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Last update: 2013-06-30

Concerns About Caffeinated Energy Drinks, Candy And Snacks (Rebroadcast).

2013-06-30

Americans love caffeine, and not just in soda and coffee. Sales in caffeinated energy drinks may reach $19 billion this year. Sales in new caffeinated snacks and candy, like Energy Gummi Bears and Jolt Gum, exceeded $1.6 billion last year. But the Food and Drug Administration is concerned about the potential health impacts of these new caffeinated products, particularly those that appeal to children. The FDA is reviewing reports of six deaths allegedly associated with energy drinks. But companies that make caffeinated food and drinks argue their products are safe and that they don't market to children.

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Friday News Roundup - International.

2013-06-28

A panel of journalists joins Diane for analysis of the week's top international news stories, including: Syrian civil war deaths are said to top 100,000, NSA leaker Edward Snowden remains in limbo at a Moscow airport and President Barack Obama arrives in Africa.

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Friday News Roundup - Domestic.

2013-06-28

A panel of journalists joins Diane for analysis of the week's top national news stories, including: a recap of major Supreme Court decisions, President Barack Obama's new climate agenda and a dramatic filibuster in Texas over abortion.

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Concerns About Caffeinated Energy Drinks, Candy And Snacks

2013-06-27

Americans love caffeine, and not just in soda and coffee. Sales in caffeinated energy drinks may reach $19 billion this year. Sales in new caffeinated snacks and candy, like Energy Gummi Bears and Jolt Gum, exceeded $1.6 billion last year. But the Food and Drug Administration is concerned about the potential health impacts of these new caffeinated products, particularly those that appeal to children. The FDA is reviewing reports of six deaths allegedly associated with energy drinks. But companies that make caffeinated food and drinks argue their products are safe and that they don't market to children.

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Far-Reaching Effects Of Supreme Court Rulings

2013-06-27

The U.S. Supreme Court ended its term with some of the most highly-anticipated decisions of the year. It overturned part of the federal Defense of Marriage Act and opened the door to resume same-sex marriages in California. It made race-conscious admissions slightly harder, but not impossible. And it invalidated a key section of the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Most of the news this week focused on immediate reactions to the high court's rulings. Now, we begin to contemplate their cultural and political implications. Diane and her guests discuss the practical effects of this week's landmark Supreme Court decisions and what's next for those on all sides of the arguments.

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The Supreme Court's Decisions On Same-Sex Marriage

2013-06-27

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled this morning on two high-profile same-sex marriage cases. The justices voted 5-4 to strike down a key provision in the Defense of Marriage Act, known as DOMA. DOMA prohibits the federal government from recognizing same-sex marriages, even in states where they are legal. The court said "DOMA singles out a class of persons deemed by a state entitled to recognition and protection to enhance their own liberty." The court avoided a ruling on California's Proposition 8 ban on gay marriage. With a 5-4 vote, the court said it lacked jurisdiction to decide the case. A discussion of the Supreme Court's same-sex marriage rulings.

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The US Job Market

2013-06-27

President Franklin Roosevelt set the first mandated minimum wage 75 years ago at $.25 an hour. Since then, it's been raised 22 times and is now $7.25 an hour. President Barack Obama is pushing for $9 an hour. Supporters say the increase is critical to the welfare of nation's working poor and would also be a boost for the economy, but others argue it's an increase many businesses, especially small businesses, can't afford. Seth Harris, Acting Secretary of Labor, talks about the minimum wage, labor standards in the U.S. today and prospects for the U.S. job market.

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The Supreme Court's Decisions On Same-Sex Marriage

2013-06-26

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled this morning on two high-profile same-sex marriage cases. The justices voted 5-4 to strike down a key provision in the Defense of Marriage Act, known as DOMA. DOMA prohibits the federal government from recognizing same-sex marriages, even in states where they are legal. The court said "DOMA singles out a class of persons deemed by a state entitled to recognition and protection to enhance their own liberty." The court avoided a ruling on California's Proposition 8 ban on gay marriage. With a 5-4 vote, the court said it lacked jurisdiction to decide the case. A discussion of the Supreme Court's same-sex marriage rulings.

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Supreme Court Decision On The Voting Rights Act

2013-06-25

The Supreme Court ruled this morning that a key component of the 1965 Civil Rights Act is unconstitutional. Specifically, the court threw out a long-standing formula for determining which states and local governments need pre-clearance before making changes to their voting procedures. A panel of experts discusses the Supreme Court decision on the Voting Rights Act and implications for U.S. election process.

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Widespread Protests In Brazil

2013-06-25

Brazilians have taken to the streets to protest rising prices, high taxes and government corruption. What the demonstrations mean for Latin America's biggest economy.

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Supreme Court Decision On Affirmative Action

2013-06-24

In a much-awaited decision, the Supreme Court on Monday chose not to strike down affirmative action. Instead, the justices returned Fisher v. University of Texas to a lower court in a 7-1 vote. Last October, the Supreme Court heard arguments challenging the university's use of race-based preferences in admitting students. Proponents had argued these practices, although imperfect, were the best way to address diversity in higher education. A panel discusses what today's Supreme Court decision means for the future of affirmative action.

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Diplomatic And Legal Twists In NSA Leaker Case

2013-06-24

Former government contractor Edward Snowden fled Hong Kong and arrived in Moscow yesterday. His flight was aided by the whistle-blower web site Wikileaks. Snowden's ultimate destination is unknown, but the government of Ecuador confirmed he has requested asylum there. The U.S. has charged Snowden with three felonies: two counts of espionage and one of theft. His passport was revoked on Saturday and a warrant was issued for his request. Diane and her guests discuss the latest on Snowden's flight and what it means for relations between the U.S. and Russia, China, and any country that ends up taking him in.

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Friday News Roundup - International

2013-06-21

The Afghan government stalls peace talks with the Taliban. President Barack Obama calls for cuts in U.S. and Russian nuclear arsenals. And widespread protests continue in Brazil. A panel of journalists joins Diane for analysis of the week's top international news stories.

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Friday News Roundup - Domestic

2013-06-21

The FBI admits using drones in the United States. A Congressional Budget Office report says an immigration bill would cut the federal deficit. And the Federal Reserve outlines an end to its stimulus. Diane and a panel of journalists discuss the week's top national news stories.

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Sahar Delijani: "Children Of The Jacaranda Tree"

2013-06-20

In 1983, a baby girl named Neda is born in prison in Tehran, Iran. The baby's mother is a political prisoner and only allowed to keep her for a few months before a guard takes her away. Neda is a fictional character in the debut novel "Children of the Jacaranda Tree" by Sahar Delijani. But Neda is based on the real life story of the book's author, who spent the first forty-five days of her life in prison in Tehran. Like the fictional character Neda, Delijani was raised by her grandparents for a few years until her parents were released. Delijani's family eventually leaves Iran and moves to northern California.

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Health Insurance Exchanges

2013-06-20

Advocacy groups across the country have launched major campaigns to promote President Barack Obama's Affordable Care Act. The aim is to inform uninsured Americans about health insurance exchanges and government subsidies — and persuade them to sign up. Open enrollment in the new programs begins Oct. 1, 2013. It's estimated that more than 75 percent of uninsured Americans are not aware of the changes ahead. A government report released yesterday questioned whether the exchanges would be ready. Critics of the Obama health law said the report confirmed their doubts. Diane and guests talk about implementing the Affordable Care Act.

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The Mission To Fly A Solar-Powered Plane Around The World

2013-06-19

In 1999, the Swiss explorer Bertrand Piccard became the first person to circumnavigate the globe in a balloon. The journey took three weeks but he almost didn't make it, nearly running out of fuel. That close call inspired Piccard to attempt another flight around the world--this time without relying on fossil fuels. Today he is just years away from accomplishing that dream. This time the trip won't be in a balloon, but a plane. Piccard, and his partner, Andre Borschberg, are the first to build and fly a solar powered plane that can fly at night. The two join Diane for the hour to talk about adventure, innovation and the flying without fossil fuel.

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The Impact Of Sequestration

2013-06-19

In a recent poll, more than one in three Americans reported negative effects of the sequester. That's up from one in four when the $85 billion in budget cuts took effect in March. A Meals on Wheels Association of America survey showed nearly 70 percent of local programs have had to reduce the number of meals served to housebound seniors. Head Start programs for preschoolers have shrunk, funding for medical research is reduced and national parks are scaling back services. Diane and her guests discuss the broad reach of sequestration on Americans' lives.

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How The FBI And Police Are Using Facial Recognition Systems

2013-06-18

Yesterday former intelligence subcontractor Edward Snowden denied ties to China. Many questions remain unanswered related to his claims that the U.S. government routinely collects vast troves of information on ordinary Americans. But there's another kind of surveillance not widely acknowledged: facial recognition. An estimated 120 million facial images are stored in searchable databases across the country. Law enforcement authorities in 26 states are allowed to search these images for crime suspects, victims and witnesses. How facial recognition software and other biometric techniques are being used today.

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Alvaro Vargas Llosa: "Global Crossings"

2013-06-18

Immigration has long been an emotionally and politically charged topic in the United States. The Senate last week began debating a bill to reform the nation's immigration policies. President Barack Obama called it a "broken system" and urged lawmakers to fix it. Some members of Congress are fighting for tougher laws. They, along with many Americans, worry immigrants are taking jobs from U.S. citizens and burdening already strapped social service programs. But a new book argues that legal immigration is almost always economically — and morally — beneficial. Diane speaks with Alvaro Vargas Llosa about immigration.

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Making Better End-Of-Life Care Decisions

2013-06-17

Most Americans say they want to die at home, but 75 percent die in hospitals or nursing homes. Hospitalization often means aggressive, high-cost treatment at the expense of quality of life. And life-prolonging care accounts for 30 percent of total Medicare spending. Now, two Harvard doctors are making movies that visually depict common forms of end-of life care in hospitals. The short films show real patients receiving treatment such as emergency CPR and feeding tubes. Clinical studies show that patients who view these movies overwhelmingly opt out of costly, life-prolonging treatment. Diane and her guests discuss how to make better end-of-life decisions.

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New Developments In The Middle East

2013-06-17

The United States weighs a no-fly zone in Syria after determining the government of Bashar al-Assad used chemical weapons on its citizens. In a surprise landslide, Iran elects a moderate-conservative president, stunning the Islamic Republic's hardline establishment. And violent clashes spread in Turkey. Diane and her guests discuss the latest developments in the Middle East and what they mean for the region and the U.S.

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Floyd Abrams: "Friend Of The Court: On The Front Lines With The First Amendment"...

2013-06-16
Length: 52s

In 1971, a collection of documents that came to be known as the Pentagon Papers was leaked to The New York Times. The papers traced the path of U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War. When the Nixon administration tried to block publication, young Floyd Abrams was part of the Times' legal defense team, which went on to win at the Supreme Court. In the years since, Abrams has been on the front lines of the nation's top free speech cases, including the Brooklyn Museum's battle with New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani as well as the Citizens United case. A conversation with America's leading First Amendment lawyer.

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Friday News Roundup - Domestic

2013-06-14
Length: 51s

NSA and FBI directors defended U.S. surveillance programs and testified they had prevented terror attacks. Senator Diane Feinstein said Congress would consider legislation to limit private contractor access to sensitive intelligence. The Senate passed a farm bill and began consideration of amendments to the immigration bill. A federal judge approved an FDA plan to drop limits on one type of morning after pill. And six months after the Newtown shootings, family members, elected officials, and other leaders gathered for a day of remembrance, and a call to revive gun control initiatives. A panel of journalists join Diane for the domestic hour of the Friday News Roundup.

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Friday News Roundup - International

2013-06-14
Length: 51s

The U.S. said it plans to send weapons to Syrian rebels. The Obama Administration concludes Bashar al-Assad used chemical weapons on his people. The U.N. says nearly ninety-three thousand people have been killed in the Syrian civil war. The Turkish Prime Minister invited protesters to his home for talks. Iran holds presidential elections today. Pope Francis was quoted as acknowledging a "gay lobby" and corruption within the Vatican. South Africa's Nelson Mandela health is said to be improving from a lung infection. A panel of journalists joins Diane for the international hour of the Friday News Roundup.

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Shohreh Aghdashloo: "The Alley Of Love And Yellow Jasmines"

2013-06-13
Length: 51s

Actress Shohreh Aghdashloo made history in 2003 as the first Iranian-American actor to be nominated for an Academy Award. Forced to flee Tehran before the 1979 revolution for her avant-garde theater work, she settled in California and continued acting. Her performance in the film "House of Sand and Fog," opposite Ben Kingsley, won her an Oscar nomination for best supporting actress. Later, she received an Emmy Award for her role in the 2009 HBO miniseries "House of Saddam." In her new memoir, Aghdashloo reflects on her personal journey from Tehran to Hollywood.

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Efforts To Reignite Gun Control Six Months After Newtown

2013-06-13
Length: 51s

The mass shooting in Newtown, Conn., last December sparked a debate over gun laws. President Barack Obama called on Congress to act, and gun control advocates saw the moment as their best chance in years to take on the powerful fire arms lobby. But bipartisan legislation to expand background checks failed. Six months later, families of Newtown victims are back in Washington with hopes of re-starting the conversation. And they're not the only group fighting to keep momentum alive. New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg is using his political leverage to target democrats opposed to gun control measures, a strategy some warn could backfire. Diane and her guests discuss efforts to reignite the gun control debate.

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Lionel Shriver: "Big Brother"

2013-06-12
Length: 51s

Lionel Shriver is known for bringing a brutally honest perspective to current events in her newspaper columns and fiction. Her latest novel, "Big Brother," examines our complex contemporary attitudes toward food and body size. It's the story of a 40-year-old woman caught between a fitness freak husband and a morbidly obese brother. She must chose whether to risk her marriage or try to save her brother from eating himself to death. The author's own brother died from weight-related complications four years ago. We talk about America's preoccupation with food and how it affects all our relationships.

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Floyd Abrams: "Friend Of The Court: On The Front Lines With The First Amendment"

2013-06-11
Length: 51s

In 1971, a collection of documents that came to be known as the Pentagon Papers was leaked to The New York Times. The papers traced the path of U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War. When the Nixon administration tried to block publication, young Floyd Abrams was part of the Times' legal defense team, which went on to win at the Supreme Court. In the years since, Abrams has been on the front lines of the nation's top free speech cases, including the Brooklyn Museum's battle with New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani as well as the Citizens United case. A conversation with America's leading First Amendment lawyer.

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The Economic Impact of Climate Change Policy

2013-06-11
Length: 51s

The warning wasn't a surprise. The International Energy Agency says carbon dioxide emissions from energy use are rising rapidly — too much to limit the increase in average global temperature to two degrees Celsius. That's a commonly cited benchmark to prevent the worst impacts of climate change. The I.E.A. urged governments to swiftly pass energy policies that would keep climate goals without harming economic growth. Some say political will is shifting as we recognize the impact of climate change in storm surges, heat waves, and drought. But others argue the cure for reducing carbon dioxide emissions will do more harm than good. Diane and her guests discuss the economic impact of climate change policy.

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Infidelity And How It Affects Marriage, Children And Families

2013-06-10
Length: 51s

An estimated 40 percent of American marriages experience at least one episode of infidelity. Studies show more men than women cheat, but they often do it for the same reasons. While infidelity is a factor in many divorces, half of American marriages survive an extramarital affair. New social science and medical research is contributing to understanding the causes of infidelity. And it's helping therapists guide couples who seek to repair a damaged marriage. A discussion on what drives people to cheat and how infidelity can affect children and the whole family.

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What's Private In The Modern Age

2013-06-10
Length: 51s

An ex-CIA computer technician and a relatively low level consultant for Booze Allen Hamilton has admitted that he was the source of the series of leaks on the us surveillance programs. The revelations shed light on NSA programs that collect data from smartphones, tables, social media, email, and many other forms of electronic communication. Advances in technology allow analysts to sift through this vast trove of data in what some say amounts to something of a universal dragnet. The disclosures prompted a lengthy defense from President Obama last week. Please join us to discuss what, if anything, is private in the digital age.

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Shibley Telhami: "The World Through Arab Eyes" (Rebroadcast)

2013-06-09
Length: 52s

The Arab uprisings that began in 2010 profoundly altered politics in the Middle East. Once a voiceless region dominated by authoritarian rulers, the Arab world developed a new identity that led many experts to revise their understanding of the Arab people. Political scientist Shibley Telhami says the uprisings would not have been such a surprise if analysts had paid closer attention to Arab public opinion. In a new book, Telhami uses a decade's worth of original polling data to argue that the driving forces behind the Arab Spring had been gestating for decades.

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Friday News Roundup - International

2013-06-07
Length: 51s

Turkey's Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan calls for anti-government protests to stop and says charges of excessive police force are being investigated. Syrian troops, with help from Hezbollah, capture two cities in the country's opposition heartland. A U.N. peacekeeping unit says it will withdraw from the buffer zone between Israel and Syria following fighting between rebels and Syrian forces. And an Egyptian court convicts 43 defendants, including 16 Americans, in a case against democracy promotion groups. A panel of journalists join Diane for the international hour of our Friday News Roundup.

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Friday News Roundup - Domestic

2013-06-07
Length: 51s

The federal government confirms it gathered online information on foreigners from some of the country's largest internet companies. This follows reports that the White House is collecting the phone records of millions of Americans...National Security Advisor Tom Donilon steps down and is to be replaced by U.N. ambassador Susan Rice...An IRS official apologizes to lawmakers for lavish spending by the agency at a California conference...The Senate's oldest member, Frank Lautenberg, dies at age 89...And the economy added one 175,000 jobs in May beating estimates...Diane and her guests discuss the top news stories of the week.

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Shibley Telhami: "The World Through Arab Eyes"

2013-06-06
Length: 51s

The Arab uprisings that began in 2010 profoundly altered politics in the Middle East. Once a voiceless region dominated by authoritarian rulers, the Arab world developed a new identity that led many experts to revise their understanding of the Arab people. Political scientist Shibley Telhami says the uprisings would not have been such a surprise if analysts had paid closer attention to Arab public opinion. In a new book, Telhami uses a decade's worth of original polling data to argue that the driving forces behind the Arab Spring had been gestating for decades.

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High Stakes Battle Over Judicial Appointments

2013-06-06
Length: 51s

President Barack Obama nominates three candidates to the D.C. federal appeals court. Diane and her guests discuss how the fight over appointing judges could set the stage for a battle over the filibuster in the Senate.

