM's Watson Jeopardy!-playing computer. And ScientificAmerican.com's Larry Greenemeier spoke with Ford's Brad Probert about the new all-electric Focus at the Consumer Electronics Show last week in Las Vegas…

x

Share: What Is the Watson Jeopardy-Playing Supercomputer, Alex?


Vinod Khosla: Searching for the Radical Solution

2010-12-23 :: Scientific American

Clean technology investor Vinod Khosla, co-founder of Sun Microsystems, talks with Scientific American editor Mark Fischetti about the energy payoffs to be had by reinventing mainstream technologies…

x

Share: Vinod Khosla: Searching for the Radical Solution


How You Gonna Keep Flu Down on the Farm?: Pig Farms and Public Health

2010-12-22 :: Scientific American

Journalist Helen Branswell discusses her January Scientific American article, "Flu Factories," about the attempts to monitor new strains of flu that can originate on pig farms and the difficulties of balancing economic and public health constituencies…

x

Share: How You Gonna Keep Flu Down on the Farm?: Pig Farms and Public Health


Anna Deavere Smith: Let Me Down Easy

2010-12-20 :: Scientific American

Actor, playwright and journalist Anna Deavere Smith talks about the health care crisis and her play about people dealing with illness, health and the health care system, Let Me Down Easy

x

Share: Anna Deavere Smith: Let Me Down Easy


The Spewings of Titan (and More from the AGU Meeting)

2010-12-16 :: Scientific American

Scientific American editor Davide Castelvecchi joins us from San Francisco to talk about some of the highlights of the meeting of the American Geophysical Union, including volcanoes on Titan, x-rays from lightning, the biota of the Sulawesi Sea, and the connection between light pollution and air pollution. Plus, we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news…

x

Share: The Spewings of Titan (and More from the AGU Meeting)


Let's Talk Stuffing--Your Face

2010-11-24 :: Scientific American

Cornell University's Brian Wansink talks about eating behavior and how mindless eating has us consuming way more calories than we suspect…

x

Share: Let's Talk Stuffing--Your Face


Let's Talk Turkey!

2010-11-24 :: Scientific American

Turkey scientist Rich Buchholz talks about the turkey on your plate and his own turkey research…

x

Share: Let's Talk Turkey!


Why Do Women Live Longer Than Men?

2010-11-19 :: Scientific American

Scientific American Editor in Chief Mariette DiChristina and podcast host Steve Mirsky talk about longevity differences in the sexes, the importance of music education, the pros and cons of the Kindle, and other content from the November issue. Plus, we test your knowledge about some recent science in the news…

x

Share: Why Do Women Live Longer Than Men?


Physics Nobel Laureate Steven Weinberg

2010-11-15 :: Scientific American

Nobel physicist Steven Weinberg spoke to an audience of science journalists, and then to podcast host Steve Mirsky…

x

Share: Physics Nobel Laureate Steven Weinberg


Photograph 51: Rosalind Franklin and the Race For The Double Helix of DNA (Part 2 of 2)

2010-11-05 :: Scientific American

Photograph 51 is a new play about Rosalind Franklin, Watson and Crick, and the race to determine the structure of DNA, at the Ensemble Studio Theatre in New York City, running through November 21st. A panel discussion about the play on November 2nd featured crystallography expert Helen Berman, biologist and Franklin scholar Lynne Osman Elkin, science journalist Nicholas Wade, playwright Anna Ziegler and moderator Stuart Firestein…

x

Share: Photograph 51: Rosalind Franklin and the Race For The Double Helix of DNA (Part 2 of 2)


Photograph 51: Rosalind Franklin and the Race for the Double Helix of DNA, Part 1 of 2

2010-11-03 :: Scientific American

Photograph 51 is a new play about Rosalind Franklin, Watson and Crick, and the race to determine the structure of DNA, at the Ensemble Studio Theatre in New York City, running through November 21st. This November 2nd, a panel discussion about the play and the issues it raises featured crystallography expert Helen Berman; biologist and Franklin scholar Lynne Osman Elkin; science journalist Nicholas Wade; playwright Anna Ziegler; and moderator Stuart Firestein…

x

Share: Photograph 51: Rosalind Franklin and the Race for the Double Helix of DNA, Part 1 of 2


