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Last update: 2013-06-27

SC 44 How College is Different From High School

2013-06-27
Length: 20s

In this podcast we offer 22 examples of how college is different from high school along with some tips about each.

How College is different from High School

You will be the youngest and not the oldest. You may have older students in your classes who are returning to college. Your fellow students will come from a much larger geographic area. Nothing happens automatically. You must initiate. You won't hear bells at the conclusion of each class. You must manage your own time. It will appear that you have more free time. You may be living in a dorm instead of at home. You college may be in a location new to you. Different climate. Different food. Different Air! Lunch will have more options, alcohol may be served, and coffee will become an important part of your life. The class sizes may be larger - much larger. Bells will not ring at the end of each class period. You wont' say the pledge of allegiance. There will no "announcements" over a PA system. The teacher will likely be a professor, teachers assistant or graduate student. It is assumed that you will be responsible for your own grades and deadlines. The professors will not check with each other to compare notes on how you are doing. Academic requirements will be new and at a higher level. Right or control click here to download the MP3 Why Your Opinion Matters:

Our upcoming book:The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching, was written with feedback from many educators and students, which was our plan all along. We began by outlining our thoughts on a series of topics, then we recorded them to share with the world. From the feedback we received, we were informed about the needs of the student caring community. We need your feedback so we may continue to fulfill our mission statement and help students, the world over.

Please, click to write a review for this podcast in iTunes. If you have a question you'd potentially like answered on a future podcast, CALL our toll free Internet voicemail number: (855) 639-9292. Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro Thank you!

Daniel & David

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SC 43 Negotiating With Our Students

2013-06-21
Length: 23s

Four strategies to help with this topic

In this podcast we discuss strategies to manage the issue of grade negotiations.
(By the way, this is a preview from our upcoming book.)

 

Four strategies to help with this topic.

An executive summary of the syllabus explains the rules of engagement. Keeping grades up to date removes opportunities for negotiation. Written reflections on grades create a paper trail. Pre-Final examination grade projections and rules limit the scope of negotiations.

Sound Bites:

How many other professors have has this student had this conversation with? We come from a culture of negotiation. My parents negotiate, isn't that the was it is done? I can not imagine having that conversation with a professor. How can professors minimize this type of situation at the end of a term? Engaging in negotiation, obviously sends the wrong message to students.
Right or control click here to download the MP3
Why Your Opinion Matters:

Our upcoming book:The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching, was written with feedback from many educators and students, which was our plan all along. We began by outlining our thoughts on a series of topics, then we recorded them to share with the world. From the feedback we received, we were informed about the needs of the student caring community. We need your feedback so we may continue to fulfill our mission statement and help students, the world over.

Please, click to write a review for this podcast in iTunes. If you have a question you'd potentially like answered on a future podcast, CALL our toll free Internet voicemail number: (855) 639-9292. Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro Thank you!

Daniel & David

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SC 42 #2 Underprepared Students: Facts and Fictions

2013-06-14
Length: 23s

We welcome back special guest, Professor Summer Serpas, who teaches English at Irvine Valley College in Orange County, California. Prof. Serpas is a member of the California Acceleration Project, which works with underprepared college students.

Part Two of Two

In this episode you’ll learn about:

Fiction: Underprepared students need hand holding. I would argue against the idea that we are not supposed to hand hold at all. We are also teaching students how "to do" college. We are working to build autonomy in our work over the semester I structure the grading so that the grading does not count so much in the beginning. In class, I really do almost no lecture. Students are in small groups, whole class discussions, and activities - so I can move through the class one on one. Students say, "We want to work on this over the weekend". How do you work with students one on one during class? I circulate around the room when they are working on a group activity. While they are doing activities, I pull them up one by one and have a mini five-minute conference Students will often stay after class for one on one instruction. It's not "lecture" it's more helping them out. Fiction: At-risk students are often at risk because problems with English as a Second Language. I personally would never categorize an E.S.L. student as an at-risk student unless he or she were making the choice to move out of an that E.S.L sequence before making native level proficiency. Sometimes it's fear based.  The more we can work with our E.S.L Department, the more it will help.  Fiction: Accelerated programs are really meant for intellectually gifted students--certainly not for at-risk students. I think our gut instinct is to slow down when students are struggling and to take it step by step.  My student stated that they were placed at the bottom of the pit. Getting only 30% of students through to the college level writing class is not okay. If we accelerate, we have to also then change our way of teaching. We have to follow that backwards design, we have to provide just in time remediation, and most important, we have to address those effective issues that are causing students to fail. If we do that together then I think that acceleration can work. If we can change our approach  to teaching, and really teaching in a way that will allow them to get where they want to be. Do you have anything additional that you would like to share with our community? I think it is important as instructors that we are always growing and changing. This has really challenged me to have that "growth mindset" that I was speaking about for my students in my own teaching and being willing to grow as a teacher and change what I am doing and change my approach. What I like about this approach is that it is very respectful to students. To students: You can do this work and I can help you do this work". I feel better connected to my students.

Items mentioned in this podcast include:

Irvine Valley College Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us by Daniel H. Pink California Acceleration Project website "Accelerated English at Chabot College: A Synthesis of Key Findings" by Katie Hern (pdf) Brainology by Carol Dweck / Link to website: Mindset Works Email for Professor, Summer Serpas: sserpas@ivc.edu Why Your Opinion Matters:

Our upcoming book:The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching, was written with feedback from many educators and students, which was our plan all along. We began by outlining our thoughts on a series of topics, then we recorded them to share with the world. From the feedback we received, we were informed about the needs of the student caring community. We need your feedback so we may continue to fulfill our mission statement and help students, the world over.

Please, click to write a review for this podcast in iTunes. If you have a question you'd potentially like answered on a future podcast, CALL our toll free Internet voicemail number: (855) 639-9292. Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro Thank you!

Daniel & David

 

 

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SC 41 #1 Underprepared Students: Facts and Fictions

2013-05-29
Length: 26s

We welcome special guest, Professor Summer Serpas, who teaches English at Irvine Valley College in Orange County, California. Prof. Serpas is a member of the California Acceleration Project, which works with underprepared college students.

Part One of Two

In this episode you’ll learn about:

Fiction: Underprepared students are intellectually unprepared for college. This is a common myth that many people believe in. Students often procrastinate so they can blame the 'procrastination' instead of themselves. The "Fess Up" list. Who did not do the reading today? "I really did the reading, but I did not get it." Fiction: Underprepared students cannot initially take on the same challenging intellectual work expected of their peers. 3 principles of teaching: backwards design, just-in-time remediation, intentional support for issues (such as fear). I practice intrusive interventions for struggling students.  You can raise that academic bar and students can complete that challenging work that we think they might not be ready for. Fiction: Underprepared students do not succeed as well as their peers in college--success stories are the exception rather than the rule. I think they don't succeed due to the structure of our system. Every "Exit Point" that we add, is a point where a student can slip out of the system. What we are doing is eliminating exit points. You can’t just do this, you have to teach differently as well. Right or control click here to download the MP3  

Items mentioned in this podcast include:

California Acceleration Project website "Accelerated English at Chabot College: A Synthesis of Key Findings" by Katie Hern (pdf) Brainology by Carol Dweck / Link to website: Mindset Works The College Fear Factor: How Students and Professors Misunderstand One Another by Rebecca Cox The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business by Charles Duhigg Email for Professor, Summer Serpas: sserpas@ivc.edu Why Your Opinion Matters:

Our upcoming book:The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching, was written with feedback from many educators and students, which was our plan all along. We began by outlining our thoughts on a series of topics, then we recorded them to share with the world. From the feedback we received, we were informed about the needs of the student caring community. We need your feedback so we may continue to fulfill our mission statement and help students, the world over.

Please, click to write a review for this podcast in iTunes. If you have a question you'd potentially like answered on a future podcast, CALL our toll free Internet voicemail number(855639-9292. Email:  General Information   |   Dr. Daniel de Roulet   |   Prof. David C. Pecoraro Thank you!

Daniel & David

 

   

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SC 40 The First Year of College and Your Family

2013-05-28
Length: 17s

The First Year of College and Your Family

In this podcast, we offer advice for college bound students and their parents about the transition which occurs between  high school and college.

Negotiating your relationship with your parents. Staying in touch with siblings. Working to discover the right balance.  Sound Bites: • What happens between high school and college is a big change.• You are now a "College Man or "College Woman"

• What is it like having a college student at home or away in a dorm?

•  Parents, this can be a time of "fear."

•  College changes everything!

•  We recommend a genuine heart - to - heart family meeting.Students, give your parents a good idea of the work load that you have - yes, show them your syllabi.

•  Students, before, during and after college, you are still that family member.

•  Students, be sensitive to younger siblings.

•  Ask and answer the question: "Is living away from home a good idea?"

•  Parents, is it best for my student to live away from home?

•  Hear the story: "Where's Farm Boy?"

•  In dorm life, you build a second family.

•  Students:  It's really nice if you don't desert your family during that first year.

Keep in mind, that your goal is to get to that wonderful day of celebration - the commencement ceremony!

We welcome your feedback to this podcast and our work: PLEASE go to iTunes and write a review or simply, in iTunes, click on STAR to rate us. – we would really appreciate that! Email us! Daniel: daniel@studentcaring.com  OR David: david@studentcaring.com

OR You may tell give voice feedback on student caring TOLL – FREE voice number: 1 – (855) NEWWAY- CARE That’s – 1 -(855)639-9292

THIS EPISODE WAS RECORDED ON Wednesday, March 20, 2013

PLEASE JOIN OUR COMMUNITY You may find us on: Twitter   Facebook   Google+  Pinterest  and at  STUDENT CARING DOT COM – You may also sign up for our free NEWSLETER – That way, we can keep you informed about our upcoming Book: The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching.

 

The First Year of College and Your Family …

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SC 39 College and Finances

2013-05-23
Length: 18s

College and Finances

In this podcast, we offer some tips for college bound students and their parents about the financial aspects of going to college.

Firsts:  Day-To-Day and long-term financial decisions. Financial aid, work, and time enough for school. Credit cards. Sound Bites: One of the great permissions of college is to be poor.
Cheap coffee vs. - a Venti Mocha Latte   Professor, I can't come to class because I have to work. Working during college will intimately reduce your income down the road.   Financial Aid or a Loan?   For every hour spent in class, you need to plan to study two hours outside of class.    Not enough time to sleep and eat.   First and foremost, how much time do I need for my classes?   Ask yourself, "Do I want to do this part-time job for the rest of my life?"   Why are you going to college?   You need to stay the course and delay gratification.   Somehow, the credit card companies know that you have just graduated from high school.

 

We welcome your feedback to this podcast and our work: PLEASE go to iTunes and write a review or simply, in iTunes, click on STAR to rate us. – we would really appreciate that! Email us! Daniel: daniel@studentcaring.com  OR David: david@studentcaring.com

OR You may tell give voice feedback on student caring TOLL – FREE voice number: 1 – (855) NEWWAY- CARE That’s – 1 -(855)639-9292

THIS EPISODE WAS RECORDED ON Wednesday, March 20, 2013

PLEASE JOIN OUR COMMUNITY You may find us on: Twitter   Facebook   Google+  Pinterest  and at  STUDENT CARING DOT COM – You may also sign up for our free NEWSLETER – That way, we can keep you informed about our upcoming Book: The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching.

 

 

   

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SC 38 College: Your Chance at a New Start

2013-05-18
Length: 17s

In this podcast, we discuss the experiences of a high school student from the moment when they receive their acceptance letter to college and the transitional opportunities from high school to college.

In life, there are few chances for a new start. Don't be eager to conform. Take advantage of this time to do a self-assessment of your life and formal education to date. What do you want to change about yourself? Reflect about your friends and educational experiences as you prepare for college.

Resources mentioned in this episode:

Please Understand Me

Strengths Finder 2.0

We welcome your feedback to this podcast and our work: PLEASE go to iTunes and write a review or simply, in iTunes, click on STAR to rate us. – we would really appreciate that! Email us! Daniel: daniel@studentcaring.com OR David: david@studentcaring.com

OR You may tell give voice feedback on student caring TOLL – FREE voice number: 1 – (855) NEWWAY- CARE That’s – 1 -(855)639-9292

THIS EPISODE WAS RECORDED ON Wednesday, March 20, 2013

PLEASE JOIN OUR COMMUNITY You may find us on: Twitter Facebook Google+ and Pinterest At STUDENT CARING DOT COM – You may also sign up for our free NEWSLETER – That way, we can keep you informed about our upcoming Book: The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching.

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SC 37 Difficult Student Situations

2013-05-10
Length: 46s

How to Turn Difficult and Emotional Interactions with Students
Into Priceless Teaching Opportunities

Recently we had the opportunity to present a session at the annual TASS (Teaching Academic Survival Skills) conference in Fort Lauderdale, FL. This conference is a find for people interested in addressing the problems of at-risk students. It’s a fairly small gathering filled with professionals dedicated to the success of students who enter college on the margins—so you find yourself meeting and spending time with dedicated professionals who know of what they speak. It’s also reasonably priced and well run. We highly recommend it.

Sometimes students are at risk because they lack family experience in college, or resources, or good foundational high school experiences. At other times, life simply gets in the way of success. A student may experience an illness, or a family crisis, or a conflict with other students or an instructor. This week’s podcast continues a series on students in crisis; this one takes on a range of situations from the point of view of the professor in getting the best possible outcome out of difficult situations. It’s a recording of our conference presentation with our colleague Prof. Bonni Stachowiak.

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SC 36 Caring for Graduate Students

2013-04-27
Length: 49s

Caring for Graduate Students

This week in Student Caring, we continue with our visit to the University of California at Santa Barbara, but this time we talk about student caring on another level.

Graduate students are a forgotten and often misunderstood population on university campuses.  Parents and students may see them as teacher assistants for—or often teachers of—first year courses.  This is often the case, but what we often forget is that grad students are just a year or a few years away from being undergraduates, and yet, we expect them to be experts not only in teaching, but in balancing work and studies, and in managing the challenges of starting families or starting their lives over in a new environment, far from home, in which they often feel invisible.  We know that as graduate students we faced all of these challenges, and found ourselves in competitive programs where the notions of collegiality and mentoring were sought after by many and found by few. We both had great mentors, but we struggled with the other demands of graduate life, and we were part of an environment in which many students, for a host, of reasons, did not finish their studies and struggled with feeling isolated when they thought they would be celebrating meeting life-long goals.

So we invite undergraduates, graduate students, and their professors to join us this week as UC Santa Barbara helps us to get an inside look at graduate studies.

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SC 35 Preventing Student Dying

2013-03-31
Length: 52s

Preventing Student Dying 

It is not supposed to be like this.