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Richard Haass: "Foreign Policy Begins At Home: The Case For Putting America's House In...

2013-06-05
Length: 51s

The president of the Council on Foreign Relations says the biggest threat to the United States comes not from abroad but from within. He says that only by getting our own house in order — fixing our crumbling infrastructure, second-class schools and outdated immigration system — will we be able to lead a world that will otherwise be overwhelmed by global challenges, regional conflicts and failed states. Diane and her guest discuss why he believes foreign policy begins at home.

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America's Energy Future Beyond Oil And Gas

2013-06-05
Length: 51s

Ten years ago American natural gas fields were thought to be on the way out. American oil production was falling fast. Coal was king, and wind and solar energy production plans were barely underway. Much has changed. According to recent government projections, in September the U.S. will produce more oil than it imports for the first time in almost 20 years. The discovery of massive natural gas reserves and advances in fracking techniques are forcing a dramatic rewrite of America's energy future, but what has not changed, so far, is our overall reliance on fossil fuels.

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Environmental Outlook: Jellyfish And The Health Of The Ocean

2013-06-04
Length: 51s

Jellyfish are over 560 million years old. They have no brains and no spines, yet these gelatinous animals are among the worlds' most successful organisms. While other creatures evolved to develop tails and feet, jellyfish continued to thrive staying just the same. But lately scientists are concerned the animals are thriving too well — overrunning beaches, forcing nuclear power plants to shut down and disrupting the ecosystem. And experts say it is human-caused changes to the environment that's behind the rise in jellyfish. For our June Environmental Outlook, Diane and her guests discuss jellyfish and the health of the ocean.

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New Questions About IRS Activities

2013-06-04
Length: 51s

An inspector general's report is expected to show the Internal Revenue Service spent about $50 million on conferences for employees between 2010 and 2012. It comes on the heels of three recently released videos showing IRS employees dancing and performing in "Star Trek" and "Gilligan's Island" spoofs. Yesterday, Danny Werfel made his first appearance on Capitol Hill as acting commissioner of the IRS. He said those activities are "an unfortunate vestige from a prior era." House Oversight Committee Chairman Darrell Issa has vowed to investigate that, as well as the targeting of conservative groups seeking tax exempt status. Diane and her guests discuss new questions about IRS activities.

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Ru Freeman: "On Sal Mal Lane"

2013-06-03
Length: 51s

A journalist uses her experiences growing up during Sri Lanka's civil war to inform her latest novel. Ru Freeman describes how growing religious and ethnic tensions affected children from diverse backgrounds living on an ordinary lane in Colombo in the years preceding the war.

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The Battle Over Student Loan Rates

2013-06-03
Length: 51s

Interest rates on government-subsidized student loans are set to double on July 1st unless Congress steps in. President Obama urged lawmakers to freeze rates at their current 3.4 percent. The president says this would help low- and moderate-income students save thousands of dollars in interest. The House passed a bill that ties rates to Treasury notes. Critics argue that the House bill does not differ significantly from the president's long-term proposal. Republicans accused the White House of using its push on student loan rates to deflect attention from current political controversies. A discussion of the proposals and what each would mean for students, families and the cost of a college education.

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Democracy In Trouble (Rebroadcast)

2013-06-02
Length: 52s

Citizenship and governance are the bedrock of a healthy democracy. But voter turnout is down and trust in politicians and public institutions is eroding. Governments in North America and Europe often seem crippled in their capacity to deliver what people want and need. That is the premise of a new report by the Transatlantic Academy. In the U.S., democracy is threatened by gridlock and polarization. In Europe, the legitimacy of the EU is being questioned. And Canadians worry about the unchecked power placed in the hands of the prime minister. Diane and her guests discuss the disconnect between citizens and government on both sides of the Atlantic and the potential for revitalizing democracy

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Friday News Roundup - International

2013-05-31
Length: 51s

A U.S. drone kills Pakistan's number two Taliban leader. Syria says it has received the first shipment of Russian missiles. And a Chinese firm agrees to buy the world's largest pork producer. A panel of journalists joins Diane for analysis of the week's top international news stories.

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Friday News Roundup - Domestic

2013-05-31
Length: 51s

The F.B.I. reveals another round of suspicious letters that may contain ricin. Latest targets include the White House, an Air Force base, and the C.I.A. Attorney General Eric Holder tells news editors in a private meeting that he is committed to changing Justice Department guidelines on probes involving journalists. President Obama reportedly plans to nominate former senior Justice Department official James Comey to head the F.B.I. The president and Governor Chris Christie reunite on the New Jersey shore to view recovery efforts after Superstorm Sandy. And consumer confidence is the strongest in over five years. A panel of journalists joins Diane for analysis of the week's top national news stories.

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Glenn Hubbard: "Balance: The Economics Of Great Powers From Ancient Rome To Modern...

2013-05-30
Length: 51s

The United States is on the road to civil collapse. At least that's the warning from economist Glenn Hubbard. The former chair of President George W. Bush's Council of Economic Advisors claims that America's financial imbalance is threatening its leadership as a world power. Hubbard says other great civilizations- Rome, medieval China, nineteenth-century Britain — collapsed under the similar circumstances. In our case, he believes a root cause is the creation of a middle-class entitlement state. He argues that without a new approach to politics, the U. S. may be next to fall. Diane talks with Glenn Hubbard about reversing America's economic decline.

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The Future Of The GOP

2013-05-30
Length: 51s

Stunned by electoral losses last fall, the Republican National Committee commissioned an analysis of the GOP. It found the party had come to be defined by what it's against, not by what it stands for. In a recent speech, former Florida Governor Jeb Bush said, "Way too many people believe Republicans are anti-immigrant, anti-woman, anti-science, anti-gay, anti-worker." Some believe extremists have hijacked the party - hurting moderates at the polls and in Congress. In a TV interview over the weekend, former Republican Senator Bob Dole suggested he barely recognizes today's GOP. Diane and guests assess the future of the Republican Party.

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Update On The Escalating Crisis In Syria.

2013-05-29
Length: 51s

The bitter two year conflict in Syria may be widening. Yesterday four rockets were fired into a Lebanon town near its border with Syria. Three Lebanese border guards were killed by an unidentified gunman, and on Monday three Lebanese civilians were killed by rocket fire. The recent attack is thought to be related to Hezbollah support of the Syrian government. President Obama is evaluating a range of options including a no-fly zone over Syria. Senator John McCain, who secretly met with Syrian rebels over the weekend, is among those pushing for more direct U.S. action. Please join us to discuss fears of a widening crisis in Syria and what to do about it.

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Readers' Review: "The Art of Fielding" by Chad Harbach

2013-05-29
Length: 51s

"The Art of Fielding" is a book about baseball, the great American sport that has served as inspiration for many authors. At the center of the tale is Henry Skrimshander, a superstar shortstop who never makes an error--until he does. And that sets into motion his own unraveling. While the action of the novel is on the baseball diamond, the story is as much about life at a liberal arts college, relationships between men, and the pursuit of perfection. With literary references from Melville to T.S. Eliot - as many critics have pointed out- it's a baseball novel with something for everyone. For our May Readers' Review, Diane and guests discuss "The Art of Fielding" by Chad Harbach.

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Democracy In Trouble

2013-05-28
Length: 51s

A new study says democracy is in trouble on both sides of the Atlantic. Diane and her guests discuss why citizens in North America and Europe feel disconnected from their government as well as prospects for reviving the democratic spirit.

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New Research On Inner City Fathers

2013-05-28
Length: 51s

In 1960, 11 percent of American children lived in homes without fathers. Today, that figure has jumped to more than 40 percent. And in poor, urban areas, the numbers are even higher. Studies show that kids who grow up without fathers are more likely to have behavioral and emotional problems and to remain poor. The public widely believes these fathers are "deadbeat dads" who just don't care. But new research reveals men who are truly devoted to fatherhood and want to give their children better lives. Critics say these men may be more involved with their kids now but still aren't shouldering enough of the financial burden. Diane and guests discuss new research on inner city fathers and what it could mean for social policy.

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U.S. Poet Laureate Natasha Trethewey (Rebroadcast)

2013-05-27
Length: 51s

U.S. Poet Laureate Natasha Trethewey was born in Mississippi, 100 years to the day after Confederate Memorial Day was established. Her mother was black, her father is white. Their marriage was against the law in the state. Her poetry explores the interplay of race and memory in her life and in American history. The past she mines is often unsettling: growing up biracial in the deep south of the 1960s, the lives of forgotten African-American Civil War soldiers, her mother's murder and the legacy of slavery. Tretheway is the first poet laureate to move to Washington, D.C., and work out of the Library of Congress since the position was established in 1986. She's the first southern Poet Laureate since Robert Penn Warren. And she's the first person to serve simultaneously as the poet laureate of a state — Mississippi — and the nation. In 2007, she received a Pulitzer Prize for her poetry collection, "Native Guard." Last year, she published a follow-up titled, "Thrall." She joins Diane to talk about the role of poetry in our everyday lives.

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Scientific Advances In Prosthetic Limbs (Rebroadcast)

2013-05-27
Length: 51s

An estimated 2 million Americans have had an arm or leg amputated from injury or illness. Many chose to wear prosthetic limbs. Ten years ago, most artificial arms and legs were clunky and fragile. But prosthetic technology has advanced significantly since then. A vast body of research gained from treating American soldiers wounded in Iraq and Afghanistan has led to robotic knees and ankles that adjust to terrain and activity. Leg amputees now run marathons, climb mountains and even skydive. And a new bionic arm powered by the thoughts of the person wearing it can mimic almost all the movements of a real hand.

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Olympia Snowe: "Fighting For Common Ground: How We Can Fix The Stalemate In Congress"...

2013-05-26
Length: 52s

For the last few years, Congress's approval ratings have been dismal. A Gallup poll last month showed only 15 percent of Americans approve of how Congress is doing its job. Seventy-nine percent disapprove. Olympia Snowe is fed up with Congress, too. After 18 years in the U.S. Senate, the Maine Republican called it quits. When she announced she would not seek re-election in 2012, she cited increasingly partisan politics as a major factor. In her new political memoir, she tells how she went from being an orphan at age 9 to a GOP lawmaker known for reaching across the aisle. Her take on what's wrong with Congress and how to fix it.

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Friday News Roundup - Domestic

2013-05-24
Length: 51s

President Barack Obama says he wants to end the war on terror. In a major policy speech, he announced steps to narrow the scope of the U.S. drone program and reinforced his vow to close Guantanamo. The president plans a visit to inspect tornado damage in Oklahoma. Another IRS official is on the way out after refusing to testify about the agency's admitted targeting of conservative groups. Apple's CEO and lawmakers square off over taxes. An immigration reform bill moves to the Senate floor for debate. And the FBI shoots a man questioned in the Boston bombings. A panel of journalists joins guest host Katty Kay for analysis of the week's top national news stories.

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Friday News Roundup - International

2013-05-24
Length: 51s

The brutal killing of a British soldier in London raises terror alarms. Secretary of State John Kerry meets with Israelis and Palestinians. And the White House acknowledges drone strikes have killed four Americans overseas since 2009. A panel of journalists joins guest host Katty Kay for analysis of the week's top international news stories.

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Khaled Hosseini: "And The Mountains Echoed"

2013-05-23
Length: 51s

The best-selling author of the novels "The Kite Runner" and "A Thousand Splendid Suns" introduced millions of readers to Afghanistan. Khaled Hosseini's new book begins in Afghanistan, but then branches out as it follows characters from Kabul to Paris and California - reflecting the author's personal journey. Born in Kabul, Hosseini spent part of his childhood in Paris as the son of a diplomat. But his family was forced to stay in France after the 1978 coup. Later, they were granted political asylum in California, where Hosseini became a doctor, started writing fiction, and still lives today.

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Prospects For Immigration Reform Legislation

2013-05-23
Length: 51s

Three Republicans joined ten Democrats on the Senate Judiciary Committee to pass broad immigration reform legislation. Next it goes to full Senate. The bill would bring the biggest changes in US immigration policy in years:There's a thirteen year path to citizenship for immigrants here illegally, plus more border security and new rules for both high and low skilled workers seeking jobs in this country. Critics of the bill say it gives illegal immigrants an unfair advantage over those who have played by the rules. They also say the changes will mean fewer jobs for American citizens. Please join us to discuss prospects for immigration reform.

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The Role Of The Federal Government In Disaster Relief

2013-05-22
Length: 51s

Following the devastating tornado in Oklahoma, the federal government is stepping in. A look at disaster assistance and the politics of relief.

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Charles Moore: "Margaret Thatcher"

2013-05-22
Length: 51s

Charles Moore, the author of Margaret Thatcher's authorized biography, joins us to discuss his new book.

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The Intersection Of Political Influence And Journalism

2013-05-21
Length: 51s

In recent years, federal funding for public broadcasting has fallen to record lows. Many broadcasters have turned to wealthy donors to fill the gap. In 2006, billionaire industrialist David Koch joined the board of WNET, New York's PBS affiliate. Last fall, the station aired a documentary titled, "Park Avenue: Money, Power and the American Dream," which contrasted ultra-rich residents of the Upper East Side with their Bronx counterparts. In an article for The New Yorker magazine out this week, investigative journalist Jane Mayer chronicles the fate of that movie and another documentary produced for PBS. Diane talks with Mayer about the questions her article raises about the influence of big money on public media outlets.

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Olympia Snowe: "Fighting For Common Ground: How We Can Fix The Stalemate In Congress"

2013-05-21
Length: 51s

For the last few years, Congress's approval ratings have been dismal. A Gallup poll last month showed only 15 percent of Americans approve of how Congress is doing its job. Seventy-nine percent disapprove. Olympia Snowe is fed up with Congress, too. After 18 years in the U.S. Senate, the Maine Republican called it quits. When she announced she would not seek re-election in 2012, she cited increasingly partisan politics as a major factor. In her new political memoir, she tells how she went from being an orphan at age 9 to a GOP lawmaker known for reaching across the aisle. Her take on what's wrong with Congress and how to fix it.

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Jessica Buchanan & Erik Landemalm: "Impossible Odds: The Kidnapping Of Jessica Buchanan...

2013-05-20
Length: 51s

The rescue of an American aid worker kidnapped in Somalia. The story of her ordeal and why she intends to return to Africa.

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Debate Over Ending Lifetime Alimony

2013-05-20
Length: 51s

Lifetime alimony payments may soon be a relic of the past. A growing number of states are considering laws that would generally end permanent spousal support. Instead, they would create formulas to determine the amount and duration of awards. Some proponents of alimony-law reform are seeking to make the elimination of permanent alimony retroactive. The proposals have triggered heated debate: payers who criticize what they call unjust and outdated awards are pitted against family law attorneys who say the measures are punitive to women. One twist: an increasing number of those seeking reform are women who out-earn their ex-husbands. Diane and her guests discuss the future of alimony.

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Taking The Pulse Of The U.S. Economy (Rebroadcast)

2013-05-19
Length: 52s

The U.S. economy has been showing some positive signs: the stock market is up. House prices in many places are higher than they've been for seven years. The number of new workers seeking unemployment benefits has declined, and the deficit is smaller this year compared to last. But there are still more than 12 million Americans looking for work. Current deficit numbers may delay the next political showdown over the raising the debt limit, but that battle is still coming, and there is no sign that the White House and Congress will be able to agree on plan that supports long term growth. Please join us to discuss what's ahead for the U.S. economy.

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Friday News Roundup - Domestic

2013-05-17
Length: 51s

The acting chief of the Internal Revenue Service is forced to resign. President Barack Obama goes on the offensive over political scandals. And the federal budget deficit is shrinking. A panel of journalists joins Diane for analysis of the week's top national news stories.

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Friday News Roundup - International

2013-05-17
Length: 51s

The U.N. passes a resolution for a transitional government in Syria. Russia expels a suspected U.S. spy. And Nawaz Sharif is elected prime minister of Pakistan again. A panel of journalists joins Diane for analysis of the week's top international news stories.

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Scientific Advances In Prosthetic Limbs

2013-05-16
Length: 51s

An estimated 2 million Americans have had an arm or leg amputated from injury or illness. Many chose to wear prosthetic limbs. Ten years ago, most artificial arms and legs were clunky and fragile. But prosthetic technology has advanced significantly since then. A vast body of research gained from treating American soldiers wounded in Iraq and Afghanistan has led to robotic knees and ankles that adjust to terrain and activity. Leg amputees now run marathons, climb mountains and even skydive. And a new bionic arm powered by the thoughts of the person wearing it can mimic almost all the movements of a real hand.

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The Department Of Justice, National Security And Freedom Of The Press

2013-05-16
Length: 51s

The Obama administration is under fire. Addressing one of several controversies, the president asked for the resignation of the head of the Internal Revenue Service. The tax agency is accused of targeting some conservative groups for extra scrutiny. In another political scandal, the Justice Department disclosed it seized phone records of the Associated Press without first informing the news agency. The seizure is said to be part of an investigation into a leak about a counter-terrorism operation in Yemen. Media and First Amendment groups reacted strongly, calling it an abuse of power. Diane and guests discuss the Justice Department's actions, press freedom and national security.

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Qais Akbar Omar: "A Fort Of Nine Towers: An Afghan Family Story"

2013-05-15
Length: 51s

A memoir of growing up in Afghanistan. From civil war to Taliban rule, the journey one family takes across Afghanistan as they attempt to flee decades of violence and turmoil in their homeland.

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Tax Exempt Status: Which Organizations Qualify And Why

2013-05-15
Length: 51s

The Justice Department has opened a criminal probe into reports that the Internal Revenue Service gave special and unwarranted scrutiny to tax exempt applications made by conservative groups. According to a Treasury Inspector General report the practice began in early 2010. The groups in question had applied for tax exempt status as 501C-4s. These types of organizations can be set up to pursue primarily social welfare objectives but are allowed to engage in some political activity. The agency has apologized for the incidents and says it's taken corrective action, but more changes will probably be required. Please join us to talk about tax exempt status at the IRS.

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Dr. Allen Frances: "Saving Normal: An Insider's Revolt Against Out-Of-Control...