The Quest for the Giant Pumpkin

2010-10-29 :: Scientific American

Susan Warren, author of the book Backyard Giants, talks about "the passionate, heartbreaking and glorious quest to grow the biggest pumpkin ever." Plus, we'll test your knowledge about some recent science in the news…

x

Share: The Quest for the Giant Pumpkin


Not Your Grandfather's Scientific American

2010-10-20 :: Scientific American

Scientific American Editor in Chief Mariette DiChristina talks about the new look and new outlook of Scientific American magazine and of ScientificAmerican.com Plus, we discuss the results of a poll of the readers of Scientific American and Nature

x

Share: Not Your Grandfather's Scientific American


The Harlem Science Renaissance

2010-10-15 :: Scientific American

Molecular geneticist Sat Bhattacharya talks about his creation, the Harlem Children Society, which gets underprivileged kids involved in scientific research. And 13-year-olds Mitchell Haverty and Angus Fung talk about their research on algae as alternative fuel. Plus, we test your knowledge about some recent science in the news…

x

Share: The Harlem Science Renaissance


Totally Bogus: The Science Talk Quiz

2010-10-08 :: Scientific American

In this special stand-alone edition, see if you know which of four science news stories is Totally Bogus.…

x

Share: Totally Bogus: The Science Talk Quiz


Exactly When Is a Person Dead?

2010-09-23 :: Scientific American

Award-winning science journalist Robin Marantz Henig and podcast host Steve Mirsky discuss Robin's article in the September issue about organ donation and definitions of death. Plus, we test your knowledge about some recent science in the news. Web sites related to this episode include http://bit.ly/ctIDsx; http://bit.ly/9Us1lE…

x

Share: Exactly When Is a Person Dead?


Could Time End?

2010-09-21 :: Scientific American

Scientific American staff editor George Musser joins podcast host Steve Mirsky to discuss his article in the September issue about the possibility of time itself coming to an end…

x

Share: Could Time End?


The End: Death, Endings and Things That Should End

2010-09-14 :: Scientific American

Editor in Chief Mariette DiChristina and issue editor Michael Moyer talk with podcast host Steve Mirsky about the September single-topic issue of Scientific American--endings in science. Plus, we test your knowledge of some recent science in the news…

x

Share: The End: Death, Endings and Things That Should End


Cooking for Geeks: Jeff Potter on Experimenting in the Kitchen

2010-09-03 :: Scientific American

Jeff Potter, author of Cooking for Geeks: Real Science, Great Hacks and Good Food, talks with daily podcast correspondent Cynthia Graber, and podcast host Steve Mirsky tests your knowledge of some recent science in the news. Web sites related to content of this podcast include www.cookingforgeeks.com…

x

Share: Cooking for Geeks: Jeff Potter on Experimenting in the Kitchen


Mary Roach Is Packing for Mars, Part 2

2010-08-20 :: Scientific American

Podcast host Steve Mirsky talks with author Mary Roach about her new book "Packing For Mars: The Curious Science of Life in the Void." Part 2 of 2. (Part 1 is at http://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/episode.cfm?id=mary-roach-is-packing-for-mars-10-08-20). Web sites related to content of this podcast include www.maryroach.net.…

x

Share: Mary Roach Is Packing for Mars, Part 2


Mary Roach Is Packing for Mars, Part 1

2010-08-20 :: Scientific American

Podcast host Steve Mirsky recently attended a talk by author Mary Roach about her new book Packing for Mars: The Curious Science of Life in the Void. In part 1 of this two-part episode, we'll hear that talk. Web sites related to content of this podcast include www.maryroach.net…

x

Share: Mary Roach Is Packing for Mars, Part 1


When Humans Almost Died Out; Earthy Exoplanets; And Scientific American 's 165th Birthday