The focus, and often pride, of so many families is seeing their daughter or son off to college—a place of hopes, bright futures, and new beginnings.  Yet, estimates from the National Institute on Alcohol, Abusive, and Alcoholism (part of the governmental NIH) places the number of college students who die from alcohol-related causes at 1,825 annually. A practice growing more popular on college campuses called synergy—the mixing of drug and alcohol to produce new experiences—can cause catastrophic physiological effects as well.  According to a university website on health and wellness, when cocaine is combined with alcohol, “cocaine increases heart rate three to five times as much as when either drug is given alone. This can lead to heart attacks and heart failure.” People at the beginning of their adult lives should not be facing the end of their lives… (read more)

This week in Student Caring, we bring you a podcast interviewing one of our friends, and a friend to college students at risk, Dr. Don Lubach.  We spent a day on his campus, the University of California at Santa Barbara, attending an annual summit and speaking to Don and his colleagues about what caring campuses can do to help students who place themselves at risk.

First, a little background is helpful.  In case your notions of drugs and alcohol on campus revolve around either memories tempered by time movies such as Animal House, the CDC weighs in on the problem.  It states that the intermediate effects of something like binge drinking (consuming four or more drinks) have serious immediate and long-term side effects—and we’re not even bringing mixing drugs and alcohol into the picture.  According to CDC studies, immediate effects of binge drinking include unintended trauma (including traffic accidents), falls, drownings, burns, and unintentional firearm injuries.  Effects can also include abuse (including “intimate partner violence”), risky sexual behavior that can end in sexual assault, and alcohol poisoning—a medical emergency.  Alcohol abuse over the long term can work with other physiological and psychological problems to result in addiction, severe depression and anxiety, cardiovascular and neurological issues, and liver disease.

Even limiting the discussion to student success, the effects of even short term use of alcohol or drugs on education can be devastating as well.  Have you ever wondered about a student’s academic performance or changes to his or her behavior?  How can professors identify students in their classes who are at risk, and what should we as professors do?  What level of risks are our students experiencing?

Join us for an important podcast, “Preventing Student Dying.”

- Dr. Daniel de Roulet

We welcome your feedback to this podcast and our work: YOU MAY Go to iTunes and write a review or simply, in iTunes, click on STAR to rate us. – we would really appreciate that! Email us!

Daniel: daniel@studentcaring.com  OR David: david@studentcaring.com

OR You may tell give voice feedback on student caring TOLL – FREE voice number,

1 – (855) NEWWAY- CARE       That’s – 1 -(855)639-9292

THIS EPISODE WAS RECORDED ON Friday, March 1, 2013

PLEASE JOIN OUR COMMUNITY You may find us on: Twitter Facebook Google+ and Pinterest

At STUDENT CARING DOT COM – You may also sign up for our free NEWSLETER - That way, we can keep you informed about our upcoming Book:  The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching.

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SC 34 Responding To Our Students

2013-03-27
Length: 40s

Responding To Our Students

In this blogpost / podcast we comment on our interviews of the two previous podcasts with Mr. Micah Stratton and Ms. Tasha Levin.

Here are the statements we comment on:

Micha:  "I want my class time to count." Micha:  "You have to make us think for ourselves." Micha:  "We are only taking the general education courses because we have to." Micha:  "I think the most popular one (struggle) is time management." Micha:  "I have seen the looks on their (Seniors) faces and they have no ideal what they are doing after they graduate." Tasha:  "After taking a break 'in the real world,' I realized how important an education is and that you can't get anywhere without it." Tasha:  "RATE MY PROFESSORS DOT COM, it's a tool that has never failed me, ever." Tasha:  "I am seeing the teacher turning away students who are trying to get in." Tasha:  "It is the atmosphere that you create as a teacher. That helps to set the pace for the entire semester."

LINKS REFERENCED IN THIS EPISODE

Teaching Academic Survival and Success - Conference

aSleep App - Source of the beach and sea gull sounds.

Teaching and the Case Study Method - Discussion Based Teaching

Rate My Professors dot com.

Apple Movie Trailers.

This episode was recorded in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida on Tuesday, March 19, 2013.

[box] AN INVITATION TO THE STUDENT CARING COMMUNITY:

Students, Professors, Parents, and all of higher education, we invite your feedback on these important topics. Thank you.

[/box]

You May:

Go to iTunes and write a review or simply, in iTunes, click on STAR to rate us. - we would really appreciate that!

Email us! Daniel: daniel@studentcaring.com  David: david@studentcaring.com

Respond to the BLOG on STUDENTCARING . COM

OR You may tell give voice feedback on student caring TOLL - FREE voice number, 1 - (855) NEWWAY- CARE       That’s - 1 -(855) 639-9292

THANK YOU FOR LISTENING & PLEASE JOIN OUR COMMUNITY

You may find us on:

Twitter Facebook Google + Pinterest

This way, we can keep you informed about our upcoming eBook and Audio program:  The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching.

 

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SC 33 Understanding Our Students - Tasha

2013-03-02
Length: 37s

Understanding Our Students - Tasha

In this blogpost / podcast we interview our special guest, Ms. Tasha Levin who shares her thoughts about her experiences while in college and responds to our questions.

Here are some highlights from the podcast.

STUDENT CARING:  "What has college been like for you?"

"I felt really lost in a large university."

"I did not know where to go."

"My biggest challenge in California is getting into classes."

"I was number 32 on the petition list!"

STUDENT CARING: "We often now have waiting lists that are larger than the classes."

"Half these kids are going to flake out in two week anyways, LET ME IN!"

STUDENT CARING: "What are the difficulties that students face in College today?

"There is no guarantee at the end that you will get a job, it is very disheartening."

"Students don't take their education seriously."

"It took me a little while to stand up to my parents."

STUDENT CARING: "How do you balance being a student full time and working full time?"

"I learned to prioritize my education as number one."

"My employer allows my education to be my number one priority.

STUDENT CARING: "Can you identify what makes a class great?"

"I enjoy the classes the most when a teacher incorporates us into the discussion."

"I appreciate a break during a lecture."

"It gets our brains moving when we break into groups."

"When the teacher learns everybody's names you feel like a person."

STUDENT CARING: "When do things not go so well in a class?"

"It is exactly like the teacher on 'Wonder Years', boring, the teacher answers all the questions."

STUDENT CARING: "How do you decide which class / professor to take?"

"RATE MY PROFESSOR DOT COM. Almost every person uses this. It is a tool that has never failed me."

"Many times, a student just wants an easy class, they just want to get the grade."

STUDENT CARING: "Does RATE MY PROFESSOR DOT COM influence your course evaluations ?"

"I give my heartfelt evaluation at the end, how else are they going to know?"

STUDENT CARING: "What's your opinion of your fellow students?"

"In Boston, everybody was paying tens of thousands for each class, everybody was very serious."

"Here, (in California) students are more open, it is very diverse."

STUDENT CARING: "How do you think students feel about general education classes?"

"I think a lot of students feel resentful. You know your not going to use it for the rest of your life."

STUDENT CARING: "What advice do you have for administrators and professors?"

"You don't know what is in a students mind until you ask them. People who are older are so far separated, they are not equipped to make those decisions at all.

STUDENT CARING: "Since you will be a teacher one day, what do you think will be most important for you to bring into the classroom as a teacher?"

"I say, it is the atmosphere that you create as a teacher. The class feeds upon that. When they are excited about what they are teaching the students follow through."

"When a professor is really boring, I can't take it."

"A professor can change a class from day to night.  Come in with a smile!"

STUDENT CARING: "Thank you Tasha!"

This episode was recorded in Southern California on Tuesday, February 26, 2013.

[box] AN INVITATION TO THE STUDENT CARING COMMUNITY:

Students, Professors, Parents, and all of higher education, we invite your feedback on these important questions and on the answers given by Ms. Tasah Levin. Thank you.

[/box]

You May:

Go to iTunes and write a review or simply, in iTunes, click on STAR to rate us. - we would really appreciate that!

Email us! Daniel: daniel@studentcaring.com  David: david@studentcaring.com

Respond to the BLOG on STUDENTCARING . COM

OR You may tell give voice feedback on student caring TOLL - FREE voice number, 1 - (855) NEWWAY- CARE       That’s - 1 -(855) 639-9292

THANK YOU FOR LISTENING & PLEASE JOIN OUR COMMUNITY

You may find us on:

Twitter Facebook Google + Pinterest

This way, we can keep you informed about our upcoming eBook and Audio program:  The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching.

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SC 32 Understanding Our Students - Micah

2013-02-27
Length: 48s

Understanding Our Students

In this blogpost / podcast we interview our special guest, Mr. Micha Stratton who shares his thoughts about his experiences while in college and responds to our questions.

Here are some highlights from the podcast.

STUDENT CARING:  What is a successful classroom experience?

Mr. Micah Stratton:
"We want to get something out of a class."

"Don't read the syllabus to us."

"I want my class time to count."

"We don't want to be board."

"When there is no diversity - we check out - we want to contribute."

"We love professors who are relaxed, a familiar face."

"A good professor makes us give back to them."

"Be real, take time to digress, we need that mental break."

STUDENT CARING:  WHAT DO YOU STRUGGLE WITH?

Mr. Micah Stratton:
"Busy work in the classroom."

"I love being intellectually stimulated."

"You have to make us think for ourselves."

"We need help to learn what we should learn."

"We are only taking the general eds. because we have to."

"I feel like I am wasting my time, my time is precious."

STUDENT CARING:  What do you observe other students struggling with the most?

Mr. Micah Stratton:
"Time management is something that a lot of people don't figure out."

"I see other students staying up till 3 am because they didn't get all their assignment done."

"We are not thinking in long term chunks, we're just trying to get through the moment."

"Time management is a tough thing for us."

"Do you really want to do that or watch Iron Man?"

STUDENT CARING:  Do you see things that students struggle with in their personal lives?

Mr. Micah Stratton:
"Social life takes up a lot of time."

"People struggle to find something to do with the time that they have."

"Quality relationships and friendships take time, I really struggle with friends, having time for them."

"I choose health and I choose sleep. I am sacrificing."

Mr. Micah Stratton - On procrastination...

"I can find out that morning that I have a test and I usually don't get anything less than an A-.

"Planning ahead for me is just not something that I make time for because I don't have to.

"Half the time students realize they have homework when other students bring it up randomly.

"Procrastination is just something you have time for. Planning ahead is something you don't.

"There's people who procrastinate and it works, and then there's the kind of people who are just lazy and their grade reflects that, and then there's just the person who does the assignment, they don't procrastinate."

Mr. Micah Stratton - On my test taking system...

"I spend 15 seconds - max on a test question."

"CABDD - I memorize that, then fill in the Scantron."

"If you don't know the answer, just move on."

"You need to learn how to take tests well."

STUDENT CARING:  How well do you think your College experiences have prepared you for life after college?

Mr. Micah Stratton: "As an actor there are a lot of things that  are different.

"Do I need a college degree get work? No. But, I do need the classes.

"I  watch seniors graduate and they don't do anything, I see the looks on their faces when they realize they have no idea what they are doing after they graduate."

"It's scary. I'm nervous right now. I don't know what I am going to do."

"It's hard to not feel that I am wasting my time."

"I think that, as a student, we need to be groomed for the future."

"We need our professors and teachers to look outside the box for us."

"College is our time to grow, that is when we are supposed to grow. We get coddled, we get babied."

"I don't know if I'm going to be successful after I graduate, am I wasting my time here?  I'm only 20 once, I'm only in college, once."

STUDENT CARING:  What are your opinions about higher education in general and other opinions that you could honestly share about college.

Mr. Micah Stratton: 
"What's the point of math to a theatre major?"

"Why am I required to take the same class that I took in High School?"

"I feel that we need to find things that help us."

"We need our careers to be molded."

"Professors can put their hand into your life."

"Is it worth all of the time and the money I am spending?"

"Higher Education is important, but it needs to have a point. We want our time be used correctly."

STUDENT CARING:  Has anyone of your prof.s in a general ed class said - "This is how this class will help you?"

Mr. Micah Stratton:
"
I can't remember a time."

"The good things are what keeps me in higher education

AN INVITATION TO THE STUDENT CARING COMMUNITY:

Students, Professors, Parents, and all of higher education, we invite your feedback on these important questions and on the answers given by Mr. Micah Stratton. Thank you.

You May:

Go to iTunes and write a review or simply, in iTunes, click on STAR to rate us. - we would really appreciate that!

Email us! Daniel: daniel@studentcaring.com  David: david@studentcaring.com

Respond to the BLOG on STUDENTCARING . COM

OR You may tell give voice feedback on student caring TOLL - FREE voice number, 1 - (855) NEWWAY- CARE       That’s - 1 -(855) 639-9292

THANK YOU FOR LISTENING & PLEASE JOIN OUR COMMUNITY

You may find us on:

Twitter Facebook Google + Pinterest

This way, we can keep you informed about our upcoming eBook and Audio program:  The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching.

 

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SC 31 #2 A Day In the Life of A Professor

2013-02-15
Length: 33s

A "L O N G" Day in the life of Prof. David Pecoraro. This episode picks up from where the previous one left off.

TIMELINE

11:00 am - Stage Lighting Design Class
12:07 pm - Office time - Lunch Break!
02:20 pm - Journey to my Introduction to the Arts Class
02:35 pm - Experiencing a group production number with student choreographer, Bretlyn Schmitt.
03:55 pm - Lighting Class - Lab / Light Call 05:00 pm - Break! Audio tour of my office
05:30 pm - Dinner with my son, Joseph at the university cafeteria
06:45 pm - Return to the theatre for a dress rehearsal for "Little Women"
09:3 0 pm - After the dress rehearsal, David walks back to his office and concludes his day.

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SC 30 #1 A Day In the Life of A Professor

2013-01-31
Length: 18s

Podcast 30:

#1 A Day in the Life of a Professor

The Student Caring Project champions the higher education student by surrounding them with a community of support. This community will often consist of family, professors, administrators, and staff. One of our most popular blog posts has been “A Day in the Life of a College Student.”

Following up on that concept, Co-founder, David Pecoraro picked up his digital recorder on the morning of November 26, 2012 and recorded his day. We hope you will be entertained, amused, and quite possibly learn something about, at least, one day in the life of Prof. David C. Pecoraro!

TIMELINE
09:00 am – Departure from home with Joseph Pecoraro
09:20 am – Arrival at Vanguard University of Southern California
10:00 am – Theatre Department faculty meeting

In the next podcast you will hear the remainder of the day.

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SC 29 Rethinking the First-year College Seminar According to Student Cognitive Development

2013-01-17
Length: 32s

This podcast features Daniel delivering his paper at the Hawaii International Conference on Higher Education.
Now, we take you to the Hilton Hawaiian Village Conference Center - Honolulu - January 6, 2013 - Enjoy!