2013-05-14
Length: 51s

There are no laboratory tests for psychiatry, no bright lines to say who is sick and who is well. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, or DSM, has come to be regarded as the bible of psychiatric diagnosis. First published in 1952 and revised several times since then, it improved the reliability of subjective diagnoses. But Dr. Allen Frances says it's also had harmful unintended consequences. He was once dubbed "the most powerful psychiatrist in America" by The New York Times. Now he says the DSM has contributed to psychiatric fads, diagnostic inflation and over-medication. He believes the latest version threatens to turn everyday living into psychiatric disease. He joins Diane to discuss his new book, "Saving Normal," and how to rein in psychiatry and drug companies.

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Ongoing Controversy Over The Deadly Attack In Benghazi

2013-05-14
Length: 51s

On Sept. 11, 2012, the U.S. diplomatic post in Benghazi, Libya, was attacked. Four Americans died, including Ambassador Christopher Stevens. In the days and months following the deadly attack, the Obama administration has been criticized by Republicans for its handling of the tragedy. U.N. Ambassador Susan Rice withdrew her name from consideration for Secretary of State, and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton testified before Congress. But Republicans have continued to press the issue, saying the White House misled the American people. The administration denies any wrongdoing. Diane and guests discuss the ongoing controversy over the Benghazi tragedy.

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Edna O'Brien: "Country Girl: A Memoir"

2013-05-13
Length: 51s

In 1960, Edna O'Brien published "The Country Girl," her first novel. Considered scandalous at the time, the book was burned by priests throughout her native Ireland. Undeterred, she spent the next 50 years creating a body of work that stands among the best writing of the 20th century. Diane talks with Edna O'Brien about her often lonely life and the work that sustained her.

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Taking The Pulse Of The U.S. Economy

2013-05-13
Length: 51s

The stock market, consumer spending, housing prices and better-than-expected job numbers: taking the pulse of the U.S. economy.

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Sexual Assault In The Military (Rebroadcast)

2013-05-12
Length: 52s

A new report indicates sexual assault cases in the military increased more than 30 percent in two years. Diane and guests discuss pressures on the Pentagon to prosecute offenders and prevent future crimes.

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Friday News Roundup - Domestic

2013-05-10
Length: 51s

President Barack Obama traveled to Austin, Texas, yesterday to spotlight manufacturing success stories there. He blamed Congress for hampering the economy by blocking his jobs proposals. Boston police officials told a House committee the FBI never informed them that Russia was concerned about the bombing suspect's older brother. A former high-ranking State Department official gave emotional testimony to a House hearing on the Benghazi tragedy. Republican senators pushed for hundreds of border security amendments to the proposed immigration bill. And officials said they might seek the death penalty for the suspect in the kidnapping of three Cleveland women. A panel of journalists joins Diane for a discussion of the week's top national stories.

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Friday News Roundup - International

2013-05-10
Length: 51s

The U.S. and Russia lay the groundwork for Syrian diplomacy. A political kidnapping in Pakistan ahead of elections. And another garment industry tragedy occurs in Bangladesh. A panel of journalists joins Diane for analysis of the week's top international news stories.

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Sexual Assault In The Military

2013-05-09
Length: 51s

A new report indicates sexual assault cases in the military increased more than 30 percent in two years. Diane and guests discuss pressures on the Pentagon to prosecute offenders and prevent future crimes.

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Jaron Lanier: "Who Owns The Future?"

2013-05-09
Length: 51s

Digital technology networks like Facebook, Twitter and Google are estimated to be worth billions of dollars. Yet these ventures employ vastly fewer people than the big companies of the past. Jaron Lanier is a computer scientist who helped create Silicon Valley start-ups that are now part of these companies. But he argues these digital networks enrich relatively few people and do not enlarge the overall economy. In his new book, "Who Owns the Future?," Lanier lays out his vision for how the middle class could benefit more from the new information economy.

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Who Benefits From College And Why

2013-05-08
Length: 51s

New research suggests the college-for-all approach needs revision. Understanding who benefits from college and why.

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Maya Angelou: "Mom & Me & Mom"

2013-05-08
Length: 51s

Maya Angelou is one of the most distinguished poets, authors and playwrights of our time. Born in Saint Louis, Angelou's parents had a difficult marriage and separated after just a few years. She and her brother were sent away to be raised by their grandmother in Arkansas. At 13, she was sent back to live with her mother, Vivian Baxter, who ran a gambling business in San Francisco. In a new memoir, Angelou writes for the first time about the fraught relationship she had with her mother after their reunion. It's a story of forgiveness, healing and reconciliation.

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Preventing Terrorism In The Digital Age

2013-05-07
Length: 51s

The surviving Boston bombing suspect told investigators he and his brother learned to build bombs from online sources. Terrorism in the digital age.

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Environmental Outlook: Stink Bugs

2013-05-07
Length: 51s

Scientists are warning farmers and homeowners to gear up for battle with the invasive insect known as the brown marmorated stink bug. The number of adult bugs overwintering increased 60 percent in late 2012, and now they're emerging to lay eggs. The shield-shaped, brown speckled insect probably arrived as a stowaway on a ship from Asia. First seen in Pennsylvania in the 1990s, it's since been spotted in 40 states. Stink bugs get their name from the pungent smell emitted when they are frightened or crushed. For this month's Environmental Outlook, entomologists reveal the secrets of stinkbugs and talk about the search for sustainable methods of control.

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World Bank President Jim Yong Kim

2013-05-06
Length: 51s

The World Bank says 20 of the most troubled countries are making progress. Poverty has been reduced, more girls are being educated and fewer women are dying in childbirth. The good news came in a new report on the so-called Millennium Development Goal. But when looking at the world's poorest nations, much of the news remains discouraging. And with the U.S. and Europe still trying to recover from their own economic troubles, resources for the world's poor are even more strained. But the World Bank's president believes it's possible to end extreme poverty. A conversation with Jim Yong Kim.

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Ongoing Debate Over Fracking Regulation

2013-05-06
Length: 51s

In his 2012 State of the Union address, President Barack Obama claimed America is sitting on a supply of natural gas that could last nearly a century. Those who support hydraulic fracturing — or fracking — to extract that natural gas from shale say it could make the U.S energy independent. Others worry about what the prospect of excessive development from drilling could mean for their local communities. Most everyone agrees that fracking needs some level of regulation, but questions remain about how much regulation is too much and what controls are realistic. The ongoing debate over fracking and its impact on U.S. energy prices.

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The Growing Demand For Home Health Aides (Rebroadcast)

2013-05-05
Length: 52s

An estimated 2.5 million people work as in-home health and personal aides for the elderly and disabled in this country. Tasks include helping with meals and bathing, light cleaning and companionship. These services can allow an elderly person to postpone or avoid costlier nursing home care. As baby boomers age, demand for this kind of care is projected to rise significantly. But in many states, in-home health care providers earn less than minimum wage and are not entitled to overtime. What the shortage of caregivers means for patients, their families and the home health care industry.

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Friday News Roundup - Domestic

2013-05-03
Length: 51s

President Barack Obama renews calls to close Guantanamo. Criminal charges are filed against three friends of the Boston bombing suspect. And the latest housing and unemployment numbers. A panel of journalists provides analysis of the week's top national news stories.

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Friday News Roundup - International

2013-05-03
Length: 51s

The U.S. says it's considering arming rebels in Syria. President Barack Obama talks trade and other issues with his counterpart in Mexico. Iraq is hit with the worst violence in five years. Afghanistan's president admits to receiving bags of cash from the CIA over the past decade. Bangladesh makes more arrests in the factory collapse that killed hundreds. The U.S. demands North Korea release an American citizen sentenced to 15 years of hard labor for unspecified "hostile acts." And Europe's central bank cuts a key interest rate as the region struggles with recession. Guest host Steve Roberts and a panel of journalists provide analysis of the week's top international news stories.

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Death Penalty

2013-05-02
Length: 51s

Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley is expected to sign a bill today that would abolish the death penalty. This makes Maryland the sixth state in the last six years to repeal capital punishment. New Mexico, Illinois, New York, New Jersey and Connecticut have abolished capital punishment and other states, including Nebraska and Delaware have considered similar reforms. There is growing unease among lawmakers across the country that the risk of putting an innocent person to death remains too great. But many argue that the death penalty remains a worthwhile deterrent to violent crime.

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Comfort Dogs

2013-05-02
Length: 51s

In the aftermath of recent tragedies, specially trained dogs have been sent to provide comfort. Diane and her guests discuss why canines are uniquely suited for the job.

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The Growing Demand For Home Health Aides

2013-05-01
Length: 51s

An estimated 2.5 million people work as in-home health and personal aides for the elderly and disabled in this country. Tasks include helping with meals and bathing, light cleaning and companionship. These services can allow an elderly person to postpone or avoid costlier nursing home care. As baby boomers age, demand for this kind of care is projected to rise significantly. But in many states, in-home health care providers earn less than minimum wage and are not entitled to overtime. What the shortage of caregivers means for patients, their families and the home health care industry.

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Paul Farmer: "To Repair the World: Paul Farmer Speaks to the Next Generation"

2013-05-01
Length: 51s

Diane speaks with renowned physician and social activist Paul Farmer. In his latest book, he encourages young people to tackle the greatest challenges of our times, from global health and poverty to climate change.

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Nathaniel Philbrick: "Bunker Hill"

2013-04-30
Length: 51s

In 1775, Boston was a city of 15,000 people packed into a one-mile island. King George was tightening his grip on the colony with new taxes and blockades. British soldiers occupied the city, angering the colonists. And vigilantes roamed the streets, exacting their own justice. In June, the tension exploded at Bunker Hill, one of several unoccupied peaks outside the city. In the bloodiest clash of the Revolutionary War, an unlikely group of citizen soldiers wiped out half the British forces. Their courageous stand changed the course of the American Revolution. From the bestselling author of "Mayflower," a new book on the battle of Bunker Hill.

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Chemical Weapons In Syria And Calls For U.S. Intervention

2013-04-30
Length: 51s

Evidence that Syria has used chemical weapons against its people puts new pressure on the Obama administration to respond.

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William Friedkin: "The Friedkin Connection: A Memoir"

2013-04-29
Length: 51s

Not many films have changed the American cinematic landscape. But "The French Connection" can make that claim. The 1971 classic, with its handheld documentary style and legendary car chase, became the standard for on-screen authenticity. Its director, William Friedkin, is still going strong at age 77. Though his career stalled for a time after making "The Exorcist," he's enjoying a late renaissance. His 2011 horror-thriller "Killer Joe" garnered some of the best reviews of his five-decade career. And now he's enjoying a second calling: directing opera. Diane talks with Academy Award-winning director William Friedkin about his life and career.

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Hunger Strike At Guantanamo Prison

2013-04-29
Length: 51s

More than half the detainees at the U.S. military prison in Guantanamo are on a hunger strike. Their lawyers as well as military officials say the protest reflects the level of despair felt by the prisoners there. Set up under President George W. Bush to hold terror suspects after 9/11, the prison today incarcerates 166 men. Most of them have never been charged with a crime. Detainee advocates want President Barack Obama to make good on his promise to close the Guantanamo facility. But others argue the detainees pose a national security threat — even those who have been cleared for transfer to their home countries. A discussion of the future of Guantanamo's detainees.

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David Rohde: "Beyond War: Reimagining American Influence In A New Middle East"...

2013-04-28

Two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter David Rohde spent eight years covering Afghanistan and Pakistan. For seven months of that time he was held captive by the Taliban. In a new book, he argues our experience in Iraq and Afghanistan clearly underscores the limits of military power. What's needed, he says, is not military force but support for economic growth, the kind of support we used to regularly deliver through USAID and other civilian institutions. Veteran foreign affairs columnist David Rohde on the urgent need for traditional American diplomacy, how the Islamic world is changing and what these shifts mean for U.S. strategy.

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Friday News Roundup - Domestic

2013-04-26
Length: 51s

Frustration over sequester-related air travel problems. The latest on the Boston bombing investigation. And five presidents help dedicate the George W. Bush presidential library. Journalists provide analysis of the week's national headlines.

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Friday News Roundup - International

2013-04-26

The U.S. is pressing for a comprehensive United Nations investigation of chemical weapons use in Syria. Canada foils a terror plot to derail a passenger train. And the deadly collapse of a garment factory in Bangladesh. A panel of journalists provides analysis of the week's top international news stories.

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Tim Gallagher: "Imperial Dreams: Tracking the Imperial Woodpecker Through the Wild Sierra...

2013-04-25
Length: 51s

Naturalist Tim Gallagher is obsessed with rare birds. A decade ago, the editor-in-chief of "Living Bird," the magazine of the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, joined Diane to talk about his rediscovery of the legendary ivory-billed woodpecker. Now, Gallagher relays his current pursuit to save the giant imperial woodpecker of Mexico's Sierra Madre Mountains. No one knows whether this rare bird is extinct. Gallagher describes his dangerous expedition into this remote region of Geronimo and Pancho Villa where he dodged armed drug traffickers and kidnappers.

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Debate Over Taxing Internet Sales

2013-04-25
Length: 51s

The Senate is likely to move ahead this week on a bill that would allow states to tax Internet sales. All but four states require brick and mortar retailers to charge their customers sales tax. Online retailers have been exempt. Customers who buy on the internet are supposed to be keeping track of their on-line purchases and paying taxes due on their own, but this happens rarely. Opponents of the law argue it would be an administrative nightmare for small online sellers to comply with the all the different state sales tax rules and an added expense for consumers. Please join us to discuss the pros and cons of taxing internet sales.

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Readers' Review: T.S. Eliot's "Four Quartets"

2013-04-24
Length: 51s

By the late 1920s, poet T.S. Eliot was regarded as one of the great literary figures of the day. His "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" and "The Waste Land" were widely read and admired. But Eliot's personal life was in turmoil. His marriage to a depressed woman was unraveling and he began a spiritual journey that led to religious conversion. As Europe moved toward war, Eliot wrote the first poem of what would later become "Four Quartets." Inspired by Beethoven, every poem contained imagery of four seasons and four elements. Each was a complex meditation on time, redemption and eternity. For this month's Readers' Review: Diane and guests discuss T.S. Eliot's "Four Quartets."

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Federal Aviation Administration Furloughs And Flight Delays

2013-04-24

Federal Aviation Administration furloughs of air traffic controllers are causing flight delays across the country. Diane and her guests discuss how the fight over budget cuts is affecting air travel.

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David Rohde: "Beyond War: Reimagining American Influence In A New Middle East"

2013-04-23

Two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter David Rohde spent eight years covering Afghanistan and Pakistan. For seven months of that time he was held captive by the Taliban. In a new book, he argues our experience in Iraq and Afghanistan clearly underscores the limits of military power. What's needed, he says, is not military force but support for economic growth, the kind of support we used to regularly deliver through USAID and other civilian institutions. Veteran foreign affairs columnist David Rohde on the urgent need for traditional American diplomacy, how the Islamic world is changing and what these shifts mean for U.S. strategy.

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Fertilizer Plant Safety And Oversight

2013-04-23
Length: 51s

The fertilizer plant explosion in West, Texas, raises questions about the safety of similar facilities around the country. Concerns over how fertilizer plants are regulated and risks to the public.

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Meg Wolitzer: "The Interestings"

2013-04-22
Length: 51s

Few people who show early talent go on to achieve stellar success. But their lives can be rich and wonderful nonetheless. That's one of the messages of a new novel that spans four decades. It all begins when six teenagers become friends at an artsy summer camp in New England's Berkshire Mountains. It's the summer that President Richard Nixon resigns and the teens declare themselves special. The future awaits them with all the promises and pitfalls a fully lived life has to offer. From the '70s to the present, the zeitgeist of each decade is woven into the story. A novel about love, luck, tragedy and talent.

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Latest Developments In Boston Bombing Case

2013-04-22
Length: 51s

A panel of experts joins Diane for an update on the Boston Marathon bombers and what the deadly incident could mean for keeping Americans safe.

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A Conversation With Investigative Journalist David Corn (Rebroadcast)

2013-04-21
Length: 52s

David Corn has been an investigative journalist for more than 20 years. During the recent presidential election, Corn published the now-infamous "47 percent" video of Republican candidate Mitt Romney. Now, Corn has another secret tape: this one of Kentucky Republican Sen. Mitch McConnell. He's heard talking about using damaging personal information against would-be candidate Ashley Judd. McConnell has called the tape an invasion of privacy, but Corn insists it was obtained legally and he won't reveal his source. Diane talks with Mother Jones' Washington Bureau Chief David Corn about the Romney and McConnell tapes and investigative reporting in the digital age.

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Friday News Roundup - Domestic

2013-04-19
Length: 51s

The Senate rejects gun control measures. A fertilizer plant in Texas explodes. And an update on the Boston marathon bombing.

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Friday News Roundup - International

2013-04-19
Length: 51s

North Korea sets preconditions for talks. Results of Venezuela's presidential election are disputed. And former Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf flees after an order for his arrest.

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David Rothenberg: "Bug Music: How Insects Gave Us Rhythm and Noise"

2013-04-18
Length: 51s

Any day now, cicadas in the northeastern United States will again emerge from their 17-year cycle. The deafening sound upon their arrival is familiar to many people — and often a nostalgic reminder of sweltering summer evenings. Musician and professor David Rothenberg can't wait for the cicadas. He has spent the last few years studying and playing duets with cicadas, crickets and beetles. In his other books he explored why birds sing and whale songs. Now he examines the rhythm and noise of insects and their influence on human music. His new book and CD are called "Bug Music."

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Texas Fertilizer Plant Explosion, Boston Bombings And Ricin Letters

2013-04-18

The nation has experienced its share of tragedy this week. The Boston Marathon bombings that killed three people and injured scores. A scare from suspicious letters that reminded people of the anthrax poisonings shortly after 9/11. And last night a fire and massive explosion at a fertilizer plant in the town of West, Texas. More than a dozen people are believed to have died and 160 injured. Authorities are treating the plant as a crime scene until more is known. No connection has been found among the explosions in Boston and Texas and the suspicious letters. Diane and her guests discuss the latest on the tragedies and investigations.

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Clinical Trials And Premature Babies

2013-04-17

The decision to be part of a clinical trial isn't an easy one, but it's an especially hard decision for parents. Thousands of families agreed to allow their premature babies to take part in a government-funded study. Now, a federal agency has found that a number of major universities failed to tell them that the study of oxygen levels for their very premature babies could cause blindness or death. The study's designers say that the risk of blindness should have been more clearly explained, but that the infants were within the standard of care. Others say the lack of disclosure was unethical. Diane and guests discuss balancing the risks and benefits of clinical trials.