2010-08-12 :: Scientific American

Podcast host Steve Mirsky talks with human evolution expert Kate Wong about the small group of humans who survived tough times beginning about 195,000 years ago and gave rise to all of us, a story told in the cover article of the August issue of Scientific American, our 165th anniversary edition. And Editor in Chief Mariette DiChristina talks about the rest of the contents of the issue, including our coverage of the search for rocky exoplanets. Plus, we test your knowledge about some recent science in the news. Web sites related to content of this podcast include http://snipurl.com/10louu…

x

Share: When Humans Almost Died Out; Earthy Exoplanets; And Scientific American 's 165th Birthday


Arguing with Non-Skeptics, Part 2 of 2

2010-07-28 :: Scientific American

A panel discussion on arguing with non-skeptics at the recent Northeast Conference on Science and Skepticism in New York City featured James Randi, George Hrab, D. J. Grothe and podcast host Steve Mirsky. Julia Galef moderated. Part 2 of 2. Web sites related to content of this podcast include www.necsscon.org…

x

Share: Arguing with Non-Skeptics, Part 2 of 2


Arguing with Non-Skeptics, Part 1 of 2

2010-07-27 :: Scientific American

A panel discussion on arguing with non-skeptics at the recent Northeast Conference on Science and Skepticism in New York City featured James Randi, George Hrab, D. J. Grothe and podcast host Steve Mirsky. Julia Galef moderated. Part 1 of 2. Web sites related to content of this podcast include www.nature.com/nature/podcast and www.necsscon.org…

x

Share: Arguing with Non-Skeptics, Part 1 of 2


Whiz Kids: Intel Science Talent Search Documentary

2010-07-19 :: Scientific American

The new documentary film Whiz Kids follows three high school student-scientists as they attempt to get their projects accepted into the prestigious Intel Science Talent Search. Scientific American podcast host Steve Mirsky talks with the film's writer and editor, Jane Wagner, and with two of the stars of the documentary, Ana Cisneros and Hermain Khan. Plus, we'll test your knowledge about some recent science in the news. Web sites related to content of this podcast include www.nature.com/nature/podcast and http://whizkidsmovie.com…

x

Share: Whiz Kids: Intel Science Talent Search Documentary


Will Your Plug-In Car Actually Be Coal-Powered? And Other July Stories

2010-07-08 :: Scientific American

Scientific American Editor in Chief Mariette DiChristina and staff editor Michael Moyer join podcast host Steve Mirsky to talk about articles in the July issue, including: "The Dirty Truth about Plug-In Hybrids"; "How Babies Think"; and "Birds That Lived with Dinosaurs". Plus, we'll test your knowledge about some recent science in the news. Web sites related to content of this podcast include www.scientificamerican.com/sciammag; http://bit.ly/cwcTtR…

x

Share: Will Your Plug-In Car Actually Be Coal-Powered? And Other July Stories


Paul Dirac: "The Strangest Man" of Science, Part 2

2010-06-25 :: Scientific American

Award-winning writer and physicist Graham Farmelo talks with podcast host Steve Mirsky about The Strangest Man, Farmelo's biography of Nobel Prize-winning theoretical physicist Paul Dirac. Part 2 of 2. Web sites related to this episode include www.thestrangestman.com and http://bit.ly/dirac1963…

x

Share: Paul Dirac: "The Strangest Man" of Science, Part 2


"The Strangest Man" of Science, Part 1

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

Award-winning writer and physicist Graham Farmelo talks with podcast host Steve Mirsky about The Strangest Man, Farmelo's biography of Nobel Prize-winning theoretical physicist Paul Dirac. Part 1 of 2. Web sites related to this episode include www.…

x

Share: "The Strangest Man" of Science, Part 1


Physics Now and Then: From Neutrinos to Galileo

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

Theoretical physicist Lawrence Krauss, director of the Origins Initiative at Arizona State University, talks with podcast host Steve Mirsky about neutrinos and gravity waves. And Cynthia Graber talks with Paolo Galluzzi, director of the newly reopened Mus…