 Abstract:  The presentation presents a summary of typical approaches to first-year seminar or “introduction to college” courses, and suggests an approach integrated into the liberal arts curriculum that uses cognitive development models to plan student learning outcomes, assignments, and course format.  The redesigned seminar addresses academic preparedness for college work and students’ understanding of a liberal arts curriculum, and prepares students to begin to make the transition into higher levels of thinking.

Daniel de Roulet, Ph.D., Professor of English and co-chair, Irvine Valley College, daniel@studentcaring.com

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SC 28 #2 Courage and Course Evaluations

2012-12-27
Length: 28s

Course Evaluations, Part 2

In this podcast, we’ll look at how people other than professors see the course evaluation process, using some of our administrative experience to convince professors, parents, and students that department chairs, deans, and academic vice presidents really do look at the results.  We’ll discuss course evaluations as early signals of troubled or superior teaching.  Administrators often refer to course evaluations when they receive complaints about professors or classes; and, they often look at evaluations when getting good news about tenure-track faculty and when deciding on course assignments for part-time faculty.

Evaluations show patterns of teaching behavior that help administrators and faculty development committees or centers determine areas of need in a professor’s course skills.  They also identify potential mentors from established faculty for new faculty members.  Moreover, evaluations are not well used when they are a way of turning teaching performance into numbers; rather, they identify patterns of students care and learning.

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SC 27 #1 Courage and Course Evaluations

2012-12-13
Length: 29s

SC 27 #1 Courage and Course Evaluations

At the end of each academic semester, as students are racing to prepare for finals and professors are scrambling to grade papers and exams, our colleges and universities ask course evaluations to be completed.  Students and professors have many questions about this ritual.  Students may be wondering how confidential their responses are, or if anyone reads the evaluations, or what effects their comments may actually have on a professor’s teaching method and course.  Professors may see evaluations as an interruption as they try to cover the planned class material before the semester runs out.  They may see evaluations with a sense of dread if the semester did not go well, and they may wonder how administrators will react to the evaluations.  They may just wonder what their students think of them.

In this podcast, we’ll look at why evaluations are important—and not just those that take place at the end of the term.  We’ll discuss what the best kinds of evaluations are, and how students, professors and administrators can all benefit from the process, if the process is performed correctly.

 

 

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SC 26 How To Procrastinate Your Way to an A

2012-11-21
Length: 31s

STUDENTS: Listen to Prof's de Roulet and Pecoraro teach you how you can procrastinate your way to an "A".

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SC 25 Helping Students When They Fall Too Far Behind

2012-11-08
Length: 23s

In our experience, students fall behind in classes primarily because of problems with relationships, life emergencies, over-commitment, and lack of self-discipline / time management. 

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SC 24 Dangerous Territory

2012-10-25
Length: 25s

How to address highly charged emotional situations with students.

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SC 23 Reuniting With Continuing Students

2012-10-05
Length: 18s

Connecting with returning students.

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SC 23 Reuniting With Continuing Students

2012-10-05
Length: 18s

Connecting with returning students.

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SC 22 Meeting First-Time College Students

2012-09-22
Length: 20s

Caring for Students who are New to College

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SC 22 Meeting First-Time College Students

2012-09-22
Length: 20s

Caring for Students who are New to College

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SC 21 Designing and Implementing A Syllabus for Learning

2012-09-04
Length: 25s

For most professors and students, the fall term has either begun or will be beginning very soon.  So today we want to talk to you about something we’re all doing right now:  designing or redesigning the course syllabus.

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SC 21 Designing and Implementing A Syllabus for Learning

2012-09-04
Length: 25s

For most professors and students, the fall term has either begun or will be beginning very soon.  So today we want to talk to you about something we’re all doing right now:  designing or redesigning the course syllabus.

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SC 20 #2 Parents: Going to College for the First Time

2012-08-06
Length: 28s

This podcast offers 4 more tips for parents of soon-to-be first time college students from Professors (and parents of college students), Daniel de Roulet and David C. Pecoraro.

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SC 20 #2 Parents: Going to College for the First Time

2012-08-06
Length: 28s

This podcast offers 4 more tips for parents of soon-to-be first time college students from Professors (and parents of college students), Daniel de Roulet and David C. Pecoraro.

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SC 19 #1 Parents: Going to College for the First Time

2012-07-25
Length: 32s

This podcast offers 4 tips for parents of soon-to-be first time college students from Professors (and parents of college students), Daniel de Roulet and David C. Pecoraro.

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SC 19 #1 Parents: Going to College for the First Time

2012-07-25
Length: 32s

This podcast offers 4 tips for parents of soon-to-be first time college students from Professors (and parents of college students), Daniel de Roulet and David C. Pecoraro.

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SC 18 Students: Going to College for the First Time

2012-07-10
Length: 36s

This podcast is for all students who will be going to college for the first time. Most of your education, especially the last four years—has been pointing to this moment.  But now what?  What should you expect from going to or going away to college in the fall, and what can you do this summer to get ready? Listen for 10 ACTION STEPS STUDENTS CAN DO DURING THE SUMMER BEFORE YOU GO TO COLLEGE.

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SC 18 Students: Going to College for the First Time

2012-07-10
Length: 36s

This podcast is for all students who will be going to college for the first time. Most of your education, especially the last four years—has been pointing to this moment.  But now what?  What should you expect from going to or going away to college in the fall, and what can you do this summer to get ready? Listen for 10 ACTION STEPS STUDENTS CAN DO DURING THE SUMMER BEFORE YOU GO TO COLLEGE.

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SC 17 #2 The Commencement from HELL!

2012-06-15
Length: 33s

DAVID:  Welcome.  I’m David AND I’m Daniel AND This is a podcast for: Students, Professors, Parents, and all of higher education. Our mission is to champion “Student Caring” as a way of addressing the challenges in higher education today.

This is our 17th Podcast!

This Episode it titled: THE COMMENCEMENT FROM HELL!
THE COMMENCEMENT FROM HEAVEN!

In our last episode we explored the expectations and challenges of a commencement ceremony from the perspectives of each group of participants: students, attendees, organizers participants, and faculty.
In this episode, we’ll take you through a sequence of activities which often occur for a commencement ceremony and what can make them HEAVEN or HELL.

DANIEL
LONG RANGE COMMENCEMENT PLANNING
- This is usually the responsibility of an individual who chairs a committee.

The importance of selecting a date. Way in advance (Minimum of 18 months) Do not change the date. DAVID: I recently heard of a college who give a “T” shirt to all incoming freshman on their first day which has their commencement date and time on it.

- The involvement of the Registrar’s office is essential.

DAVID:
PLANNING DURING THE 9 MONTHS BEFORE THE CEREMONY

Secure the venue or venues. Your decision about the interior or exterior is a crucial one. Be sure to take into consideration: If outdoors, what you will do in the event of inclement weather. The time of day when the event will begin and the position of the sun in relationship to the stage or attendees. (I’ve seen this decision result in misery for all attendees, in the form of about 4,000 sun-burnt people.) Identifying the number of graduates and attendees is essential. Chair monthly, then weekly meetings to review and prepare all areas.

 

DANIEL:

SELECTION OF KEYNOTE AND STUDENT SPEAKERS
- Decisions about who will speak at your ceremony can easily make it HEAVEN OR HELL. How many of these have you attended, or heard about where the speaker was terrible?

DAVID:  I have attended too many where the keynote speaker ruined the day and made it HELL. Let me tell you a story about the politician… Make sure they have an opportunity to speak with each other about what they plan to talk about. During the ceremony is not the time when you want them to make an awkward discovery that they are speaking about the same or opposing topics.

PRE COMMENCEMENT PLANNING In general, I recommend that you, with the entire planning committee, “Go to your event, in real time – in your minds” and visualize all aspects well in advance. I doing this,m you will discover many details that you need to take care of. The key to any successful live event lies in what you do before the day of the event.
- Contract all vendors – from staging to restrooms.

A printed program for in person attendees. A digital program for those viewing via the Internet.

THE COMMENCEMENT REHEARSAL
The venue must be set-up and have all essential areas tested and ready to go at least 2 days before. The essential areas may include:
- Staging, which is safe and handicapped accessible.

Lighting, in necessary for viewing or for the television cameras. A professional audio system. Video Photography Security First Aid Concessions Restrooms Traffic and parking control.

ELEMENTS OF THE COMMENCEMENT CEREMONY – THE BIG DAY
- Ticketing

Security / Extra Security / Traffic Control Directions / Parking / Location of the Ceremony on Campus Locations for: Graduates / Platform Guests / Attendees Admission to the ceremony / Ticketing / Program Distribution Start on time. (Live and Internet audiences.) A word about the music – it must be good.

The Procession
- Platform dignitaries enter

Faculty enter Students enter (Pomp and Circumstance) Welcome Water and restrooms Handicap access Taking of photographs (Must be instructed) Emergency Exits / First Aid / Lost and Found

 

Student speaker introduction / Student speaker Keynote speaker introduction / Keynote speaker Focus on the students Short and meaningful We hope for moments of humanness and appropriate humor. Speaker – Rick Warren story. The politician who would not stop talking The speaker who spoke all about themselves. Reading of the names.

Things students may do:

Firecracker Tortilla throw Students give gifts to the president As they are walking across the stage – cartwheels. Length of the ceremony This is NOT the time to welcome them into the alumni association.

 

POST EVENT MEETING
- This is crucial, weather or not there were problems, the committee needs to meet to review what went well and what cold have gone better.

If available, watch the video of the ceremony to refresh everyone’s memory. Detailed notes should be taken, then reviewed at the first meeting for the following year.

 

The importance of the faculty after the ceremony to be available for meet and greet and photo’s.

Well, thank you very much for listening to this episode and sincerely hope that we have provided you with some helpful information.

 

DANIEL
We welcome your feedback to this podcast and our work:
YOU MAY
Go to iTunes and write a review or simply, in iTunes, click on STAR to rate us. – we would really appreciate that!
Email us! Daniel: daniel@studentcaring.com

David: david@studentcaring.com

Respond to the BLOG on STUDENTCARING . COM

OR You may tell give voice feedback on student caring TOLL – FREE voice number,

1 – (855) NEWWAY- CARE       That’s – 1 -(855) 639-9292

THIS EPISODE WAS RECORDED ON Thursday, May 17, 2012

THANK YOU FOR LISTENING & PLEASE JOIN OUR COMMUNITY
You may find us on:
Twitter
Facebook
Google +
Pinterest

 

This way, we can keep you informed about our upcoming eBook and Audio program:  The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching

Until next time:  Keep  Caring!

 

 

 

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SC 17 #2 The Commencement from HELL!

2012-06-15
Length: 33s

DAVID:  Welcome.  I’m David AND I’m Daniel AND This is a podcast for: Students, Professors, Parents, and all of higher education. Our mission is to champion “Student Caring” as a way of addressing the challenges in higher education today.

This is our 17th Podcast!

This Episode it titled: THE COMMENCEMENT FROM HELL!
THE COMMENCEMENT FROM HEAVEN!

In our last episode we explored the expectations and challenges of a commencement ceremony from the perspectives of each group of participants: students, attendees, organizers participants, and faculty.
In this episode, we’ll take you through a sequence of activities which often occur for a commencement ceremony and what can make them HEAVEN or HELL.

DANIEL
LONG RANGE COMMENCEMENT PLANNING
- This is usually the responsibility of an individual who chairs a committee.

The importance of selecting a date. Way in advance (Minimum of 18 months) Do not change the date. DAVID: I recently heard of a college who give a “T” shirt to all incoming freshman on their first day which has their commencement date and time on it.

- The involvement of the Registrar’s office is essential.

DAVID:
PLANNING DURING THE 9 MONTHS BEFORE THE CEREMONY

Secure the venue or venues. Your decision about the interior or exterior is a crucial one. Be sure to take into consideration: If outdoors, what you will do in the event of inclement weather. The time of day when the event will begin and the position of the sun in relationship to the stage or attendees. (I’ve seen this decision result in misery for all attendees, in the form of about 4,000 sun-burnt people.) Identifying the number of graduates and attendees is essential. Chair monthly, then weekly meetings to review and prepare all areas.

 

DANIEL:

SELECTION OF KEYNOTE AND STUDENT SPEAKERS
- Decisions about who will speak at your ceremony can easily make it HEAVEN OR HELL. How many of these have you attended, or heard about where the speaker was terrible?

DAVID:  I have attended too many where the keynote speaker ruined the day and made it HELL. Let me tell you a story about the politician… Make sure they have an opportunity to speak with each other about what they plan to talk about. During the ceremony is not the time when you want them to make an awkward discovery that they are speaking about the same or opposing topics.

PRE COMMENCEMENT PLANNING In general, I recommend that you, with the entire planning committee, “Go to your event, in real time – in your minds” and visualize all aspects well in advance. I doing this,m you will discover many details that you need to take care of. The key to any successful live event lies in what you do before the day of the event.
- Contract all vendors – from staging to restrooms.

A printed program for in person attendees. A digital program for those viewing via the Internet.

THE COMMENCEMENT REHEARSAL
The venue must be set-up and have all essential areas tested and ready to go at least 2 days before. The essential areas may include:
- Staging, which is safe and handicapped accessible.

Lighting, in necessary for viewing or for the television cameras. A professional audio system. Video Photography Security First Aid Concessions Restrooms Traffic and parking control.

ELEMENTS OF THE COMMENCEMENT CEREMONY – THE BIG DAY
- Ticketing

Security / Extra Security / Traffic Control Directions / Parking / Location of the Ceremony on Campus Locations for: Graduates / Platform Guests / Attendees Admission to the ceremony / Ticketing / Program Distribution Start on time. (Live and Internet audiences.) A word about the music – it must be good.

The Procession
- Platform dignitaries enter

Faculty enter Students enter (Pomp and Circumstance) Welcome Water and restrooms Handicap access Taking of photographs (Must be instructed) Emergency Exits / First Aid / Lost and Found

 

Student speaker introduction / Student speaker Keynote speaker introduction / Keynote speaker Focus on the students Short and meaningful We hope for moments of humanness and appropriate humor. Speaker – Rick Warren story. The politician who would not stop talking The speaker who spoke all about themselves. Reading of the names.

Things students may do:

Firecracker Tortilla throw Students give gifts to the president As they are walking across the stage – cartwheels. Length of the ceremony This is NOT the time to welcome them into the alumni association.

 

POST EVENT MEETING
- This is crucial, weather or not there were problems, the committee needs to meet to review what went well and what cold have gone better.

If available, watch the video of the ceremony to refresh everyone’s memory. Detailed notes should be taken, then reviewed at the first meeting for the following year.

 

The importance of the faculty after the ceremony to be available for meet and greet and photo’s.

Well, thank you very much for listening to this episode and sincerely hope that we have provided you with some helpful information.