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The Latest On The Boston Investigation And The Limits Of Security

2013-04-17

Profound sadness and unanswered questions mark reactions to Monday's deadly explosions near the finish of the Boston Marathon. Three people died and dozens more were critically wounded. The FBI and Boston police are appealing to the public to share any and all images and recollections which could be helpful in the investigation. Some clues have emerged, but experts warn breakthroughs in the case may be hard to come by. Meanwhile security procedures in public places around the country are being reviewed. Please join us for an update on the investigation and a discussion on assessing risk and summoning resilience in the face of trauma.

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Cass Sunstein: "Simpler: The Future of Government"

2013-04-16

From 2009 to 2012, Cass Sunstein was administrator of the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, known as OIRA. As President Obama's "regulatory czar," he oversaw nearly 2,000 new rules, from fuel efficiency standards and the redesign of the food pyramid to health care and Wall Street reform. In a new book, he says efforts to simplify and scale back regulation in the president's first term resulted in net benefits of $91.3 billion dollars in net benefits for the American public. He joins Diane to explain why simplification is the key to the future of government.

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Explosions In Boston

2013-04-16
Length: 51s

The FBI is leading the investigation into explosions that killed three and injured about 140 people near the finish line of the Boston Marathon. A number of blocks in downtown Boston are being searched for clues. At the time of the blasts, the area was crowded with spectators and runners in what has traditionally been a day of celebration and pride in the city. In remarks last night, President Barack Obama pledged to put the full resources of the federal government behind the investigation. But many also warn not to rush to judgment. Diane and her guests discuss questions on the day after the deadly explosions in Boston.

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A Conversation With Investigative Journalist David Corn

2013-04-15
Length: 51s

David Corn has been an investigative journalist for more than 20 years. During the recent presidential election, Corn published the now-infamous "47 percent" video of Republican candidate Mitt Romney. Now, Corn has another secret tape: this one of Kentucky Republican Sen. Mitch McConnell. He's heard talking about using damaging personal information against would-be candidate Ashley Judd. McConnell has called the tape an invasion of privacy, but Corn insists it was obtained legally and he won't reveal his source. Diane talks with Mother Jones' Washington Bureau Chief David Corn about the Romney and McConnell tapes and investigative reporting in the digital age.

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Growing Presence Of Police In Schools

2013-04-15
Length: 51s

Placing armed guards in schools around the country is just one idea contained in proposed gun legislation. Diane and guests discuss the effects on students and teachers.

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Dan Jones: "The Plantagenets: The Warrior Kings and Queens Who Made England" (Rebroadcast)

2013-04-14

Despite its longevity, the English crown has had few enduring dynasties. Even Britain's most famous royal family, the Tudors, stayed on the throne for just over a century. But the Plantagenets — who directly preceded the Tudors — reigned longer than any family before or since. From 1154 to 1399, eight generations of Plantagenet kings and queens ruled England in unbroken succession. Their names are legendary: Eleanor of Aquitaine, Richard the Lionheart and King John. They transformed a broken kingdom inherited from the Normans into the powerful realm we know today. And they created institutions we regard as essentially British, from parliament to Magna Carta. Diane and her guest, British historian Dan Jones, talk about a new history of the Plantagenet dynasty.

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Friday News Roundup - International

2013-04-12

The world braces for a possible missile launch by North Korea. Al-Qaida in Iraq merges with a Syrian rebel group. And the legacy of former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher. A panel of journalists joins Diane for analysis of the week's top international news stories.

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Friday News Roundup - Domestic

2013-04-12
Length: 51s

President Barack Obama offers his 2014 budget plan. The Senate clears the way to debate gun control legislation. And the U.S. Postal Service will continue Saturday delivery. A panel of journalists joins Diane for analysis of the week's top national news stories.

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Sexual Assault On Campus

2013-04-11
Length: 51s

Sexual assault on campus used to be something few people talked about, but not because it wasn't happening. It's estimated that one in five college students is sexually assaulted. Too often victims don't get help and alleged perpetrators are never charged. But this may change: the Violence Against Women Act includes a provision to address sexual assault on campus. And activists are increasingly using social media to connect with each other and share information on how Title IX of the Civil Rights Act can be applied to college rape cases.

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Assessing The North Korean Threat

2013-04-11
Length: 51s

North Korea continues to warn of nuclear war and has advised foreigners to leave South Korea. A panel of experts joins Diane to assess the North Korean threat.

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Carol Burnett: "Carrie and Me: A Mother-Daughter Love Story"

2013-04-10
Length: 51s

Even after The Carol Burnett Show ended its 11-year run, Carol Burnett did anything but slow down. She starred on television and performed on Broadway. Burnett also wrote a play with her daughter, Carrie Hamilton, which opened in 2002. But its debut came at a difficult time for Burnett. Not long before, Carrie passed away. Carrie had a turbulent childhood, addicted to drugs and she was in and out of rehab. But once sober and in college, Carrie found that like her mother, she had a talent for performing. Burnett's new memoir is part of a promise Carrie asked of her mother before dying. Carol Burnett joins Diane to talk about being a mother, losing a daughter and her decades-long career.

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President Obama's 2014 Budget Proposal

2013-04-10
Length: 51s

President Barack Obama's 2014 budget includes a plan to slow the growth of Social Security and other federal benefits. Join us to discuss the details of the proposal and prospects for compromise with Congress.

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Dan Jones: "The Plantagenets: The Warrior Kings and Queens Who Made England"

2013-04-09
Length: 51s

Despite its longevity, the English crown has had few enduring dynasties. Even Britain's most famous royal family, the Tudors, stayed on the throne for just over a century. But the Plantagenets — who directly preceded the Tudors — reigned longer than any family before or since. From 1154 to 1399, eight generations of Plantagenet kings and queens ruled England in unbroken succession. Their names are legendary: Eleanor of Aquitaine, Richard the Lionheart and King John. They transformed a broken kingdom inherited from the Normans into the powerful realm we know today. And they created institutions we regard as essentially British, from parliament to Magna Carta. Diane and her guest, British historian Dan Jones, talk about a new history of the Plantagenet dynasty.

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New Research On Red Meat And Heart Disease

2013-04-09
Length: 51s

Heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide. An estimated 80 million Americans have one or more types of the deadly disease. For many years, numerous studies stressed the link between a diet high in saturated fat and cholesterol with hardening of the arteries. But critics of these studies doubted they had found the true dietary cause. Now, new research from doctors at the Cleveland Clinic finds that a compound in red meat and supplements leads to higher heart disease risk. For our Mind and Body Series: the latest research on red meat and what it might mean for heart disease treatment and prevention.

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Adam Grant: "Give and Take"

2013-04-08
Length: 51s

A Wharton school professor re-examines what it takes to succeed and finds many misconceptions. What we can learn from people who are both extremely giving and extremely successful.

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States And The Debate Over Abortion Rights

2013-04-08
Length: 51s

A handful of states from North Dakota to Alabama recently passed laws limiting abortion rights. But Washington State is considering requiring health insurers to cover the procedure. A look at states and the debate over abortion rights.

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David Stockman: "The Great Deformation" (Rebroadcast)

2013-04-07
Length: 52s

David Stockman, the former budget director under President Ronald Reagan, says the economy will not improve until the United States rethinks its habits of borrowing, spending and money printing. His new book, "The Great Deformation: The Corruption of Capitalism in America," argues that Washington has enabled Wall Street to fuel financial bubbles and alter the markets, all while crushing middle class families.

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Friday News Roundup - Domestic

2013-04-05

Connecticut passes strict new gun laws. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel tells the Pentagon to brace for spending cuts. And the latest unemployment numbers are released. A panel of journalists joins guest host Susan Page for analysis of the week's top national news stories.

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Friday News Roundup - International

2013-04-05
Length: 51s

North Korean threats prompt the U.S. to boost missile defenses in the Pacific. Syria's civil war claims a record 6,000 lives in March. And the U.N. adopts a global arms trade treaty. A panel of journalists joins guest host Susan Page for analysis of the week's top international news stories.

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Mandatory Minimum Sentencing

2013-04-04

Mandatory minimum sentencing has been part of the government's war on drugs, but critics say it's not working. A panel joins guest host Susan Page to discuss new efforts to give judges more discretion.

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Steven Harper: "The Lawyer Bubble"

2013-04-04

In his new book, "The Lawyer Bubble", former 30-year litigator Steven Harper says there are too many lawyers, too few jobs and too much emphasis on profits. He joins guest host Susan Page.

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Mapping The Human Brain

2013-04-03
Length: 51s

President Barack Obama announced a new multi-year research initiative to map the human brain. He compared its potential to that of the Human Genome Project. Scientists hope the brain project will eventually lead to solutions to diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's and better treatments for a range of mental illnesses. The National Institutes of Health will coordinate the project. The president wants Congress to approve $100 million in initial funding. Some critics argue the money could be better spent on smaller grants to a number of brain research projects with specific goals. But many scientists are enthusiastic. Join Diane and NIH Director Francis Collins for a discussion on mapping the human brain.

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David Stockman: "The Great Deformation"

2013-04-03

David Stockman, the former budget director under President Ronald Reagan, says the economy will not improve until the United States rethinks its habits of borrowing, spending and money printing. His new book, "The Great Deformation: The Corruption of Capitalism in America," argues that Washington has enabled Wall Street to fuel financial bubbles and alter the markets, all while crushing middle class families.

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Dan Fagin: "Toms River: A Story of Science and Salvation"

2013-04-02
Length: 51s

Before the mid-20th century, the most exciting thing to happen in Toms River, N.J., was the American Revolution. Before the war, the coastal village's inlet was a popular haven for small-time pirates. But the arrival of the chemical industry ushered in a decades-long drama, culminating in one of the largest legal settlements in the history of toxic dumping. Toms River became home to a cluster of childhood cancers linked to local air and water pollution. Journalist Dan Fagin spent five years uncovering an account of rampant pollution and inadequate oversight. He says the town's story is a cautionary tale for fast-growing industrial towns from South Jersey to China. For this month's environmental outlook, Diane and Fagin discuss the story of Toms River.

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The Proposed Keystone XL Pipeline & Ongoing Debate Over US Energy Policy

2013-04-02
Length: 51s

The oil industry and labor unions are pushing the Obama administration to approve the Canada-to-Mexico Keystone pipeline: The ongoing debate over the future of U.S. energy policy.

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Elizabeth Strout: "The Burgess Boys: A Novel"

2013-04-02
Length: 51s

Elizabeth Strout's novel in stories, "Olive Kitteridge," won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction in 2009. Her new novel took more than seven years to research and write. "The Burgess Boys" centers on three middle-aged siblings haunted by their father's accidental death. The guilt of one brother has defined his life, as well as that of his sister, brother, their spouses and children. The brothers fled small town Maine for New York City. But when their sister calls them home, buried family tensions erupt. Her teenaged son is involved in an incident that threatens the peace between the newly arrived Somali community and the locals.

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Update On Gun Control Legislation

2013-04-02
Length: 51s

Three months have passed since the killing of 20 schoolchildren and six adults in Newtown, Conn. And already the sense of urgency for new gun control legislation is waning. President Barack Obama's top agenda item, a ban on assault-style weapons, isn't likely to survive in the Senate. A proposal to expand background checks also appears doubtful. And news that the Newtown shooter massacred two dozen people in five minutes may not be enough to save an amendment banning high-capacity magazines. But while it seems not much has changed, there may be long-term hope for gun control advocates: since December, real money is beginning to flow to counter the gun lobby. Diane and her guests discuss the latest on gun control laws.

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Understanding International Tax Havens (Rebroadcast)

2013-04-02
Length: 52s

The crisis in Cyprus sheds a light on how investors shelter their wealth. A panel joins Diane to explain how tax havens work and their effect on economies around the world.

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Friday News Roundup - Domestic

2013-04-02
Length: 51s

President Barack Obama urges lawmakers to pass gun control legislation as Republicans threaten a Senate filibuster. In Connecticut, unsealed search warrants for the Newtown shooter reveal a large stash of weapons and ammunition. The Supreme Court hears arguments in two cases involving same-sex marriage. Questioning by the Justices suggests the Court might strike down DOMA, the Defense of Marriage Act. The so-called "Gang of Eight" senators visits the U.S.-Mexico border. Housing prices reach the highest levels in six years but consumer confidence drops. And North Dakota passes the nation's strictest abortion laws. A panel of journalists joins Diane for analysis of the week's top national news stories.

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The Future Of The CIA

2013-03-29
Length: 51s

The future of the CIA and challenges facing the new director: Questions on drones, interrogation techniques and other clandestine operations.

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Readers' Review: "The Lonely Girl" By Edna O'Brien

2013-03-29
Length: 51s

When the first novel of Edna O'Brien's "Country Girl" trilogy was published in 1960, it was banned — and burned — in her native Ireland. The author's own mother went through the book, blackening all the offending words. Today it's hard to imagine that a series about two Irish girls coming of age could stir up so much moral outrage. The story of Kate and Baba traced their lives from youthful friendship through sexual awakening to marriage. In the trilogy's second book, the pair have moved from the countryside of their childhood to what they hope is a new life in Dublin. But their principles and friendship are tested when Kate falls in love with a married man. Join Diane and her guests for a Readers' Review of Edna O'Brien's "The Lonely Girl."

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Understanding International Tax Havens

2013-03-29
Length: 51s

The crisis in Cyprus sheds a light on how investors shelter their wealth. A panel joins Diane to explain how tax havens work and their effect on economies around the world.

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Help For Families Of Wounded Veterans

2013-03-29
Length: 51s

Hundreds of thousands of American veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars are believed to have some form of post-traumatic stress disorder. As many as 40 percent of returning veterans today report symptoms of combat stress in their relationships with friends and family. As the war in Afghanistan draws down, those numbers are expected to rise. When a combat veteran comes home with PTSD or traumatic brain injury, his — or her — condition can affect the entire family. And while resources for veterans are improving, family members are still too often in the dark about what to do. Diane and guests talk about helping families cope with wounded warriors.

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The Role Of Nurse Practitioners

2013-03-29
Length: 51s

In 18 states, plus the District of Columbia, nurse practitioners are allowed to treat patients and prescribe medications without a doctor's involvement. Lawmakers in a number of other states are pushing for similar changes to so-called "scope of practice" laws that determine what nurse practitioners can do for patients. Proponents argue expanding the roles of nurse practitioners can address what has become a major problem: a shortage of primary care doctors. But many physicians say a team-based approach that includes at least one medical doctor is better for patients. Please join us to discuss the role of nurse practitioners.

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Glenn Frankel: "The Searchers"

2013-03-29
Length: 51s

Life in the 19th century American west was hard. Settlers struggled to farm and feed their families, and Indian tribes fought to keep control of shrinking land. The two sides feared each other and clashed frequently along borders. In 1836, a 9-year-old Texas girl was kidnapped by a Comanche tribe. She lived with them for 24 years before she was recaptured, and her story was told to generations of Texans. In the 1950s, a novel about the abduction, titled "The Searchers," was made into a hit movie starring John Wayne. A new book explores how and why the film changed the story, and its role in shaping myths of the American west.

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Friday News Roundup - International

2013-03-29
Length: 51s

Cyprus banks reopen under tight controls. The Arab League recognizes the Syrian opposition. And a new government crackdown in Egypt. A panel of journalists joins Diane for analysis of the week's top international news stories.

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Peter Andreas: "Smuggler Nation: How Illicit Trade Made America"

2013-03-29
Length: 51s

As Congress continues to hammer out the details of immigration reform, many are demanding measures to regain control of the nation's borders. But a new book argues that politicians suffer from historical amnesia and America's borders have never been secure. In fact, smuggling and porous borders have played a key role in America's birth and economic development, according to a book by Peter Andreas, "Smuggler Nation: How Illicit Trade Made America." Far from being a new danger to the country, the illicit underside of globalization is actually an American tradition.

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Preview Of US Supreme Court Same-Sex Marriage Cases

2013-03-29
Length: 51s

The U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments on two cases that address same-sex marriage: the constitutionality of the Defense of Marriage Act and California's Proposition 8.

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Peter Andreas: "Smuggler Nation: How Illicit Trade Made America"

2013-03-28
Length: 51s

As Congress continues to hammer out the details of immigration reform, many are demanding measures to regain control of the nation's borders. But a new book argues that politicians suffer from historical amnesia and America's borders have never been secure. In fact, smuggling and porous borders have played a key role in America's birth and economic development, according to a book by Peter Andreas, "Smuggler Nation: How Illicit Trade Made America." Far from being a new danger to the country, the illicit underside of globalization is actually an American tradition.

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The Future Of The CIA

2013-03-28
Length: 51s

The future of the CIA and challenges facing the new director: Questions on drones, interrogation techniques and other clandestine operations.

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Glenn Frankel: "The Searchers"

2013-03-28
Length: 51s

Life in the 19th century American west was hard. Settlers struggled to farm and feed their families, and Indian tribes fought to keep control of shrinking land. The two sides feared each other and clashed frequently along borders. In 1836, a 9-year-old Texas girl was kidnapped by a Comanche tribe. She lived with them for 24 years before she was recaptured, and her story was told to generations of Texans. In the 1950s, a novel about the abduction, titled "The Searchers," was made into a hit movie starring John Wayne. A new book explores how and why the film changed the story, and its role in shaping myths of the American west.

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The Future Of The CIA

2013-03-28
Length: 51s

The future of the CIA and challenges facing the new director: Questions on drones, interrogation techniques and other clandestine operations.

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Readers' Review: "The Lonely Girl" By Edna O'Brien

2013-03-28
Length: 51s

When the first novel of Edna O'Brien's "Country Girl" trilogy was published in 1960, it was banned — and burned — in her native Ireland. The author's own mother went through the book, blackening all the offending words. Today it's hard to imagine that a series about two Irish girls coming of age could stir up so much moral outrage. The story of Kate and Baba traced their lives from youthful friendship through sexual awakening to marriage. In the trilogy's second book, the pair have moved from the countryside of their childhood to what they hope is a new life in Dublin. But their principles and friendship are tested when Kate falls in love with a married man. Join Diane and her guests for a Readers' Review of Edna O'Brien's "The Lonely Girl."

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Understanding International Tax Havens

2013-03-28
Length: 51s

The crisis in Cyprus sheds a light on how investors shelter their wealth. A panel joins Diane to explain how tax havens work and their effect on economies around the world.