x

Share: Physics Now and Then: From Neutrinos to Galileo


The Big Dozen: 12 Events That Will Change Everything

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

Scientific American magazine Editor in Chief Mariette DiChristina and news editor Philip Yam join podcast host Steve Mirsky to talk about the cover story of the June issue of the magazine, "12 Events That Will Change Everything". How things like th…

x

Share: The Big Dozen: 12 Events That Will Change Everything


Remembering Martin Gardner, with Douglas Hofstadter

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

Martin Gardner died May 22nd at 95. He wrote the Mathematical Games column for Scientific American magazine for 25 years and published more than 70 books. Podcast host Steve Mirsky talks with Gardner's friend Douglas Hofstadter, Pulitzer Prize-winn…

x

Share: Remembering Martin Gardner, with Douglas Hofstadter


More from MacMania: Kindle v. iPad, Mac v. PC and App Development

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

MacWorld editorial director Jason Snell and app developer Peter Watling talk with podcast host Steve Mirsky about the iPad, computer culture and apps, aboard a cruise ship in the Atlantic during MacMania, produced by insightcruises.com

x

Share: More from MacMania: Kindle v. iPad, Mac v. PC and App Development


David Pogue on Tech, Twitter and Transgenic Goats

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

The ubiquitous David Pogue, author of the Missing Manual series and tech columnist for The New York Times, talks with podcast host Steve Mirsky aboard a cruise ship in the Atlantic during MacMania, produced by insightcruises.com. Plus, we'll…

x

Share: David Pogue on Tech, Twitter and Transgenic Goats


Durban Deal May Bring Climate Change Action into 21st Century

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

As time ran out on the latest international climate change negotiations, an agreement was reached that includes all significant countries in the effort to reduce greenhouse gases. David Biello reports…

x

Share: Durban Deal May Bring Climate Change Action into 21st Century


High-Tech Bartending Makes New Drinks

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

An article in Physics World discusses how scientific instruments are being used to make state-of-the-art alcoholic beverages. Cynthia Graber reports…

x

Share: High-Tech Bartending Makes New Drinks


Tiger Woods Made Other Golfers Worse

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

An analysis of 10 years of PGA events found that if Tiger Woods was present, his intimidated opponents averaged almost a full stroke worse than they otherwise would have scored. Christopher Intagliata reports…

x

Share: Tiger Woods Made Other Golfers Worse


Fast Climate Change Moves Slow Species

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

Species attempt to remain in their thermometric comfort zone, but climate change is far outpacing the rate at which they can adapt. Karen Hopkin reports…

x

Share: Fast Climate Change Moves Slow Species


Hoopsters Believe In Hot-or-Not Hand

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

Pro basketball players were much more likely to try another three-point shot after making one than after missing one. John Matson reports…

x

Share: Hoopsters Believe In Hot-or-Not Hand


Creativity Linked to Rule Bending

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

People who scored high on standard tests for creativity were also more likely to be willing to cheat for personal gain. Sophie Bushwick reports…

x

Share: Creativity Linked to Rule Bending


Bat Ears Deform for Better Ping Pickups

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

Slow-motion video and high-resolution imaging show that horseshoe bats can deform the shape of their outer ears for superior echolocation. Cynthia Graber reports…

x

Share: Bat Ears Deform for Better Ping Pickups


Conservators Keep Last Supper Fresh

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

A sophisticated air purification system protects The Last Supper from Milan's dirty air. Cynthia Graber reports…

x

Share: Conservators Keep Last Supper Fresh


Doorway to Blame for Room Amnesia

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

Ever walk into the kitchen and forgot why you went there? Of course you have. Good news: it's the doorway's fault. Sophie Bushwick reports…

x

Share: Doorway to Blame for Room Amnesia


Sex Keeps Elderly Happier in Marriage

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

Elderly married people still having sex were happier in life and marriage than their celibate compatriots. Cynthia Graber reports…