 

DANIEL
We welcome your feedback to this podcast and our work:
YOU MAY
Go to iTunes and write a review or simply, in iTunes, click on STAR to rate us. – we would really appreciate that!
Email us! Daniel: daniel@studentcaring.com

David: david@studentcaring.com

Respond to the BLOG on STUDENTCARING . COM

OR You may tell give voice feedback on student caring TOLL – FREE voice number,

1 – (855) NEWWAY- CARE       That’s – 1 -(855) 639-9292

THIS EPISODE WAS RECORDED ON Thursday, May 17, 2012

THANK YOU FOR LISTENING & PLEASE JOIN OUR COMMUNITY
You may find us on:
Twitter
Facebook
Google +
Pinterest

 

This way, we can keep you informed about our upcoming eBook and Audio program:  The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching

Until next time:  Keep  Caring!

 

 

 

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SC 16 #1 The Commencement from HELL!

2012-05-18
Length: 30s

Heaven or Hell - it’s really up to you.

THE COMMENCEMENT FROM HELL!
THE COMMENCEMENT FROM HEAVEN!

Student Caring - Podcast No. 16
Outline:
DAVID: Welcome.  I’m David AND I’m Daniel. AND This is a podcast for: Students, Professors, Parents, and all of higher education. Our mission is to champion “Student Caring” as a way of addressing the challenges in higher education today.

 DANIEL: Can you believe it?  This is our 16th Podcast! We want to talk to you about a very important day which occurs regularly in Higher Education - COMMENCEMENT.
This Episode it titled: THE COMMENCEMENT FROM HELL! THE COMMENCEMENT FROM HEAVEN!

 DAVID: But first - Student Caring NEWS  Thank you to all the people who came by our table at the WASC / ARC - Western Association of Schools and Colleges- Accrediting --  Academic Resource Conference in Costa Mesa, California on April 19. It was so very to good to meet so many of you and talk about your interest in  The Student Caring Project. Many people in attendance were interested in inviting us to speak - if YOU are interested - we are currently booking for the 2012 - 2013 Academic Year - Please send an email with the dates you have in mind to:  info@studentcaring.com

Thank you to Rosa Ray from COLLEGE COURSES . COM - who listened to our podcast on HOW TO CHEAT IN COLLEGE - AND WHAT TO DO ABOUT IT - and was inspired to create an INFO-GRAPHIC based on the information.  -  You can find a link to this excellent resource in the blog post for this episode. - If you teach - you might want to post it in your room or in your syllabus.

LINK:  http://www.studentcaring.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/How-Students-Cheat-800.png

 DANIEL: Next we would like to thank listener Melody Prado for leaving a Student Caring story on the care - phone number. 1 -(855) 639-9292 - Please listen to this story - - -  The Professor - The Student and WISDOM TEETH - ECTOMY.

 DANIEL and DAVID: Reactions to the student caring story.

Informational link for Melody Prado:  http://www.davidpecoraro.com/students/?p=207

 DAVID:  Opening statement. Commencement - Heaven or Hell - it’s really up to you. This ceremony will create memories, good or bad, which will last a lifetime for thousands of graduates, attendees, and participants - - you have to this right.

DANIEL: First we are going to talk about the expectations and challenges of a commencement ceremony.

 

STUDENTS
Expectations

This will be a happy day. I will feel relief having completed this significant goal. The ceremony will be organized and I won’t be confused about what to do.

Challenges

This will be a happy day - it isn’t always, many factors, both personal and professional may contribute to this.I My parents, family, friends may not be able to - or want to attend. Maybe someone passed away who was looking forward to this day for you. Now What? I have been in a fairly protected environment, now my life is changing and I don’t know what to do. Now I will have to find a job. Now, I am off to graduate school and more education. Do I really have to sit through the whole ceremony just to hear my name called and receive an I.O.U. for my real diploma?

Related activities often include:

The burning of textbooks! Moving out of a dorm, or moving to another city. The loss of day t day personal contact with friends and the college environment.

DAVID:
ATTENDEES: PARENTS / FAMILY / FRIENDS

Expectations

They will be able to see the person they came to support receive their degree, hear their name called, and be able to take pictures. They will hear the traditional music, “Pomp and Circumstance.” It will be a happy day and I will feel PROUD! This will be an emotional day.

Challenges

They might not be able to attend - or they may not be able to obtain admission due to a limited number of tickets. The expense of traveling to the ceremony may be a strain. Parking, walking and getting a good seat can be stressful. The sound system may be inadequate. The person reading off the names may pronounce it incorrectly. YOUR graduate may be coming back home or moving away.

Related activities often include:
- Photo’s at the event.

Gift giving. A special meal or party before or after. The gift of a trip to celebrate.

DANIEL:
ORGANIZERS / ADMINISTRATION

Expectations
- All will go according to our plan.

The persons responsible for running the ceremony will do a good job. It will be a happy day for the students and their families. Now, I will have time to focus on areas of responsibility which I don’t have time to do when classes are in session.

Challenges

Worry about security. Worry about. Worry about bad weather. Worry about the unknown.

Related activities often include:

Posing for photographers. Meeting with the press. End of the academic year luncheons.

DAVID:
PARTICIPANTS / Speakers / Academic Officials

Expectations

I won’t have to worry and will be taken care of by the organizers. The stage will be safe and the sound system will operate properly.

Challenges

“There is so much that could go wrong!” - Worry! “What if I trip and fall?” “What if the sound system is bad?” “What if I get bood?” “What if they don’t like me and throw stuff?” “What if I am nervous and forget what I am supposed to say?” “What if the script that I have been given to follow is wrong?”

Related activities often include:
- Pictures before and after.

DANIEL:
FACULTY
Expectations

This will be a time of happiness and relaxation The event will be organized and start on time. I will be told what to do so I don’t have to think that day. For New Faculty “This is cool!” “I feel special in my academic robes.” I will feel edified - “This is why I went into teaching in the first place.” I will feel like I accomplished something. For Experienced Faculty I will feel some relief - a  short break

Challenges

Even though the student are graduating and I get a break from teaching, I have the pressures of getting all the finals graded and turned in on time. New Faculty What am I supposed to do? What will I experience as a result of this ceremony? Experienced Faculty The loss of working with students whom you care for. A negative attitude: “We are only set-dressing - icing on the cake.” “We really don’t do anything other than walk in sit down - watch - and parade out at the end.” “There’s nothing for me to do.” “How am I going to survive the next 3 hours?” Survival techniques that we have witnessed: The reading of a book - carefully placed inside of the commencement program. The marriage game. Casting faculty members in a Shakespeare play. The “Faculty Bingo Game!”


Related activities often include:

A department dinner / awards ceremony for the majors in my department. Student evaluations. Faculty / Course evaluations. Program assessment paperwork.

Well, thank you very much for listening to this episode and sincerely hope that we have provided you with some helpful information.

DANIEL
We welcome your feedback to this podcast and our work:
YOU MAY
Go to iTunes and write a review or simply, in iTunes, click on STAR to rate us. - we would really appreciate that!


Email us! Daniel: daniel@studentcaring.com

David: david@studentcaring.com

Respond to the BLOG on STUDENTCARING . COM

OR You may tell give voice feedback on student caring TOLL - FREE voice number,   

1 - (855) NEWWAY- CARE       That’s - 1 -(855) 639-9292

 THIS EPISODE WAS RECORDED ON Thursday, May 17, 2012

THANK YOU FOR LISTENING & PLEASE JOIN OUR COMMUNITY
You may find us on: facebook
Twitter
Google +
Pinterest

 

This way, we can keep you informed about our upcoming eBook and Audio program:  The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching  

 

Until next time:  Keep  Caring!

x

Share: SC 16 #1 The Commencement from HELL!


SC 16 #1 The Commencement from HELL!

2012-05-18
Length: 30s

Heaven or Hell - it’s really up to you.

THE COMMENCEMENT FROM HELL!
THE COMMENCEMENT FROM HEAVEN!

Student Caring - Podcast No. 16
Outline:
DAVID: Welcome.  I’m David AND I’m Daniel. AND This is a podcast for: Students, Professors, Parents, and all of higher education. Our mission is to champion “Student Caring” as a way of addressing the challenges in higher education today.

 DANIEL: Can you believe it?  This is our 16th Podcast! We want to talk to you about a very important day which occurs regularly in Higher Education - COMMENCEMENT.
This Episode it titled: THE COMMENCEMENT FROM HELL! THE COMMENCEMENT FROM HEAVEN!

 DAVID: But first - Student Caring NEWS  Thank you to all the people who came by our table at the WASC / ARC - Western Association of Schools and Colleges- Accrediting --  Academic Resource Conference in Costa Mesa, California on April 19. It was so very to good to meet so many of you and talk about your interest in  The Student Caring Project. Many people in attendance were interested in inviting us to speak - if YOU are interested - we are currently booking for the 2012 - 2013 Academic Year - Please send an email with the dates you have in mind to:  info@studentcaring.com

Thank you to Rosa Ray from COLLEGE COURSES . COM - who listened to our podcast on HOW TO CHEAT IN COLLEGE - AND WHAT TO DO ABOUT IT - and was inspired to create an INFO-GRAPHIC based on the information.  -  You can find a link to this excellent resource in the blog post for this episode. - If you teach - you might want to post it in your room or in your syllabus.

LINK:  http://www.studentcaring.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/How-Students-Cheat-800.png

 DANIEL: Next we would like to thank listener Melody Prado for leaving a Student Caring story on the care - phone number. 1 -(855) 639-9292 - Please listen to this story - - -  The Professor - The Student and WISDOM TEETH - ECTOMY.

 DANIEL and DAVID: Reactions to the student caring story.

Informational link for Melody Prado:  http://www.davidpecoraro.com/students/?p=207

 DAVID:  Opening statement. Commencement - Heaven or Hell - it’s really up to you. This ceremony will create memories, good or bad, which will last a lifetime for thousands of graduates, attendees, and participants - - you have to this right.

DANIEL: First we are going to talk about the expectations and challenges of a commencement ceremony.

 

STUDENTS
Expectations

This will be a happy day. I will feel relief having completed this significant goal. The ceremony will be organized and I won’t be confused about what to do.

Challenges

This will be a happy day - it isn’t always, many factors, both personal and professional may contribute to this.I My parents, family, friends may not be able to - or want to attend. Maybe someone passed away who was looking forward to this day for you. Now What? I have been in a fairly protected environment, now my life is changing and I don’t know what to do. Now I will have to find a job. Now, I am off to graduate school and more education. Do I really have to sit through the whole ceremony just to hear my name called and receive an I.O.U. for my real diploma?

Related activities often include:

The burning of textbooks! Moving out of a dorm, or moving to another city. The loss of day t day personal contact with friends and the college environment.

DAVID:
ATTENDEES: PARENTS / FAMILY / FRIENDS

Expectations

They will be able to see the person they came to support receive their degree, hear their name called, and be able to take pictures. They will hear the traditional music, “Pomp and Circumstance.” It will be a happy day and I will feel PROUD! This will be an emotional day.

Challenges

They might not be able to attend - or they may not be able to obtain admission due to a limited number of tickets. The expense of traveling to the ceremony may be a strain. Parking, walking and getting a good seat can be stressful. The sound system may be inadequate. The person reading off the names may pronounce it incorrectly. YOUR graduate may be coming back home or moving away.

Related activities often include:
- Photo’s at the event.

Gift giving. A special meal or party before or after. The gift of a trip to celebrate.

DANIEL:
ORGANIZERS / ADMINISTRATION

Expectations
- All will go according to our plan.

The persons responsible for running the ceremony will do a good job. It will be a happy day for the students and their families. Now, I will have time to focus on areas of responsibility which I don’t have time to do when classes are in session.

Challenges

Worry about security. Worry about. Worry about bad weather. Worry about the unknown.

Related activities often include:

Posing for photographers. Meeting with the press. End of the academic year luncheons.

DAVID:
PARTICIPANTS / Speakers / Academic Officials

Expectations

I won’t have to worry and will be taken care of by the organizers. The stage will be safe and the sound system will operate properly.

Challenges

“There is so much that could go wrong!” - Worry! “What if I trip and fall?” “What if the sound system is bad?” “What if I get bood?” “What if they don’t like me and throw stuff?” “What if I am nervous and forget what I am supposed to say?” “What if the script that I have been given to follow is wrong?”

Related activities often include:
- Pictures before and after.

DANIEL:
FACULTY
Expectations

This will be a time of happiness and relaxation The event will be organized and start on time. I will be told what to do so I don’t have to think that day. For New Faculty “This is cool!” “I feel special in my academic robes.” I will feel edified - “This is why I went into teaching in the first place.” I will feel like I accomplished something. For Experienced Faculty I will feel some relief - a  short break

Challenges

Even though the student are graduating and I get a break from teaching, I have the pressures of getting all the finals graded and turned in on time. New Faculty What am I supposed to do? What will I experience as a result of this ceremony? Experienced Faculty The loss of working with students whom you care for. A negative attitude: “We are only set-dressing - icing on the cake.” “We really don’t do anything other than walk in sit down - watch - and parade out at the end.” “There’s nothing for me to do.” “How am I going to survive the next 3 hours?” Survival techniques that we have witnessed: The reading of a book - carefully placed inside of the commencement program. The marriage game. Casting faculty members in a Shakespeare play. The “Faculty Bingo Game!”


Related activities often include:

A department dinner / awards ceremony for the majors in my department. Student evaluations. Faculty / Course evaluations. Program assessment paperwork.

Well, thank you very much for listening to this episode and sincerely hope that we have provided you with some helpful information.

DANIEL
We welcome your feedback to this podcast and our work:
YOU MAY
Go to iTunes and write a review or simply, in iTunes, click on STAR to rate us. - we would really appreciate that!


Email us! Daniel: daniel@studentcaring.com

David: david@studentcaring.com

Respond to the BLOG on STUDENTCARING . COM

OR You may tell give voice feedback on student caring TOLL - FREE voice number,   

1 - (855) NEWWAY- CARE       That’s - 1 -(855) 639-9292

 THIS EPISODE WAS RECORDED ON Thursday, May 17, 2012

THANK YOU FOR LISTENING & PLEASE JOIN OUR COMMUNITY
You may find us on: facebook
Twitter
Google +
Pinterest

 

This way, we can keep you informed about our upcoming eBook and Audio program:  The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching  

 

Until next time:  Keep  Caring!

x

Share: SC 16 #1 The Commencement from HELL!


SC 15 How To Cheat in College

2012-04-15
Length: 34s

How To Cheat In College & What to do About It

PODCAST OUTLINE
I’m David AND I’m Daniel.
This is a podcast for: Students, Professors, Parents, and all of higher education. Our mission is to champion “Student Caring” as a way of addressing the challenges in higher education today.