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Help For Families Of Wounded Veterans

2013-03-28
Length: 51s

Hundreds of thousands of American veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars are believed to have some form of post-traumatic stress disorder. As many as 40 percent of returning veterans today report symptoms of combat stress in their relationships with friends and family. As the war in Afghanistan draws down, those numbers are expected to rise. When a combat veteran comes home with PTSD or traumatic brain injury, his — or her — condition can affect the entire family. And while resources for veterans are improving, family members are still too often in the dark about what to do. Diane and guests talk about helping families cope with wounded warriors.

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Preview Of US Supreme Court Same-Sex Marriage Cases

2013-03-28
Length: 51s

The U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments on two cases that address same-sex marriage: the constitutionality of the Defense of Marriage Act and California's Proposition 8.

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Peter Andreas: "Smuggler Nation: How Illicit Trade Made America"

2013-03-28
Length: 51s

As Congress continues to hammer out the details of immigration reform, many are demanding measures to regain control of the nation's borders. But a new book argues that politicians suffer from historical amnesia and America's borders have never been secure. In fact, smuggling and porous borders have played a key role in America's birth and economic development, according to a book by Peter Andreas, "Smuggler Nation: How Illicit Trade Made America." Far from being a new danger to the country, the illicit underside of globalization is actually an American tradition.

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The Role Of Nurse Practitioners

2013-03-28
Length: 51s

In 18 states, plus the District of Columbia, nurse practitioners are allowed to treat patients and prescribe medications without a doctor's involvement. Lawmakers in a number of other states are pushing for similar changes to so-called "scope of practice" laws that determine what nurse practitioners can do for patients. Proponents argue expanding the roles of nurse practitioners can address what has become a major problem: a shortage of primary care doctors. But many physicians say a team-based approach that includes at least one medical doctor is better for patients. Please join us to discuss the role of nurse practitioners.

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Peter Andreas: "Smuggler Nation: How Illicit Trade Made America"

2013-03-28
Length: 51s

As Congress continues to hammer out the details of immigration reform, many are demanding measures to regain control of the nation's borders. But a new book argues that politicians suffer from historical amnesia and America's borders have never been secure. In fact, smuggling and porous borders have played a key role in America's birth and economic development, according to a book by Peter Andreas, "Smuggler Nation: How Illicit Trade Made America." Far from being a new danger to the country, the illicit underside of globalization is actually an American tradition.

x

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The Future Of The CIA

2013-03-28
Length: 51s

The future of the CIA and challenges facing the new director: Questions on drones, interrogation techniques and other clandestine operations.

x

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Readers' Review: "The Lonely Girl" By Edna O'Brien

2013-03-27
Length: 51s

When the first novel of Edna O'Brien's "Country Girl" trilogy was published in 1960, it was banned — and burned — in her native Ireland. The author's own mother went through the book, blackening all the offending words. Today it's hard to imagine that a series about two Irish girls coming of age could stir up so much moral outrage. The story of Kate and Baba traced their lives from youthful friendship through sexual awakening to marriage. In the trilogy's second book, the pair have moved from the countryside of their childhood to what they hope is a new life in Dublin. But their principles and friendship are tested when Kate falls in love with a married man. Join Diane and her guests for a Readers' Review of Edna O'Brien's "The Lonely Girl."

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Understanding International Tax Havens

2013-03-27
Length: 51s

The crisis in Cyprus sheds a light on how investors shelter their wealth. A panel joins Diane to explain how tax havens work and their effect on economies around the world.

x

Share: Understanding International Tax Havens


Help For Families Of Wounded Veterans

2013-03-27
Length: 51s

Hundreds of thousands of American veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars are believed to have some form of post-traumatic stress disorder. As many as 40 percent of returning veterans today report symptoms of combat stress in their relationships with friends and family. As the war in Afghanistan draws down, those numbers are expected to rise. When a combat veteran comes home with PTSD or traumatic brain injury, his — or her — condition can affect the entire family. And while resources for veterans are improving, family members are still too often in the dark about what to do. Diane and guests talk about helping families cope with wounded warriors.

x

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The Role Of Nurse Practitioners

2013-03-27
Length: 51s

In 18 states, plus the District of Columbia, nurse practitioners are allowed to treat patients and prescribe medications without a doctor's involvement. Lawmakers in a number of other states are pushing for similar changes to so-called "scope of practice" laws that determine what nurse practitioners can do for patients. Proponents argue expanding the roles of nurse practitioners can address what has become a major problem: a shortage of primary care doctors. But many physicians say a team-based approach that includes at least one medical doctor is better for patients. Please join us to discuss the role of nurse practitioners.

x

Share: The Role Of Nurse Practitioners


Glenn Frankel: "The Searchers"

2013-03-27
Length: 51s

Life in the 19th century American west was hard. Settlers struggled to farm and feed their families, and Indian tribes fought to keep control of shrinking land. The two sides feared each other and clashed frequently along borders. In 1836, a 9-year-old Texas girl was kidnapped by a Comanche tribe. She lived with them for 24 years before she was recaptured, and her story was told to generations of Texans. In the 1950s, a novel about the abduction, titled "The Searchers," was made into a hit movie starring John Wayne. A new book explores how and why the film changed the story, and its role in shaping myths of the American west.

x

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Preview Of US Supreme Court Same-Sex Marriage Cases

2013-03-27
Length: 51s

The U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments on two cases that address same-sex marriage: the constitutionality of the Defense of Marriage Act and California's Proposition 8.

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Readers' Review: "The Lonely Girl" By Edna O'Brien

2013-03-27
Length: 51s

When the first novel of Edna O'Brien's "Country Girl" trilogy was published in 1960, it was banned — and burned — in her native Ireland. The author's own mother went through the book, blackening all the offending words. Today it's hard to imagine that a series about two Irish girls coming of age could stir up so much moral outrage. The story of Kate and Baba traced their lives from youthful friendship through sexual awakening to marriage. In the trilogy's second book, the pair have moved from the countryside of their childhood to what they hope is a new life in Dublin. But their principles and friendship are tested when Kate falls in love with a married man. Join Diane and her guests for a Readers' Review of Edna O'Brien's "The Lonely Girl."

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Understanding International Tax Havens

2013-03-27
Length: 51s

The crisis in Cyprus sheds a light on how investors shelter their wealth. A panel joins Diane to explain how tax havens work and their effect on economies around the world.

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Help For Families Of Wounded Veterans

2013-03-27
Length: 51s

Hundreds of thousands of American veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars are believed to have some form of post-traumatic stress disorder. As many as 40 percent of returning veterans today report symptoms of combat stress in their relationships with friends and family. As the war in Afghanistan draws down, those numbers are expected to rise. When a combat veteran comes home with PTSD or traumatic brain injury, his — or her — condition can affect the entire family. And while resources for veterans are improving, family members are still too often in the dark about what to do. Diane and guests talk about helping families cope with wounded warriors.

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The Role Of Nurse Practitioners

2013-03-27
Length: 51s

In 18 states, plus the District of Columbia, nurse practitioners are allowed to treat patients and prescribe medications without a doctor's involvement. Lawmakers in a number of other states are pushing for similar changes to so-called "scope of practice" laws that determine what nurse practitioners can do for patients. Proponents argue expanding the roles of nurse practitioners can address what has become a major problem: a shortage of primary care doctors. But many physicians say a team-based approach that includes at least one medical doctor is better for patients. Please join us to discuss the role of nurse practitioners.

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Readers' Review: "The Lonely Girl" By Edna O'Brien

2013-03-27
Length: 51s

When the first novel of Edna O'Brien's "Country Girl" trilogy was published in 1960, it was banned — and burned — in her native Ireland. The author's own mother went through the book, blackening all the offending words. Today it's hard to imagine that a series about two Irish girls coming of age could stir up so much moral outrage. The story of Kate and Baba traced their lives from youthful friendship through sexual awakening to marriage. In the trilogy's second book, the pair have moved from the countryside of their childhood to what they hope is a new life in Dublin. But their principles and friendship are tested when Kate falls in love with a married man. Join Diane and her guests for a Readers' Review of Edna O'Brien's "The Lonely Girl."

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Understanding International Tax Havens

2013-03-27
Length: 51s

The crisis in Cyprus sheds a light on how investors shelter their wealth. A panel joins Diane to explain how tax havens work and their effect on economies around the world.

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Help For Families Of Wounded Veterans

2013-03-26
Length: 51s

Hundreds of thousands of American veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars are believed to have some form of post-traumatic stress disorder. As many as 40 percent of returning veterans today report symptoms of combat stress in their relationships with friends and family. As the war in Afghanistan draws down, those numbers are expected to rise. When a combat veteran comes home with PTSD or traumatic brain injury, his — or her — condition can affect the entire family. And while resources for veterans are improving, family members are still too often in the dark about what to do. Diane and guests talk about helping families cope with wounded warriors.

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The Role Of Nurse Practitioners

2013-03-26
Length: 51s

In 18 states, plus the District of Columbia, nurse practitioners are allowed to treat patients and prescribe medications without a doctor's involvement. Lawmakers in a number of other states are pushing for similar changes to so-called "scope of practice" laws that determine what nurse practitioners can do for patients. Proponents argue expanding the roles of nurse practitioners can address what has become a major problem: a shortage of primary care doctors. But many physicians say a team-based approach that includes at least one medical doctor is better for patients. Please join us to discuss the role of nurse practitioners.

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Glenn Frankel: "The Searchers"

2013-03-25
Length: 51s

Life in the 19th century American west was hard. Settlers struggled to farm and feed their families, and Indian tribes fought to keep control of shrinking land. The two sides feared each other and clashed frequently along borders. In 1836, a 9-year-old Texas girl was kidnapped by a Comanche tribe. She lived with them for 24 years before she was recaptured, and her story was told to generations of Texans. In the 1950s, a novel about the abduction, titled "The Searchers," was made into a hit movie starring John Wayne. A new book explores how and why the film changed the story, and its role in shaping myths of the American west.

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Glenn Frankel: "The Searchers"

2013-03-25
Length: 51s

Life in the 19th century American west was hard. Settlers struggled to farm and feed their families, and Indian tribes fought to keep control of shrinking land. The two sides feared each other and clashed frequently along borders. In 1836, a 9-year-old Texas girl was kidnapped by a Comanche tribe. She lived with them for 24 years before she was recaptured, and her story was told to generations of Texans. In the 1950s, a novel about the abduction, titled "The Searchers," was made into a hit movie starring John Wayne. A new book explores how and why the film changed the story, and its role in shaping myths of the American west.

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Glenn Frankel: "The Searchers"

2013-03-25
Length: 51s

Life in the 19th century American west was hard. Settlers struggled to farm and feed their families, and Indian tribes fought to keep control of shrinking land. The two sides feared each other and clashed frequently along borders. In 1836, a 9-year-old Texas girl was kidnapped by a Comanche tribe. She lived with them for 24 years before she was recaptured, and her story was told to generations of Texans. In the 1950s, a novel about the abduction, titled "The Searchers," was made into a hit movie starring John Wayne. A new book explores how and why the film changed the story, and its role in shaping myths of the American west.

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Preview Of US Supreme Court Same-Sex Marriage Cases

2013-03-25
Length: 51s

The U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments on two cases that address same-sex marriage: the constitutionality of the Defense of Marriage Act and California's Proposition 8.

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Preview Of US Supreme Court Same-Sex Marriage Cases

2013-03-25
Length: 51s

The U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments on two cases that address same-sex marriage: the constitutionality of the Defense of Marriage Act and California's Proposition 8.

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Preview Of US Supreme Court Same-Sex Marriage Cases

2013-03-25
Length: 51s

The U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments on two cases that address same-sex marriage: the constitutionality of the Defense of Marriage Act and California's Proposition 8.

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Glenn Frankel: "The Searchers"

2013-03-25
Length: 51s

Life in the 19th century American west was hard. Settlers struggled to farm and feed their families, and Indian tribes fought to keep control of shrinking land. The two sides feared each other and clashed frequently along borders. In 1836, a 9-year-old Texas girl was kidnapped by a Comanche tribe. She lived with them for 24 years before she was recaptured, and her story was told to generations of Texans. In the 1950s, a novel about the abduction, titled "The Searchers," was made into a hit movie starring John Wayne. A new book explores how and why the film changed the story, and its role in shaping myths of the American west.

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Preview Of US Supreme Court Same-Sex Marriage Cases

2013-03-25
Length: 51s

The U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments on two cases that address same-sex marriage: the constitutionality of the Defense of Marriage Act and California's Proposition 8.

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Preview Of US Supreme Court Same-Sex Marriage Cases

2013-03-25
Length: 51s

The U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments on two cases that address same-sex marriage: the constitutionality of the Defense of Marriage Act and California's Proposition 8.

x

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Glenn Frankel: "The Searchers"

2013-03-25
Length: 51s

Life in the 19th century American west was hard. Settlers struggled to farm and feed their families, and Indian tribes fought to keep control of shrinking land. The two sides feared each other and clashed frequently along borders. In 1836, a 9-year-old Texas girl was kidnapped by a Comanche tribe. She lived with them for 24 years before she was recaptured, and her story was told to generations of Texans. In the 1950s, a novel about the abduction, titled "The Searchers," was made into a hit movie starring John Wayne. A new book explores how and why the film changed the story, and its role in shaping myths of the American west.

x

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Preview Of US Supreme Court Same-Sex Marriage Cases

2013-03-25
Length: 51s

The U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments on two cases that address same-sex marriage: the constitutionality of the Defense of Marriage Act and California's Proposition 8.

x

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Glenn Frankel: "The Searchers"

2013-03-25
Length: 51s

Life in the 19th century American west was hard. Settlers struggled to farm and feed their families, and Indian tribes fought to keep control of shrinking land. The two sides feared each other and clashed frequently along borders. In 1836, a 9-year-old Texas girl was kidnapped by a Comanche tribe. She lived with them for 24 years before she was recaptured, and her story was told to generations of Texans. In the 1950s, a novel about the abduction, titled "The Searchers," was made into a hit movie starring John Wayne. A new book explores how and why the film changed the story, and its role in shaping myths of the American west.

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Friday News Roundup - International

2013-03-22
Length: 51s

President Barack Obama meets with Israeli and Palestinian leaders. World powers probe unconfirmed reports of a chemical weapons attack in Syria. And banks in Cyprus remain closed. A panel of journalists joins guest host Tom Gjelten for analysis of the week's top international news stories.

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Choosing Efficient And Effective Charities

2013-03-19
Length: 51s

In the late 19th century, the growing wealth inequality of the Gilded Age led to social unrest. Americans began looking to private charities to solve public problems, and later, changes to the U.S. tax code provided financial incentives for donating money. Today, there are more than one million charitable organizations in the U.S., addressing everything from water quality to drug education. These groups now account for 10 percent of the U.S. economy. Critics say charities have little oversight and are not held accountable for measurable results. Major charities insist they are responding to donor calls for transparency. Diane and guests discuss how to choose efficient and effective charities.

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President Obama's Middle East Trip: A Preview

2013-03-19
Length: 51s

Barack Obama is about to begin his first visit to Israel as president. It's also his first foreign trip of his second term. On the itinerary is a stop at Israel's national Holocaust memorial, Yad Vashem. He's also expected to visit the Palestinian-controlled West Bank. While there, he'll tour the Church of the Nativity with President Mahmoud Abbas of the Palestinian Authority. But perhaps most important is the face time he'll have with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. The two leaders have had a rocky relationship and mistrust on both sides is said to be high. Diane and her guests talk about U.S.-relations and what's at stake for the region.

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The Gun Debate In Congress

2013-03-18
Length: 51s

Four gun control measures are on their way to the full Senate in April. They were approved along party lines by the Senate Judiciary Committee in the past two weeks. One bill includes an assault weapons ban and a limit on ammunition magazines. Other proposals would expand background checks and enact tougher laws against firearms trafficking and straw purchases. At the same time, addendums to spending bills could undermine both existing and proposed gun control efforts. Three months after the shooting deaths of 20 first graders in Newtown, Conn., a panel joins Diane to discuss the gun debate in Congress.

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Matthew Goodman: "Eighty Days"

2013-03-18
Length: 51s

In 1873 writer Jules Verne captivated the literary world with his novel, "Around The World In 80 Days". Sixteen years later two young women set off in a real life race of their own. You may have heard of one of them: Nellie Bly. She was an intrepid reporter for Joseph Pulitzer's "The World" newspaper. Chances are you haven't heard of the other. Her name was Elizabeth Bisland. She worked as journalist with "The Cosmopolitan" magazine. In a new book author Mathew Goodman recreates their daring 28,000mile race against time and each other. He joins us to talk about these women and their era.

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Friday News Roundup - Domestic

2013-03-15
Length: 51s

Conservatives are meeting here in Washington for their annual political action conference, and on the agenda is the direction of the GOP. Both parties unveil competing blueprints for the federal budget this week. President Barack Obama meets on Capitol Hill with lawmakers to seek a budget deal, as his approval rating dips below 50 percent. Intelligence chiefs warn that cyberattacks, not terrorism, are the most dangerous threats facing the U.S. A bill banning assault weapons passes the Judiciary Committee but faces strong opposition in the full Senate. And the New York Supreme Court overturns Mayor Michael Bloomberg's ban on big sodas. A panel of journalists joins guest host Susan Page to discuss the week's news.

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Friday News Roundup - International

2013-03-15
Length: 51s

The U.S. commander in Afghanistan cautions troops to brace for violence. The warning comes after a series of anti-American statements by Afghan president Hamid Karzai. Britain and France signal they will arm Syrian rebels unless the European Union lifts a blanket arms embargo of the country. European leaders meeting at a summit in Brussels stick to a course of austerity. China's new president promises to root out corruption in the Communist party. President Barack Obama names a new ambassador to Libya. And Roman Catholics wait to see what course the new pontiff, Pope Francis, will take. A panel of journalists joins guest host Susan Page for analysis of the week's top international news stories.

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Roman Catholics Choose A New Pope

2013-03-14
Length: 51s

The Roman Catholic Church has a new pope. Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio took the name of Francis yesterday at the Vatican as he became the first Jesuit pontiff. Dubbed a conservative with a common touch, the Argentinian is known for his outreach to his country's poor. He's a theological conservative who backs the Vatican's stand on abortion, gay marriage and the ordination of women. The first Latin American pope represents a cultural bridge between two worlds — he's the son of Italian immigrants from the New World, an area that represents a growing segment of the world's billion Roman Catholics. Diane and her guests discuss the challenges facing Pope Francis and the Roman Catholic Church.