x

Share: Sex Keeps Elderly Happier in Marriage


Mind-Body Mindblower: Posture Affects Estimates

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

Leaning to one side may affect your estimates about anything from the height of an object to the frequency of an event. Sophie Bushwick reports…

x

Share: Mind-Body Mindblower: Posture Affects Estimates


Have a Food-Safe Thanksgiving

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

Safety tips for handling your bird from North Carolina State University food expert Ben Chapman. Steve Mirsky reports…

x

Share: Have a Food-Safe Thanksgiving


False Confessions Confuse Forensics

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

Forensic investigators tended to find more evidence supporting a guilty verdict following a confession, even if it was forced or coerced. Christopher Intagliata reports…

x

Share: False Confessions Confuse Forensics


High-IQ Kids Later Try Drugs More

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

A British study found significantly higher drug experimentation among people who performed well on IQ tests as kids. Sophie Bushwick reports…

x

Share: High-IQ Kids Later Try Drugs More


Male Spiders Scam Females with Gift-Wrapped Garbage

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

Male nursery web spiders lure mates with silk-wrapped offerings, only some of which contain tasty treats. Cynthia Graber reports…

x

Share: Male Spiders Scam Females with Gift-Wrapped Garbage


Glucose Test Swaps Tears for Blood

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

Tears have much lower glucose levels than blood but, as the ratio is consistent, they could serve for diabetes glucose monitoring. Sophie Bushwick reports…

x

Share: Glucose Test Swaps Tears for Blood


Clock Ticks for Phobos-Grunt Mars Mission

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

The Phobos-Grunt spacecraft is stuck in Earth orbit and has only until December to break free for Mars. John Matson reports…

x

Share: Clock Ticks for Phobos-Grunt Mars Mission


Clever Cooler Cases Could Conserve Current

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

Better design of supermarket fridge cases could save $100 million in electricity annually. Cynthia Graber reports…

x

Share: Clever Cooler Cases Could Conserve Current


Fever Increases Numbers of Immune Cells

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

Fever can play a variety of roles, such as inhibiting pathogen replication. It also apparently increases the population of killer T cells of the immune system. Christopher Intagliata reports…

x

Share: Fever Increases Numbers of Immune Cells


Project Seeks Your Tiny Squatters

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

The Wildlife of Your Home project seeks samples of your microscopic living companions. Cynthia Graber reports…

x

Share: Project Seeks Your Tiny Squatters


Belief in Relic Putter Helped Golf Scores

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

Subjects who thought their putter had been owned by a pro golfer putted better than others using the same putter without being told its pedigree. Amy Kraft reports…

x

Share: Belief in Relic Putter Helped Golf Scores


Predators Can Stress Prey to Death

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

Safe dragonfly larvae that could sense the presence of their predators had a higher mortality rate than unstressed larvae. Christopher Intagliata reports…

x

Share: Predators Can Stress Prey to Death


Calories Depend on Food Preparation

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

Mice gained more weight eating cooked food than raw food, indicating that preparing the food gives it a higher effective energy value. Sophie Bushwick reports…

x

Share: Calories Depend on Food Preparation


Age for Nobel-Winning Work Rises

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

A survey of science Nobels finds that the age at which winners do their work has been going up over the last century. Cynthia Graber reports…

x

Share: Age for Nobel-Winning Work Rises


Protein May Make UV Exposure Safer in Morning

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

Levels of a DNA repair protein naturally rise in the morning and fall later in the day, which may make exposure to UV safest early…

x

Share: Protein May Make UV Exposure Safer in Morning


Birds Show Price Humans Pay for Good Clotting

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

Birds have different clotting proteins than humans, which explains our better clotting in trauma, but their avoidance of certain cardiovascular problems. Karen Hopkin reports…

x

Share: Birds Show Price Humans Pay for Good Clotting


Lions and Tigers Bear Vocal Cords for Roars

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

Most animal vocal cords are triangular, but the uniquely stretchable square cords of the big cats let them produce their amazingly loud roars. Rose Eveleth reports…