DANIEL
Today, for PODCAST #15 ---------   HOW TO CHEAT - AND WHAT TO DO ABOUT IT

DAVID
NEWS:  Thank you to listener Rick Willems who currently working on my Masters in psychology, for your feedback about our “Career Directions and Your Daily Bread” Podcast.  / Student Caring On The Big Screen? - Yes!  Read all about at studentcaring.com
I ASKED ON FACEBOOK
Have you seen a student cheat on a test? How? Cheat while writing a paper? How. Please share - we are collection information.

FORMER STUDENT:   This feels like a trap.

FORMER STUDENT:Well in my good ol' cheating days I would record my answers onto my iphone and put it in my pocket with my earphones hidden- I’ve also written equations onto my calculator in lead so it doesn't show up until you reflect it off light. Sometimes i'll write answers on my arms or legs and pretend I have an itch to check them. before class i will also get there early and write answers on my desk and cover them with my arm until I need them. These are my secrets I'm giving to you David for I no longer need them- use them well

Miranda Gorman: Sometimes wonder if those who cheat really come out ahead in life?

Janet Arbuckle:  I'm with Miranda, but I'm also in support of the teachers who want to protect from cheating. Sorry, no specific stories to tell.

FORMER STUDENT:   I never cheated, I also never studied. Hence, my grades in college

At A FAMILY GATHERING COMPRISED OF HIGH SCHOOL AND COLLEGE STUDENTS & SEVERAL PROFESSORS - I ASKED THE SAME QUESTION:

(I AM FASCINATED BY PEOPLE’S WILLINGNESS TO SHARE THIS INFORMATION WITH ME)
UCI computer engineering: tapping simple morse code with class ring. (2/3 of exam was Morse Code, so it worked until they got caught.)

"Professors just just set up their desks and I don't have a clue why what's going on."

"Sticky note on the back of the calculator or photograph of notes everything is view on the phone."

"We just look up papers online and use somebody else's."

"It’s not called cheating.  Just using your resources."

"Students don't know how to cite.  If they pull from multiple sources they think it's not cheating."

"Someone else writes the paper. Often a girl friend."

"Wear a hoodie with an iPod, listen to the answers."

"Pre program answers into a calculator."

"There is real  vs fake  ignorance."

"I write answers  in between my fingers or on my shoes."

"I use white quote marks - surrounding the entire purchased paper for turnitin.com --  it doesn't catch that I purchased the paper."

"Submit a bad file to get out of turning a paper in on time. Shows to the Professor as a “Bad file” - It buys you more time to turn it in.

"Put chapstick on a SCANTRON. All answers come out correct.”

"Place notes in a jacket sleeve."

"Mirrors on the top of my shoes. Answers under the desk."

"Create sources which don't exist."

"I watch people teach all the time."

"Answers are placed just under the hem of a skirt."

"Most of the time nobody gets caught."

"Have a scantron already made out from a previous class who took the same test."

"I place a paper under test and look at at."

"Get there early and write the answers on desk."

"Answers on the floor in the text book."

"Answers on sandals - under my foot.

"I ask the person next to me."

"Professors need to pay attention when someone turns in their paper to you, that's when students cheat."

"Answers are placed in side of doodles."

"Wear a jacket - place the empty arm on the desk - answers are on your arm - inside the jacket."

"Answers under the bill of a hat.

From our online community:
Colin Fredericks - I've seen some people take advantage of the fact that sitting in banked lecture halls gives you a great view on the diagonal. I've had students (both my own and friend's) cut-and-paste from scientific journals and papers. Hell, I had someone cut-and-paste from Wikipedia and not even take out the [1] footnotes. I've had students who copied someone else's scantron sheet, not realizing that every single person in the 150-seat class had an individually randomized exam.

This is not restricted to my teaching days. I had classmates in graduate school who used the Chinese version of the textbook, which had the answers to the homework. (They failed the tests hard, having never done the work to learn.)

A graduate student at my old college cheated on his qualifying exams by hiding books in a bathroom stall, and the college was too cowardly to kick him out. Later he plagiarized his masters thesis and finally got kicked out. He'll never work in physics again.

But just type "buy a paper" or "write papers for money" into Google and page through the results. Or check out this article: http://www.slate.com/articles/life/shopping/2001/12/adventures_in_cheating.single.html

and this one http://www.salon.com/2010/07/26/write_college_essays_for_cash/

YouTube - How To Cheat
How To Cheat On Any Test - Links (Millions of views)

DANIEL:
Our recent podcast details a number of amazing ways students have developed to cheat on exams and essays, suggesting that cheating is happening much more (and in more sophisticated ways) than we would like to admit.

What should we, as educators who care for our students' futures, do about this?

1. The Preemptive Presentation:
On the first day of class, while discussing the syllabus, share with your students what you now know about cheating. Show them a website, talk about different techniques, and talk to them about your need to take this seriously because academic dishonesty robs them of an education.  Remind them of your knowledge, you policies and the consequences of cheating before exams and before essays are due.

2.  Have a Plan
Be active during tests, circulating through the class (or assigning a T.A. to circulate through a larger lecture), and have policies established about not allowing students to leave during the class, not allowing phones, etc.

3.  Know Your Policies
Know your college's policies on academic dishonesty and abide by them--don't over-punish students and try not to under-punish them as well.  Report instances of plagiarism or other dishonesty per your policies.  If you don't report a case, a student may continue to act dishonestly in other classes and have a further incident be treated as a first offense.

4.  Understand, Build Relationships, and Care
Understand that some students cooly choose to cheat, while others panic.  Try to have a conversation on the substance of what has happened and what cheating does to people, rather than focusing on just the grade implications.  If the student is open to it, give them some advice on studying / preparing / essay writing.

DAVID
Well, thank you very much for listening to this episode and sincerely hope that we have provided you with some helpful information.

DANIEL
We welcome your feedback to this podcast and our work:

YOU CAN
Go to iTunes and write a review.
Or simply, in iTunes, click on STAR to rate us. - we would really appreciate that!

Email us! Daniel: daniel@studentcaring.com

David: david@studentcaring.com

Respond to the BLOG on STUDENTCARING . COM

OR You may tell give voice feedback on student caring TOLL - FREE voice number,

1 - (855) NEWWAY- CARE       That’s - 1 -(855) 639-9292

We welcome your feedback to this podcast and our work:

You May:
Go to iTunes and write a review
Email us! Daniel: daniel@studentcaring.com
David: david@studentcaring.com
Respond to the BLOG on STUDENTCARING . COM
OR You may tell give voice feedback on student caring TOLL - FREE voice number,

1 - (855) NEWWAY- CARE       That’s - 1 -(855) 639-9292

This episode was recorded on: Thursday, April 12, 2012

THANK YOU FOR LISTENING & PLEASE JOIN OUR COMMUNITY

You canfind us on these social networks:
Twitter
Facebook
Google +
... This way, we can keep you informed about our upcoming eBook and Audio program:
The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching

Until next time:  Keep Caring!

 

x

Share: SC 15 How To Cheat in College


SC 15 How To Cheat in College

2012-04-15
Length: 34s

How To Cheat In College & What to do About It

PODCAST OUTLINE
I’m David AND I’m Daniel.
This is a podcast for: Students, Professors, Parents, and all of higher education. Our mission is to champion “Student Caring” as a way of addressing the challenges in higher education today.

DANIEL
Today, for PODCAST #15 ---------   HOW TO CHEAT - AND WHAT TO DO ABOUT IT

DAVID
NEWS:  Thank you to listener Rick Willems who currently working on my Masters in psychology, for your feedback about our “Career Directions and Your Daily Bread” Podcast.  / Student Caring On The Big Screen? - Yes!  Read all about at studentcaring.com
I ASKED ON FACEBOOK
Have you seen a student cheat on a test? How? Cheat while writing a paper? How. Please share - we are collection information.

FORMER STUDENT:   This feels like a trap.

FORMER STUDENT:Well in my good ol' cheating days I would record my answers onto my iphone and put it in my pocket with my earphones hidden- I’ve also written equations onto my calculator in lead so it doesn't show up until you reflect it off light. Sometimes i'll write answers on my arms or legs and pretend I have an itch to check them. before class i will also get there early and write answers on my desk and cover them with my arm until I need them. These are my secrets I'm giving to you David for I no longer need them- use them well

Miranda Gorman: Sometimes wonder if those who cheat really come out ahead in life?

Janet Arbuckle:  I'm with Miranda, but I'm also in support of the teachers who want to protect from cheating. Sorry, no specific stories to tell.

FORMER STUDENT:   I never cheated, I also never studied. Hence, my grades in college

At A FAMILY GATHERING COMPRISED OF HIGH SCHOOL AND COLLEGE STUDENTS & SEVERAL PROFESSORS - I ASKED THE SAME QUESTION:

(I AM FASCINATED BY PEOPLE’S WILLINGNESS TO SHARE THIS INFORMATION WITH ME)
UCI computer engineering: tapping simple morse code with class ring. (2/3 of exam was Morse Code, so it worked until they got caught.)

"Professors just just set up their desks and I don't have a clue why what's going on."

"Sticky note on the back of the calculator or photograph of notes everything is view on the phone."

"We just look up papers online and use somebody else's."

"It’s not called cheating.  Just using your resources."

"Students don't know how to cite.  If they pull from multiple sources they think it's not cheating."

"Someone else writes the paper. Often a girl friend."

"Wear a hoodie with an iPod, listen to the answers."

"Pre program answers into a calculator."

"There is real  vs fake  ignorance."

"I write answers  in between my fingers or on my shoes."

"I use white quote marks - surrounding the entire purchased paper for turnitin.com --  it doesn't catch that I purchased the paper."

"Submit a bad file to get out of turning a paper in on time. Shows to the Professor as a “Bad file” - It buys you more time to turn it in.

"Put chapstick on a SCANTRON. All answers come out correct.”

"Place notes in a jacket sleeve."

"Mirrors on the top of my shoes. Answers under the desk."

"Create sources which don't exist."

"I watch people teach all the time."

"Answers are placed just under the hem of a skirt."

"Most of the time nobody gets caught."

"Have a scantron already made out from a previous class who took the same test."

"I place a paper under test and look at at."

"Get there early and write the answers on desk."

"Answers on the floor in the text book."

"Answers on sandals - under my foot.

"I ask the person next to me."

"Professors need to pay attention when someone turns in their paper to you, that's when students cheat."

"Answers are placed in side of doodles."

"Wear a jacket - place the empty arm on the desk - answers are on your arm - inside the jacket."

"Answers under the bill of a hat.

From our online community:
Colin Fredericks - I've seen some people take advantage of the fact that sitting in banked lecture halls gives you a great view on the diagonal. I've had students (both my own and friend's) cut-and-paste from scientific journals and papers. Hell, I had someone cut-and-paste from Wikipedia and not even take out the [1] footnotes. I've had students who copied someone else's scantron sheet, not realizing that every single person in the 150-seat class had an individually randomized exam.

This is not restricted to my teaching days. I had classmates in graduate school who used the Chinese version of the textbook, which had the answers to the homework. (They failed the tests hard, having never done the work to learn.)

A graduate student at my old college cheated on his qualifying exams by hiding books in a bathroom stall, and the college was too cowardly to kick him out. Later he plagiarized his masters thesis and finally got kicked out. He'll never work in physics again.

But just type "buy a paper" or "write papers for money" into Google and page through the results. Or check out this article: http://www.slate.com/articles/life/shopping/2001/12/adventures_in_cheating.single.html

and this one http://www.salon.com/2010/07/26/write_college_essays_for_cash/

YouTube - How To Cheat
How To Cheat On Any Test - Links (Millions of views)

DANIEL:
Our recent podcast details a number of amazing ways students have developed to cheat on exams and essays, suggesting that cheating is happening much more (and in more sophisticated ways) than we would like to admit.

What should we, as educators who care for our students' futures, do about this?

1. The Preemptive Presentation:
On the first day of class, while discussing the syllabus, share with your students what you now know about cheating. Show them a website, talk about different techniques, and talk to them about your need to take this seriously because academic dishonesty robs them of an education.  Remind them of your knowledge, you policies and the consequences of cheating before exams and before essays are due.

2.  Have a Plan
Be active during tests, circulating through the class (or assigning a T.A. to circulate through a larger lecture), and have policies established about not allowing students to leave during the class, not allowing phones, etc.

3.  Know Your Policies
Know your college's policies on academic dishonesty and abide by them--don't over-punish students and try not to under-punish them as well.  Report instances of plagiarism or other dishonesty per your policies.  If you don't report a case, a student may continue to act dishonestly in other classes and have a further incident be treated as a first offense.

4.  Understand, Build Relationships, and Care
Understand that some students cooly choose to cheat, while others panic.  Try to have a conversation on the substance of what has happened and what cheating does to people, rather than focusing on just the grade implications.  If the student is open to it, give them some advice on studying / preparing / essay writing.

DAVID
Well, thank you very much for listening to this episode and sincerely hope that we have provided you with some helpful information.

DANIEL
We welcome your feedback to this podcast and our work:

YOU CAN
Go to iTunes and write a review.
Or simply, in iTunes, click on STAR to rate us. - we would really appreciate that!

Email us! Daniel: daniel@studentcaring.com

David: david@studentcaring.com

Respond to the BLOG on STUDENTCARING . COM

OR You may tell give voice feedback on student caring TOLL - FREE voice number,

1 - (855) NEWWAY- CARE       That’s - 1 -(855) 639-9292

We welcome your feedback to this podcast and our work:

You May:
Go to iTunes and write a review
Email us! Daniel: daniel@studentcaring.com
David: david@studentcaring.com
Respond to the BLOG on STUDENTCARING . COM
OR You may tell give voice feedback on student caring TOLL - FREE voice number,

1 - (855) NEWWAY- CARE       That’s - 1 -(855) 639-9292

This episode was recorded on: Thursday, April 12, 2012

THANK YOU FOR LISTENING & PLEASE JOIN OUR COMMUNITY

You canfind us on these social networks:
Twitter
Facebook
Google +
... This way, we can keep you informed about our upcoming eBook and Audio program:
The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching

Until next time:  Keep Caring!

 

x

Share: SC 15 How To Cheat in College


SC 14 #3 When a Class Goes Bad

2012-04-10
Length: 30s

How to Identify and Fix a Bad Class

What Happens When a Class Goes Bad?

Listen to Podcast Episode No. 14  [display_podcast]

PODCAST OUTLINE
Difficulty of materiel?
Does class seem well organized / well planned?
Inconsistency with the syllabus and assignments.
Is the class what you expected it to be?

DAVID
Questions to ask yourself?
Am I revising / deviating from the syllabus?
Am I revising / deviating from students exceptions?
How do I feel about going to class?
Are there one or more students who are showing their discontent?
Respond to positive feedback and students will notice.