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Sheryl Sandberg: "Lean In: Women, Work and the Will to Lead"

2013-03-14
Length: 51s

Growing up in Miami, Fla., Sheryl Sandberg was always at the top of her class. In middle school, she beat high schoolers in a debating contest, and later enrolled at Harvard. After working in government and then at Google, Sandberg joined Facebook. As chief operating officer, she helped lead the social media company to profitability. In a new book, Sandberg writes about her journey to the top of Silicon Valley while balancing a family. She says women hold themselves back from reaching leadership positions and should take more risks. Diane talks with Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg about why women should "lean in" to their careers.

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Dr. Michael Mosley: "The Fast Diet"

2013-03-13
Length: 51s

Fasting has always been part of the world's religious practices. Now it's at the center of a popular new diet. The British physician who developed the two-day-a-week fasting plan says it not only spurs weight loss, but it can reduce the risk of disease. Diane and her guest discuss the benefits of fasting.

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US Foreign Policy Challenges Ahead

2013-03-13
Length: 51s

Foreign policy experts General Brent Scowcroft and Dr Zbigniew Brzezinski discuss the U-S role in Syria, tensions with Iran, and the direction of U-S foreign policy.

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Deborah Hicks: "The Road Out: A Teacher's Odyssey In Poor America"

2013-03-12
Length: 51s

A teacher describes how literature helped a group of girls in an inner-city, white Appalachian ghetto get through the toughest years of adolescence.

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Competing Plans For The Federal Budget

2013-03-12
Length: 51s

Since 1921, the White House has been required to submit a budget. But this year marks the first time that Congress, not the president, will begin the budget process. Republican Congressman Paul Ryan offers his party's budget today. His plan cuts overall spending by nearly five trillion dollars and transforms Medicare and Medicaid. The Ryan budget would also repeal the new health care law. Senator Patty Murray will offer a Senate Democratic version tomorrow, which is expected to call for higher taxes on the wealthy and corporations, and more spending on education and infrastructure. Diane and guests discuss competing visions for the federal budget.

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Lee Sandlin: "Storm Kings: The Untold Story Of America's First Tornado Chasers"

2013-03-11
Length: 51s

Tornadoes have been spotted all around the globe. In the suburbs of Rome in 1749, in Bangladesh, Australia and elsewhere. But nowhere in the world are conditions more perfect for tornadoes than the Central Plains of North America. The Great Tri-state Tornado of 1925 was the deadliest in American history. It killed some 900 people in Missouri, Illinois and Indiana. A new book delves into the history of Americans' relationship with twisters. And new research by the National Severe Storms Lab examines whether climate change is affecting the incidence or severity of tornadoes.

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The Outlook For The US Economy

2013-03-11
Length: 51s

Corporate profits are soaring. The jobless rate is at its lowest level in four years. But sequester cuts loom. Differing views on the outlook for the U.S. economy.

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Friday News Roundup - International

2013-03-08
Length: 51s

North Korea raises threats over new U.N. sanctions. International support grows for Syrian rebels. Venezuelans mourn the death of President Hugo Chavez. A panel of journalists joins Diane for analysis of the week's top international news stories.

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Friday News Roundup - Domestic

2013-03-08
Length: 51s

President Barack Obama courts rank-and-file Republicans. The House votes to avert a government shutdown. The latest jobs numbers are released. A panel of journalists joins Diane for analysis of the week's top national news stories.

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Fighting Deadly Superbugs

2013-03-07
Length: 51s

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are warning about the rise of a so-called "nightmare bacteria" in U.S. hospitals. The director of the CDC calls the Carbapenen-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae — or CRE — bacteria a triple threat. They are resistant to almost all antibiotics, they can transfer their invincibility to other bacteria and they are deadly. Infection with CRE has a fatality rate as high as 50 percent. So far, these infections are still relatively rare. They've only been seen in hospitals and long-term care facilities. But the fear is that they could soon to spread to the wider community, and the proportion of drug-resistant bacteria has quadrupled in the last decade. Diane and her guests discuss the rise of superbugs and how public health officials are trying to stop their spread.

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Taiye Selasi: "Ghana Must Go"

2013-03-07
Length: 51s

Critics say 32-year-old author Taiye Selasi is one of the most exciting new writers. Part Ghanian and part Nigerian, Selasi was raised in London and educated in the United States. This biography is reflected in her new book which spans the globe from Accra, Ghana, to London to New York. It's the story of a successful African immigrant family living in Boston. They seem to be fulfilling the American dream until the father, a surgeon, inexplicably leaves. This sets into motion an unraveling family that's repaired only by a reunion following their father's untimely death. Taiye Selasi joins Diane to discuss her first novel, "Ghana Must Go."

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Syria And The US Role In The Middle East

2013-03-06
Length: 51s

The Obama administration is stepping up support for rebels in Syria's civil war. A panel joins Diane to discuss U.S. leverage in Syria and America's role in the Middle East.

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Venezuela After The Death Of Hugo Chavez

2013-03-06
Length: 51s

Venezuela after Chavez: What the death of the Socialist leader will mean for the country, the region and the U.S.

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Environmental Outlook: Air Pollution In China

2013-03-05
Length: 51s

For this month's Environmental Outlook: China is said to be literally choking on its own success. The World Health Organization says an Air Quality Index rating above 300 is hazardous. The U.S. Embassy in Beijing has a pollution monitor that shows the city regularly exceeds 500. By comparison, the air quality index in Los Angeles is typically in the 20s. Chinese factories operate 24/7 and the prevalence of automobiles has skyrocketed. The worsening pollution impelled the Chinese government to issue an emergency warning about the air in Beijing for the first time. But much more needs to be done. Diane and her guests discuss the air pollution crisis in China.

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Legal Debate Over Doctor-Assisted Suicide

2013-03-05
Length: 51s

Montana's House of Representatives passed a bill that could imprison doctors for assisting in suicide. Legislation is pending in other states to make it legal. A panel joins Diane to discuss the legal and political debate over end-of-life issues.

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Singer/Songwriter, Author And Activist Carole King

2013-03-04
Length: 51s

Carole King began writing songs when she was just 3 years old. She was still a teenager when she wrote her first No. 1 hit: "Will You Love Me Tomorrow?" King wrote or co-authored some of the biggest hits of the '60s and '70s, including "The Loco-Motion" and "You've Got a Friend." Her groundbreaking 1971 album "Tapestry" won four Grammys and is one of the best-selling records of all time. With songs like "It's Too Late," "I Feel the Earth Move" and "So Far Away," it's easy to see why it sold millions of copies. King is well-known as a singer and songwriter, but she's also a serious political and environmental activist. Diane talks with Carole King about her music, her life and the causes she fights for.

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Dealing With Sequestration Fallout

2013-03-04
Length: 51s

Assessing the economic and political damage from the tax and spending impasse: The price to be paid and who pays it.

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US Health Care Costs (Rebroadcast)

2013-03-03
Length: 52s

According to journalist Steven Brill, the Affordable Care Act changes some of the rules about who pays for what in health care, but a basic problem remains: the cost. In a lengthy cover story for Time Magazine, he explains why labs, drug companies, hospital administrators and the purveyors of medical equipment make so much money. He also explores why doctors who don't game the system are getting squeezed and why patients, especially those under 65, are left holding the bag. Join us to talk with Steven Brill about why we pay so much for health care in the U.S. and what we can do about it.

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Friday News Roundup - International

2013-03-01
Length: 51s

Secretary of State Kerry announced a plan to provide the Free Syrian Army with food and medical supplies. The U.S. will also more than double humanitarian aid for rebel-controlled areas. But the administration's first public commitment of support for the armed opposition fell short of their request for weapons. Nuclear talks between six world powers and Iran ended with only an agreement to hold further meetings this spring. Pope Benedict officially entered retirement. And Italy's inconclusive election reignited fears about the European Union's debt crisis. A panel of journalists joins Diane for analysis of the week's top international news stories.

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Friday News Roundup - Domestic

2013-03-01

A panel of journalists joins Diane for analysis of the week's top national news stories.

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How Processed Food Took Over The American Diet

2013-02-28

Processed foods account for roughly 70 percent of our nation's calories. Despite the growth of farmer's markets and availability of organic produce, food additives are nearly impossible to avoid. Diane and her guests talk about what goes into our food and how it affects our eating habits.

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Transition At The Vatican

2013-02-28

Roman Catholic cardinals gather to choose a new pope. Diane and her guests discuss transition at the Vatican and challenges facing the world's largest Christian denomination.

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Readers' Review: "The March" By E.L. Doctorow

2013-02-27

For February's Readers' Review, E.L. Doctorow's historic novel about Union Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman's path of destruction through the deep South near the end of the Civil War. The title is "The March." Diane invites listeners to join the discussion.

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US Health Care Costs

2013-02-27
Length: 51s

According to journalist Steven Brill, the Affordable Care Act changes some of the rules about who pays for what in health care, but a basic problem remains: the cost. In a lengthy cover story for Time Magazine, he explains why labs, drug companies, hospital administrators and the purveyors of medical equipment make so much money. He also explores why doctors who don't game the system are getting squeezed and why patients, especially those under 65, are left holding the bag. Join us to talk with Steven Brill about why we pay so much for health care in the U.S. and what we can do about it.

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Voting Rights Act Before The Supreme Court

2013-02-26
Length: 51s

The 15th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution made it illegal for states to deny voting rights based on race or color. But Southern states enacted poll taxes and literacy tests to keep blacks from voting. Then in 1965, Congress passed the Voting Rights Act. Section 5 of the Act identified nine states for their history of discrimination. The new law required these states to get "pre-clearance" from the government before changing their voting laws. Critics of Section 5 say the formula is outdated and violates states' rights. But supporters argue voting rights are still at risk in these areas of the country and need special protection. Diane and guests discuss the future of the Voting Rights Act at the Supreme Court.

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Former U.S. Senator Tom Daschle

2013-02-26
Length: 51s

Tom Daschle, former U.S. senator from South Dakota, was one of the longest serving Senate Democratic leaders in history and the only one to serve twice as both majority and minority leader. His new book, "The U.S. Senate," is a guide to how the institution works. Sen. Daschle joins Diane for the hour.

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The Potential Impact Of Sequestration

2013-02-25
Length: 51s

The U.S. is bracing for steep, across-the-board cuts in the federal budget. If implemented, they could mean furloughs at the Pentagon, longer airport security lines and delays in food inspection. Diane and her guests discuss the potential impact of sequestration.

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Ernest Freeberg: "The Age of Edison: Electric Light and the Invention of Modern America"

2013-02-25
Length: 51s

Thomas Edison is widely remembered as the man who invented the light bulb. As with many singular events, there's much more to the story, and a new book places the invention in the context of the time. In the mid-19th century the U.S. was in a period of intense technological creativity. Edison and a team of high-level assistants at his New Jersey laboratory benefited from a vibrant exchange of ideas among scientists in the U.S. and across the Atlantic. When Edison finally unveiled the incandescent light bulb in 1879, Americans witnessed the birth of a new age. Diane and her guest discuss how an invention we take for granted today transformed American life.

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Fifty Years After "The Feminine Mystique" (Rebroadcast)

2013-02-24
Length: 52s

Fifty years ago, Betty Friedan published her groundbreaking book "The Feminine Mystique." Diane considers its relevance today and the ongoing debate over gender equality at work and at home.

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Friday News Roundup - International

2013-02-22
Length: 51s

A deadly bombing in Syria targets the ruling party. Civilian deaths fall sharply in Afghanistan. And Secretary of State John Kerry delivers his first major foreign policy speech. Guest host Steve Roberts and a panel of journalists discuss the week's top international news stories.

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Friday News Roundup - Domestic

2013-02-22
Length: 51s

Sparring over spending and taxes intensifies one week before sequestration. Details of immigration proposals emerge. And Florida's governor reverses course on Medicaid. Guest host Steve Roberts and a panel of journalists discuss the week's top national stories.

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Debate Over The Use Of Domestic Drones

2013-02-21
Length: 51s

Many say it's only a matter of time before unmanned aircraft, otherwise known as drones, are used routinely for such tasks as traffic monitoring, battling forest fires, and looking for lost children. The government already uses surveillance drones to monitor our border with Mexico. Some police departments and a few universities have permits to use them as well. The FAA has been charged with coming up with a plan for widespread commercial use by 2015, but many say safety and privacy issues need to be addressed. Please join us for debate over the rules for domestic drones.

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Amity Gaige: "Schroder"

2013-02-21
Length: 51s

Lives built on lies and secrets rarely have happy endings. A new novel by Amity Gaige explores the nature of truth and identity. Her main character comes to the U.S. from East Germany while he was just a boy. He lies about his identity to win a scholarship to a New England summer camp. The lies seem harmless at first, and they help liberate him from his immigrant past and the pain of leaving his mother behind. But one lie leads to another and soon we have a man who is trapped in a fictional identity. When he kidnaps his beloved 6-year-old daughter during a custody fight, his lies lead to tragic consequences. Amity Gaige discusses "Schroder," a novel about truth, love and obsession.

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Fifty Years After "The Feminine Mystique"

2013-02-20
Length: 51s

Fifty years ago, Betty Friedan published her groundbreaking book "The Feminine Mystique." Diane considers its relevance today and the ongoing debate over gender equality at work and at home.

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Jess Bravin: "The Terror Courts: Rough Justice At Guantanamo Bay"

2013-02-20
Length: 51s

In the aftermath of the Sept. 11 attacks, the U.S. rounded up hundreds of suspected terrorists in Afghanistan and around the world. Many ended up at a special military detention center in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, where they would face what officials called "rough justice." Instead of trials in military, federal or state courts, enemy aliens would be prosecuted by military commissions subject to the president's command. Wall Street Journal correspondent Jess Bravin and Lt. Col. Stuart Couch, former senior prosecutor in the Office of Military Commissions, describe the complex ethical and legal challenges dogging the Guantanamo Commissions.

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David Shambaugh: "China Goes Global"

2013-02-19
Length: 51s

Just 30 years ago, China was a poor, isolated nation of rural farmers. The vast majority of its citizens struggled to afford food and clothes. But a series of free market reforms in the 1980s and '90s transformed China, propelling it to the No. 2 spot in the global economy. China is now the world's largest manufacturer and has the second biggest military. But a leading China expert says the rise of the Middle Kingdom has been greatly exaggerated. He says China's influence is limited by isolationism and a focus on low-end manufacturing. Diane and author David Shambaugh discuss the myth of China's global power.

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Guns And Suicide

2013-02-19
Length: 51s

In 2010, more than 30,000 Americans died from gunshot wounds, and about two-thirds were self-inflicted. More people used a firearm to take their own lives than every other method combined. For most, if not all victims, suicide reflects a treatment failure — someone in distress who didn't get the right kind of help when they most needed it. People determined to take their own lives can find a way, but research shows that having easy access to a gun boosts the likelihood that an attempt will be successful. Diane and guests discuss who is at risk for suicide, and what can be done to reduce that risk.

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What It Means To Be A Millennial

2013-02-18
Length: 51s

Today's 20-somethings are politically progressive, at ease with technology and more ethnically diverse than previous generations. How millennials are re-defining traditional ideas of what it means to be an adult.

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President Obama's Plan For Universal Preschool

2013-02-18
Length: 51s

Before leaving for a weekend getaway, President Barack Obama announced details of a plan to make high-quality preschool available to all American children. It would use federal money to make preschool classes available for more low- and moderate-income children. But the goal would be to persuade states to offer preschool to all who wanted it. The program could cost as much as $10 billion a year — nearly a tenth of the entire federal education budget. Supporters say it would provide long-term benefits to all American children. Critics are concerned about the scope of the program, its quality controls and the criteria for participation. Diane and her guests discuss the president's plan for universal preschool.

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Gavin Newsom: "Citizenville: How To Take The Town Square Digital And Reinvent...

2013-02-17
Length: 52s

California's Lieutenant Governor Gavin Newsom has been on the cutting edge of technology and social issues. The former mayor of San Francisco on making government better in the digital age.

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Friday News Roundup - International

2013-02-15
Length: 51s

World leaders condemn North Korea's nuclear test. The U.S. and European Union pursue a new trade pact. And Pope Benedict XVI announces his retirement. A panel of journalists joins Diane for analysis of the week's top international news stories.

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Friday News Roundup - Domestic

2013-02-15
Length: 51s

President Barack Obama travels to promote the agenda for his second term. American Airlines and US Airways merge. And a Senate showdown begins over the nomination of Chuck Hagel as defense secretary. A panel of journalists joins Diane for analysis of the week's top domestic news stories.

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Gavin Newsom: "Citizenville: How To Take The Town Square Digital And Reinvent...

2013-02-14
Length: 51s

California's Lieutenant Governor Gavin Newsom has been on the cutting edge of technology and social issues. The former mayor of San Francisco on making government better in the digital age.

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New Questions About The Safety Of Hip Replacements

2013-02-14
Length: 51s

The Food and Drug Administration recently issued new warnings on the safety of some hip replacements. As part of our occasional series, "Mind and Body," Diane and her guests discuss what patients need to know about safety and cost of hip replacements.

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Garry Wills: "Why Priests? A Failed Tradition"

2013-02-13
Length: 51s

Pope Benedict XVI, the Roman Catholic Church's top priest, took the world by surprise with his decision to resign. Pulitzer Prize-winning author — and lifelong Catholic — Gary Wills asks why we need priests and suggests Christianity would have been better off without the priesthood.

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Analysis Of The State Of The Union Address

2013-02-13
Length: 51s

President Obama takes to the road today to win public support for the policy proposals he presented during last night's State of the Union address. He said it was time for the parties to come together in support of the middle class. In particular, he called for a higher minimum wage and expanded access to preschool programs and job training. He also emphasized the need for gun control and efforts to address climate change. Senator Marco Rubio of Florida, delivered the Republican response. He said private enterprise, not government, should be boosting the middle class. Please join us for analysis of last night's State of the Union address.