x

Share: Lions and Tigers Bear Vocal Cords for Roars


Chock-Full Church Made Choral Clarity

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

A doctoral student performed acoustic archaeology to determine how music could have been properly appreciated in a cavernous 16th-century church. Sarah Fecht reports…

x

Share: Chock-Full Church Made Choral Clarity


Flesh-Tearing Piranhas Communicate with Sound

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

Red-bellied piranhas make three distinctive sounds when communicating about how much they will mess each other up. Cynthia Graber reports…

x

Share: Flesh-Tearing Piranhas Communicate with Sound


People with Sweet Tooths May Be Sweeter

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

Study subjects who expressed a preference for sweet over savory tastes also tended to be more agreeable. Karen Hopkin reports…

x

Share: People with Sweet Tooths May Be Sweeter


Robins Found Guilty in West Nile Virus Spread

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

A study of the spread of West Nile virus across North America since its introduction in 1999 implicates robins as a key disease vector. Sophie Bushwick…

x

Share: Robins Found Guilty in West Nile Virus Spread


App Turns iPhone into spiPhone

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

An iPhone app can enable the smart phone to tell what somebody is typing on a nearby computer keyboard. Christopher Intagliata reports…

x

Share: App Turns iPhone into spiPhone


Kid Scientists Show Medicines Can Be Mistaken for Candy

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

A study by sixth graders found that children and adults can easily mistake some medications for sweets. Rose Eveleth reports…

x

Share: Kid Scientists Show Medicines Can Be Mistaken for Candy


Bat Die-Offs Affect Human Health and Economics

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

Biologist Jeffrey Foster at the ScienceWriters2011 conference in Flagstaff on October 16 discussed the implications to humans of the bat die-off resulting from the fungal disease called white-nose syndrome. Steve Mirsky reports…

x

Share: Bat Die-Offs Affect Human Health and Economics


Pathogen Genomics Has Become Dirt Cheap

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

Microbiologist Paul Keim at the ScienceWriters2011 conference in Flagstaff on October 16 explained that sequencing a pathogen's genome has dropped in 10 years from $500,000 to as low as $10. Steve Mirsky reports…

x

Share: Pathogen Genomics Has Become Dirt Cheap


Animal Production Practices Create Antibiotic Resistance

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

Microbiologist Lance Price at the ScienceWriters2011 conference in Flagstaff on October 16 explained that modern animal production methods are virtually designed to create antibiotic resistant bacteria. Steve Mirsky reports…

x

Share: Animal Production Practices Create Antibiotic Resistance


Moon Not Made of Cheese, Physicist Explains

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

Theoretical physicist Sean Carroll at the ScienceWriters2011 conference in Flagstaff on October 17 explained why we need not sample the moon to know it's not made of cheese. Steve Mirsky reports…

x

Share: Moon Not Made of Cheese, Physicist Explains


Steven Pinker: Violence Is Lower Than Ever

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

Harvard psychologist Steven Pinker talked about the thesis of his new book, The Better Angels of Our Nature: Why Violence Has Declined, at the ScienceWriters2011 conference in Flagstaff on October 17. Steve Mirsky reports…

x

Share: Steven Pinker: Violence Is Lower Than Ever


Women on the Pill Might Like Men's Credentials, but Unsatisfied in Bed

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

A new study suggests that women on the pill are happy with their man's practical credentials, but are not necessarily swooning between the sheets. Christopher Intagliata reports…

x

Share: Women on the Pill Might Like Men's Credentials, but Unsatisfied in Bed


100,000-Year-Old Art Studio Discovered

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

Archeologists have discovered a paint production studio in an ancient South African cave…

x

Share: 100,000-Year-Old Art Studio Discovered


Chivalrous Crickets Benefit from Protecting Mates

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

Male crickets who guarded their mates against predators gained mating opportunities and offspring. Sophie Bushwick reports…