DANIEL
DON’T fall into a retaliation mode.
Inform your department chair about the situation and ask for advise.  - Avoid surprises. - Be pro-active. - Ask a trusted colleague for advice.

DAVID
Before walking into the classroom - re discover you “Self Confident” Mode.
“CHEERFUL EXPECTANCY” are good words to keep in mind.
Review your resume and prior EXCELLENT course evaluations.
If you have teaching for awhile, look at where previous successful students are now today

DANIEL
Use a little humor to lighten the atmosphere.
Find an acceptable way to lighten their load without sacrificing quality of instruction.
Don’t give up.

We welcome your feedback to this podcast and our work:

You May:
Go to iTunes and write a review
Email us! Daniel: daniel@studentcaring.com
David: david@studentcaring.com
Respond to the BLOG on STUDENTCARING . COM
OR You may tell give voice feedback on student caring TOLL - FREE voice number,

1 - (855) NEWWAY- CARE       That’s - 1 -(855) 639-9292

This episode was recorded on: Thursday, March 1, 2012

THANK YOU FOR LISTENING & PLEASE JOIN OUR COMMUNITY

You canfind us on these social networks:
Twitter
Facebook
Google +
... This way, we can keep you informed about our upcoming eBook and Audio program:  The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching

Until next time:  Keep Caring!

 

 

What Happens When A Class Goes Bad / Part Three…

x

Share: SC 14 #3 When a Class Goes Bad


SC 14 #3 When a Class Goes Bad

2012-04-10
Length: 30s

How to Identify and Fix a Bad Class

What Happens When a Class Goes Bad?

Listen to Podcast Episode No. 14  [display_podcast]

PODCAST OUTLINE
Difficulty of materiel?
Does class seem well organized / well planned?
Inconsistency with the syllabus and assignments.
Is the class what you expected it to be?

DAVID
Questions to ask yourself?
Am I revising / deviating from the syllabus?
Am I revising / deviating from students exceptions?
How do I feel about going to class?
Are there one or more students who are showing their discontent?
Respond to positive feedback and students will notice.

DANIEL
DON’T fall into a retaliation mode.
Inform your department chair about the situation and ask for advise.  - Avoid surprises. - Be pro-active. - Ask a trusted colleague for advice.

DAVID
Before walking into the classroom - re discover you “Self Confident” Mode.
“CHEERFUL EXPECTANCY” are good words to keep in mind.
Review your resume and prior EXCELLENT course evaluations.
If you have teaching for awhile, look at where previous successful students are now today

DANIEL
Use a little humor to lighten the atmosphere.
Find an acceptable way to lighten their load without sacrificing quality of instruction.
Don’t give up.

We welcome your feedback to this podcast and our work:

You May:
Go to iTunes and write a review
Email us! Daniel: daniel@studentcaring.com
David: david@studentcaring.com
Respond to the BLOG on STUDENTCARING . COM
OR You may tell give voice feedback on student caring TOLL - FREE voice number,

1 - (855) NEWWAY- CARE       That’s - 1 -(855) 639-9292

This episode was recorded on: Thursday, March 1, 2012

THANK YOU FOR LISTENING & PLEASE JOIN OUR COMMUNITY

You canfind us on these social networks:
Twitter
Facebook
Google +
... This way, we can keep you informed about our upcoming eBook and Audio program:  The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching

Until next time:  Keep Caring!

 

 

What Happens When A Class Goes Bad / Part Three…

x

Share: SC 14 #3 When a Class Goes Bad


SC 13 #2 When a Class Goes Bad

2012-03-28
Length: 32s

How to Identify and Fix a Bad Class

Listen to Podcast Episode No. 13  [display_podcast]

PODCAST OUTLINE

What can a professor do in this situation?
DON’T GIVE UP - a course can be turned around.
What can happen when these symptoms occur?
- Students can complain to the professor
- Or, more commonly, they go over their head
- Parents complain to the administration
- Students become disruptive in class

All of this, unfortunately results in, “Students are not learning”

Some of these FEELINGS might be experienced:
For the students
Frustrated /  angry  /  overwhelmed /  inadequate / apathetic / passive-aggressive

For the professor
Frustration / worry / concern / helpless / defensive

For the administration
Frustrated / Concerned / wary / increased workload - aka - fire fighting

DON’T GIVE UP - a course can be turned around.

When you address the problem is important.
- Don’t assume that you know what the problem is.
- Conduct an anonymous - in-class survey.

Midterm Evaluation (pdf)

Upcoming Conference:
WASC Academic Resource Conference 2012
We welcome your feedback to this podcast and our work:
You May:
Go to iTunes and write a review
Email us! Daniel: daniel@studentcaring.com
David: david@studentcaring.com
Respond to the BLOG on STUDENTCARING . COM
OR You may tell give voice feedback on student caring TOLL - FREE voice number,

1 - (855) NEWWAY- CARE       That’s - 1 -(855) 639-9292

This episode was recorded on: Thursday, March 1, 2012

THANK YOU FOR LISTENING & PLEASE JOIN OUR COMMUNITY

You canfind us on these social networks:
Twitter
Facebook
Google +
... This way, we can keep you informed about our upcoming eBook and Audio program:  The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching

Until next time:  Keep Caring!

x

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SC 13 #2 When a Class Goes Bad

2012-03-28
Length: 32s

How to Identify and Fix a Bad Class

Listen to Podcast Episode No. 13  [display_podcast]

PODCAST OUTLINE

What can a professor do in this situation?
DON’T GIVE UP - a course can be turned around.
What can happen when these symptoms occur?
- Students can complain to the professor
- Or, more commonly, they go over their head
- Parents complain to the administration
- Students become disruptive in class

All of this, unfortunately results in, “Students are not learning”

Some of these FEELINGS might be experienced:
For the students
Frustrated /  angry  /  overwhelmed /  inadequate / apathetic / passive-aggressive

For the professor
Frustration / worry / concern / helpless / defensive

For the administration
Frustrated / Concerned / wary / increased workload - aka - fire fighting

DON’T GIVE UP - a course can be turned around.

When you address the problem is important.
- Don’t assume that you know what the problem is.
- Conduct an anonymous - in-class survey.

Midterm Evaluation (pdf)

Upcoming Conference:
WASC Academic Resource Conference 2012
We welcome your feedback to this podcast and our work:
You May:
Go to iTunes and write a review
Email us! Daniel: daniel@studentcaring.com
David: david@studentcaring.com
Respond to the BLOG on STUDENTCARING . COM
OR You may tell give voice feedback on student caring TOLL - FREE voice number,

1 - (855) NEWWAY- CARE       That’s - 1 -(855) 639-9292

This episode was recorded on: Thursday, March 1, 2012

THANK YOU FOR LISTENING & PLEASE JOIN OUR COMMUNITY

You canfind us on these social networks:
Twitter
Facebook
Google +
... This way, we can keep you informed about our upcoming eBook and Audio program:  The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching

Until next time:  Keep Caring!

x

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SC 12 #1 When a Class Goes Bad

2012-03-03
Length: 37s

How to Identify and Fix a Bad Class

What Happens When a Class Goes Bad?


PODCAST OUTLINE
What do you do with a dead class?
What do you do when a class isn’t working?
This is not for the faint of heart.
It is our hope that this information will prevent the Professor from receiving poor course evaluations - or worse.
OR - taking away from the quality of learning.

For our student listeners, we hope that information will give you some insights into some of the challenges your professors may be dealing with.

A moment of truth, albeit - too late, is when you open the sealed envelope containing your course evaluations - often, months after the course has ended

HERE’S A LIST OF SITUATIONS WHICH MIGHT CONTRIBUTE TO A CLASS GOING BAD - BEFORE THE FIRST DAY OF INSTRUCTION:

- At the last minute, a professor is unable to teach a course and you take over.
- The professor who taught these students prior to your arrival taught very differently. This situation is very common, someone leaves a university and takes a different job, retires, or passes away. - The current student population, and the new Prof. are forced into a transitionary situation -sometimes overnight.
- When the professor designed the course, they deviated from the course description, which the students read when they registered for the course.
- The professor was just hired shortly before the class began did not have adequate time to design the course.
- The professor did not take the time “get to know who their students are” when they designed the course.
- The professor does not know how to design a course.

WHAT ARE THE SIGNS WHEN A CLASS IS NOT WORKING?
Some symptoms might be:
- Students are not engaged.
- Students drop early in the semester
- A student or students tell the Prof. the class is not working.
- Attendance problems.
- Lack of participation.
- Lack of community atmosphere in the class.
- Students not doing well with the materiel.
- Obvious lack of professor respect.
- Professor’s attitude toward the class changes.

WHAT CAN HAPPEN WHEN THESE OCCUR?
- Students can complain to the professor

In our next podcast, we will continue with this topic and discuss solutions.
Well, thank you very much for listening to this episode and sincerely hope that we have provided you with some helpful information.

We welcome your feedback to this podcast and our work:
You May:
Go to iTunes and write a review
Email us! Daniel: daniel@studentcaring.com
David: david@studentcaring.com
Respond to the BLOG on STUDENTCARING . COM
OR You may tell give voice feedback on student caring TOLL - FREE voice number,

1 - (855) NEWWAY- CARE       That’s - 1 -(855) 639-9292

This episode was recorded on: Thursday, March 1, 2012

THANK YOU FOR LISTENING & PLEASE JOIN OUR COMMUNITY

You canfind us on these social networks:
Twitter
Facebook
Google +
... This way, we can keep you informed about our upcoming eBook and Audio program:  The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching

Until next time:  Keep Caring!

DAVID
And now, with gratitude to my son, Joseph   < jpecoraro211@gmail.com> - for our guitar music.

 

 

x

Share: SC 12 #1 When a Class Goes Bad


SC 12 #1 When a Class Goes Bad

2012-03-03
Length: 37s

How to Identify and Fix a Bad Class

What Happens When a Class Goes Bad?


PODCAST OUTLINE
What do you do with a dead class?
What do you do when a class isn’t working?
This is not for the faint of heart.
It is our hope that this information will prevent the Professor from receiving poor course evaluations - or worse.
OR - taking away from the quality of learning.

For our student listeners, we hope that information will give you some insights into some of the challenges your professors may be dealing with.

A moment of truth, albeit - too late, is when you open the sealed envelope containing your course evaluations - often, months after the course has ended

HERE’S A LIST OF SITUATIONS WHICH MIGHT CONTRIBUTE TO A CLASS GOING BAD - BEFORE THE FIRST DAY OF INSTRUCTION:

- At the last minute, a professor is unable to teach a course and you take over.
- The professor who taught these students prior to your arrival taught very differently. This situation is very common, someone leaves a university and takes a different job, retires, or passes away. - The current student population, and the new Prof. are forced into a transitionary situation -sometimes overnight.
- When the professor designed the course, they deviated from the course description, which the students read when they registered for the course.
- The professor was just hired shortly before the class began did not have adequate time to design the course.
- The professor did not take the time “get to know who their students are” when they designed the course.
- The professor does not know how to design a course.

WHAT ARE THE SIGNS WHEN A CLASS IS NOT WORKING?
Some symptoms might be:
- Students are not engaged.
- Students drop early in the semester
- A student or students tell the Prof. the class is not working.
- Attendance problems.
- Lack of participation.
- Lack of community atmosphere in the class.
- Students not doing well with the materiel.
- Obvious lack of professor respect.
- Professor’s attitude toward the class changes.

WHAT CAN HAPPEN WHEN THESE OCCUR?
- Students can complain to the professor

In our next podcast, we will continue with this topic and discuss solutions.
Well, thank you very much for listening to this episode and sincerely hope that we have provided you with some helpful information.

We welcome your feedback to this podcast and our work:
You May:
Go to iTunes and write a review
Email us! Daniel: daniel@studentcaring.com
David: david@studentcaring.com
Respond to the BLOG on STUDENTCARING . COM
OR You may tell give voice feedback on student caring TOLL - FREE voice number,

1 - (855) NEWWAY- CARE       That’s - 1 -(855) 639-9292

This episode was recorded on: Thursday, March 1, 2012

THANK YOU FOR LISTENING & PLEASE JOIN OUR COMMUNITY

You canfind us on these social networks:
Twitter
Facebook
Google +
... This way, we can keep you informed about our upcoming eBook and Audio program:  The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching

Until next time:  Keep Caring!

DAVID
And now, with gratitude to my son, Joseph   < jpecoraro211@gmail.com> - for our guitar music.

 

 

x

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SC 11 Career Directions and Your Daily Bread

2012-01-27
Length: 33s

David is interviewed by Daniel about a course that he teaches designed to help student make the transition from college to career.

http://www.studentcaring.com/

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SC 11 Career Directions and Your Daily Bread

2012-01-27
Length: 33s

David is interviewed by Daniel about a course that he teaches designed to help student make the transition from college to career.

http://www.studentcaring.com/

x

Share: SC 11 Career Directions and Your Daily Bread


SC 10 Rebuilding the Bridge: Responding to Change in the Higher Education Landscape

2012-01-21
Length: 17s

From Waikiki, Daniel reads his paper to the atendees: Rebuilding the Bridge: Responding to Change in the Higher Education Landscape.

The audio quality will sound a little different than what you are are accustomed to from us because we used microphones which pick up the entire conference room.

The setting is a conference room at the Hilton - Waikiki Beach.

Just outside of the room is a swimming pool - in case you wonder about the background noise.

This was recorded during an afternoon session on January 5, 2012. 

If you would like to receive a copy of this paper presentation, REBUILDING THE BRIDGE: RESPONDING TO CHANGE IN THE HIGHER EDUCATION LANDSCAPE - Please go to http://www.studentcaring.com/ and subscribe to our newsletter.

http://www.studentcaring.com/

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SC 10 Rebuilding the Bridge: Responding to Change in the Higher Education Landscape

2012-01-21
Length: 17s

From Waikiki, Daniel reads his paper to the atendees: Rebuilding the Bridge: Responding to Change in the Higher Education Landscape.

The audio quality will sound a little different than what you are are accustomed to from us because we used microphones which pick up the entire conference room.

The setting is a conference room at the Hilton - Waikiki Beach.

Just outside of the room is a swimming pool - in case you wonder about the background noise.

This was recorded during an afternoon session on January 5, 2012. 