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George Saunders: "Tenth of December"

2013-02-12
Length: 51s

"George Saunders has written the best book you'll read this year." That was the title of a New York Times magazine article last month about a man widely recognized as a master of the short story genre. Saunders won a MacArthur "Genius Grant" in 2006, which comes with a $500,000 prize. He continues to teach writing at Syracuse University and plug away at his stories. He's not prolific; he writes on average two stories a year, and one story in his new collection took 12 years to finish. Join Diane as she talks with George Saunders about his unconventional path to becoming one of America's most celebrated writers and why he loves short stories.

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The Growing Threat Of Cyber-Espionage

2013-02-12
Length: 51s

Until very recently, cyber espionage was only a concern of intelligence agencies and the military. But a new report warns U.S. infrastructure and businesses are broadly under attack in cyberspace. Experts say the biggest offender is China, whose cyber spies threaten competitiveness and national security. Recent targets include Google, Lockheed Martin and The New York Times. While Congress weighs legislative options, President Barack Obama plans to issue an executive order on cyber security tomorrow. But critics say new laws raise privacy concerns. Diane and guests discuss what to do about the growing threat of cyber-espionage.

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Inside Addiction Treatment

2013-02-11
Length: 51s

More than 20 million teenagers and adults are addicted to alcohol or drugs in this country. Some go to residential treatment programs, while others turn to outpatient programs in their communities. But the vast majority of people who need help don't get any at all. In a new book, health and medical writer Anne Fletcher describes what goes on inside many different kinds of rehab programs. She joins us to talk about the challenge of finding effective addiction treatment. We'll also hear from the head of a residential care facility and a director of an outpatient addiction treatment center. Please join us to discuss the challenges of getting help for drug and alcohol addiction.

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Safety Concerns At Compounding Pharmacies

2013-02-11
Length: 51s

A deadly meningitis outbreak last year drew attention to a relatively new segment of the drug industry: large-scale compounding pharmacies. The Food and Drug Administration is calling for new, stronger and clearer legislation to effectively oversee firms that mix custom drugs for specific patients. In the past two decades, compounding pharmacies have grown into a multimillion dollar business, making some of the highest risk drugs available. But they are not required to follow the safety rules that apply to commercial drug makers. State pharmacy boards have an uneven record of policing them. A panel joins Diane to discuss efforts to improve the safety and oversight of compounded drugs.

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Friday News Roundup - International

2013-02-08
Length: 51s

Iran's supreme leader rejects direct talks with the U.S. Turmoil in Tunisia following the assassination of an opposition leader. And the remains of England's Richard III are found and identified. A panel of journalists joins Diane for analysis of the week's top international news stories.

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Friday News Roundup - Domestic

2013-02-08
Length: 51s

The White House agrees to give Congress classified drone documents. The Justice Department sues Standard and Poor's. And the Post Office announces plans to end Saturday delivery. A panel of journalists joins Diane for analysis of the week's top national news stories.

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Former West Wing Actor Richard Schiff

2013-02-04
Length: 51s

Richard Schiff won an Emmy Award for his role as White House communications director Toby Ziegler on "The West Wing." Schiff talks about his latest theater work and why he never planned to be an actor.

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Controversy Over Legal Protections For Gun Companies

2013-02-04
Length: 51s

A 2005 law protects gun companies from liability suits, making it difficult for victims of gun violence to challenge the industry. Diane and her guests explore how gun makers got special protection, and new attempts to change the federal law.

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A Conversation With Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor (Rebroadcast)

2013-02-03
Length: 52s

Ever since Sonia Sotomayor was appointed to the Supreme Court in 2009, people have been as curious about her personal story as her views on the law and the courts. Children with diabetes want to know about her experiences living with the disease. Others ask how she coped with losing her father at a young age. Minority students wonder whether she has experienced discrimination and how she stays connected to her community. In a new memoir titled "My Beloved World," Sotomayor describes how adversity has spurred her on instead of knocking her down. Diane talks with Justice Sotomayor about the sources of her hope and optimism, and the value of holding on to far-fetched dreams.

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Friday News Roundup - Domestic

2013-02-01
Length: 51s

The U.S. economy shrinks slightly in the fourth quarter. A bipartisan group of senators and the White House propose immigration reform. And a Senate committee holds hearings on gun violence. A panel of journalists joins Diane for analysis of the week's top national news stories.

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Friday News Roundup - International

2013-02-01
Length: 51s

Syria claims Israel bombs military targets near Damascus. Egypt declares emergency rule in three cities. And French forces take a key airport in Mali. A panel of journalists joins Diane for analysis of the week's top international news stories.

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Al Gore: "The Future: Six Drivers of Global Change"

2013-01-31
Length: 51s

Al Gore believes we are at the dawn of a new future. The former vice president and Democratic presidential nominee claims we're living in a time of revolutionary change unmatched in history. In a new book, he says we're racing toward a future that is both complicated and different from anything we've seen before. The Nobel Peace Prize winner has identified what he believes are six forces remaking the world, from economic globalization to the digital revolution to — no surprise here — climate change. The self-identified "recovering politician" joins Diane to talk about the changes facing our world and his vision for the future.

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Looming Battles Over Pentagon Spending Cuts

2013-01-31
Length: 51s

Confirmation hearings for former Sen. Chuck Hagel begin today. If approved as Secretary of Defense, he'll take office in the middle of a possible sequester fight. A panel joins Diane to discuss what possible spending cuts could mean for national security.

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Readers' Review: "The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao" By Junot Diaz

2013-01-30
Length: 51s

Junot Diaz's first novel, "The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao," established him as one the most important voices in contemporary fiction. A New York Times review described his style as "Mario Vargas Llosa meets Star Trek meets David Foster Wallace meets Kanye West." It's the story of Oscar, a second-generation American obsessed with science fiction and finding love. Diaz takes us from Oscar's home in New Jersey to his ancestral home in the Dominican Republic. Along the way, Oscar learns of the "curse" that haunted his family in the "old world," and may still be in the U.S. For this month's Readers' Review, Diane and her guests discuss the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel.

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A Conversation With Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor

2013-01-30
Length: 51s

Ever since Sonia Sotomayor was appointed to the Supreme Court in 2009, people have been as curious about her personal story as her views on the law and the courts. Children with diabetes want to know about her experiences living with the disease. Others ask how she coped with losing her father at a young age. Minority students wonder whether she has experienced discrimination and how she stays connected to her community. In a new memoir titled "My Beloved World," Sotomayor describes how adversity has spurred her on instead of knocking her down. Diane talks with Justice Sotomayor about the sources of her hope and optimism, and the value of holding on to far-fetched dreams.

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The Growing Popularity Of Audio Books

2013-01-29
Length: 51s

Audio books have come full circle. Once just for the blind, books on cassette and then CD first became available to the general public three decades ago, mostly in libraries or by subscription. Soon they popped up in bookstores, taking up a shelf or two. By the late '90s, big box stores featured whole walls of audio books. Now, in the age of digital downloads, book shelves are sparse once more. But the industry is thriving — it's currently estimated to be worth $1.2 billion. Many love the convenience of audio books and enjoy being read to. Critics argue listening to a narrated book is not the same as reading. Diane and her guests discuss the future of audio books.

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Andy Williams: "Moon River and Me" (Rebroadcast)

2013-01-01

Diane talks with legendary entertainer, Andy Williams, about his seven decades in show business, his Emmy-winning variety show, and performing live at the age of 82.

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Academy Award-Winning Actor F. Murray Abraham (Rebroadcast)

2013-01-01

F. Murray Abraham won an Oscar for his leading role in the 1984 film "Amadeus." The classically trained actor joins Diane to talk about his four decades of performing on the big screen, small screen and live on stage.

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Laurie Rubin: "Do You Dream in Color? Insights From A Girl Without Sight" (Rebroadcast)

2012-12-31
Length: 51s

Laurie Rubin was born blind, unable to see anything except white light. But that did not stop her from learning to ski, studying at Yale University, handcrafting jewelry and enjoying a successful career in opera. She is also the author of a new memoir and CD, both titled "Do You Dream In Color?" She answers that question when she joins Diane in studio to discuss how she and her family refused to let her disability define her.

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Readers' Review: "Year of Wonders: A Novel of the Plague" By Geraldine Brooks...

2012-12-31
Length: 51s

Geraldine Brooks is no stranger to war zones. The journalist-turned-author once covered Bosnia and the Middle East for The Wall Street Journal. And Brooks' understanding of human suffering is evident in her first novel. In it, she spins a real-life horror story into a tale of fragile hope. "Year of Wonders" fictionalizes the true account of villagers in seventeenth-century Eyam, England. They voluntarily quarantined their plague-infested town to prevent the disease from spreading. Brooks' storyteller is a young maid who aids the village rector in his mission to contain the plague. Join Diane and her guests for our October Readers' Review of Geraldine Brooks' novel, "Year of Wonders."

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Barbara Kingsolver: "Flight Behavior" (Rebroadcast)

2012-12-30
Length: 52s

Many writers have warned about the perils of climate change. But few novelists have succeeded in turning scientific data into gripping fiction. The best-selling author of "The Lacuna" and "The Poisonwood Bible" hopes to change that. Barbara Kingsolver's latest book tells the story of Dellarobia Turnbow, a young mother trapped in rural poverty, who discovers millions of butterflies glowing like a "lake of fire" in a pasture. That vision — which stops her from an adulterous tryst - and its aftermath becomes a wake-up call about climate change for an Appalachian community. It also marks the beginning of a new life for her. Join Diane for her interview with author Barbara Kingsolver.

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Domingo Martinez: "The Boy Kings Of Texas: A Memoir" (Rebroadcast)

2012-12-28
Length: 51s

Domingo Martinez is the only author without a Pulitzer Prize to be nominated for this year's National Book Award. He joins Diane to discuss his memoir about growing up between two cultures on the border of Texas and Mexico.

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Living With Migraine And The Search For New Treatments (Rebroadcast)

2012-12-28
Length: 51s

For those who suffer from migraine headaches, the pain can be devastating. Intense throbbing and sensitivity to light or sound often keeps people from their normal lives for hours or even days on end. The World Health Organization ranks migraine as one of the most debilitating diseases, and more than 10 percent of the population suffers from it. Yet migraine is not widely understood and is often misdiagnosed. But patients can find relief with the right treatments. As scientists learn more about the cause of migraines, doctors and patients have their sights on better medication. Diane and her guests discuss living with migraines and the search for new treatments.

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Mark Brazaitis: "The Incurables" (Rebroadcast)

2012-12-27
Length: 51s

Award-winning writer Mark Brazaitis talks with Diane about his latest collection of short stories.

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Environmental Outlook: "American Canopy" by Eric Rutkow (Rebroadcast)

2012-12-27
Length: 51s

When Europeans first came to the U.S. as settlers, there were roughly a billion acres of ancient forests. America's trees have been under assault ever since. Westward expansion, industrialization, rapid population growth, the rise of the suburbs and various diseases have all exacted a toll. Today woodland acreage is down by about 25 percent - and much of it is populated with young trees. A new book tells the history of America through its trees. Like Dr. Seuss's environmental classic "The Lorax," it's a sad story, but one that's not without hope. In the next segment of our Environmental Outlook series - trees, forests and the making of a nation.

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Readers' Review: "Ethan Frome" by Edith Wharton (Rebroadcast)

2012-12-26
Length: 51s

Born into a life of wealth and privilege, American novelist Edith Wharton was known for her insider's critiques of the upper class. But her 1911 novel, "Ethan Frome," featured working-class characters who couldn't have been more different from her usual subjects. The novel's namesake is a poor farmer married to a domineering and sickly wife. When Ethan's wife hires her young cousin as a housekeeper, Ethan falls hopelessly in love with her. The doomed romance set against a stark New England countryside became Wharton's most widely-read novel. Join Diane and guests for a Readers' Review of Edith Wharton's "Ethan Frome."

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The Civil War And American Art (Rebroadcast)

2012-12-26
Length: 51s

A new exhibit at the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, D.C., explores how the Civil War redefined American art and painting. Diane is joined by exhibit curator Eleanor Jones Harvey.

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Deb Perelman: "The Smitten Kitchen Cookbook" (Rebroadcast)

2012-12-25
Length: 51s

Deb Perelman didn't set out to become a famous cook, a professional photographer or the author of an award-winning blog, but she is all of these things now. She's the author of SmittenKitchen.com, a website with recipes for seasonal, easy-to-prepare food that includes how-to photographs and casual commentary on cooking and life. In her newly published cookbook, she brings the Smitten Kitchen website to the hard copy world. Please join us for a conversation with Deb Perelman on the joys of cooking at home.

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Wendell Berry: "A Place in Time: Twenty Stories Of The Port William Membership"...

2012-12-25

Wendell Berry received the National Humanities Medal in 2010 for his achievement as a poet, novelist, farmer and conservationist. He summarized his philosophy in this year's Jefferson Lecture, titled "It All Turns On Affection." For more than 50 years, Berry has been writing about life in a fictional small town called Port William. Its families are closely bound by marriage, kinship, friendship, history and memory. They help each other with the hard work of farming and take pleasure in the telling of shared stories. In a new collection, characters age and pass on, but their tales of love, joy and sorrow live on.

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Kenny Rogers: "Luck Or Something Like It: A Memoir" (Rebroadcast)

2012-12-24

Kenny Rogers is known worldwide as an award-winning pop and country singer. But many fans don't know he began his career 50 years ago singing in a doo-wop group at his Texas high school. He played stand-up bass in a jazz trio before joining a rock band in the late 1960s. It was with the band First Edition that Kenny Rogers found fame with the song, "Ruby, Don't Take Your Love to Town." In 1977, he launched a solo career in country music with the hit "Lucille." He soon became known for his story songs like "The Gambler." Diane talks with Kenny Rogers about his journey from a Houston housing project to becoming one of the best-selling artists of all time.

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Robert Gottlieb: "Great Expectations: The Sons and Daughters of Charles Dickens"...

2012-12-24

Charles Dickens is one of the world's greatest and best-loved novelists. He created such indelible child characters as Oliver Twist, Little Nell, Tiny Tim and David Copperfield. Dickens endured a difficult childhood. When he was 11, his father was sent to debtors' prison, and Dickens was put to work in a blackening factory. Beginning in his teens, his talent, energy and drive ensured he would never suffer such disgrace again. Dickens also had great expectations for his 10 children — seven boys and three girls. Author Robert Gottlieb tells us what became of the sons and daughters of Charles Dickens.

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Friday News Roundup - International

2012-12-21
Length: 51s

An independent panel faults the U.S. State Department on Benghazi, Libya. Pakistani militants kill nine polio vaccine workers. And South Korea elects its first female president. A panel of journalists joins Diane for analysis of the week's top international news stories.

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Friday News Roundup - Domestic

2012-12-21
Length: 51s

President Barack Obama taps Vice President Joe Biden to lead a gun violence task force. House Republicans vow to push a "Plan B" to avert the fiscal cliff. And four State Department officials leave after a damaging report on Benghazi, Libya. A panel of journalists joins Diane for analysis of the week's top national news stories.

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Adam Makos: "A Higher Call: An Incredible True Story Of Combat And Chivalry In The War-Torn...

2012-12-20
Length: 51s

On Dec. 20, 1943, a young American fighter pilot named Charlie Brown was on his first World War II mission. Flying in the German skies, Brown's B-17 bomber was shot and badly damaged. As Brown and his men desperately tried to escape enemy territory back to England, a German fighter plane pulled up to their tail. It seemed certain death. Instead of shooting the plane down, however, the German pilot, Franz Stigler, escorted the Americans to safety. In his new book, "A Higher Call: An Incredible True Story of Combat and Chivalry in the War-Torn Skies of World War II", author Adam Makos describes the fateful wartime encounter, and how the two men found each other nearly 50 years later.

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Identifying And Treating Severe Mental Illness

2012-12-20
Length: 51s

The vast majority of mentally ill people are not a danger to themselves or society, but for those who are, treatment is critical. Diane and her guests discuss the challenge of identifying and treating severe mental illness.

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Shopping Addiction

2012-12-19
Length: 51s

More than 18 million Americans are compulsive buyers, an addiction that can devastate families and bank accounts. The struggle to control a shopping addiction.

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Debate Over Ways To Improve School Safety

2012-12-19
Length: 51s

Last week's tragedy in Connecticut prompts new questions about how to keep students safe at school: What parents, administrators, and safety experts think should be done to improve security.

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Matthew Guerrieri: "The First Four Notes: Beethoven's Fifth and the Human...

2012-12-18
Length: 51s

The opening phrase of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony is one of the most widely recognized in music. It has mystified musicians, historians and philosophers for 200 years. Music critic Matthew Guerrieri says it's "short enough to remember and portentous enough to be memorable." Listeners agree it says something powerful and profound, but none can agree on what that might be. Guerrieri considers what could have influenced Beethoven when he wrote those four notes. And he describes how the motif has been interpreted around the world and throughout history. Join Diane and her guest for new insights into the music, the composer and the Fifth Symphony's lasting influence.

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Americans And Gun Control

2012-12-18
Length: 51s

The horror and outrage in the aftermath of last week's mass shootings in Connecticut are galvanizing new efforts to ban assault weapons. Diane and her guests discuss Americans and gun control.

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Financial Planning In Uncertain Times

2012-12-17
Length: 51s

In recent years, it has become increasingly difficult for Americans to plan for their financial future. The decline of pensions, collapse in home prices and a volatile stock market have created a precarious economy. And this uncertainty has increased demand for financial planners who can make sense of it all. But advice to save more and spend less, and maximize individual retirement accounts has failed to take hold. Three-quarters of Americans have saved just $25,000 for retirement. And nearly half of us now live paycheck-to-paycheck, making it more difficult to save. Diane and a panel of experts discuss planning for your financial future in uncertain times.

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Mass Shootings And Their Effect On The American Psyche

2012-12-17
Length: 51s

Reaction to Friday's school shooting in Newtown, Conn., has been loud and swift. New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg called on President Barack Obama to make gun control his No. 1 agenda. The dean of Washington's National Cathedral said, "enough is enough ... the massacre of these 28 people in Connecticut is ... the last straw." A sense of helplessness and frustration is palpable across the nation. While many are calling for more controls on guns and ammunition, others say we must focus on creating a more accessible mental health system. They worry we aren't doing enough to de-stigmatize treatment. Diane and her guests discuss the effects of mass shootings on the American psyche.