x

Share: Chivalrous Crickets Benefit from Protecting Mates


Pickup Soccer Helps Homeless Health

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

Homeless men who played soccer a few times a week had improved cardiovascular health and a lower risk of death. Cynthia Graber reports…

x

Share: Pickup Soccer Helps Homeless Health


New Evidence for Comet Sources of Ocean Water

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

Comet Hartley 2 has the same deuterium-to-hydrogen ratio as ocean water, lending support to the idea that Earth's water was delivered by comets. John Matson reports…

x

Share: New Evidence for Comet Sources of Ocean Water


Rapid PCR Could Bring Quick Diagnoses

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

A technique for doing PCR amplification of DNA samples could make it possible to do genome analysis in minutes of infectious agents. Cynthia Graber reports…

x

Share: Rapid PCR Could Bring Quick Diagnoses


Candidates Affect Viewer Reactions to Ads in Debates

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

Seeing an ad after seeing a political candidate you don't like can affect your opinion of the product in the ad. Amy Kraft reports…

x

Share: Candidates Affect Viewer Reactions to Ads in Debates


2011 Nobel Prize in Chemistry

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

The 2011 Nobel Prize in Chemistry goes to Daniel Shechtman of the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology for the discovery of quasicrystals--infinite, non-repeating ordered materials. Steve Mirsky reports…

x

Share: 2011 Nobel Prize in Chemistry


2011 Nobel Prize in Physics

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

Saul Perlmutter, Brian Schmidt and Adam Reiss share the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics for their observations that type Ia supernovae indicate that the expansion of the universe is accelerating. Steve Mirsky reports…

x

Share: 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics


2011 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

Bruce Beutler, Jules Hoffmann and Ralph Steinman share the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their eludication of the complex workings of the immune system. Steve Mirsky reports…

x

Share: 2011 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine


How the Koala Got Its Low Voice

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

The koala makes a sound that should require a bison-size body. A descended larynx gives it an unusually long vocal tract. Sophie Bushwick reports…

x

Share: How the Koala Got Its Low Voice


Roads Lead to Resistance

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

Villages close to a road built in Ecuador saw a larger rise in antibiotic resistance than did more remote areas. Karen Hopkin reports…

x

Share: Roads Lead to Resistance


City Cyclists Suck In Soot

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

Cyclist commuters in London had more than twice as much black soot in their lungs than did walking commuters. Amy Kraft reports…

x

Share: City Cyclists Suck In Soot


Sound Sends Electron to Specific Location

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

Sound impelled an electron in an energy well to a second energy well and back. It's a step toward controlled single-electron transfer for use in quantum computer electronic circuits. Sophie Bushwick reports…

x

Share: Sound Sends Electron to Specific Location


Electrolyte Balancers Set Stage for Multicellularity

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

Comparative genomics shows that sodium channel and pump proteins evolved just before multicellular animals arose, implying that control of electrolyte balancing was a crucial event in life's history. Karen Hopkin reports…

x

Share: Electrolyte Balancers Set Stage for Multicellularity


Amateur Planet Hunters Find Exoplanets

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

You can search for exoplanets via the citizen scientist project Planet Hunters, which has already found candidate worlds orbiting distant stars. John Matson reports…

x

Share: Amateur Planet Hunters Find Exoplanets


Health Data Could Spot Genocide Risk

0000-00-00 :: Scientific American

Marginalized populations have more health problems related to poor nutrition and prenatal care. Tracking such data could identify groups at risk for future genocide. Cynthia Graber reports…

x

Share: Health Data Could Spot Genocide Risk


Science Talk

Science Talk is a weekly science audio show covering the latest in the world of science and technology. Join Steve Mirsky each week as he explores cutting-edge breakthroughs and controversial issues with leading scientists and journalists. He is also an articles editor and columnist at Scientific American magazine and his column, "Antigravity", is one of science writing's rate venues for humor. Check our the new daily podcast from Scientific American: "60-Second Science." To view all of our archived podcasts please go to www.scientificamerican.com/podcast

Science Talk


Switch to our mobile site