If you would like to receive a copy of this paper presentation, REBUILDING THE BRIDGE: RESPONDING TO CHANGE IN THE HIGHER EDUCATION LANDSCAPE - Please go to http://www.studentcaring.com/ and subscribe to our newsletter.

http://www.studentcaring.com/

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Share: SC 10 Rebuilding the Bridge: Responding to Change in the Higher Education Landscape


SC 09 What We Learned at the Hawaiian International Conference on Higher Education

2012-01-20
Length: 18s

From Waikiki - The Student Caring Project

Professors de Roulet and Pecoraro share their experiences from the Hawaiian International Conference on Higher Education from Waikiki Beach. (YouTube Version) The Student Caring Project encourages students, parents, and professors to focus, first, on -Student Caring- as a way of solving the problems in higher education today.

http://www.studentcaring.com/

x

Share: SC 09 What We Learned at the Hawaiian International Conference on Higher Education


SC 08 Student Caring at the End of the Semester

2012-01-20
Length: 24s

The final days of a class...

PODCAST OUTLINE
- Recorded on December 6, 2011

- Success story from listener, Dave Stachowiak who tried beginning his class with an exercise to engage with the students as opposed to spending the entire session on the syllabus.

We are in that last week of instruction and finals.
- Students are in a high-stress state of mind.
What are professors are thinking about?
- Looking forward to the end of the term.
- Looking ahead to the next term. We are continually revise our courses.
- Students who live in the dorms are packing up to move out for a month.
- Students are working hard to prepare for their finals.
- Students and professors are on the same track at this time of the year which can result in stressful teaching and cramming.
- This is a busy time of year for professors.
- Our students are over tired, nervous, stressed and tend to be more accident prone.
What are students thinking about?
- Finals!
- Preparing to travel and go home for the holiday break.
- The red zone. When students do not have as much to do.
- Life insists on crashing in on our carefully planned schedules. Life and family issues which were not a big part of their schedules during a semester, are now about to return to their lives.
- David shares a creative solution to using unexpected lab fees to help out his students during a mini-class graduation ceremony at the end of the semester.
Students do not always have a lot of friends to turn to during this time of the year.
- Daniels is trying to get his students to calm down and reflect on what has been learned as opposed to panic study. He encourages his students to write final exam questions so they may think calmly and reflectively near the end of the term.
- The last class is very important. Focusing on: What can you do with this information? Examples of students who have come before them and what they have done with this information.
- The Christmas rush is on all of our minds, this is a time to calm down and reflect.
- Since our journey together is coming to an end, it can be sad.
We would like to hear from you, our listeners, what have you observed which was wonderful student caring?

CONTACT US AND TELL YOUR STUDENT CARING STORY:

Student Caring – Story & Message Line:  Toll Free:  855.639.9292

facebook

Twitter

- We are signing off for the semester and we thank you for joining us during this semester.

- Our next podcast will be broadcast from Waikiki, Hawaii where we will be presenting at the Hawaii International Conference on Higher Education.
- The tentative schedule for are events is:
Thursday, January 5, 2012 at 3:00pm
Workshop:  Student Caring:  Reinventing the College Learning Environment
Thursday, January 5, 2012 at 4:45pm
Paper: Rebuilding the Bridge:  Responding to Changes in the Higher Education Landscape
Friday, January 6, 2012 at 3:00pm in the Kona Moku Room
Poster Presentation:  Student Caring:  Reinventing the College Classroom

We are having our first, Student Caring Meet-Up on Thursday, January 5, 2012 at 7:00pm
Location TBA.
If your are interested in joining us please email us at:  info@studentcaring.com.

We wish you a warm holiday - like we are looking forward to.

http://www.studentcaring.com/

x

Share: SC 08 Student Caring at the End of the Semester


SC 08 Student Caring at the End of the Semester

2012-01-20
Length: 24s

The final days of a class...

PODCAST OUTLINE
- Recorded on December 6, 2011

- Success story from listener, Dave Stachowiak who tried beginning his class with an exercise to engage with the students as opposed to spending the entire session on the syllabus.

We are in that last week of instruction and finals.
- Students are in a high-stress state of mind.
What are professors are thinking about?
- Looking forward to the end of the term.
- Looking ahead to the next term. We are continually revise our courses.
- Students who live in the dorms are packing up to move out for a month.
- Students are working hard to prepare for their finals.
- Students and professors are on the same track at this time of the year which can result in stressful teaching and cramming.
- This is a busy time of year for professors.
- Our students are over tired, nervous, stressed and tend to be more accident prone.
What are students thinking about?
- Finals!
- Preparing to travel and go home for the holiday break.
- The red zone. When students do not have as much to do.
- Life insists on crashing in on our carefully planned schedules. Life and family issues which were not a big part of their schedules during a semester, are now about to return to their lives.
- David shares a creative solution to using unexpected lab fees to help out his students during a mini-class graduation ceremony at the end of the semester.
Students do not always have a lot of friends to turn to during this time of the year.
- Daniels is trying to get his students to calm down and reflect on what has been learned as opposed to panic study. He encourages his students to write final exam questions so they may think calmly and reflectively near the end of the term.
- The last class is very important. Focusing on: What can you do with this information? Examples of students who have come before them and what they have done with this information.
- The Christmas rush is on all of our minds, this is a time to calm down and reflect.
- Since our journey together is coming to an end, it can be sad.
We would like to hear from you, our listeners, what have you observed which was wonderful student caring?

CONTACT US AND TELL YOUR STUDENT CARING STORY:

Student Caring – Story & Message Line:  Toll Free:  855.639.9292

facebook

Twitter

- We are signing off for the semester and we thank you for joining us during this semester.

- Our next podcast will be broadcast from Waikiki, Hawaii where we will be presenting at the Hawaii International Conference on Higher Education.
- The tentative schedule for are events is:
Thursday, January 5, 2012 at 3:00pm
Workshop:  Student Caring:  Reinventing the College Learning Environment
Thursday, January 5, 2012 at 4:45pm
Paper: Rebuilding the Bridge:  Responding to Changes in the Higher Education Landscape
Friday, January 6, 2012 at 3:00pm in the Kona Moku Room
Poster Presentation:  Student Caring:  Reinventing the College Classroom

We are having our first, Student Caring Meet-Up on Thursday, January 5, 2012 at 7:00pm
Location TBA.
If your are interested in joining us please email us at:  info@studentcaring.com.

We wish you a warm holiday - like we are looking forward to.

http://www.studentcaring.com/

x

Share: SC 08 Student Caring at the End of the Semester


SC 08 Student Caring at the End of the Semester

2012-01-20
Length: 24s

The final days of a class...

PODCAST OUTLINE
- Recorded on December 6, 2011

- Success story from listener, Dave Stachowiak who tried beginning his class with an exercise to engage with the students as opposed to spending the entire session on the syllabus.

We are in that last week of instruction and finals.
- Students are in a high-stress state of mind.
What are professors are thinking about?
- Looking forward to the end of the term.
- Looking ahead to the next term. We are continually revise our courses.
- Students who live in the dorms are packing up to move out for a month.
- Students are working hard to prepare for their finals.
- Students and professors are on the same track at this time of the year which can result in stressful teaching and cramming.
- This is a busy time of year for professors.
- Our students are over tired, nervous, stressed and tend to be more accident prone.
What are students thinking about?
- Finals!
- Preparing to travel and go home for the holiday break.
- The red zone. When students do not have as much to do.
- Life insists on crashing in on our carefully planned schedules. Life and family issues which were not a big part of their schedules during a semester, are now about to return to their lives.
- David shares a creative solution to using unexpected lab fees to help out his students during a mini-class graduation ceremony at the end of the semester.
Students do not always have a lot of friends to turn to during this time of the year.
- Daniels is trying to get his students to calm down and reflect on what has been learned as opposed to panic study. He encourages his students to write final exam questions so they may think calmly and reflectively near the end of the term.
- The last class is very important. Focusing on: What can you do with this information? Examples of students who have come before them and what they have done with this information.
- The Christmas rush is on all of our minds, this is a time to calm down and reflect.
- Since our journey together is coming to an end, it can be sad.
We would like to hear from you, our listeners, what have you observed which was wonderful student caring?

CONTACT US AND TELL YOUR STUDENT CARING STORY:

Student Caring – Story & Message Line:  Toll Free:  855.639.9292

facebook

Twitter

- We are signing off for the semester and we thank you for joining us during this semester.

- Our next podcast will be broadcast from Waikiki, Hawaii where we will be presenting at the Hawaii International Conference on Higher Education.
- The tentative schedule for are events is:
Thursday, January 5, 2012 at 3:00pm
Workshop:  Student Caring:  Reinventing the College Learning Environment
Thursday, January 5, 2012 at 4:45pm
Paper: Rebuilding the Bridge:  Responding to Changes in the Higher Education Landscape
Friday, January 6, 2012 at 3:00pm in the Kona Moku Room
Poster Presentation:  Student Caring:  Reinventing the College Classroom

We are having our first, Student Caring Meet-Up on Thursday, January 5, 2012 at 7:00pm
Location TBA.
If your are interested in joining us please email us at:  info@studentcaring.com.

We wish you a warm holiday - like we are looking forward to.

http://www.studentcaring.com/

x

Share: SC 08 Student Caring at the End of the Semester


SC 09 What We Learned at the Hawaiian International Conference on Higher Education

2012-01-20
Length: 18s

From Waikiki - The Student Caring Project

Professors de Roulet and Pecoraro share their experiences from the Hawaiian International Conference on Higher Education from Waikiki Beach. (YouTube Version) The Student Caring Project encourages students, parents, and professors to focus, first, on -Student Caring- as a way of solving the problems in higher education today.

http://www.studentcaring.com/

x

Share: SC 09 What We Learned at the Hawaiian International Conference on Higher Education


SC 08 Student Caring at the End of the Semester

2012-01-20
Length: 24s

The final days of a class...

PODCAST OUTLINE
- Recorded on December 6, 2011

- Success story from listener, Dave Stachowiak who tried beginning his class with an exercise to engage with the students as opposed to spending the entire session on the syllabus.

We are in that last week of instruction and finals.
- Students are in a high-stress state of mind.
What are professors are thinking about?
- Looking forward to the end of the term.
- Looking ahead to the next term. We are continually revise our courses.
- Students who live in the dorms are packing up to move out for a month.
- Students are working hard to prepare for their finals.
- Students and professors are on the same track at this time of the year which can result in stressful teaching and cramming.
- This is a busy time of year for professors.
- Our students are over tired, nervous, stressed and tend to be more accident prone.
What are students thinking about?
- Finals!
- Preparing to travel and go home for the holiday break.
- The red zone. When students do not have as much to do.
- Life insists on crashing in on our carefully planned schedules. Life and family issues which were not a big part of their schedules during a semester, are now about to return to their lives.
- David shares a creative solution to using unexpected lab fees to help out his students during a mini-class graduation ceremony at the end of the semester.
Students do not always have a lot of friends to turn to during this time of the year.
- Daniels is trying to get his students to calm down and reflect on what has been learned as opposed to panic study. He encourages his students to write final exam questions so they may think calmly and reflectively near the end of the term.
- The last class is very important. Focusing on: What can you do with this information? Examples of students who have come before them and what they have done with this information.
- The Christmas rush is on all of our minds, this is a time to calm down and reflect.
- Since our journey together is coming to an end, it can be sad.
We would like to hear from you, our listeners, what have you observed which was wonderful student caring?

CONTACT US AND TELL YOUR STUDENT CARING STORY:

Student Caring – Story & Message Line:  Toll Free:  855.639.9292

facebook

Twitter

- We are signing off for the semester and we thank you for joining us during this semester.

- Our next podcast will be broadcast from Waikiki, Hawaii where we will be presenting at the Hawaii International Conference on Higher Education.
- The tentative schedule for are events is:
Thursday, January 5, 2012 at 3:00pm
Workshop:  Student Caring:  Reinventing the College Learning Environment
Thursday, January 5, 2012 at 4:45pm
Paper: Rebuilding the Bridge:  Responding to Changes in the Higher Education Landscape
Friday, January 6, 2012 at 3:00pm in the Kona Moku Room
Poster Presentation:  Student Caring:  Reinventing the College Classroom

We are having our first, Student Caring Meet-Up on Thursday, January 5, 2012 at 7:00pm
Location TBA.
If your are interested in joining us please email us at:  info@studentcaring.com.

We wish you a warm holiday - like we are looking forward to.

http://www.studentcaring.com/

x

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SC 07 #2 Parents and College Students: Knowing Who Your Students Are Today.

2011-11-16
Length: 31s

Advice for Parents


Parents and College Students - Part 2 / Knowing who your students are today - Parental & Professorial Hopes

http://www.studentcaring.com/
The Podcast Outline:
We welcome our newest International listeners:
Japan
The Republic of Korea
Morocco
Saudi Arabia
The United Kingdom
Australia

We wanted to remind you about our upcoming speaking engagement at the International Conference on Higher Education. It will be January 5-8 in Honolulu, Hawaii.
Their website is:  http://www.hiceducation.org/ Registration is still open.

We will be hosting a gathering on Wakiki Beach  where we would love to meet with you to talk about student caring and higher education.

In this podcast we’ll discuss what parents, students, professors and administrators these do about the very real fears.

As we discussed in our last podcast - here is our list of common parental fears:
- My kid will major in the wrong thing and never make money.
- My kid will not be able get a job.
- My student is wasting the talents which I have observed them to process.
- My child will not be safe in college.
- My child will never settle on an major, they keep changing it.
- My child will not act responsibly and keep up with his or her class work.
- I worry that the cost of the education will not pay off.
- Will child will act socially irresponsibly and get into trouble.
- My child will radically change. / I will not know him / her anymore.
- I will never see them again. / They will move away.
- Empty nest syndrome. / What do I do now? / What is my job now / Is my job done?
- My child has significant health / sociological needs - who will take care of them in college?
- Who will make sure that my student is getting good grades?
- I did not send my child to the right school. / My child did not select right school.
- I did not save / invest enough money for their education.
- My child will mess up and not finish their degree.
- My child will not good enough grades to advance into graduate studies.

PARENTAL HOPES
- My child will earn their degree and get a job a good job.
- My child will find a lifelong spouse.
- My child will make good friends for life.
- My child will stay in touch with their familial roots.
- My child will live near me.
- My child will become a mature well-rounded adult.
- My child will earn excellent grades.

OUR HOPES
We say our, because we are all in this together - for the student.
- We want them to learn how to learn.
- We want them to learn how to solve their own problems and seek help appropriately.
- We want them to enjoy and become excited about their education.
- We relish in seeing their transformation from the students who is 3 months out of high school to the young adult who is self-confident.
- We want them to know their strengths and skills.
- We want them to know what they still need to learn.
- We want them to be prepared for what follows our time with them.
- We want them to stay in touch with us as adults.
- We want them to learn how to interact successfully with other adults.
- We want them to do well academically.
- We want them to learn how to recover from failure.

College, at best is adulthood with a safety net.
College is meant to address important issues, of preparation and transformation.
College is not meant to solve everything.
We must learn to relate to them not as child but as an adult.
Realities of how this affects the learning environment for administrators and professors.