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Mind And Body: Head Injuries And What New Research Means For Football (Rebroadcast)

2012-12-16
Length: 52s

A new study released last week looks at the brains of people who experienced repeated head injuries. It provides some of the clearest evidence yet linking recurring mild head trauma to long-term brain disease. Of the 85 people in the study, 50 had been football players. Athletes who play contact sports are always vulnerable to head injuries, but these days, football is in the spotlight. From youth leagues to the NFL, questions are being raised about the prevalence of head injuries and what can be done to make the game safer. For our series "Mind and Body", Diane and her guests discuss the latest science on head injuries and how to best protect players.

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Friday News Roundup - International

2012-12-14
Length: 51s

More than 100 nations now back the Syrian rebel coalition. Tensions remain high in Egypt ahead of a draft Constitution referendum. And the European Union wins the Nobel Prize for Peace. A panel of journalists joins Diane for analysis of the week's top international news stories.

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Friday News Roundup - Domestic

2012-12-14
Length: 51s

Fiscal cliff negotiations appear stuck in neutral. The Fed ties interest rates to jobless numbers. And the Michigan governor signs a "right to work" law. Diane and a panel of guests discuss the week's top domestic stories.

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Con Slobodchikoff:"Chasing Doctor Dolittle: Learning the Language of Animals"

2012-12-13
Length: 51s

Dr. Con Slobodchikoff is professor emeritus of biology at Northern Arizona University and Director of the Animal Language Institute.

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Mobile Apps And Children's Privacy

2012-12-13
Length: 51s

The number of kids using mobile technology is exploding. Apple's app store has seen a 40% increase of downloads in just nine months. Google Play's growth has been even more dramatic - 80% over the same period. But the Federal Trade Commission is concerned popular smartphone and tablet apps aimed at children are collecting and sharing personal data without informing parents. The agency claims the data collected allows companies to target ads with new precision. While app developers agree children should be protected, they fear some of the FTC's proposals could stifle innovation. Join Diane and her guests as they discuss concerns about mobile apps and children's privacy.

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Mind And Body: Head Injuries And What New Research Means For Football

2012-12-12
Length: 51s

A new study released last week looks at the brains of people who experienced repeated head injuries. It provides some of the clearest evidence yet linking recurring mild head trauma to long-term brain disease. Of the 85 people in the study, 50 had been football players. Athletes who play contact sports are always vulnerable to head injuries, but these days, football is in the spotlight. From youth leagues to the NFL, questions are being raised about the prevalence of head injuries and what can be done to make the game safer. For our series "Mind and Body", Diane and her guests discuss the latest science on head injuries and how to best protect players.

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Debate Over The Benefits Of Routine Mammograms

2012-12-12
Length: 51s

The availability of 3-D mammograms renews debate about who should get them and when: Calculating the health benefits of routine mammograms.

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Mark Brazaitis: "The Incurables"

2012-12-11
Length: 51s

Award-winning writer Mark Brazaitis talks with Diane about his latest collection of short stories.

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The People Who Make Our Clothes And The Conditions They Face

2012-12-11
Length: 51s

Dozens of Bangladesh workers making clothes for the U.S. market were killed in a factory fire last month. Debate over the safety of apparel makers and what can be done to improve conditions.

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Cracking Down On Wildlife Trafficking

2012-12-10
Length: 51s

International wildlife trafficking has long been considered a critical conservation issue. Now the U.S. State Department has made it a foreign policy priority as well. Wildlife trafficking increasingly threatens the security, national health and economies of many countries. Poaching operations have become more large scale, sophisticated and organized. The black market in wildlife is second only to trade in drugs and arms. It's a likely source of funding for transnational criminal networks, possibly even terrorist groups. Meanwhile demand has grown for furs, tusks, bones, horns and other illegal animal goods. Robert Hormats, Under Secretary of State for Economic Growth, Energy and the Environment, updates us on new efforts to raise awareness about conservation and stop illegal wildlife trafficking.

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The Mortgage Interest Deduction And The U.S. Housing Market

2012-12-10
Length: 51s

President Barack Obama seems to be, so far, holding firm on his campaign pledge to raise tax rates for those with taxable income above $250,000, but he has also not ruled out reducing or eliminating longstanding tax breaks including the mortgage interest deduction. It's been in effect for almost a century, and now costs about $100 billion a year in lost tax revenues. For many upper income tax payers, its benefit is clear, and it's also believed to encourage home ownership. Please join us to discuss who the mortgage interest deduction helps, who it hurts and what would change if the rules were modified.

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Future Of Landline Phones (Rebroadcast)

2012-12-09
Length: 52s

Landline phone use is plummeting. The telecom industry argues it should no longer be required to provide the service. Consumer groups disagree. The future of the landline.

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Friday News Roundup - International

2012-12-07
Length: 51s

Protesters clash in Egypt. U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton leads a new diplomatic effort on Syria. And new details on the Bangladesh factory fire. James Kitfield of National Journal, Nadia Bilbassy of MBC and Matt Frei of the UK Channel 4 discuss the week's top international stories, what happened and why.

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Friday News Roundup - Domestic

2012-12-07
Length: 51s

The November jobs number report. What's new in the fiscal cliff negotiations. And former President George W. Bush weighs in on immigration. Shawna Thomas of NBC, Naftali Bendavid of The Wall Street Journal and Lori Montgomery of The Washington Post join Diane to talk about the week's top national stories, what happened and why.

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Lady Bird Johnson, An Oral History

2012-12-06
Length: 51s

Lady Bird Johnson chronicled her life in a series of interviews spanning almost 20 years. Oral historian Michael Gillette recounts his interviews with the former first lady, and we hear her firsthand account of life and marriage with President Lyndon Baines Johnson.

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Future Of Landline Phones

2012-12-06
Length: 51s

Landline phone use is plummeting. The telecom industry argues it should no longer be required to provide the service. Consumer groups disagree. The future of the landline.

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Future Of Landline Phones

2012-12-06
Length: 51s

Landline phone use is plummeting. The telecom industry argues it should no longer be required to provide the service. Consumer groups disagree. The future of the landline.

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The Illusion Of Online Security

2012-12-05
Length: 51s

The age of passwords is over. That's the claim made in this month's "Wired" magazine. Most of us trust that a string of letters, numbers and characters is enough to protect our bank accounts, email and credit cards. But hackers are breaking into computer systems and hosts of user names and passwords on the Web with increasing regularity. And because so much of our personal information is stored in the cloud, hackers can trick customer service agents into resetting passwords. Some Internet companies say the trade-offs — convenience and privacy — are necessary to protect our data. Privacy advocates say that price is too high. Diane and her guests discuss the illusion of online security and whether you can make your accounts harder to crack.

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The Challenge Of Feeding America's Hungry

2012-12-05
Length: 51s

Americans are relying on what we used to call food stamps in unprecedented numbers. According to figures released in September, more than 46 million Americans, about one in seven, are getting government assistance for food, but it's estimated that millions more struggle with hunger. The nation's food banks, supported by private dollars and donations, are straining to fill the gap. Federal funding for food stamps is not on the line in the current tax and spending negotiations, but some believe new limits on government food assistance programs are needed. Please join us to discuss hunger in America and what we can do about it.

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David Haskell: "The Forest Unseen: A Year's Watch in Nature"

2012-12-04
Length: 51s

Forests cover more than 30 percent of the world's land surface. They are home to a variety of living organisms, but much of what happens in the woods is a mystery to humans. Inspired by the mandalas of Tibetan monks, biologist David Haskell set out to better understand forest ecology: he visited the same spot in the Tennessee forest every day for a year. His days were spent quietly listening and observing. What he found was a thriving biological world of plants, animals and insects, all bound together by a shared ecosystem. On this month's Environmental Outlook: "The Forest Unseen."

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Building A Customer-Oriented Health Insurance Exchange

2012-12-04
Length: 51s

In the shadow of negotiations over the so-called fiscal cliff, another deadline looms in Washington. States have until December fourteenth to decide whether they intend to create state-based health insurance markets. If states choose not to build their own or partner with others, then the federal government will step in. As states rush to create exchanges by 2014, they're considering how best to develop health care comparison tools. Individuals and small businesses need ways to plan for unexpected expenses, find out which plans include their provider, and compare service quality. Diane and her guests talk about building customer-friendly health insurance exchanges.

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Robert Gottlieb: "Great Expectations: The Sons and Daughters of Charles Dickens"

2012-12-03
Length: 51s

Charles Dickens is one of the world's greatest and best-loved novelists. He created such indelible child characters as Oliver Twist, Little Nell, Tiny Tim and David Copperfield. Dickens endured a difficult childhood. When he was 11, his father was sent to debtors' prison, and Dickens was put to work in a blackening factory. Beginning in his teens, his talent, energy and drive ensured he would never suffer such disgrace again. Dickens also had great expectations for his 10 children — seven boys and three girls. Author Robert Gottlieb tells us what became of the sons and daughters of Charles Dickens.

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Anti-Tax Crusader Grover Norquist

2012-12-03
Length: 51s

Tax policy has never been easy - for politicians to agree on or for Americans who are not accounting experts to understand. Now we have the so-called fiscal cliff looming over the nation. And the Obama administration and Republican leaders are at a stalemate on how to avert it. Anti-tax crusader Grover Norquist has played an outsized role in the debate. Most Republican members of the current Congress have signed Norquist's anti-tax pledge. With November elections over and the fiscal cliff just weeks away, some pledge-signers have begun to waver. Grover Norquist of Americans for Tax Reform joins Diane to talk about one of life's two certainties - taxes.

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The Role Of The SEC And What's Needed To Keep Watch On Wall Street (Rebroadcast)

2012-12-02
Length: 52s

Mary Schapiro took over as chair of the Securities and Exchange Commission in 2009. The nation was in serious financial crisis and Wall Street seemed to resemble the Wild West in need of a strong sheriff. Many saw Schapiro as that sheriff and credit her with salvaging the agency's role as Wall Street's watchdog. Critics point to unfinished business, such as addressing the root causes of the financial crisis and punishing the perpetrators whose actions contributed to it. A discussion of the role of the SEC and its future under new leadership.

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Friday News Roundup - International

2012-11-30
Length: 51s

Protests in Egypt over the president's power grab. The Palestinian Authority makes a U.N. bid. And European finance ministers set new bailout terms for Greece. Moises Naim of El Pais, Anne Applebaum of Slate and The Washington Post and Tom Gjelten of NPR join Diane for analysis of the week's top international news stories.

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Friday News Roundup - Domestic

2012-11-30
Length: 51s

Negotiations to avoid the "fiscal cliff" continue. A fight over U.N. Ambassador Susan Rice heats up. And President Obama lunches with former Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney. The week's top national stories: what happened and why.

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Michael Sandel: "What Money Can't Buy"

2012-11-29
Length: 51s

Harvard professor Michael Sandel on whether there's something wrong with a world in which everything is for sale.

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Privacy Rights And Government Access To Electronic Messages

2012-11-29
Length: 51s

The Senate considers a bill to allow federal agencies to access electronic messages. Balancing privacy rights and public safety.

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Readers' Review: "The Bonfire of the Vanities" By Tom Wolfe

2012-11-28
Length: 51s

"The Bonfire of the Vanities" was Tom Wolfe's 11th book and first novel. Inspired by Thackeray's 19th century satire "Vanity Fair," Wolfe set out to capture the essence of high and low society in 1980s New York. The story centers on Sherman McCoy, a wealthy bond trader and self-regarded "master of the universe." His life is destroyed when he and his mistress make a wrong turn into the Bronx one night. Critics said Wolfe's portrayal of urban class and race came as close as fiction could to breaking news. It's the 25th anniversary of the novel, and this month's Readers' Review.

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The Role Of The SEC And What's Needed To Keep Watch On Wall Street

2012-11-28
Length: 51s

Mary Schapiro took over as chair of the Securities and Exchange Commission in 2009. The nation was in serious financial crisis and Wall Street seemed to resemble the Wild West in need of a strong sheriff. Many saw Schapiro as that sheriff and credit her with salvaging the agency's role as Wall Street's watchdog. Critics point to unfinished business, such as addressing the root causes of the financial crisis and punishing the perpetrators whose actions contributed to it. A discussion of the role of the SEC and its future under new leadership.

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Ray Kurzweil: "How to Create a Mind: The Secret of Human Thought Revealed"

2012-11-27
Length: 51s

Inventor, futurist and author Ray Kurzweil has long predicted humans will one day be able to transcend the limitations of their biology. In a new book, Kurzweil explains why that day is coming sooner than we might think. He argues that the expansion of the brain's neocortex was the last biological evolution man needed to make. That's because it is inevitably leading to "truly intelligent machines," which Kurzweil calls the last invention that humanity needs to make. Join Diane and Ray Kurzweil for a discussion on prospects for attaining immortality through technology.

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Egypt's Emerging Democracy

2012-11-27
Length: 51s

Egypt's president appeared to back away from his declaration last week to take on near-absolute power. A representative for Mohamed Morsi said Monday a compromise with the Supreme Judicial Council would leave most of the president's actions subject to court review. But the agreement would protect the Constitutional Council from being dissolved before finishing its work. The deal didn't satisfy critics who say President Morsi's power grab is a threat to Egypt's fragile young democracy. And some suggest the U.S. is turning a blind eye to the president's actions as long as he supports a truce between Palestinians and Israelis. Diane and her guests discuss the latest on Egypt's power struggle.

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Paul Reid: "The Last Lion: Winston Spencer Churchill: Defender of the Realm, 1940-1965"

2012-11-26
Length: 51s

The works of historian William Manchester included two enormously popular biographies of Winston Churchill: "The Last Lion", Volumes I and II. They were published in the 1980s and chronicled Churchill's life up until World War II. Manchester spent a number of years doing the research for the next installment, but his health began to fail. Before he died in 2004 he asked his friend, journalist Paul Reid, to complete the task. Now, nearly two decades later, this third and final volume has been published. It details Churchill's pivotal role during World War II and his post-government years. Join Diane for a conversation with biographer Paul Reid about the life of Winston Churchill.

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President Obama And The Lame Duck Congress

2012-11-26
Length: 51s

Diane and her guests talk priorities and prospects for compromise on tax rates, spending cuts and other key policy decisions in the final weeks of the lame duck Congress.

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Domingo Martinez: "The Boy Kings Of Texas: A Memoir" (Rebroadcast)

2012-11-25
Length: 52s

Domingo Martinez is the only author without a Pulitzer Prize to be nominated for this year's National Book Award. He joins Diane to discuss his memoir about growing up between two cultures on the border of Texas and Mexico.

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Marilu Henner On Life With Highly Superior Autobiographical Memory (Rebroadcast)

2012-11-23
Length: 51s

Actress Marilu Henner is one of the rare documented cases of Highly Superior Autobiographical Memory in the world. It's an ability that allows her to vividly recall every detail of every day of her life since childhood. Henner is a consultant to the CBS television show "Unforgettable," in which the main character has the condition. Diane also speaks to Dr. James McGaugh who diagnosed this ability and studies people who have it. A discussion with Marilu Henner on what it means to remember your life in detail and what the phenomenon tells us about the brain.

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Alex Danchev: "Cezanne: A Life" (Rebroadcast)

2012-11-23
Length: 51s

The mid-19th century art world was transformed by a group of French impressionist painters. These men revolutionized the conventional Paris salon, which was slow to recognize their collective genius. Among them was Paul Cezanne, who grew up in southern France. An artistic late bloomer, Cezanne didn't decide to become a painter until age 21. He was tormented by self-doubt and an obsessive drive to paint what he called "truth." Rejected by the Paris salon for 40 years, C?zanne is now considered one of the greatest painters who ever lived. A new biography on the life and art of Paul C?zanne.

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Shawn Colvin: "Diamond in the Rough" (Rebroadcast)

2012-11-22
Length: 51s

Shawn Colvin began life on the South Dakota prairie where the great sky was a canvas on which to paint her dreams. Her father gave her a guitar at age 10 and she has been pursuing a music career ever since. In 1989, her debut recording won a Grammy for Best Contemporary Folk Album. Nine years later, she won two Grammys for the hit song "Sunny Came Home." But she battled alcoholism, depression and bad choices in love along the road to success. In a new memoir, she describes how she found her voice as a songwriter--and why she thinks she's a lousy girlfriend and an even worse wife.

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Bob Spitz: "Dearie: The Remarkable Life of Julia Child" (Rebroadcast)

2012-11-22
Length: 51s

Decades before the Cooking Channel or "food celebrities," Julia Child captivated her television viewers with "The French Chef." The woman who brought fine cuisine into the homes of average Americans transformed the way this country thought about cooking and eating. A new biography says the mark she left went well beyond the kitchen. Her biographer describes Julia Child as an early feminist who taught women to find pride in their work and to take charge of their lives. Today would have been Julia Child's 100th birthday. To talk about her life and legacy, Diane sits down with Bob Spitz, the author of the new biography, "Dearie: The Remarkable Life of Julia Child."

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Dan Buettner: "Blue Zones: Second Edition"

2012-11-21
Length: 51s

Human longevity is thought to be explained by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. But recent studies show that as much as 90 percent of life expectancy may be determined by habits. Several years ago, a team of National Geographic scientists identified four regions in the world where people live the longest. In these so-called "Blue Zones," residents experience far lower rates of chronic disease than Americans do. And people who live in these zones share common habits: they eat mostly plants, are spiritual and have strong ties with family and friends. Now, researchers have identified a fifth Blue Zone: the island of Ikaria, Greece. Author and explorer Dan Buettner on lessons for a long life from the world's oldest people.

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Shopping Trends In America

2012-11-21
Length: 51s

The holiday season is a critical time for most U.S. retailers. Merchants rack up at least a fifth of their annual sales in the last two months of the year, and sales in stores and on-line are expected to grow this year. The day after Thanksgiving - Black Friday - has long launched a three-day shopping frenzy across the nation. Now, a growing number of retailers are opening their doors a day earlier - on Thanksgiving Day. That has sparked a backlash - including protests from some of the employees who will be working behind cash registers on the holiday. Guest host Susan Page and her guests discuss holiday shopping in America.

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Evan Thomas: "Ike's Bluff"

2012-11-20
Length: 51s

Historian Evan Thomas talks with Diane about why he believes President Dwight D. Eisenhower saved the world from nuclear holocaust.

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Tax Policy Debate: Raising Rates Versus Limiting Deductions

2012-11-20
Length: 51s

Raising rates versus limiting deductions and loopholes: tax policy debate in Washington and efforts to raise tax revenues by $1.6 trillion over the next decade.

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