Does this mean that parents are no longer useful - not at all
Establishing an adult relationship with your child?
Advice on money management.

Allowing them to learn by experience - which can be painful.
The years that a student is in college are precious and temporary.

Thank you for listening to this episode.
In our next episode, you will HEAR about WHAT WE ARE DOING AS WE APPROACH THE END OF OUR SEMESTERS

To you, our listeners,  IT IS YOUR TURN   ---   as we have shared some thoughts with you about this topic - we invite you to do the same.

We want to hear your stories about Student Caring or the lack there of. YOU MAY TELL YOUR STORY….

By going to our website,     STUDENT  CARING . COM • AND / OR You may tell your story - via the TELEPHONE.. Please call the student caring TOLL - FREE voice number,

1 - (855) NEWWAY- CARE       A.K.A.  1 -(855) 639-9292

THIS EPISODE WAS RECORDED ON November 3, 2011

THANK YOU FOR LISTENING

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Thank you for listening. Please join us every two weeks as we take you through our academic year and explore, “Student Caring.”

http://www.studentcaring.com/

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SC 07 #2 Parents and College Students: Knowing Who Your Students Are Today.

2011-11-16
Length: 31s

Advice for Parents


Parents and College Students - Part 2 / Knowing who your students are today - Parental & Professorial Hopes

http://www.studentcaring.com/
The Podcast Outline:
We welcome our newest International listeners:
Japan
The Republic of Korea
Morocco
Saudi Arabia
The United Kingdom
Australia

We wanted to remind you about our upcoming speaking engagement at the International Conference on Higher Education. It will be January 5-8 in Honolulu, Hawaii.
Their website is:  http://www.hiceducation.org/ Registration is still open.

We will be hosting a gathering on Wakiki Beach  where we would love to meet with you to talk about student caring and higher education.

In this podcast we’ll discuss what parents, students, professors and administrators these do about the very real fears.

As we discussed in our last podcast - here is our list of common parental fears:
- My kid will major in the wrong thing and never make money.
- My kid will not be able get a job.
- My student is wasting the talents which I have observed them to process.
- My child will not be safe in college.
- My child will never settle on an major, they keep changing it.
- My child will not act responsibly and keep up with his or her class work.
- I worry that the cost of the education will not pay off.
- Will child will act socially irresponsibly and get into trouble.
- My child will radically change. / I will not know him / her anymore.
- I will never see them again. / They will move away.
- Empty nest syndrome. / What do I do now? / What is my job now / Is my job done?
- My child has significant health / sociological needs - who will take care of them in college?
- Who will make sure that my student is getting good grades?
- I did not send my child to the right school. / My child did not select right school.
- I did not save / invest enough money for their education.
- My child will mess up and not finish their degree.
- My child will not good enough grades to advance into graduate studies.

PARENTAL HOPES
- My child will earn their degree and get a job a good job.
- My child will find a lifelong spouse.
- My child will make good friends for life.
- My child will stay in touch with their familial roots.
- My child will live near me.
- My child will become a mature well-rounded adult.
- My child will earn excellent grades.

OUR HOPES
We say our, because we are all in this together - for the student.
- We want them to learn how to learn.
- We want them to learn how to solve their own problems and seek help appropriately.
- We want them to enjoy and become excited about their education.
- We relish in seeing their transformation from the students who is 3 months out of high school to the young adult who is self-confident.
- We want them to know their strengths and skills.
- We want them to know what they still need to learn.
- We want them to be prepared for what follows our time with them.
- We want them to stay in touch with us as adults.
- We want them to learn how to interact successfully with other adults.
- We want them to do well academically.
- We want them to learn how to recover from failure.

College, at best is adulthood with a safety net.
College is meant to address important issues, of preparation and transformation.
College is not meant to solve everything.
We must learn to relate to them not as child but as an adult.
Realities of how this affects the learning environment for administrators and professors.

Does this mean that parents are no longer useful - not at all
Establishing an adult relationship with your child?
Advice on money management.

Allowing them to learn by experience - which can be painful.
The years that a student is in college are precious and temporary.

Thank you for listening to this episode.
In our next episode, you will HEAR about WHAT WE ARE DOING AS WE APPROACH THE END OF OUR SEMESTERS

To you, our listeners,  IT IS YOUR TURN   ---   as we have shared some thoughts with you about this topic - we invite you to do the same.

We want to hear your stories about Student Caring or the lack there of. YOU MAY TELL YOUR STORY….

By going to our website,     STUDENT  CARING . COM • AND / OR You may tell your story - via the TELEPHONE.. Please call the student caring TOLL - FREE voice number,

1 - (855) NEWWAY- CARE       A.K.A.  1 -(855) 639-9292

THIS EPISODE WAS RECORDED ON November 3, 2011

THANK YOU FOR LISTENING

facebook

Twitter

Thank you for listening. Please join us every two weeks as we take you through our academic year and explore, “Student Caring.”

http://www.studentcaring.com/

studentcaring.com

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SC 06 #1 Parents and College Students: Knowing Who Your Students Are Today

2011-11-02
Length: 31s

Advice for Parents


Parents and College Students - Part 1 / Kno
wing who your students are today

http://www.studentcaring.com/

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SC 06 #1 Parents and College Students: Knowing Who Your Students Are Today

2011-11-02
Length: 31s

Advice for Parents


Parents and College Students - Part 1 / Kno
wing who your students are today

http://www.studentcaring.com/

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SC 05 Academic Preparedness: Knowing Who Your Students Are Today

2011-10-16
Length: 37s

How Important is Academic Preparedness?


Academic Preparedness / Knowing who your students are today

http://www.studentcaring.com/

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SC 05 Academic Preparedness: Knowing Who Your Students Are Today

2011-10-16
Length: 37s

How Important is Academic Preparedness?


Academic Preparedness / Knowing who your students are today

http://www.studentcaring.com/

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SC 04 Student Finances: Knowing Who Your Students Are Today

2011-10-01
Length: 45s

The HIGH Cost of Higher Education Today


Student Finances: Knowing who your students are today.

In podcast episode No. 4, the co-hosts, Dr. Daniel de Roulet and Prof. David C. Pecoraro,  talk about “Knowing who your Students are Today: Student Finances”

The Podcast Outline:

This is the first of a 3 part series: Knowing Who Your Students Are Today

#1  Student Finances

#2  Student Academic Preparedness

#3  Students and Parents

Announcement: Student Caring will be speaking at the Hawaiian International Conference on Higher Education. We’ll be putting together a “Meet and Greet” for our listeners. Attire: Business Casual or Hawaiian!

Dinosaur (Historical) information from Daniel and David

We’re talking “That 70’s Show” era rather than “Happy Days.”

• David shares his journey from high school to college and graduate school from a financial perspective.

• Daniel shares his situation and the benefits of an education which was not cost prohibitive.

• A college education, while a struggle, was not unsurmountable, nor difficult to finance.

• Daniel shares statistics from: National Center for Education Statistics

• From 2001 to now the cost of education has increased by an average of 50%.

• Students and parents are taking out loans at an average of $18,000 a year.

• Graduation Rates: Just a little over 50% of undergraduate student graduate in 4 years. 61 % graduate in 5 years and 63% graduate in 6 years.

• Family debt for a 4 year degree is averaging $72,000 – $100,000.

• Taking out a second mortgage on a home, with today’s housing market, is not an option for many families.

• College savings accounts, begun 20 years ago, are “not enough” for the cost of today’s education.

• In 2011, our students are worried about tuition hikes and debt.

• Full-time students in a four-year program are working to address these concerns.

42% of our students are working over 25 hours per week.

25% of our students are working 36 hours or more per week.

• These factors create additional stress for the student.

• What can we as educators do?

Be aware. Survey your students to discover how they are doing and your own stress level?

David’s advice: Meet with the student one-on-one and illustrate where their education fits into the big picture of their lives.

Daniel:  The national medium income for a graduate is an average of $15,000 a year more than those without a degree. He advises:  “Stick with it,” advice he was given.

Advice to students:

Look over the long term to discover future benefits.

Ask:  “Are you working more than you need to?”

• Today’s students are expected to bring technology with them, which is an increased cost. Automobiles are often necessary and expensive.

Students need to stay focused on your primary work: getting an education.

• Helping students to learn how to manage their time can be very helpful in relieving stress.

• Listening to students talk about their stresses is essential.

• David shares how important it is for him to be the very best professor possible because his students deserve the best.

• Listener, Don Lubach, Ph.D., stated in a review of our podcast: “Our only hope is to pool resources and techniques. We have to do our best work to help our students as they make their way to graduation and a tough job market.”

• Daniel encourages everyone to make this a “College Issue.”

• Today’s financial landscape is very different from the 1970’s.

STUDENT CARING TIPS

• When a class finishes a few minutes early, this a golden opportunity for students and professors to connect with each other.

• Stick around during a break.

• Let students know where you will be having coffee or lunch and invite them to join you.

• Coffee is important!

 

Please, tell your friends and colleagues about us!

In our next episode we’ll talk about, “Knowing Who Today’s Students Are: Student Academic Preparedness,” and continue to take us with you as we explore student caring.

We welcome your feedback to this podcast and our work:

YOU MAY  Go to iTunes and write a review or simply, in iTunes, click on STAR to rate us. – we would really appreciate that!

Email us!

Daniel: daniel@studentcaring.com   David: david@studentcaring.com

OR You may tell give voice feedback on student caring TOLL – FREE voice number, 1 – (855) NEWWAY- CARE       That’s – 1 -(855) 639-9292

THANK YOU FOR LISTENING & PLEASE JOIN OUR COMMUNITY

You may find us on:

Twitter    Facebook   Google +   Pinterest

This way, we can keep you informed about our upcoming eBook and Audio program:  The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching

Until next time:  Keep  Caring!

http://www.studentcaring.com/

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SC 04 Student Finances: Knowing Who Your Students Are Today

2011-10-01
Length: 45s

The HIGH Cost of Higher Education Today


Student Finances: Knowing who your students are today

http://www.studentcaring.com/

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SC 03 The First Day of Instruction

2011-09-03
Length: 36s

Zero to 100 Miles per hour - overnight!


Listen to Student Caring story from one of our listenrs and hear how the first days of instruction went from, Dr. Daniel de Roulet and Prof. David C. Pecoraro.

In podcast episode No. 3, the co-hosts, Dr. Daniel de Roulet and Prof. David C. Pecoraro, discuss a story from a listener and their first days of instruction.

The Podcast Outline:

• Welcome to the world of “Fast Pace!”

• Student caring typically needs to be “spliced in” to daily life.

• Meetings, meetings, and more meetings.

• David invites the audience to listen to two stories by Robin Homalok.

• Robin’s story about the professor and those who take care of you.

• Robin’s second story, “The Professor and the Slide Rule.”

• Reaction to the stories.

• How to counteract the possibility of an initial negative reaction to the course and professor.

• Creating a “Welcoming” first day of instruction.

• Highlights from Dr. James K.A. Smith of Calvin College

• Caring in chaos during the first week of instruction.

• Student Caring is about action!

• Student Caring is often about encouraging students to enter adulthood. This can involve “tough encounters. Daniel tells a story about a student from his past, who wanted to negotiate her grade.

• Additional highlights from Dr. James K.A. Smith. Look at your alumni to assess how well they have been taught. Professors are not merely “Heads on a Stick,” they are also, “Hearts on a Stick.”

• A student’s perspective of the professor during class and the results of their “in-class time” afterward when they turn in excellent work.

• Students are also, heads and hearts!

• Summary of the podcast topics.In our next episode we’ll talk about, “Knowing Who Today’s Students Are,” and continue to take us with you as we explore student caring.

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SC 02 Preparing For the First Day of Instruction

2011-08-16
Length: 26s

What we do to get ready for our students.

Preparing for the first days of instruction. The co hosts discuss what they do to prepare for the first day of instruction.

In podcast episode No. 2, the co-hosts, Dr. Daniel de Roulet and Prof. David C. Pecoraro, discuss the preparations they are making for their first days of instruction for the fall semester.To all of the listeners who have downloaded our first podcast, “THANK YOU.” We are very happy to see how popular this subject is.

The Podcast Outline:

•  Our courses have larger than usual enrollments and large waiting lists.

•  Communicating with our students via email during the weeks before the first day of instruction.

•  Preparing a welcoming orientation meeting.

•  Meeting with the new students and addressing their unique needs.

•   Pairing up new students with continuing ones and the assignment of a faculty mentor.

•  We each discuss the courses that we’ll be teaching.

•  Daniel discusses the importance of office hours and a coffee hour.

•  An exploration of learning experiences which could occur outside of the classroom.

•  An exercise in learning about your students before you meet them.

-  A look at significant events which have occurred during their lives.

-  Looking at our students’ lives in contrast to ours.

•  The summer before a student begins college.

-  Daniel shares his summer before college and his first day of instruction.

-  David discusses the summer vacation which did not occur and his transition to college.

•  Understanding the student’s perspective and the professor’s opportunity to set the tone.

•  Daniel provides words of encouragement for all professors.

•  David preparations for getting to know his students and pronounce their names!

•  The professor’s perspective vs. your students’.

-  Establishment of ground rules.

-  “Crossing the bridge from high school to college.”In our next episode you hear about how our first days went.

We welcome your feedback to this podcast and our work:

YOU MAY  Go to iTunes and write a review or simply, in iTunes, click on STAR to rate us. – we would really appreciate that!Email us!

Daniel: daniel@studentcaring.com   David: david@studentcaring.com

OR You may tell give voice feedback on student caring TOLL – FREE voice number, 1 – (855) NEWWAY- CARE       That’s – 1 -(855) 639-9292

THANK YOU FOR LISTENING & PLEASE JOIN OUR COMMUNITY

You may find us on:

Twitter    Facebook   Google +   Pinterest

This way, we can keep you informed about our upcoming eBook and Audio program:  The Caring Professor: A Guide to Effective, Rewarding, and Rigorous Teaching

Until next time:  Keep  Caring!

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Share: SC 02 Preparing For the First Day of Instruction


SC 02 Preparing For the First Day of Instruction

2011-08-16
Length: 26s

What we do to get ready for our students.

Preparing for the first days of instruction. The co hosts discuss what they do to prepare for the first day of instruction.

http://www.studentcaring.com/

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SC 01 Welcome to Student Caring

2011-08-01
Length: 18s

About: Student Caring / Daniel & David


Welcome to The Student Caring Project! Join professors de Roulet and Pecoraro every two weeks as they encourage students, parents, professors to focus, first, on Student Caring - A New Way of Thinking About College.

http://www.studentcaring.com/

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Student Caring - A New Way of Thinking About College

Join professors de Roulet and Pecoraro as they encourage students, parents, professors to focus, first, on, Student Caring, A New Way of Thinking About College.

Student Caring - A New Way of Thinking About College


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